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Romantic Doctor Teacher Kim: Episode 3

After the high intensity of last week, this third episode takes on a slightly slower pace, as our two apprentices try to negotiate the large space between them. Seo-jung is intent on keeping her distance and pushing Dong-joo away, but Dong-joo is filled with unanswered questions for both Seo-jung and especially Teacher Kim, that refuse to go unanswered. He spends the majority of the episode clashing with the two, but at the end of the day it’s he who begins to question all he had believed before.

 

 
Chapter 3: “Friday of Thirteen People”

We return right where we left our team of doctors at the end of the last episode. Teacher Kim assesses Seo-jung’s wrist injury, and asks Dong-joo if he has any experience in this kind of procedure. He seems a little distracted, but eventually admits that he hasn’t, which leads Teacher Kim to threaten the safety of Dong-joo’s hand yet again should he screw up.

Teacher Kim commences with the surgery and announces that he will finish rejoining the cut nerve, artery, and three tendons within thirty minutes. Dong-joo wonders to himself if that is even possible, but withholds voicing his disbelief.

In voiceover, Dong-joo explains the 10,000-hour rule, where if a person works every single day for three hours on something, they can become an expert. However, the time it takes to become a specialist is twenty hours a day for eleven years, totaling at 80,300 hours.

We flash back to Dong-joo’s conversation with Teacher Kim in the last episode, where he vowed to go back to his old hospital no matter what. In voiceover, Dong-joo colors the memory with his newfound doubt, “But, the present seemed to be as grim as ever, and thus, I was more uncertain about my future.”

Back in the present, Dong-joo continues to observe Teacher Kim’s surgical skills, commenting in astonishment at his speed, as he struggles to keep up with Teacher Kim’s pace. Meanwhile, Nurse Oh counts down as they work, cool as a cucumber, and precise in her movements.

Teacher Kim is relentless in his operating, exhibiting laser focus and accuracy, shouting at Dong-joo whenever he isn’t there when he needs him. As they approach Teacher Kim’s deadline, Dong-joo’s nerves get the best of him and he clumsily knocks down a pair of surgical scissors, alarming all in the room.

He apologizes and tries to recover, but Nurse Oh swiftly fills the void, and takes over Dong-joo’s duties with more skill and speed than he had before. He notes to himself how she always seemed to know what Teacher Kim needs, and is ready without ever making a single mistake.

Teacher Kim finishes his last stitch just as the promised thirty minutes elapses, then immediately inquires after Seo-jung’s vital levels. Nurse Oh reports everything back as normal and with that Teacher Kim gets up from his seat.

He takes a few steps to place his hand over Seo-jung’s forehead, then instructs Dong-joo to close up the wound and finish up the procedure. He can’t resist adding a bit of sarcasm at the end, stating, “You can handle that much, right?” And Dong-joo thinks to himself, “I’m so pissed off. But there was nothing that I could say. The surgical procedure he performed was the most perfect one I’d ever seen, and in that moment, I felt more stupid than I ever had before.”

Dong-joo stumbles backward, perhaps buckling under the weight of his excessive arrogance, then announces that he’s all right when the remaining surgical staff look over at him, but say nothing.

Later in his office, Teacher Kim receives a call from Nurse Oh, who informs him that they’ve moved Seo-jung to the ICU. Also, she adds, Dong-joo’s in total shock at the moment. She hangs up the phone, as Ki-tae comments on how Teacher Kim is giving someone a hard time again.

Nurse Oh thinks nothing of it, retorting that it’s the “Same as always. Teacher Kim’s usual approach.” Ki-tae predicts that based on previous doctors who’ve come and quickly gone, Dong-joo will soon leave cursing Teacher Kim’s name. At that moment, Dong-joo gets up and storms down the hall in order to confront Teacher Kim.

Dong-joo demands to know who Teacher Kim really is. He tries to make sense of all the random facts he knows: the crazy man that threatened to cut off his hand in the casino, the “Chief of the Surgical Department,” the man sleeping casually in the ER.

He continues that based on the surgery Teacher Kim performed on the patient in the runaway car, he could be a general surgeon, but the operation on Seo-jung requires the skills of a specialist. With that, Dong-joo asks for Teacher Kim’s specialty, but Teacher Kim just responds glibly that his specialty is “saving lives.”

Annoyed, Dong-joo requests a serious answer, to which Teacher Kim wonders aloud if Dong-joo is acting this way because he feels embarrassed for humiliating himself in the operating room. And since he brought up the casino, Teacher Kim ridicules him for nearly using a defibrillator on a choking patient.

Dong-joo warns Teacher Kim not to patronize him since he’s passed his boards with the highest marks in the country and is far from unskilled. But Teacher Kim asks him what his credentials are worth if he can’t even keep up and keep it together in the operating room when it truly matters. Dong-joo shoots back that Teacher Kim worked at an abnormally fast rate.

Teacher Kim then asks Dong-joo if he knows why surgeons wear masks in the operating room. Dong-joo replies immediately that it’s to prevent contamination, but Teacher Kim corrects him, “No, it’s so you keep your damn mouth shut.” Dangg. He adds that it’s Dong-joo’s talent that should do the talking, and advises him not to make excuses to the patient who is lying unconscious on the operating table, because surgeons do not get second chances.

Teacher Kim attempts a mic drop and begins walking away, but Dong-joo isn’t finished talking. He asks again who Teacher Kim really is, and exasperated, Teacher Kim gets up in Dong-joo’s face and declares again that he’s “Teacher Kim,” then leaves.

Ki-tae, who has witnessed the entire exchange with Nurse Oh, smiles widely after Teacher Kim leaves. He muses over Dong-joo’s “highest marks in the country,” comment, and looks on very pleased, but when Dong-joo shoots them a glance, they scatter.

Late in the night, Dong-joo sits beside Seo-jung as she sleeps, and asks why she is working at such a strange hospital. He recalls Teacher Kim putting his hand on Seo-jung’s forehead in the operating room, and watching over her tenderly, with an uneasy look in his eyes.

The next morning, Seo-jung awakes and examines her bandaged hand. She pieces together fragments of her memory, and cringes when she realizes what happened.

Meanwhile, Dong-joo updates his sunbae at his old hospital, about finding Seo-jung. The sunbae is surprised to hear that Seo-jung is preparing for her double board certification. When asked why, Dong-joo says he doesn’t know and adds that it’s a waste of time. He then asks his sunbae to look into Teacher Kim for him. Unfortunately, Dong-joo doesn’t have much information to offer, not even the man’s real name.

Before he can finish his request, Seo-jung steals the phone from him. She tells the sunbae to forget everything Dong-joo said, because he doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Upon hearing her voice, the sunbae begins asking to know what happened to her, and why she never contacted anyone for five years. But instead of answering she just hangs up on him.

Dr. Do’s son, DO IN-BUM, who has overheard the conversation, asks about Seo-jung, wondering who she is. The sunbae explains that she used to be a star member of their ER team, but after getting into a car accident she disappeared, only to have been hiding in Doldam Hospital all along. The name Doldam Hospital doesn’t sound familiar to In-bum, so the sunbae clarifies that it’s the hospital Dong-joo was “unfairly” transferred to. He immediately begins backpedaling after remembering whom he is talking to, but it isn’t very convincing.

At Doldam, Seo-jung accuses Dong-joo of spying on Teacher Kim. Dong-joo tries to pivot off-topic by chastising her for walking around so soon after her surgery. But she just ignores him and warns Dong-joo not to cause any trouble while he’s here.

He stops her as she walks away, grabbing her arm, and orders her back to bed lest her wound becomes infected. Instead of complying she tells him off for jeopardizing her effort over the last five years, and begs him to act as if they are strangers while he is at Doldam. She then warns him not to look into Teacher Kim’s affairs.

He looks away conscience-stricken, but at the mention of Teacher Kim he suddenly blurts out, “Do you like him?” then asks if that’s the reason she’s stayed at Doldam all this time. Ugh, really? She calls him a “crazy bastard,” then leaves as the memory of their kiss fades into the distance. At least he knows he said something he shouldn’t, and he berates himself for his last question, once Seo-jung is gone.

In Director Yeo’s office, Ki-tae begins his campaign for keeping Dong-joo at Doldam. Nurse Oh points out that Ki-tae was recently making bets on Dong-joo leaving Doldam soon. Ki-tae argues back that that was before he learned how talented Dong-joo is and insists they do something to persuade him to stay.

After all, he reasons, Dong-joo is young, smart, and good-looking, and the women in the area will be lured to their hospital by him. He alleges that all the new hospitals are doing it, and that their thinking is way too old. Nurse Oh suggests they speak with Teacher Kim about the idea before making any decisions, and Director Yeo agrees to Ki-tae’s dismay.

Following her argument with Dong-joo, Seo-jung carefully sneaks back to her station in the ER, looking around for someone. As soon as she sits down, Nurse Oh enters and tells her that Teacher Kim hasn’t come in yet. Echoing Dong-joo, Nurse Oh pointedly asks if she should be walking around so soon, and Seo-jung tries to play it off, explaining that she felt restless.

Luckily, she escapes any more questioning when the phone rings and Nurse Oh announces that five patients involved in a motorcycle accident are on their way. One patient in particular seems more seriously injured then the rest, and he’s rolled in on a stretcher, unconscious. Sensing an opportunity of redemption, Seo-jung jumps up to help with a delighted glint in her eyes.

Elsewhere in the hospital, Ki-tae tells Dong-joo that the patient in the runaway car from the day before hit two middle school students then drove off, and the police have arrived for questioning. Ki-tae assures Dong-joo that he will speak with the insurance company to cover the cost of damages done to Dong-joo’s car, trying to soften him up and make him feel fully taken care of.

Dong-joo manages a polite smile before his mom calls in time to save him from the awkward exchange. For a moment he seems to seriously consider finally answering her call, but alas, one of the nurses runs over to tell him about the situation in the ER, and he puts his phone in his pocket then rushes over.

In the ER, Dong-joo examines the unconscious patient, when Seo-jung comes over to inform him that the patient needs immediate surgery. Dong-joo asks the whereabouts of the guardian, and Seo-jung replies that they are about an hour away. He tells her that he will operate only after the guardian arrives and gives consent to the procedure. She shoots back that the patient could die of excessive bleeding, but Dong-joo pulls rank over her as the general surgeon and dismisses her.

She tells him to focus on saving the patient instead of worrying about what could go wrong, but he doesn’t relent, and explains that he’s seen many surgeons get sued after using her logic. She accuses him of changing and being “no fun,” but he says he was always like this, though she may not remember it. She then calls him a son of a bitch and tries to take over, when Teacher Kim comes in and barks at them to knock it off.

Teacher Kim seemingly sides with Seo-jung and orders the preparations for the surgery. But when she tries to do as instructed, he stops her and says he was talking to Dong-joo. She protests that she can do it, but Teacher Kim tells her to leave. When she proceeds anyway, Teacher Kim erupts and roars at her to step away from the patient. By his evaluation, she is mentally unfit to be a doctor since she harmed herself, and he disqualifies her from the hospital permanently.

Dong-joo sticks up for Seo-jung after she leaves, and says Teacher Kim is being too harsh, but Teacher Kim doesn’t have time to argue and begins ignoring Dong-joo. When a nurse asks about the lack of guardian consent, Teacher Kim merely says to get it over the phone.

Also, Teacher Kim adds, since they’ve now lost their ER specialist, he places Dong-joo on call for the Friday night shift, which Dong-joo takes immediate issue with, deeming it outside the scope of his responsibility. But Teacher Kim isn’t taking requests and reiterates his order.

Outside, Seo-jung cries over her circumstance, as Dong-joo watches on, when his phone rings again. This time it’s Dr. Song, the chief surgeon at Dong-joo’s old hospital. Dr. Song claims to feel bad for the way Dong-joo left, especially since no one compares to Dong-joo when it comes to skill. He invites Dong-joo to dinner tonight with head honcho Dr. Do, calling it an opportunity to ask for his old position back.

Dong-joo estimates that he will need to leave at 6 o’clock to make it to the dinner on time, sighing at the terrible timing. He heads in to begin his Friday night shift at the ER, and what awaits him is utter chaos—the ER now filled to the brim with new patients.

In Teacher Kim’s office, Director Yeo swings by to ask about Seo-jung, hoping Teacher Kim didn’t realllly fire her, right? But if he answers, we don’t get to hear it. Outside in the hall, Teacher Kim finds Nurse Oh waiting for him, and when asked where he’s going, he says he’s going to enjoy his hobby. She replies back that the Friday rush might be too much for Dong-joo to handle alone. But Teacher Kim thinks it’s good for Dong-joo to have too much work sometimes, as it will build up his experience and endurance.

Then, in a quieter voice, she asks if he really meant it when he fired Seo-jung. This time he affirms it, adding with a scowl that no one is going to change his mind. As he heads toward the exit, he receives a text message from an unnamed number, notifying him that the “VIP” arrived. He pauses for a moment to watch Dong-joo work tirelessly in the chaotic ER, with a thoughtful expression on his face.

Meanwhile, Seo-jung can’t accept that decision either and decides to beg Teacher Kim for her position back. Inside, she sees a slightly deranged-looking woman wandering through the hospital. The woman ends up in the ICU, and asks to go inside to see the driver of the runaway car, explaining that she’s his guardian.

The nurse sends her in, and we immediately see that she isn’t his guardian at all, but actually the mother of one of the middle school students he had hit. She begins strangling the unconscious patient, alerting a nearby nurse. Seo-jung jumps in to help wrestle the woman away, and sends the nurse to get help. The woman soon turns her ire onto Seo-jung, deeming her morally complicit in the wrongful death of her son for having saved the driver. Thankfully, backup arrives in time before the woman can seriously harm an already injured Seo-jung.

As the woman thrashes against the staff trying to restrain her, Seo-jung shouts that the patient she attacked isn’t the driver she is looking for—that man was moved earlier to another room–meaning she almost killed an innocent person.

Realizing what she’s done, the woman begins wailing for her departed child as she is taken out of the ICU. Seo-jung goes to check on the patient and determines he is okay, before her knees give in from the stress.

At around 6:20 p.m., Dong-joo looks around the ER, which seems to have calmed down from the earlier craziness. The window of opportunity proves extremely tempting to Dong-joo and he convinces himself to leave while he can.

However, right at that moment, another emergency patient comes in, freezing Dong-joo in place. Nurse Oh calls him over, but instead he just stands in front of the doorway, realizing that if he misses the dinner, he can kiss his chances of returning to his old job goodbye. He takes another step forward determined to leave, as Nurse Oh shouts after him, a nervous look in her eyes, as if sensing what he intends to do. Then, suddenly the mother of the new patient begins crying out to him, begging him to save her son.

The memory of his own mother’s pleads for someone to save his dying father reverberates through him like a cold chill, and Dong-joo turns around conflicted.

At the dinner, Dr. Song informs Dr. Do that he invited Dong-joo, because evidently he needs more fellow surgeons in the department to help out, and asks Dr. Do to consider taking the young surgeon back. Dr. Do gives his tacit approval, but as the evening ticks on, Dong-joo’s seat remains empty. Dr. Song calls Dong-joo in a tizzy, and growls into his voicemail that he’s finished.

Back at Doldam, the incoming patient apparently consumed a certain kind of pesticide in a drunken state, so Dong-joo gets to work pumping his stomach and trying to resuscitate him. He works as fast as he can, never letting up. But his efforts are simply not enough and tragically, the patient dies. Forlorn, he wonders to himself just what he’s doing.

Dong-joo goes out into the hall to deliver the news, but the elderly parents can’t quite hear him because they left their hearing aids at home. He tries to repeat himself, but they still can’t make it out, and instead the couple implores Dong-joo to save their son. The effect is devastating for Dong-joo who can’t bear to watch the parents beg, and he shouts that their son died. The truth finally dawns on them as their grief spreads through them.

Later, Dong-joo listens to Dr. Song’s voicemail with a defeated look on his face, the night heavy on his shoulders. A moment later, his mother calls again, and this time he answers.

Surprised to finally get through, she asks how things are going. When he doesn’t answer, she says knowingly, “It’s hard, isn’t it?” The question and the sound of his mother’s voice breaks him and he begins to sob.

Meanwhile, Nurse Oh reports to Teacher Kim, attributing the success of the night to Dong-joo, then chastises him for leaving. She urges him to come right back, but he tells her he isn’t done with his business yet before hanging up. He smiles to himself after the call. And then a man in a wheelchair enters the casino and Teacher Kim watches him intently.

Late in the night, Dong-joo goes to check on Seo-jung who sits in her hospital bed, wistful. He’s heard about her tussle in the ICU, and checks for swelling in her wrist and a fever, but she’s okay. Straightaway, she requests a different doctor, but he replies that there aren’t any. He amends himself and offers to call Teacher Kim, but guesses she doesn’t want that. Pettily, he comments that he thought she and Teacher Kim were close.

Fed up with his meddling, Seo-jung asks why he showed up in her life again, but he corrects her—he didn’t come because he wanted to, she just happened to be here, that’s all. She doesn’t argue with him, but says that it is wrong for them both to be working in the same hospital again. He corrects her again and says technically they aren’t working together since she got fired. Annoyed, she calls him a jerk, but he says he’s always been like this, straight-forward, freely speaking his mind, but perhaps she just doesn’t remember.

She doesn’t have anything else to say, so in a softer voice Dong-joo asks why she took the sedative that led to her episode. For a moment there is a fragile look in her eyes, but she doesn’t answer, then orders him to leave because she’s tired. He lingers around her bed even after she lies down, then confesses, “I missed you.”

Overcome, she pulls the blanket over her head, and Dong-joo reaches down to cover the tips of her toes that came uncovered. Under the blanket, a conflicted look crosses Seo-jung’s eyes. As he turns to leave, his phone rings—it’s Nurse Oh, saying that his help is needed with four incoming burn patients. Seo-jung springs up at the mention of burn patients and she tells Dong-joo to hurry, but he nervously admits that he’s never treated anyone with burns before.

Eventually, he makes it down to the ER, and in his ear is bluetooth headset. Is she going to tell him what to do through that? Cuuuties. From outside the ER door, Seo-jung serves as his counsel, talking through her phone, answering all his questions.

Nearby, another one of the burn patients begins choking from the burn on his respiratory tract. One of the other doctors begins walking over to perform an intubation and secure the patient’s airway, when a badly bruised Teacher Kim swoops in to take over.

Nurse Oh and the other staff members stare at him stunned, but Teacher Kim acts if nothing is wrong, though he can’t bring himself to look anyone directly in the eyes.

Teacher Kim heads over to the patient Dong-joo is working on, and stops short when he sees Seo-jung issuing instructions into her phone outside the hybrid operating room. Seo-jung doesn’t notice him there at first, but Dong-joo does, and he stops what he’s doing and looks at Teacher Kim. Confused, Seo-jung squawks at Dong-joo to hurry, but then her eyes drift over and she freezes.

In voiceover, Dong-joo narrates, “Our Friday night isn’t over yet.”

 

COMMENTS

After the crackling energy, unbridled cheekiness, and air of mystery that permeated last week’s episodes, this episode was comparatively less fun. It wasn’t necessarily because of the pace, which was slower, and it was in no way uneventful. As I said before, slow isn’t a problem so long as the moments are used effectively, and there’s a definite mixture of hit and miss moments here today. But by the end, I really missed the quirky and whimsical vibe we got before, particularly from Teacher Kim.

Today, he was crotchety without much of the eccentricity we were promised in the beginning. I can’t wait for him to have more to do, and for us to start getting bits and pieces of his dark past. His altercation with Dong-joo and their burgeoning discord established a great conflict, which is sure to get much worse before it gets better.

It was gratifying watching Dong-joo recalibrate and slowly reconnect to the most basic fundamental values of what it means to be a doctor, after foregoing his important dinner then failing to save the patient anyway. You see him begin to understand what it means to have the ability and responsibility to save the lives of helpless people who can do nothing else but stand by and pray. It provides a stark contrast to his cavalier perspective on the death of that former assemblyman, who at the end of the day was still a person who also died, which he viewed only as a chess piece in his ambitions.

I’m enjoying the parallel between Dong-joo, a character that almost prides himself in being blunt and borderline offensive, duking it out with Teacher Kim who can play Dong-joo’s game even better than he can. In fact, he can do basically everything better than Dong-joo can, particularly the job he spent eleven years of his life committed to. But instead of seeing bits of himself in Teacher Kim, and/or recognizing the taste of his own medicine, he becomes obsessed with uncovering Teacher Kim’s secrets (weaknesses), hoping it might help shatter his seemingly mythical surgical abilities. Because while Dong-joo was playing the game of thrones at Geodae, the objectives are more basic and thoroughly human at Doldam and he’s outclassed here.

On the other hand, perhaps subconsciously, Dong-joo does understand the similarities between Teacher Kim and himself. From his perspective, Teacher Kim is a man who is far more talented than Dong-joo is as a surgeon, but even then he still ends up at a crappy, outdated hospital like Doldam. Perhaps to Dong-joo, Teacher Kim is a painful reminder that no matter how skilled one is, still the forces of nepotism cannot be conquered.

I was surprised to see Nurse Oh’s character shine in this episode, even from her seemingly preferred place in the background. Initially, she seemed a bit aloof, and the sensible type, but in glimpses we are beginning to see that in actuality she’s the network at Doldam, keeping tabs on everyone and checking to make sure everyone is doing all right. I loved the moment when she watched on fearfully as Dong-joo struggled to make the right choice in the ER, but then immediately welcomed him back when he did. Her method seems to involve stepping back and letting our capricious trio of doctors come into their own, but nudging them along the way.

For Seo-jung, she may have used working in the ER as a crutch to cope with her grief over Dr. Moon’s death, but when she’s coaching Dong-joo through the burn patient’s treatment there’s a light in her eyes. It’s obvious that she truly puts her heart and soul into her work, and loves every moment of it. I was glad to see Seo-jung and Dong-joo implement a temporary cease-fire on their arguing to come together, since they really are much better teammates than enemies.

 
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Seo Jung really passionate about her job. please girl recover soon. I know you can do it.

I maybe need more episodes to open up with Dong Joo. I'm looking forward to see how he changes later. For now I just dislike everything about him.

I am shipping Teacher Kim and Nurse Oh ? especially after epi 4. Eh both are single right?

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What I love here is that it's the heroine who has the problems (medically) because in most shows, almost all the male leads have their own sickness that will be magically cured by the love of the female lead.

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ayyyy #teamNurseOh

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Yes, I shipping them too!

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Not watching this yet but...that 10000 hrs rule remind me of chilbongie

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Omigosh, thank you for the recap! I am a mixture of confusing emotions about this show. I feel like I ride a roller coaster everytime I watch it!

DJ annoys me, but at the same time I can totally relate. I would NEVER talk back to an obviously talented sunbae like Master Kim. But I do like your theory that perhaps subconsciously he sees their similarity and he wants to break the mystery behind him.

Of course this is a drama, and we allow for harsh emotional scenes, (and yes, yes, he was under stress and it's like his 2nd death only) but when he pronounced the patient dead to the relatives, that was super horrifying for me. Just saying.

But when DJ broke down while on the phone with his mom, that moved me. Sometimes at the end of the day, it all just piles up: there's really an asshole sunbae, there's stupid hoobaes, there's annoying MA patients, (ugh, the assholes I encountered during training), there's the patient you couldn't save no matter what you did, reports, files, readings, just EVERYTHING.... and It just gets to you, you know. He's actually very lucky, because I couldn't cry to my family. My family didn't get my frustrations because they tell me since I was a doctor, I should ALWAYS be better, ALWAYS understand, ALWAYS be perfect. DJ crying... damn, That scene to me was the best.

Nurse Oh is like the coolest cucumber intraop and on the wards. I wanna work with her.

Going back to Friday night... i feel like it's a sort of superstition. Hehe. We used to have something like that in training, like if you eat spaghetti when you're on-call, prepare for some toxic patients incoming. (Because spaghetti is long, so you're going to have a loooong night.. LOL)

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Haha @Lessa I've never heard of the spaghetti thing before but where I work we have many other superstitions, like not eating bao (包) which are steamed buns, or not wearing red underwear! Lol.

There was a local journal article written on it a while ago- it's a tongue in cheek look at how crazy superstitions are still followed by supposedly scientifically evidence based trained doctors, all in desperate hope for a good quiet day at work ?

http://www.annals.edu.sg/PDF/36VolNo3Mar2007/V36N3p217.pdf

And as a fellow doctor, I'm sending a hug to you, we all have those days where we need a hug or a good cry. ?

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Was the reference to the pharmacist at the end real or just a joke about them being the only ones who can ever decipher doctor's signatures??

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that's real. most doctors have crappy handwriting. although my handwriting is actually very nice. *eherm*

in our hospital, we have this "Pen Award", (it's a serious award, with like a ceremony and all.), where doctors are given a fancy fancy ballpen if he/she has beautiful, legible handwriting. (*alas, i have still not been nominated. Huhu)

when i was a resident i usually MC our christmas parties, so i made a joke awards night where we crown the opposite: the trainee with the crappiest-ECG-seizure-chicken-scratch-like handwriting. The Prize: a giant pencil. LOL.

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Haha that award is so cool! There are some doctors with great handwriting but so few! Haha. I fall somewhere in between and it depends on how crazy the day is. But i am OCD enough that I used to try to prevent certain doctors from writing on my anesthesia chart because their handwriting was just so bad! ?

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LOL! That's so cool!!! A giant pencil..

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@Michykdrama,

Thanks for that link. What a hoot! Reminds me of the Journal of Irreproducible Results.

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that article is sooo relatable! :D We also practice a lot of feng shui in the hospital... (even though we're not a chinese hospital) like we don't have rooms or floors that end in 4 or 13.

Oh, I just remembered... we even have the "antidote" for the spaghetti curse.... you have to eat ice cream in order to make the evening's chaos quiet again. LOL.

Thanks for the hug! And to all in the medical field! :D :D

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Haha. I'm going to add spaghetti to my list of "not to eat while on call" foods. But the best part is now I have another excuse to eat ice cream! ???

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Thanks for the recap, murasakimi!

I'm getting a YONG-PAL vibe from Kim Sabu as far as his expertise and surgical speed is concerned. Or maybe he has extensive military hospital experience? Or both. No wonder Dong-Joo is going bonkers trying to figure him out.

One thing is bugging me about the surgery on Seo-Jung's wrist. In voiceover, Dong-Joo notes that the nylon suture Kim Sabu is using is so fine it can barely be seen with the naked eye. It looked to me as if he were struggling to see what he was cutting. Why the heck didn't he have a loupe? I suspect he could have worked faster if he could have clearly seen what he was doing. Or maybe this was just Kim Sabu throwing him into the deep end of the pool and expecting him to call for a loupe himself? Is there a doctor in the house who could enlighten me?

I'm not a fan of Kim Sabu's sink-or-swim didactic methods, especially when there's no backup doctor in the ER. He's got some hubris issues of his own...

I am, however, a sucker for redemption, and it looked to me as if Dong-Joo turned a couple of corners in that direction during this episode. He was strongly tempted to grovel to President Do to get his old job back following Dr. Song's phone call. But when push came to shove, the angel of his better nature turned him back to the ER as he was about to leave when the poisoning patient was brought it. Losing his second patient broke down the mindspace in which he'd barricaded himself since his father's death. It was painful to watch him state six times to the hearing-impaired parents that their son had died... but it also signaled a crack in his mental armor, and the liberation of long-suppressed emotions.

When Dong-Joo checked Seo-Jung's wrist after the altercation in the ICU, she again asked him what happened to him, and he replied that he was always outspoken. But when she tells him to leave her alone and pulls the blankets over her head -- leaving her tootsies sticking out -- he very gently covers them up, and tells her he missed her, seriously. I think that was the second part of his answer to her question. And that was an interesting look on her face.

Then he gets the call from the ER that burn patients are arriving. Seo-Jung pops up like a meerkat, and he drops the bombshell that he's never treated a burn patient, which amazes her. With his admission, the vibe completely changes, and their collaboration in treating the most seriously injured chef is reminiscent of their flawless teamwork in saving the myocarditis patient five years earlier.

My seat belt is tightened for the continuing saga...

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Dang! Another case of PMS. Posting Misplacement Syndrome.

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This. This. THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This drama is utterly amazing!! I feel like I'm watching a medical version of Signal and there simply is no better compliment. It's astonishing, beautifully shot, acted, written, produced. WOW!!!!!!!
Sorry - not sorry for so many superlatives but O M G - it just keeps on delivering surprise after surprise after twist after heart-wrenching moment. Wait til you see episode 4. Chills galore!
This is mandatory viewing.
I have a close friend who has just started watching k-dramas. We're on episode 7 of City Hunter and she's begging for more. This drama will be the one I feed her next.
WOW. I wondered when another one like Signal would come along.

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Agreee!! This drama is amazing ?

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Thank you for spreading the kdrama virus. >:D

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Totally Agree!!!!!

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Thanks for the recap!
Just finished watching this episode! (Crazy day, but thank goodness less busy than the Emergency Room in Doldam!)

The story is interesting enough, but I'm not 100% invested yet, maybe because all the doctors are acting so unprofessionally, including Teacher Kim who is one big enigma. And for a star resident, DJ is pretty lousy if he nearly faints by the end of a short 30 min surgery- in real life surgeons can go on and on for HOURS without food, water or the need to pee! (I always joke that they are a different breed from other doctors) and all he was doing was using a scissors to cut. Lol! And I need him to be a bit less of a jerk before I start rooting for his romance.

Still it was enjoyable and brought back some fond memories of dealing with Burns patients (it's managed by Plastic Surgeons and Anesthetists), and having one of them who was badly burnt recover and walk out of hospital a few months later. The management of Burns patients was pretty accurately portrayed in the drama. ?

Onwards to episode 4!

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Kudos to you, Michykdrama - It's always wonderful to read your posts and I want to follow you closely as we make our way through this drama.
It bothered me greatly that Teacher Kim was wildly flapping and fanning his jacket in the burning kitchen! If anything, he should have wrapped the jacket tightly around the victim and hugged him to the floor.

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Haha @lunatic4kd I've come to accept that this drama isn't really about medical realism, other than for the occasional big words like "escharotomy" lol. So the fire didn't bother me that much ?

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@michy Is it possible to intubate burns patients when their airways have been damaged? I've not seen a burns case yet so I don't know.

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Hihi Db, I'm sorry I can't remember if you are in the medical field but I assume so, so there is some jargon in my reply. :)

Yes, it is, but the upper airways can be edematous/swollen so it may be more difficult but we can use equipment to help us- e.g. video laryngoscopes, fibreoptic bronchoscopes. But of course it will depend on the extent of the injury as well. But what the drama showed wasn't wrong.

This is a pretty good article on Burns if you want something to read. ?

http://m.ceaccp.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/02/23/bjaceaccp.mks001.full.pdf

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Thanks michy! I'm an undergrad btw :)

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Regarding why there are more patients on Friday, maybe:

1. Because it's almost the weekend, people look forward to it and thus, become more careless while doing stuff because they think that what they're doing will be over soon and thus, it may lead to accidents.

2. Because it's a day before the weekend, patients will mostly have more time to rest after their surgery/treatment.

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I also thought this episode was weak compared to the first two. It just wasn't as entertaining. Luckily, episode 4 was pretty good IMO.

I pretty much love the relationship between DJ and SJ, they work off each other really well. It would do the show some good if they let go of the angst between them a bit and capitalized on the petty banter or the temporary truces more. That's where the two of them really shine.

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Omg Dong-joo was such an ASS in the first half of the episode that I almost wanted to reach into the screen and yank his hair out. But I found myself beginning to warm up to him later on when he cried on the phone to his mum, checked in on Seo-jung (rather tenderly at that), and admitted to not having treated burn patients. I can hope that he becomes less annoying from now on, right? :')

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Agree. He needs some whacks , that how annoying and presumptuous he is. I mean, the lower he feels rather than realisations the more antagonistic be gets that he doesn't deserve any of v it when he b is the only one who deserves it.
But the writer made a neat move with his breaking down on the phone with his mom. Not seo Jung. He has to reconnect with his mom first before other relationships come into play. That's the most valuable connection n the writt gave it it's due. Liked it a lot.

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well it's been a long time to not comment about drama here. For me the plot, scenario was really, really good. The lighting, the shadowy rooms, the camera positition give an excellent scene. it's romantic. So did with the act of the cast. This drama served us a really high skills technique in surgery. The writter knew better about doctors, I suggested. I can wacth thousands of episode if the story constant like this. Like 'dr.House', maybe or the Grey's anatomy. In hospital there were many story, lessons we can take and put it into drama. So many.
Well, I don't mind about the character of Kim Sabu which was you said you really missed the quirky about this episode since the role he played was to give a life lessons to dr. Kang and dr. Yoon. Imho, maybe you thought the pace getting slower because there was no a hectic situation here from dr. Kim. But we can get the emotional situation right?. We knew dr. Kang never lost his patient before. How deppressed and angry he was when he told the patient die to his familly. He blamed the hospital because it's lack of modern equipment. For me he looked really pity. Actually as a doctors, he shouldnt depend on the tools. It's a skill is he really need. There were many skills he didnt know. Hehe..it's pitiful.
I really appreciate this drama. There so much I can feel about being doctors. As for the fourth episode, dr. Kang was asked about he was asked what he will be? be a good doctors or be the best doctors?. I will advice he just to do all best he can to help patient same as dr. Kim said. Because we can be good all the time, sometimes the situation getting bad for us. And become the best is just about the ambition people will accept us well.
I will really wait how dr. Yoon cure herself in the end since we all know that she didnt make a wrong decision to not approve her boyfriend proposal. Because that doctor (I forgot his name) not really in love with her. He used dr. Yoon for his reputation too and the fact he was cheating on dr. Yoon. And also the accident did because he was drunken.
Romantic doctor, Teacher Kim fighting!!! ;))

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I'm actually glad to see a male lead (Dong Joo is a male lead isn't he?) who isn't perfect, is annoying and arrogant. So hateful. Even though I hate him, I want the best for him. I want to see him change. A drama where the leads lost their way and struggle to come back to the right path, is like a reminder, that we, humans, how awful we are, can change.

I love Seo Jung's character! And I want to see her healing from whatever trauma she has.
And for the most part, I want to know the story behind Teacher Kim.
I hope this drama will be good. I'll keep praying everyweek.

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I dunno. I find nearly all male leads in k-dramas annoying and arrogant – it's just that they are presented as if they were perfect.

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Iam slowly following this drama and i feel like it's starting to get to me. Eventually, i'll be head-over-heels in no time.

But iam curious though, why did teacher Kim have those bruises? What is the mystry behind him?

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Man, it's been an awesome run for the show so far Lots of compelling characters with their hidden/mysterious background and how they come together at this one hospital. Alot to uncover in the later episodes. Not to mention the awesome OST/BGM of the drama so much so it kinda reminds me of a dark japanese anime heh. Keep doing your thing show, i am rooting for you!

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I'm enjoying the OST/BGM, too. Some of it had a great bluesy, RnB feel to it, but that might be in episode 4. In that respect, it reminds me of SIGNAL, whose music I loved to bits.

It really cracked me up to watch Kim Sabu chilling out to "Material Girl" by Madonna in episode 2.

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Thanks for the recap and the commentary.

I am still feeling rather mixed about this show. Unlike murasakimi, I found the pacing of this episode still too fast and we get so many things happening that we can't properly see how these incidents impact on our protagonists. It's a little too much, too quickly.

I'm nonetheless impressed by the production values of the show and how Doldam hospital is constructed. I especially loved the surgery sequence at the start!

Here are my thoughts on the episode:
https://kdramaanalysis.wordpress.com/2016/11/17/romantic-doctor-teacher-kim-episode-3/

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I'm really loving this show. It's hitting all the right notes for me.

The different medical emergencies and the ER settings reminded me a bit of Chicago Med/Chicago Fire (I liked those shows, but didn't feel like keeping up with their long seasons anymore....)

For a moment, I seriously thought Dong Joo was going to leave the ER and not care about those patients. That would have fit his character from what I've seen of him. But of course, I'm glad he didn't. That poor elderly couple had me bawling when Dong Joo had to break the news to them.

It was awesome to see Seo Jung and Dong Joo working together!!

This episode was slower than the previous ones, but I still enjoyed it. The next one is great. The supporting characters are great as well like Nurse Oh!! ^^

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Thank you murasakimi!

So far I like it a lot but I'm still behind by 2 eps. I prefer to watch it during the weekend when I have my most free time.

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I've stopped watching this. That yelling n drama in front of patients is utterly intolerable n as a drama realist mode this is unbearable to watch.

A patient will collapse n die because of how much the leads argue about treatments for him with no understanding that he can listen even if he is on his death bed. Nuts.

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So far I enjoyed every single episode of this drama, I'm loving it!

I really feel for Dong-joo, yeah I know, he acts like a jerk sometimes, well most of the time, but when he cried, I couldn't help it my heart broke for him, his whole life is falling apart, he's angry and frustrated and stuck in a strange hospital with strange people who to him are crazy, but I think he'll slowly come to adjust to this new environment, he just needs some time!

I loved seeing Seo-jung working with Dong-joo, I do understand teacher kim's decision but he was a little to harsh on her!

Thank you murasakimi for the recap.

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As for me ep. 3 & 4 >>>>>>>>>> ep. 2 >> ep. 1.

Sure the pace is slower but it felt more engaging and I'm so happy that the show is getting better by the episodes.

I love how they show us on how flawed Dong Joo is and seeing Kim Sabu knocking down his ego was soooo satisfying to watch. I mean, yassss Kim Sabu, tell that arrogant young man what he needs to hear. Haha.

But then at that moment when he's reminded of his own and mom's cries for his dad years back, and turn back, the show gets soooo gooood. Him relaying the sad news, then breaking down at his mom's phone call.

Gosh, that scene when his mom went "it's tough, isn't it?" when DJ who tried hard to maintain his emotion, and he cried... that scene reminds me so much of my own experience of similar phone calls with my mom. When in tough times, when moms tenderly ask comforting questions like that on the phone, your tears would just fall no matter how hard you tried not to.

And his straightforwardness with his "I miss you" and covering SJ's feet with the blanket ahhhhh. My heart fluttered. And their synergy for the burn patient victims, I want more of that, please.

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