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The K2: Episode 3

Politics can often feel like stepping into a dangerous minefield, where one misstep could mean the end to a career. But the importance of the ballot will be stronger than the bullet this hour, as Je-ha is thrown into the orbit of an ongoing political war he has no interest being a part of. Everyone else’s ambition will direct where the barrel of the gun is pointed at, and he’ll need to stay on his toes to figure out who his next target will be.

EPISODE 3 RECAP

Je-ha’s eyes open wide in recognition as a screaming Anna is dragged back into her room. Turning back to Yoo-jin, he remarks, “So there was someone else besides me who wanted you dead.”

He whips Yoo-jin around when more bodyguards armed with guns rush in, and he orders them to ready a car. The gun still pointed at her temple, Yoo-jin tells them to do as he says.

At Yoo-jin’s threats that he won’t make it out alive, he reminds her that her life is currently at stake. He’ll take care of himself thankyouverymuch and she’s in no position to be making demands.

Je-ha plucks a phone out of a potted plant and explains that he’s just sent an email containing a video that recorded their entire encounter here. It’s scheduled to send to the press, prosecutors, and the Blue House in 24 hours’ time, so she better leave him and the people he cares about alone.

He’s the only one in control of the fate of this email, so she’s better off praying that he remains alive every day. He tosses the phone into the microwave where it bursts, and coolly orders Secretary Kim to ensure his safe passage out of the grounds.

Se-joon prevents Chief Joo from heading back home when they get the call about Yoo-jin’s hostage situation. Chief Joo is his bodyguard and heading back there would put him in danger. To that, Chief Joo explains that he’s keeping his promise to protect Anna, and she’s at the house.

The traffic cops are still there when Je-ha ushers Yoo-jin outside and into the driver’s seat. He climbs into the backseat and the car takes off, at which point Secretary Kim and the other bodyguards immediately follow.

In the car, Yoo-jin admits that she underestimated him, though Je-ha retorts that he had no interest in her husband’s extramarital affair. She says to name his price for the email because everything in this world can be bought off with money.

He humors her, saying that the email is as valuable as his life because handing over that email would mean his death sentence. Since she still wants a price, he gives it to her: If her husband was offered to either save that email for his own political pursuits or her life, which would he choose?

When Yoo-jin says nothing, Je-ha wonders if that means her life is worth less than that email. But they’ll have to continue that conversation a little later because they’ve got a motorcyclist tailing them.

Back at home, Anna escapes back into the room upon her father’s arrival. She does, however, crack the door open to sneak a peek of him, only to close it when he looks in her direction. She places an ear to the door as Se-joon is asked if he’d like to see his daughter. He draws out a long breath before replying no, an answer that breaks her heart.

The motorcyclist and his passenger catch up to the car when it enters a tunnel. What’s scarier is that they have external control of the car, forcing it to speed up. Stepping on the brake does nothing, and Je-ha surmises that there’s another party out for Yoo-jin’s life.

The motorcycle keeps up while the car zooms down the highway. Je-ha is about to shoot through the window when it won’t budge, only to forsake that idea when he’s told it’s bulletproof.

Yoo-jin starts losing control of the speeding car and makes a sharp left to avoid passing traffic. Je-ha climbs into the driver’s seat to take over, while all of these updates are relayed to Secretary Kim and Chief Joo in their respective cars.

Je-ha identifies an upcoming curve in the road, which he believes is a perfect place to fake an accident. He attempts to swerve the car into the motorcycle, only to crash into nearby cars. Yoo-jin gasps when he steps on the gas, but he says they need to escape the remote control’s radius.

He puts the pedal to the metal, driving the car through oncoming traffic to try and lose their pursuer. But still the motorcycle keeps close and Je-ha instructs Yoo-jin to keep pressing on the button to the power windows.

Their pursuer loses the signal just as Je-ha is forced to turn left and gives Yoo-jin enough time to open the window. He gives her a heads-up before he swerves the car, shoots his gun through the open window, and regains control again to keep driving.

Je-ha notices Yoo-jin’s bodyguards actually decide to do something about the motorcycle, though he reasons it’s too late. But right now, he has bigger things to worry about like a brake that won’t listen no matter how much he stomps on it.

The car tears through a road work site thanks to that motorcyle, which stops to observe. But that gives the car carrying Secretary Kim—who is out for blood—the perfect opportunity to crash into the bike.

Je-ha still doesn’t have control when he blows through the traffic barriers around the bend. Yoo-jin yelps as the car sails through the air, flips over, and lands upside down. Bloody but conscious, Je-ha is pulled out of the wreckage.

Just then, there’s a spark, and Je-ha rushes over to wake Yoo-jin. Secretary Kim has to be pulled back from running at the burning car, though her eyes widen in surprise as she sees Je-ha carrying Yoo-jin in his arms.

Je-ha walks with heavy steps away from the car and drops to his knees when it explodes behind him. A muffler flies towards them and Yoo-jin buries herself in his chest as it hits him in the back.

He winces in pain and Yoo-jin stares at him in perhaps a new light. Her bodyguards rush to collect her and she tries reaching out to Je-ha, who collapses onto the ground.

After learning that he’s still alive, she instructs her people to take Je-ha to a hospital. She tells Secretary Kim that he mustn’t die; the two share a silent exchange that has Secretary Kim reply that she understands, though Yoo-jin continues the thought in her head: “No, you don’t know.”

We flash back to Je-ha’s days as a soldier when he had known a young woman named Rania, who had asked him if he thought the sunset would be more beautiful in heaven. At his skepticism that such a place exists, she had believed that heaven was a war-free place—perhaps Korea would be quite heavenly.

He had scoffed at that, saying that was a matter of perspective. He had found her mastery of Korean language and pop culture amusing, which had offered him a segue that he’d be heading home soon.

He’d asked if she’d like to come with him, fumbling in his pocket to present her with a broach. He had bumbled through what turns out to be an awkwardly cute proposal, stammering that he couldn’t get a ring and she could stay in Korea if they get married.

At her surprise, Je-ha had clarified his intentions were noble—they’d only be married on paper and he just wanted to help her escape the desert. When she starts welling up with tears, he doesn’t know what to do with himself. Oh my god, you’re just adorable.

He had added that he wouldn’t stop her if she changed her mind or left elsewhere later on, but she’d responded, “Yes, let’s get married.”

She had removed her head scarf, and Je-ha had sealed the deal with a kiss.

Je-ha pulls out of that memory and comes to at the hospital, where he’s been tied down with restraints. He can hear voices arguing outside his door as a pair of detectives (oh hi, Sung Dong-il) are barred entry.

A flash of the JSS badge is enough for the detectives to give up for now, as the senior detective reminds his hoobae that the CEO of JSS is friendly with the police commissioner. In short, JSS isn’t an agency to be trifled with.

Je-ha tunes into a current events show on TV where an assemblyman refers to last night’s accident as a political terror attack. Even when the host points out that there isn’t enough solid evidence to draw such a dangerous conclusion, the politician is convinced that there is a person or group behind the act.

Plus, it’s not like he specifically mentioned that one of Se-joon’s political rivals were responsible, a statement that gets a hearty chuckle out of Se-joon himself. He’s watching the broadcast in Yoo-jin’s hospital room, where Yoo-jin instructs her secretary to pay the man a compliment after the show.

She asks how “the bodyguard” is doing when the doctor arrives, and looks relieved when she’s told he’ll recover just fine. Se-joon hones in on the mention of Je-ha, whom Yoo-jin plans to make him an actual bodyguard.

It doesn’t really matter if Je-ha agrees to it or not, since she believes that it’s best to keep someone she’s most wary of by her side. Se-joon sighs, “Like with Anna.” He then walks up to her and adds that Yoo-jin cannot keep Anna by her side.

After we see Anna shedding tears in her dark room, we cut back to the hospital, where Je-ha is surprised to see Chief Joo. Once they’re alone, he makes his resentment towards Chief Joo known since he was “behind it all.” While Chief Joo left the army as an officer, Je-ha had been driven out as a private.

He doesn’t believe Chief Joo’s excuse that he didn’t have enough authority back then either—Chief Joo probably had no thoughts of helping him. To that, Chief Joo states, “One needs power to make their aims comes true, it seems.”

Yoo-jin has an unexpected visitor in the form of her younger half brother, the chairman of JB Group, CHOI SUNG-WON (Lee Jung-jin), who fusses over his noona being hospitalized. He believes that Se-joon’s rival PARK KWAN-SOO is responsible for the incident, catching himself when an insult escapes his lips.

He refuses to insert forced relational distance with his sister by speaking to her in jondae, though his smile momentarily falters when Yoo-jin points out that they were never that close. He seems to have a cordial relationship with Se-joon, though, seeing as he gives him a little cheer.

Before Se-joon can leave to face the press, Yoo-jin fusses up his hair and shirt to make him look like a concerned husband who never left her bedside. Se-joon remains tense but he keeps up pretenses by calling her a good wife and wise mother. He chuckles a moment later, saying that he should drop the “wise mother” part since Yoo-jin is childless. Ooh, burn.

He puts on a wonderful performance in front of the press, welling up with emotion at just the right moments while asking them to think about what it must’ve felt like for him to sit vigil by his wife all night.

Yoo-jin watches as Se-joon grasps at pity points, painting his loving wife as a figure of lifelong devotion and sacrifice to his ambitions and humble background. Sung-won is both amused and impressed by his brother-in-law’s performance, and Yoo-jin thinks to herself: “Because… that much was true.”

Downstairs, Se-joon’s speech continues as he questions his ability to bear the burdens of this nation and its people. He wonders if he should keep putting his wife through this treacherous path of politics, words which pique the reporters’ interest.

He then collects his voice to declare, “As of this moment, I will… stop all of my political activities regarding the presidential race.” Everyone in both the hospital lobby and Yoo-jin’s room wait for Se-joon to respond whether this means he will withdraw from the race.

Se-joon keeps his eyes closed and says nothing, and it’s in that moment the saddened civilians in the lobby cry out in dissent. He lifts his head to face the reporters and accept their pleas; in exchange for staying in the race, he will change his approach to battle all the evil forces who threaten the lives of the people head-on.

He believes that this conviction is even more important than becoming President, which is an effective way to gain public sentiment. Needless to say, it works as the people chant his name for office, and he bellows that he will stand by the people’s side and come out victorious.

Watching Se-joon be hoisted into the air as the crowd chant his name, Yoo-jin smiles over how Se-joon still has feelings even if his morals are gone.

The current events show cover Se-joon’s latest announcement, which the assemblyman emphatically claims was Se-joon’s personal declaration of war against violence. Unlike the host, he prays that Se-joon stays in the race, calling upon Yoo-jin herself to persuade her husband.

During the commercial break, the host asks if the assemblyman is too strong with his support for Se-joon, but the latter believes that this presidential election is the inflection point for change.

Turns out someone else had seen Se-joon’s rousing announcement as well—his political opponent, the ruling party leader Park Kwan-soo (Kim Gab-soo). Representative Park is also amused by the broadcast and decides to head over to the hospital.

Speaking of, Chief Joo presents Je-ha with an identification card under the same name we’ve come to know Je-ha as so far. Ah, so we don’t know his birth name. (It also makes sense since no one has actually called him by name yet. But for simplicity and consistency’s sake, we’ll keep calling him Je-ha)

Turns out the other Kim Je-ha is overseas, and Chief Joo has gone through the trouble to make sure this identity will check out. The only catch is that he can’t obtain a passport with this identity.

Sung-won believes his big sister is on her way to the Blue House now with Se-joon’s emotional speech. She wonders if JB Group has fallen upon hard times lately because she’s heard a few rumors through the grapevine. He assures Yoo-jin that her stake in the company is safe and secure overseas, happily claiming that his sister will probably pay him far more than that once she becomes the First Lady.

Representative Park is bombarded by the press when he arrives at the hospital and fields questions asking whether he was responsible for this incident. He exchanges a civil greeting with Sung-won when they cross paths.

Je-ha isn’t interested in the offer of becoming Yoo-jin’s bodyguard. He doesn’t plan on pledging his loyalty to any nation or organization anymore, to which Chief Joo replies that he shares the same sentiment. But this is a job, and one that pays well.

He knows that working under powerful people means that he’ll be thrown away as soon as his use is up, though Chief Joo figures he’ll throw those people under the bus before then. Je-ha notes how much Chief Joo has changed in the time they haven’t seen one another. Chief Joo: “It’s the world that’s changed.”

JSS is no ordinary security organization, Chief Joo continues. Not only do they collect information about JB Group’s deepest and darkest secrets, but JSS gathers all kinds of intel on the country from the economy and finance to politics and the media.

The people he’s working for aren’t to be trifled with—he believes they’re headed to the Blue House. And if that happens, Je-ha could be granted a pardon.

Je-ha sighs that he’s tired and useless,and he’s a runaway now. Chief Joo fires back, “Why? Because you can no longer kill?” He knows Je-ha suffers from PTSD and reassures him that he was the only one who read the file from Blackstone.

He frankly thought it was odd how Je-ha didn’t kill a soul when JSS ambushed him at the factory, to which Je-ha asks why Chief Joo is trying so hard to recruit him. Chief Joo laughs, “Do you think a bodyguard is some agent who kills people?”

He believes that Je-ha’s keen instinct and skills will make him an excellent bodyguard. Furthermore, it’s not like Je-ha is able to betray his master anymore. It doesn’t seem to bother Chief Joo that Je-ha still has that email—instead he asks Je-ha to join the ranks so that they can get to the Blue House and get back at the bastards who betrayed them.

Nothing about that sounds appealing to Je-ha, who had once left this country and swore never to return. He isn’t interested in working under anyone either. So Chief Joo asks that Je-ha join and stay in JSS until the election is over, at the very least. If he does, he doesn’t have to keep running away from the authorities while he’s in Korea.

But Je-ha is burned out and holds a jaded perspective on the world—as long as no one messes with him, there won’t be any deaths. As for the email, he’s erase it once the presidential election is over.

Yoo-jin’s hospital room is adorned with bouquets when Park Kwan-soo arrives. He comments on how rude it was for the other officials not to pay her a visit in person, especially if they’ve had her cooking.

But Yoo-jin delicately replies that they wouldn’t have bothered to have a humble meal like cheonggukjang (fermented soybean soup), but then remembers how Representative Park did come by often when her late father was still alive.

She adds that she doesn’t serve the soup anymore either because of the smell, a burn Representative Park takes in stride. He can dish it back too, noting her late father’s forethought in appointing her younger brother in the CEO position over her. I do enjoy how both secretaries snicker at their bosses’ insults.

Park Kwan-soo climbs into the same elevator as Je-ha whose eyes open wide in recognition. His mind flashes back to a memory of him dropping a gun and sobbing over a body. Is that… Rania?

Je-ha collects himself and spies a gun in an officer’s holster. He assesses the situation before knocking aside two bodyguards, grabbing the gun, and shooting a guard at point-blank range.

The camera spins as he pushes the officer away and kicks him down. He twirls the bodyguard around and shoots the cop, then the guard protecting Representative Park followed by another bodyguard behind him. He raises the gun to Park Kwan-soo’s quivering face.

 
COMMENTS

More life-threatening encounters, eh? As much as I enjoy getting wrapped up in seeing baddies trembling in the face of a barrel of a gun, I must admit that we haven’t traversed that much narrative ground in the past three episodes. Don’t get me wrong—the action sequences are fun to watch (even if the graphics in the elevator fight were a tad cheesy) and we’re learning more about Je-ha’s past than I would’ve anticipated.

It’s that there are times when the story would move just a tad quicker, especially since we’ve yet to be introduced to the code name in the show’s title. Honestly, it’s a minor complaint when I look at the show as a whole, though it’s hard to shake off the worry that there may not be enough plot to drive the story through sixteen episodes. Sure there’s plenty of action to keep our eyes occupied and for the show to live up to its bodyguard-action categorization, but we all know how strenuous and tiring those scenes must’ve been for our lead Ji Chang-wook.

You can attribute that worry to the writing and some similar brushstrokes between The K2 and Yong-pal. Namely we have another heroine locked away for the first few episodes, and we saw so little of Anna in this episode following her screams that ended the first week. Not only that, the imminent threat of the email wasn’t picked back up again until Je-ha’s conversation with Chief Joo, whose words placed more precedence on Je-ha’s residential status. If anything, I wish there would be a greater sense of urgency behind the threats made so that we can feel the tenseness during the full hour, and not just the buildup for the action sequences.

Still, the story is moving along because Je-ha has been extended an offer to join JSS. I appreciate that we did get a few flashbacks into Je-ha’s past that can explain his current jaded outlook on society and weariness. I frankly think it was silly that Chief Joo had to dig up confidential files in order to confirm that Je-ha suffers from PTSD because you would think he’d know that an active duty soldier would suffer from some kind of lasting psychological trauma after serving in a warzone. And while we might know just what was behind Je-ha and Chief Joo’s earlier fallout, it is interesting to know that Chief Joo harbors his own interests and plans for revenge. It’s rather naive of him to think that ambitious folk like Se-joon and Yoo-jin would reward his loyalty if for whatever reason that very loyalty got in the way of their goals, but it seems Chief Joo is determined to meet his own aims before that happens.

So Je-ha may not have anywhere or anyone to pledge fealty to, and would rather be a lone man on the run. But I’m sure it’d be nice if he could have a name he could claim as his own and have a place to call home.

 
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I just wanna say one thing...Song Yoon Ah is killing her role...she's running away with this show with Ji Chang Wook....*applause

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She is properly scary, but in a really novel sort of way. Part of her seems to be so completely calculating that she was probably always like this, but another piece of her seems to be like someone who got caught in corners so much that she's developed an uncanny slithery sense of exactly how to get the upper hand and out of trouble.

And thank goodness there is at least one extremely capable, intriguing woman in this show, because between Nania and Anna I'm a little perplexed. The Nania bit I can't even, because while I can actually see a girl in another country having a working knowledge of Korean through K-pop, the cultural behaviors seemed.... off. And Anna keeps getting locked up. So that's that.

Ji Chang Wook is excellent. I do love that he looks so incredibly young most of the time, and then when he moves he seems completely lethal. He's got a very innocent face and that never really changes, but his tone and delivery can be pretty menacing when bracketed by action scenes. He must be completely exhausted, though.

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I think you need to give the show a little more time regarding Anna.

She's supposed be a character who has been held captive her entire life.

I would think baby steps would be warranted in introducing her back into reality.

The show takes those first steps in Episode 4.

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I can't wait for more Anna!

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I don't want more Anna at all, the sexual tension between Yoo-jin and Je-ha is off the charts.

Song Yoon Ah's character really should be running for president instead of her husband. She's ruthlessly pragmatic, and South Korea's current president is a woman, so it's not even like her gender is particularly prohibitive.

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I agree. SYA should've been the presidential candidate. I guess I'm not bowled over by Jo Sung Ha's acting just yet, after having seen better acted political dads from Uncontrollably Fond and PU38. I wanted to feel manipulated with his media playing after caring for his wife but I was left underwhelmed. And him being carried around after was just tacky.

I also love how SYA's character is matching the cunningness of her husband's political rival. I'm enjoying both the mind games and the action scenes so far.

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I agreeee.... The scene where SYA look at JCW rescued him from the car blast really sucked me in. There is a tension there which make me completely want SYA to be JCW love interest a la Secret Love Affair. Heck, I don't even want Anna to be in the picture at all.

Hails SYA. This woman really delivers.

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*rescuing her

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@pollyanna

I think you're being exceedingly harsh and unfair in your assessment of Yoona's performance.

Regarding her gait in the scenes in Italy. Keep in mind that this is something she was most likely directed to do.

Regarding her shrieking at the end of Episode 2. This is a woman who has been held captive for almost 18 years of her life. Eighteen years where she's had to remain alone and quiet, in isolation. After being repressed for such length of time, she finds herself unexpectedly witness to the woman who is the direct cause of her captivity, standing before her about to be killed at the hands of a stranger. The burst of uncontrollable emotion and pain that would inform that "shriek" should be self-explanatory, but apparently not.

Regarding her facial expression upon learning her father wasn't going to visit her. I saw nothing that would warrant the characterization you've applied.

In summary, it is my view you're being extremely and unnecessarily harsh in your assessment.

But then again you are entitled to do so.

I think it's unwarranted, however.

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@Pollyanna

I agree with you. I love all characters so far, but the only one that has not convinced me yet as far as acting is Yoona's and I dnt think it's because she plays Anna. Even after ep. 4, I am not convinced by her acting. I'm hoping though that she gets better as the show continues. For now I would rather see more of SYA and JWK: their acting and chemistry are indeed off the chart!

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@Pollyanna

After reading your response and rereading mine, I realize I may have been too harsh in my comment.

I honestly didn't feel like it was so pointed when writing it. But in review after the fact it seems it was.

I didn't mean to suggest you were dim.

I can only apologize for the personal attack and chalk it up to a momentary lapse in character.

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I do not want Anna at all. I have no idea what she can add to this story. There is enough drama and potential for lethal romance with characters that have been introduced already.

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The cultural behavior seemed off?

I do want to know what you mean. Surely getting to know about kpop in the middle of war and wrecks can be a feat on its own. But I really loved her conversation with JCW's soldier. Especially the bits about whether heaven's sunset is more beautiful or not. And her inclusion in parts of his sorrow, or the disorder that he's suffering from,does give a solid background to his mission. But anyway I think I would take nania over anna lol. In fact I would be much more happy if there were no romance at all, this could be just about a man and his quest on fighting for justice..it does sound cliche but I can't keep my eyes off the action scenes and then there is the psycho crazy woman, who seems to have found a new fondness for the bodyguard? And though it sounds so wrong, but damn they have some chemistry together.

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I mean that the show seemed to be pressing the face covering as religious in nature rather than practical, and a woman who's observant in Iraq is unlikely to be out alone in the middle of nowhere with a mercenary, never mind initiating kissing.

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IA. personally i am uncomfortable with the whole rania scene as well, the head covering (esp in iraq) is more than just a fashion choice

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I'm happy for Song Yoon Ah. I remember some people were complaining about her casting.
She didn't win best actress for Mama because she was pretty or popular. She earned it. Go girl!

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Of course the chemistry between SYA and JCW is amazing, but I think we need to give Yoona some time, she is the female lead after all.

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I am pretty sure that Song Yoon Ah is the main female lead. Yoona is also female lead and will also share love line with Ji Chang Wook. I think that it is refreshing and nothing bad if the main female lead is older, villain and probably no love interest with the main male lead.

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I seriously need to watch Mama soon. I just watched her a bit in a drama before (cannot remember the name at the moment), but I'm K2, she is the one made me stay for now.

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She's terrific in Mama along with everything else I've seen her in.... And so marvelous in this show!

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I agreee, these two actors are doing well. I want to see more of Yoona's character though

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Wonderful. Just wonderful. God I love this show.

And Song Yun-ah...

That woman has all kinds of depth. The nuance she is able to put forward in her performance is thrilling.

She's evokes this real sense of caged, or contained power. But a power not without a measure of almost hidden vulnerability just under the surface.

Her armor momentarily cracked in the scene where she was being saved by Ji Chang-wook. You could see the conflict in her eyes as she almost wouldn't let herself comprehend that someone, that this man, would generally value her in some fashion. Enough to put his life forward to save hers.

Being the absolute Yoona obsessed fan I am, I never thought I'd say this, but I almost wish Song Yun-ah was the loveline Almost!

Yoona hasn't really had a chance to grab me yet, given her reduced screentime.

(EDIT: After seeing episode 4 this is totally taken care of! I'm happily looking forward to the developing relationship between Chang-wook and Yoona!)

Anyway, I'm loving this show. I don't know about the rest of you. I know some have found the action boring and taxing. But I'm really digging everything so far.

I can't wait to see how Yun-ah's newfound affection or maybe simply consideration of Chang-wook will complicate their relationship going forward when Yoona and her trauma is thrown in the mix.

I'm grabbing the popcorn!

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I had the popcorn ready since episode 1 ? I'm loving this drama ? I can never get tired of the action and fighting, mostly because ji chang wook is in it ?

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I'm loving it too, @ emanreso - and not only for Ji Chang Wook but the whole sort of Film Noir feel to the thing. I just don't know what's going to happen from moment to moment. It keeps me off balance and because the feeling of this drama is so different from anything else I've seen, I find feeling off-balance very refreshing. There are moments of cheesiness and over (or under) editing bracketed by brilliant stretches that seem unrelated to the bit before ---except they are. And I'm like, "Wah???"

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I also sees song yun ah as a potential romantic interest from time to time, and I absolutely blame kdrama noona angles for this lol. Before kdramas never knew younger male- older female relationships can be this much explored and sorted out, but now that I've seen secret love affair to I hear your voice, I can't not see how JCW and SYA had something intangible going on during the time when he was kidnapping her.
And I also agree about the film noir type,this almost seems like a movie, and the story is still quite intense. Just hope it doesn't go yongpal route.

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typo :* I also see.

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I agree!! I'm LOVING all the action, SYA is killing her role, and JCW, well, what else is there really to say???? Also after seeing ep 4, [SPOILERS]

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I love your review. I'm only on episode 5, but agree with your assessment of Jun ah and Chang Wook. I read elsewhere that he wanted to develop his full range of emotions in this series, and he is spot on. Loved episode 5!
I am concurrently watching Smile Dong Hae. He has truly developed depth in his K2 character. This series is a keeper! Thanks for your well written comments.

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Wishing the main MAIN lead of this drama was Song Yoon-ah, with Yoo-jin's story as the main focus, and Je-ha as her leading man. SIGH. Why isn't this reality. I kept going back to watch the car explosion scene, when she was being carried away from Je-ha and she tried and failed several times to grab his arm/hand, even when he was out of reach. It left such a big impression on me. It was such a raw and vulnerable moment.

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But she IS the main female lead in this show. She is introduced second after Ji Chang Wook in the episode opening, and then followed by YoonA and her dad, respectively. Even in the

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Even in the poster, her position is in the middle with Ji Chang Wook.

I'm not sure whether they're gonna have love line or not... but she definitely the main female lead here.

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I know she's the main lead, but the main protagonist is Je-ha. Maybe I was unclear, but I meant I wish she were the main protagonist, and Je-ha the lead male, not the other way around. Her character is the most interesting to me; every scene she is in makes me sit up straighter and lean in closer to better hang on to her every word, expression and gesture. She's so magnetic. And when she let's her mask crumble when no one is watching, I die a little on the inside lol.

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Honestly, I got the same vibe you did - she's developing some pretty strong feelings for Je-ha.

Not sure what that will develop into, especially since she seems to have held another woman captive for about twenty years, but there's something about Je-ha she wants. And it's not fighting skills - maybe it's something to do with the morals she knows her husband threw away?

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Oh... I got it now ;)

Well, main protagonist or not, I'm pretty sure we'll get so many of her in this show... probably almost as much as Jae Ha.

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And since this isn't pre-produced anything can happen (oops, didn't mean to open the Yongpal can of worms ? - I haven't even watched that show hehe)

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Interesting thought but she would have to be a different character. I don't think Korean audience want their leading man to love a moraless, and evil woman. So, if she is the romantic character and stays the same, I think a lot of backlash will happen.i don't know about you, but I don't think making a romantic love story about a child kidnapper and killer is going to be a hit.

Truth is no matter what we wish, we are not going to get it. Might as well sit back and enjoy the drama. If not, go watch something else. Don't stress yourself watching a drama with too many of things you wish were different.

Meanwhile, I ship Anna and ramyeon!!!

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I disagree that she would have to be a different character.

We get moral-less and "evil" male leads n drama land quite often who go on to have love lines with their female protagonists. King of Dramas for example? Anthony is ruthless and ambitious, and yet the female lead is drawn to hi over and over again. Moon Lovers? So is not the most pure character and yet I am not hearing any backlash about him having a love line wire Su. Of course in most if these scenarios, time is dedicated to fleshing out the moral-less characters and making them more humane. Same can be done for Ye Jin.

If what you are saying is true and this is where we as an audience are at, then we are tapping into some really sexist and unfair double standard tropes.

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Amen! i know exactly what you mean. I wrote the exact same thing. She and JCW are amazing together.

Plus i prefer this conflict rather than the one we will get when finally they give yoona screentime which would involve he saving her twice every episode.

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ha! I laughed.

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Lol, I so agree. I can just see it, Anna running and falling. Je ha having to fight 5million bad guys to save her, screaming crying, ultimatums. Blehhhh.

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Why do most of the elevators I have to travel in never suddenly expanded to the width of seven men plus a camera crew circling around them, and then shrunk back into normal size? Would make life much easier for me to inflict bodily harm upon my enemies. ?

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only in kdramas do you get to witness an elevator expanding its width or a lake increasing its depth.

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This reminds me of Hermione and her little pouch bag that contained a tent and the small tents that could house a family for the Quidditch Tournament. :D

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Ha ha.. always happy to see harry potter references!

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The elevator was probably attracted to JCW. Couldn't contain itself.

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LOL! So apt.

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Hahaha exactly!

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I see what you did there....:D

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definitely double take using replica that obviously bigger than the actual elevator,
I've seen behind the scene for the raid 2 when they shot prison fighting scene and I think they should just follow what they did in that video, it's really good and didn't make the elevator loked bigger

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I wanna see more interaction between ji chang wook and yoona~~

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Don't worry. I'm pretty sure a Subway date is in the works.

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I demand Je Ha kill someone with a Veggie Delite sub.

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OMG. This is hilarious! Can we petition to make this happen??LOL!

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he'd make a whole new meaning to the term "killer sandwich" lmao

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Heol! I just noticed that Subway is actually one of K2 sponsors. So yeah, we can hope for Subway date. Probably Jae Ha will take Anna to Subway for her social phobia therapy session.

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hahaha, waiting for Subway to strike again

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This is a great episode. I feel like I'm watching a Hollywood movie! Everything is perfect. All the main cast are so good at their acting. I love the OST at the end too, very nice. I feel sorry for JCW because he has to work on his action scenes so hard . [SPOILERS FOR EPISODE 4]

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Sssshhh!!! Do not spoil, chingu ya. Let's save it for later *wink wink*. I can't wait to see beanies reaction. LOL.

*goes to rewatch the scene

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@nchoe I am dying to read what the other beanies' reactions are for the 4th episode. No spoilers, yes please.. :D

Here we are reading the recap about Epi 3 when the truth is, we just want to rave about the next one and especially that scene.

JCW Oppa is amazeballs as always!

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You know everyone keeps talking about how over the top this show is.

I keep hearing the word "gratuitous" thrown around in reference to the action.

Let me tell you, from my perspective as a straight male, I haven't seen it. None of the action sequences registered in my mind as being overblown.

[SPOILERS REDACTED]

I kept scratching my head, thinking boy... this is really unnecessary. It's like the writer was like, yea... we're gonna have a largely female audience. Let's add buko dong to this scene, because ya know, why not!?

Sheesh...

;)

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What? Lol I've got to watch episode 4 then, hahaha

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Yeah, it was gloriously gratuitous and I loved every second of it, especially after the fourth or fifth replay! Thank you, drama gods!

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What happened to Lee Jung Jin? Does he not getting any leading role anymore? A supporting role now?

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Is Lee Jung Jin the step brother of Song Yoon Ah's character? Yeah, I think he is an important supporting role in the drama. Probably he will have more screen time later. I guess he is an villain that cooperates with Park assemblymen to kill his step sister so that he can get all the inheritance? Anyway, why does Yoo Jin's secretary look like Park Min Young? They just have some resemblance somehow.

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Thank you!

As much as i enjoy Oppa being badass, the plot seems slow, too slow. And after finding further similarities i am worried. Dont need yongpal 2.0! I am ready to give writers, actors second chances 'coz who doesn't make mistakes but learning is must. The action scenes are tiring, cast is sincere so writing must be good, at least.

I hope show picks up soon.

Dont know about yoo-jin but sec Kim sure feels for her.
If only Nania had said she loves Healer #meta
Uri Healer doesn't have ahjumma or dae-yong, so sad...

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I honestly don't know what you mean by tiring or slow for that matter (in reference to the action sequences).

I find them immensely enjoyable.

I think you may need to recognize that you may not like action-thrillers (and that's what this is, an action-thriller) and move on to something in a new genre.

Continuing to stick with something and hating it for being what it is will only give you turmoil and leave you unsatisfied.

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True!

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I think she meant the plot is slow and the action scenes are tiring.

I agree. And they are both related. They have so much of action, that it eats up a lot of screentime ... Where do you find time to move the plot? to develop characters?

We are 4 episodes in and we know exactly what we did in the first episode.
- He is a badass soldier with a tragic past
- they are a political couple with a facade
- Yoona runs around in a nighty

What else? They need to move the plot like now. I have been waiting for JCW's show for what seems like ages. Dramagods, don't mess it up. please. please. please.

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I meant the plot! I feel we have hardly progressed since first ep.
Am watching this show without subs coz i want to action scenes included. I wouldn't even comment here if i found those scenes lacking or tiring. I like my Man kicking bad guys even if its in stretching elevators,lol.

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I feel the same way with @Pinku, but I must agree with @emanresu.

I guess it's just about our preference. Action movies or dramas plot, even at Hollywood level, tend to be slow because the fighting scenes usually dominate the show.

That's why even though I feel that the plot is barely going anywhere... I won't complain. This show is just trying to be what it is.

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I understand what you mean. Plot taking a while to thicken eh? :)

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Yes unni! The plot is not moving. As bips99 pointed out above. The build up to actual storyline is taking so long that it may end up being boring. What i mean is Timing is essential.

Oppa is working so hard on this and the cast are working hard as well, i hope they dont suffer coz of the plot.

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I'll have JCW as my bodyguard anytime. I'd probably intentionally get myself in harms way just so I can have him save me, grasp me, hold me, carry me and heck, he could do anything to me, I wouldn't mind anyways. Hee.

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never mind being attacked, i'd prolly die earlier of constant cardio exercise whenever he flashes those guns..

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I actually forgot that there are only 16 episodes to this show. I was enjoying it so much with very very very minimal complaints because I am so pleased with the acting (Song Yoon Ah, WOW) and even the (too much) action. It's only when you mentioned your concern if there will be enough time to cover all the stories that I got really worried.

But I will trust the Drama Gods for now,.... What are the offerings to Drama Gods these days? Time? Sleep? Social Life? Done. Done. Done.

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this show is amazing but i don't want to get too excited lest the writer goes yongpal all over again lol.

i don't know much about islam but the scene with the girl removing her niqab (if that's the correct term) & kissing him had me all "i don't think that's how this works..."

yoona has pleasantly surprised me with the exception of her one "crying" scene (not sure if it was this episode or episode 4) where it was just sobbing noises & no tears. i think she's improved so much!!

but the stars literally & figuratively are ji chang wook & song yoon ah. more of them please~~

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The hijab removal was also something I keep thinking about. I don't know the rules/conventions for when it's appropriate for a Muslim woman to remove her hijab like that, but I hope the show was at least in the region of reality. I know how annoying it can be when shows get basic aspects of your faith wrong.

I'll be checking the comments here a lot tomorrow in hopes that someone more knowledgeable comments on this. If not, then I know one of the Muslim girls at the university where I work is k-drama fan and I'll ask her about it.

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if you ask the girl you know i would be interested to hear her opinion! i asked my friend & she agreed with @Sancheezy's comment & said that it sounded pretty ignorant...
i wonder if people aren't concerned about it or just aren't aware.

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Muslim female here. To address your question, technically no, a Muslim woman cannot remove her hijab/niqab in front of a male. She can remove it in front of male relatives that she can't marry. She can also remove it in front of her husband.

Some of you may wonder, if Je-ha proposed to her/married her, does that mean she can remove her niqab? The answer to that would also be no. A Muslim woman cannot marry a non-Muslim man, so their marriage wouldn't be recognized.
If Je-ha were to convert to Islam, and marry her, she can remove her niqab in front of him.

Therefore, what Naniya (or Nana) did is technically not allowed in Islam.

However, removing her niqab didn't strike me as something that should be construed as offensive or culturally insensitive by the viewers. Some women who live in Muslim countries wear the hijab because it's a cultural expectation, not because they're deeply committed to Islam. Also, keep in mind that no two peoples' definition of Islam is the exact same.

I hope this helps. :)

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that was very informative, thanks :)

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The distinct sense that the head scarf was only to keep the desert sand from blowing in her face is undeniable. With that being said the origins of the veil is not with Islam but with the people who inhabited the desert regions before them. It would be more understandable if the veil and covering the face especially the mouth appears more of a film-trick --where the actress doesn't have to speak Korean and pronounce the hangul syllables as amazing as she did, hehe.

One gets the sense that this foreign-love of JeHa was specifically written as veiled so that the two characters did not have to converse in another language, hehehe.

Whose to say, I respect if it was the actress speaking in Korean. But what if they were actually talking in another neutral language to the both of them, ehhhh? I dunno... Ehm? English? And then in order to not waste time on dubbing JeHa into English they decided to dub her in Korean instead, whilst veiled of course so that we wouldn't think the scene looked so odd.

Anyway just a thought. I would laugh if after further reading I was somehow, even mildly correct. Lol!!!!!

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^That's also a very good point. In pre-Islamic Arabia, wearing the veil was commonplace. Veiling is not a distinctly Muslim phenomenon. Christian and Jewish women also practice some form of veiling. However, in our contemporary world the practice has become closely associated with Islam.

I noticed on Youtube that many commenters are quite angry with her portrayal. The writers never claimed that she is supposed to be an embodiment of Islamic ideals/principles, so there is no need to become incensed.

Honestly, the only thing that was annoying about the scene where she removes her niqab is the fact that her was so dang perfect. Trust me, when most women remove their headscarf, they have a severe case of helmet head :)

I guess Kim Je-ha has a thing for women who cover their hair (Anna is wearing a nun's habit in the preview for next week) :P

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*her hair was so dang perfect... oops

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I born in Muslim family and live in Muslim country but I don't hijab in front my bf or any body else unless in circumstances I have to,then rania removing her hijab wasn't odd and unreal at all because many of women in my country do the same thing.

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thats not true a muslim women can marry a non-muslim male

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Honestly, me as a muslim is very uncomfortable watching that scene where his gf remove her hijab/veil/or whatever you may call the thing covering her mouth and her hair. Because that kind of style is commonly associate with muslim women, as their identity. So when you see a women dress like that in the street,without knowing who she is and her background, I believe you automatically think she is a muslim. JH's gf potrayal is so wrong. The K2 Team should be more considerate about this sensitive thing.

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actaully this is uncomfortable !! removing the hijab and worse kissing a total strange guy can never happen in reality ,it actaully made me feel bad !! i feel offended coz am muslim ,even if am a k-pop and k-drama fan but i would never remove ma scarf and kiss a strange man just because he propsed to me !! it makes the girl look cheap !! what really makes me feel sick is that they show never the reality !! it's only getting zlong with the propaganda !! war terrorism niqab''face hijab '' .i would be happy if our culture shows up in k-drama but in a deffrent way than hollywood does but unfortunatly k-drama is following the same path !! if we keep judging each other this way we ll never know each other better

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Well the girl can remove her scarf for her husband but they have to get married first lol

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Since i'm not sure why anyone in a war torn country is even learning korean to the point of fluency or where did they even get the learning material or teachers for it ......... i'm not even thinking about accuracy.

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i understand what you mean but i do think there's a difference in a far-fetched plot point & misrepresenting a religion

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very true. I didn't think of the religious implications at all. i' apologise if it looked like i was brushing aside as inconsequential what might be a sensitive subject for some. i'm Sorry.

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no need to apologize! i didn't think you were being rude in any way. plus some people are saying they don't consider the scene offensive so maybe it's not as misrepresented as i thought!

it took me out of the scene because i couldn't help wondering if that was ok lol. but if anyone who practices islam is not offended, thats what matters.

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I was like WTH on that Nania scene. I kind of get what they were trying to convey but when you are showing another culture you need to be a little careful to avoid stereotyping.

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That scene was lame.

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Totally I closed my eyes the whole time.

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i just marathoned K2 and yeah, that scene made me curse... yes, nothing says she's depicting muslim woman but it would be impossible not to think her that way... and honestly, it is insulting....

adding to much more misconception about Islam...

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that scene about removing her veil/hijab/niqab can be done without kissing,
her , opening the veil - no matter how different in people eyes already shows that she is willing to be with him, that he will became her mahram, therefore she can open her veil for him,
so no need to kiss at all, it already implied by the gesture

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that's interesting; i didn't know that. thank you for explaining this!

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Aaaahhhh, i see, so the veil/hijab/niqab does mean something much more than its physical movements- as it also means that she is accepting him as husband . I guess the writers knew that many would not understand the significance of the move and thats why they had to add a kiss too- to show that nania accepts the proposal. afterall kisses are most universally understood (even though not necessarily practised)

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well if they intended the niqab to be religious in nature then no, she would not remove her head covering in front of a male until after they are married, thus becoming her mahram

but i find the whole scene so ridiculous and stereotyping anyway, like hur hur there's a woman with a niqab so we're in iraq

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a man has the right to see her probable wife's face and decide whether he wants to continue with the marriage, but kissing her? should never happen before the actual marriage..... feels very very degrading.....

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I'm Moslem so of course the scene bothers me..
First, wearing hijab and removing it in front of stranger/another man not related as family/husband is forbidden. If you gonna wear hijab you have to stay wearing it 24hr a day except indoors or around your family.
Second, a guy kissing her and she willingly be kissed? Are you kidding me? In Middle East she and the guy will be publicly humiliated and even killed. In some parts of my country an unmarried couple who is caught dating/kissing/sex in the evening/midnight will be asked to marry.

But knowing it's Korean drama after all, I forgive them a bit since Korea is not a majority Moslem country and they probably don't even know the rules of Islam. I'm sure many Moslem friends would feel bothered by the scene, but anyway what's done is done and it's probably noteworthy Kdrama isn't the strongest when it comes to realism.

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thanks for your comment! that's what i thought... that just proposing isn't enough for that kind of action... but i don't know islam well so i wasn't sure if i was confused.

i think many cultures are misrepresented around the world, but i think it's important that if something like this happens to just say it's not okay. even if we can forgive it & accept it as not realistic. i hope somehow this writer learns that!

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Just adds some points:
She could be Moslem but it won't deter her to kiss stranger, in that case you one lucky girl coz you get to kiss Ji Chang Wook!! Not every Moslem is devout and faith is rather personal.
Or she could be non-Moslem and many non-Moslem also wearing hijab/veil in Middle East.

But if she's Moslem then yeah what I said in above comment applies.

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I'm just going to choose to interpret that Nania is in a country like Iran where the head dress is mandatory and not a actual reflection of her religious beliefs or conservatism. Because I don't think someone who chooses to wear a niqab is going to randomly take it off and make out with someone.

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I can certainly understand why Muslims would be offended at the scene, and many were according to my limited exposure to comments on Instagram.

However, we know so little about her; it's intirely possible that she's not Muslim- and she may not even be from the Middle East. All we know is that she's not Korean, she has pretty eyes, she wants out of the country she's currently in and that she is unmarried.

I'm not Muslim and I used a covering for my head and body when I went to a predominately Muslim area - for various reasons- non of which were religious.

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I am not a Muslim but have been living in a Muslim country for a while now. In the country where I am in, not all women are wearing Hijab especially the younger generations. They cover their heads only when they are praying or inside a mosque. From what I know, women covering their heads are more like an influence of their culture and not exactly in their holy book. I may be wrong so, please don't criticize me, alright?

@JesO, I kind of agree with you that she may not really be Muslim but needed to wear one since she is in that area (ex. all women regardless of religion needs to wear hijab when in public places in Saudi Arabia). After watching episode 4, [SPOILERS???] and that's why she was killed (this is not exactly a spoiler since it was shown at the end of the episode).

Nevertheless, they could have done that scene where she removes her hijab and not kiss at all.

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actually it's the reverse. according to Islamic laws, all women over puberty are required to cover her whole body with the exception of the face and hands whenever in the presence of (adult) males, except for immediate family members or her husband. to do otherwise is considered a sin.

but of course faith is personal and can not be forced, so whether they observe this rule or not is ultimately up to them, unless probably if they live somewhere where it is culturally enforced upon them

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The entire Iraq (that's where they are, right?) scene was really weird.

If you're going to imply some sort of religious imperative with the scarf/veil, then it's weird that this woman is out in the middle of nowhere with a Korean mercenary at ALL. And then it's very weird that she would take off her veil, and extremely weird that she would kiss him. That's not saying some Iraqi girls wouldn't kiss a guy at all... Just that this particular blend of stuff was off.

It's the kiss that really gets me, honestly. It would be like an American show suddenly showing a hug where the girl just stands there Korean-style, arms straight at her side. Kissing after a confession is culturally specific, and wasn't even particularly Korean in drama representation until recently. So having it crop up in mercenary-infested Iraq? Hm.

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everything you said is true! it was very strange... even more so since this girl seems to be a significant background plot point (character motivation-wise).

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it kinda contradictory,
opening the niqab already symbolizes their relationship, or even saying yes already did that, I would love if she just open to let her face shown, smile and if want to add more scene, opening the veil but the camera didn't show her hair.

Woman that wear niqab (only eye that shown) most often devoted to their choice to wear it so sudden kiss after showing her hair is a big loop, like why and how?

And woman who kissed have a higher chance to not used niqab, because niqab is more of a choice than just hijab (only the face shown), like she chooses to not let her face shown to other people outside her family,

ps : (je ha will became his family in this context so the opening niqab already implied and solified that)

if they just want to show it as middle east girl without any religion background, her face already say it all but if she is not muslim, the opening niqab doesn't need to be dramatic either.
But I take it as they just didn't knew much and she also probably wasn't a muslim.
It's all assumptions but I hope they can be more careful at handling other people culture or stereotypes.

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That desert scene had me in tears of laughter because it was so ridiculous. The whole time I was watching it, I was like...show, you didn't. You didn't, please tell me you didn't

...but you did.

The thing is, it's not really relevant whether she's Muslim or not. She might be, she might not be, but the show doesn't define it so it isn't something I take issue with (unlike a certain godawful film I won't even name) - after all, there are Muslim women who cover and those who don't, Muslim women who date, and those who don't, and so on.

The problematic part to me (and a million other women, and also in a section of feminist/decolonial thought) is "the unveiling", which is basically the quintessential male fantasy, with deep roots in colonialism (possible side-trip to white saviour territory, too, depending on the story). It fetishises and exoticises covered women, and ultimately, the unveiling (forced or voluntary, it amounts to the same thing) is a symbol of submission. It's one more unpleasant tentacle in the machinery of catering to the male gaze.

It's all just so weird and ridiculous. So Je-ha never saw her face before until then? And then, tada, your reward for proposing to me is I will show you my beauteous beauty and my luxurious locks? (also, she looks pretty European, which is a whole other can of worms)(although she could be Arab, too). It is like, because he accepted her as a covered woman, he gets the instant reward of a hot model-like beauty and also kisses (and so can you!). wtf.

Anyway. Now I'm going to watch the rest of the episode.

PS, I suspect her actual name is Raniya.

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It's interesting that you saw that scene as a manifestation of the male gaze, because for it was the complete opposite. The idea that he fell in love with her without ever seeing her face is a complete female fantasy aimed at pulling the heartstrings of women. It's the equivalent of the female lead falling in love with the poor pleb only to find out he's a prince/chaebol.

In regards to the white saviour complex, now that you mention it there is definitely a touch of Miss Saigon in there.

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Lol! .. is the show trolling us? Wasn't this supposed to be the love story of a bodyguard JCW and the damsel in distress yoona?

But the way i see, its the story of JCW and SYA
noona romance?
scarred soldier - unloved wife?
honourable man - scheming woman?
enemies to lovers?

or any permutation and combination you can choose. But seriously these 2 have such crackling chemistry and they play so amazingly off each other.

The best parts are when they are in the same frame. Lets have more of this show please.

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Yes they have crackling chemistry
SYA is just sooo GOOD!
Probably if Yoona is not around, SYA will be the female lead. LOL

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Exactly! The scenes with JCW and Yoona were cute in episode 4 though :)

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My interpretation from the very beginning, SYAa is the main female lead, although probably no love interest with JCW. Yoona is the second female lead, but she supposed to play love interest with JCW.

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Can someone write a fan fiction with this proposed story line.Please, somebody, anybody.

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The way you succinctly but accurately juxtaposed their characters makes me even more frustrated that the drama won't revolve around just the two of them. I mean, there's already SO much great setup there, SO much potential and sooooooooo much chemistry. Their push and pull is the only thing that really elevates this this drama. Adding Anna into the equation just makes the Jeha-Yoojin narrative messy and will probably only take away from it. Which will be SUCH a shame and waste. I'm super salty about it, I admit it.

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Thanks gummimochi!

Yes, still not much story. When they said action-packed, they meant it. The action-packed car chase scene was long (10-15 minutes + ?). I was thinking they must have spent a bundle on the number of cars that had to be thrashed. The number of roads they had to close to shoot those chases were also not few. Kudos to the action director :)

It seems for this episode, how to twist adversity into a political campaign and a self-promotion stint is the focus (after the action, at least). This show gives good lessons in political battling, intrigue and polite barbed insults. That scene from the TV interview to hospital interview to TV interview again... 20 minutes?

Awaiting character and plot development. ;)

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Oh! and the secretary is loony. Kill the motorcyclists? And drag them under the tires?

The actress needs to tone it down a little because she is coming off as completely deranged rather than interesting.

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I know right, she was insane.
"Kill them!"

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Yeah, I felt kind of bad for the motorcyclists.

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She's nuts, but I kind of like it. She's almost got a killer-lesbian vibe going on regarding her boss. If she's not in love with her boss, then there's some other controlling interest that makes her completely obsessive.

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"killer lesbian" is it 100% lmao
your comment hits the nail on the head for me. like someone else mentioned, she reminds me of the nurse character in yongpal who was scarily obsessed with kim tae hee. only the power dynamics are a bit different!

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Nurse Hwang?!!

Too bad she died way too early in Yong Pal.

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Totallyyy obsessed lesbian vibe. When she was wiping off her makeup off in episode 2 (or was it 1).Totally felt the obsessed love vibes.

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I was thinking it was a pity they killed the motorcyclists without finding out who had hired them first.

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That's exactly what I was thinking when she was yelling "Kill them!" lol

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i was actually thinking she had a hand in it and was trying to kill them before they spill anything

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I admit I was slightly chuckling while watching her during the car chasing scene. Her ott death glare was almost comical, completed by "kill them!" She looked a bit too satisfied if you know what I mean. kekeke

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I have to say I'm very much enjoying this show. I agree last week's action (and music) was a little much. But this week, everything was on point. The car scene was (necessarily) long but thrilling. I also like how each candidate handled the reporters. They're both bullshitting, yes, but you gotta give it to them, they're good. I like that they are layered, wiley villains. And then of course, Ji Chang Wook. Those muscles, that tan! I've already seen episode 4 so I'm totally bummed I have to wait for the next set.

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The car rescue scene reminded me of Crash - one of my all time favorite movie scenes. I like that they shot the scene differently though.

There so much chemistry between SYN and JCW, I hope the director sees it and milks it.

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If they want ratings and all the ahjummas watching, they should go with the noona romance. The younger yoona is just a distraction and I wish they have never cast her. What if the husband was the one that tried to kill SYN?

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I also agree. Yoona just doesn't do it for me (even after ep. 4). I dont find her convincing at all and I wonder why she keeps getting casted. I really do hope it gets better as the show goes on. But for now, am really for the Noona romance. It will be different and interesting.

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Totally agree! The noona dynamic is just inherently so much more interesting and full of potential than the loveline with Yoona, not to mention SYA is 10000x better at emoting. Her chemistry with JCW is amazing and what a shame that we don't get to see more of it.

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Why I am I getting the feeling that Je-ha somehow ended up killing Nania with his own gun - not bc he wanted, but because of Park Kwan-soo? Could it be tied to his supposed inability to kill?
Waiting on more scenes btwn Je-ha and Anna...

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No, that's too insane for a man to do that to his lover. Anyway, Middle East woman is forbidden to kiss a boyfriend whom she is willing to marry to (?) . They never kiss before marriage (?) I don't understand why do people complain that kissing scene. It is totally sweet to me. She just wants to show her face to her future husband who will depart Iraq soon because this is his last day there. He needs to show his feelings for her and that's also a goodbye kiss before they could meet each other again. Anyway, I'm very touched when watching the scence when Je Ha is willing to sacrifice his life to rescue Yoo Jin. Oh that makes my heart melting...I need the recap of ep 4 soon. It's a fun , cute and interesting episode too!

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No-kissing-before-marriage rule comes from Islam. Probably, she's a non-moslem middle east woman or she's a moslem, but not too devoted.

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I'm loving this show so much, all the actors are amazing and I think that YoonA's improved so much. But, like gummimochi I think the plot hasn't developed a lot. I'm absolutely enjoying all the action scenes, they're so badass and I hope that the show improves in the next episodes!

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K2 is still a work in progress, waiting for it to finish with the background stories and the many character introductions and get back to the main story line where the bodyguard is doing necessary action sequences while being the bodyguard. Nevertheless the production has a movie like effect, stunning.

Yes I too feel that Song Yun ah and Ji Chang wook chemistry is more real, profound and intense (blame the fact on the husband being not as charismatic...imagine someone like Yoo Ji tae in that role). I also dont think the same feeling will be captured with Yoona, theirs would feel more soft and comforting kind of romance but that still remains to be seen.

Also is the production never planning on Yoona wearing anything besides a white bed gown. Is that how they saved money for everything

Waiting Hopefully...K2 please dont disappoint me :)

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"Is that how they saved money..." :)
How many costumes do you have to not buy to pay for all those cars?

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