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Introverted Boss: Episode 4

Hwan-ki has spent years building the shell that protects his vulnerabilities. Until now, he was fighting to hold on to those defenses, but what happens when he finds that there are others he wants to protect, and that the answer may lie in coming out of his shell? His self-proclaimed nemesis has declared war, but how long can Ro-woon ignore the growing evidence that Hwan-ki is nothing like the person she thought he was?

Note: Introverted Boss has been pre-empted next week for the Lunar New Year, and will resume the week after.

 
EPISODE 4: “I Will Not Meet Anyone”

Three years ago, Hwan-ki walked into Ji-hye’s wake and found her grief-stricken family kneeling silently before her altar. As he watched, Ro-woon got up and stumbled past him, never registering his presence. Barefoot and blinded by tears, Ro-woon had walked out into the cold night with Hwan-ki keeping an eye on her from a distance.

Finally, she collapsed on the ground, and Hwan-ki quietly put down the slippers he had carried out of the funeral home for her. Sensing someone but never looking up, Ro-woon had said that her sister left without her shoes. This seems to pierce her deep, and Ro-woon weeps on the ground as Hwan-ki watches helplessly.

In the present day, Ro-woon’s voice narrates Hwan-ki’s daily routine. Every morning, before sunrise, he goes somewhere mysterious. Then on his return, he showers, cleans the penthouse, sharpens his pencil, puts on some music, and… dances? Ro-woon’s voice turns incredulous as we see him pull on a hooded jacket with style and dance to K-pop hits. Hah.

Ro-woon discovers this in real life, when she gets to the office early and peeks in to find Hwan-ki busting a move. Hwan-ki freezes mid-motion as their eyes meet, and Ro-woon withdraws back into the hall, convinced she was hallucinating. When she enters the office properly, Hwan-ki is quietly sitting behind his desk, and Ro-woon scoffs at the mere idea of a boss who never greets his employees dancing when no one’s looking.

Later, when everyone goes off to lunch, Ro-woon snoops around the clean, odorless kitchen, trying to find out what he eats there. She finds a cutting board with red stains on it and freaks out when Hwan-ki appears behind her and takes it away. Once she leaves, he wonders if the kitchen still smells of kimchi. Hehe.

She leaves with everyone after the workday, thinking to herself that Hwan-ki will go off before sunrise again tomorrow, just like a cockroach. To discover where he goes, she tails him in a car the next morning and ends up following him to an exercise club, where Hwan-ki plays squash. Ro-woon is surprised and impressed by how good he is at the game.

Ro-woon claps at the end of a serve and greets him. Hwan-ki immediately packs up to leave. She blocks his path and asks him to teach her how to play squash, then tells him that they should get closer by working together and having a cold drink later. Hwan-ki dodges her and hurries away, saying that he exercises alone.

He visits Woo-il at his office, who guesses he’s bothered about Ro-woon again. He says that if Hwan-ki is that uncomfortable, he’ll take Ro-woon under his own wing. This visibly disturbs Hwan-ki, who backtracks and says he’ll just have to keep her since he can’t fire her without good reason. On his way out, he spies Ro-woon walking towards Woo-il’s office and ducks out of sight. He watches them walk out together with concern.

At a restaurant with Woo-il, Ro-woon makes her report about Hwan-ki. She’s arrived at the conclusion that he’s exactly like a cockroach — active at night when the rest of the world is asleep and always dressed in black. She cribs that Silent Monster is all for show and not a place where employees have any work to do. Woo-il points out that she’s working hard, but Ro-woon says she’s just following him around, eating good food, and meeting people.

Woo-il corrects her that she’s not just meeting people, she’s forming connections. In the PR world where bids are won through presentations, it’s important to meet and persuade people to be on your side. Woo-il argues that knowing the right person is more important than reading books for work or life.

Today, they’re there to wine and dine an executive for a food company celebrating the 30th anniversary of a product, “Yong Ramyun.” Ro-woon asks if they’re bribing the man, but Woo-il just says that they’re asking for his permission to have Silent Monster submit a presentation. When the managing director, Mr. Jin, arrives, Wool-il introduces Ro-woon as a valued employee and his secret weapon.

Throughout the evening, Ro-woon laughs at Director Jin’s stories and glibly flatters his ego. Woo-il watches her win the client over with a pleased smile. Later that night, Ro-woon walks back home and thinks that she’s being recognized by Woo-il.

Then Woo-il’s words, “secret weapon,” echo in her mind, and she thinks of the secret that killed her sister in that company. She wonders what her dad will say if he finds out where she works now. Looking ahead at the front door of her house, memories from three years ago fill the scene.

Ji-hye was leaving for work before dawn, and her parents had come out to bid her goodbye. Her mother noticed her shabby heels and asked why Ji-hye wasn’t wearing the new ones she bought for her. Ji-hye said they were too expensive to wear to work. Then Ro-woon stumbled up the path, happily drunk and jubilant that she had landed the part she’d auditioned for — not the lead, but a scene stealer that involved eighteen costume changes!

Her mother was less than impressed by the daughter who came home after drinking all night, and then Ro-woon tripped and broke the heel of her shoe — which turned out to be the pair her mom had bought for Ji-hye, which Ji-hye had lent to her for luck. Running away from her furious mom, who was handed a broom by a helpful neighborhood ajusshi, Ro-woon promised to buy her sister nicer and prettier shoes as soon as she made money.

In the present, Ro-woon comes out of the memory smiling, and wonders if her mom is watching her now. She walks into the shop and her father asks if she ate, which is the same thing he asks every time she walks in. She says she did and then pauses: “It was great, it was delicious.” Then she goes into the house, while her dad stares after her. Two ajusshis in the shop comment that that was the longest sentence Ro-woon had spoken since her sister’s death. They wonder if something good must have happened.

Dad removes the wet towel from his customer’s face, and we see that it’s Hwan-ki, who must have heard everything.

Hwan-ki starts the next day with an announcement — he has an instruction for the staff. Everyone perks up at this, wondering if they’re getting yelled at. Hwan-ki gets up from his seat and says: “Do not meet anyone.”

Se-jong hilariously quips that Hwan-ki seems to be doing a series of one-liners. First it was, “We won’t say anything” with the actor, and now it’s “Do not meet anyone.” But Kyo-ri notes the look in his eyes and wonders if he’s telling her not to meet the press.

Sun-bong wonders if Hwan-ki knows about the interviews he’s giving at other companies, Yoo-hee wonders if he’s telling her to focus more on work and less on her family, and Se-jong wonders if he’s telling them not to date in the office.

Ro-woon gets a call from Director Jin about meeting again the next day. She happily agrees, then turns around to find Hwan-ki standing beside her. He asks who it is, and Ro-woon explains that she and Woo-il are trying to get Director Jin’s permission to do a presentation for Yong Ramyun.

Hwan-ki tells her that instead of chasing people, she should do work from her own place — that way a hundred people will know her, instead of her knowing a hundred people. Ro-woon retorts that she doesn’t know what her work is, since he never gives any guidance or instruction, so she finally asks him to come and meet Director Jin with her.

Hwan-ki slinks away after making his disapproval clear, but seeing how much he doesn’t want to meet Director Jin just gives Ro-woon a wicked gleam in her eyes. She calls Director Jin back and asks him to meet her early next morning.

The next day, when Hwan-ki gets to his club, he finds Director Jin playing squash on his court. Ro-woon appears with energy drinks in hand and introduces Hwan-ki to the managing director. When Director Jin extends a sweaty hand for Hwan-ki to shake, he looks at it with disgust and takes a drink from Ro-woon to hand to the man. Ro-woon covers the awkwardness and praises Hwan-ki’s expertise in squash. This gets Director Jin interested in a game and puts Hwan-ki in an uncomfortable position.

Hwan-ki tries to explain that he makes mistakes when people watch him, but Ro-woon hands him a racquet and leaves the court. Hwan-ki just stands there as Director Jin serves, and after a few unreturned balls, Director Jin gets angry at him. Hwan-ki plainly says that schmoozing is not how he gets work done, and that he would prefer to just let his presentation do the speaking for him.

This doesn’t go down very well with a man who’s used to being treated with deference by bidding companies. Ro-woon has to run in to smooth things over again, but Director Jin makes it clear that he feels Hwan-ki’s presence is unnecessary when he’d been invited there by Ro-woon. Ro-woon takes that as a cue and asks to be taught how to play the game.

Happy to get close to the pretty young girl, Director Jin complies, and Hwan-ki watches him touch her with rising anger. When the man’s “teaching” starts making Ro-woon uncomfortable, Hwan-ki throws the ball in the air and strikes hard at the wall. The ball bounces off and hits Director Jin square in the forehead. As the managing director lies writhing on the floor, Hwan-ki repeats that he makes mistakes when he’s watched before leaving.

Woo-il visits Director Jin at the hospital and half-threatens, half-flatters him out of suing Hwan-ki. He makes it clear that he knows Director Jin was harassing Ro-woon, and that it would come out in any investigation into the matter. He hands over a check as compensation, and then asks Director Jin to forgive Hwan-ki as a personal favor to him. Ro-woon looks into the room to see him bow in apology to the man.

Outside, he tells her that he got Director Jin’s permission for the presentation. She clearly feels bad that he had to apologize when he didn’t do anything wrong, but Woo-il dismisses it.

Back at Silent Monster, Hwan-ki refuses to work with Director Jin, though Woo-il points out that he’s in no position to be fussy. Hwan-ki argues that Director Jin won’t evaluate their presentation fairly, but Woo-il says that they should at least try for the sake of the employees — no, Woo-il adds pleadingly, Hwan-ki should do it for his sake.

Hwan-ki looks at him and says, “There you go again.” We flash back to the many times Woo-il has used that turn of phrase: “Do it for my sake.” Hwan-ki thinks to himself that Woo-il always manages to sound self-sacrificing when he does it, but he’s actually asking for attention.

We see another flashback where Woo-il speaks to the reporters about Silent Monster with his usual ease. Hwan-ki watches from the shadows and says in voiceover that it’s not that wanting attention is a bad thing — he is just very different from Woo-il. He says that he’s grateful that Woo-il had volunteered to stand in the spotlight so that he didn’t have to.

But then his eyes find Ro-woon standing in the crowd, obviously taken with Woo-il’s charm, and Hwan-ki thinks to himself that the problem is that Woo-il attracts attention to the point that it becomes dangerous.

In the present, Woo-il gets defensive as Hwan-ki says he’s being too greedy. Hwan-ki tells him to take his hands off Silent Monster, since he’ll protect his own employees. Woo-il asks how he proposes to do that — by wasting their time when they should be gaining experience? He points out that if Hwan-ki blows this chance, then no one will give them work, and no one will know how competent Hwan-ki truly is. Woo-il tells his friend that he’ll do the dirty work for him, so Hwan-ki can just do things his own way.

Hwan-ki works all night on the Yong Ramyun presentation, repeatedly thinking of Woo-il’s words: How will he protect his employees? The next morning, everyone arrives late and walks in to find Hwan-ki working. Expecting to be ignored as usual, they settle down before springing right up as Hwan-ki tells them to prepare for the presentation.

He points at Yoo-hee, and she hurries over to persuade him to do it himself, since she’s out of practice. She tries to hand him one of her sweet breads to ply him before asking everyone to clap for all the hard work Hwan-ki put in. But when she tries to massage his shoulders, Hwan-ki instinctively jerk away and hurts Yoo-hee’s finger. He looks apologetic, but all he says is that he needs an employee, not a mother.

Later, Ro-woon enthusiastically talks ill of Hwan-ki amongst the other employees for his abuse of power. Everyone agrees that Hwan-ki should do it himself to set an example, but no one wants to take over the presentation from Yoo-hee. Ro-woon volunteers, but since she has no experience, Yoo-hee resigns herself to do it.

At the end of the day, Ro-woon watches Yoo-hee begging her mother over the phone to postpone a trip so she can look after the children tomorrow. She looks back at Hwan-ki and glares. She thinks back to Ji-hye’s funeral three years ago, when a man from Brain offered an envelope of money to her parents. She had boldly confronted the man for trying to cover up what happened.

Her parents didn’t say anything, and her father just told the man to take the money and leave. When Ro-woon asked how he could stay silent, he said that Ji-hye should have endured her problems like everyone else does. Ro-woon had shouted that even if he wouldn’t do anything, she would.

Ro-woon wakes up in the present and finds a bouquet of flowers waiting for her. The card reads: “I’ll wait for your return to the stage.”

Hwan-ki stands outside his house and finally walks in. Before he can go in, he finds Woo-il with his mother and sister. Mrs. Eun had been waiting for Hwan-ki, but she’s pleased to see Woo-il, who (jokingly?) promises to call her “Mother” as soon as he’s married to Hwan-ki’s sister, Yi-soo. Mrs. Eun had been on a hunger strike because her son hasn’t visited in a while, but Woo-il easily cheers her up while Hwan-ki watches from the shadows.

The next day, Yoo-hee is late for the presentation because her sons fell sick and she stayed up all night taking care of them. As she hurries to get ready, one of her sons vomits straight onto her skirt, ending any chance of her getting there on time.

Ro-woon sees an opportunity for revenge in this and asks Hwan-ki to do the presentation himself. Hwan-ki clearly has no plans to comply and wants to simply walk away, but all of his excuses get shot down by his staff. They force him to go inside, and Hwan-ki suddenly finds himself facing dozens of faces, while his staff hurries to set everything up.

Hwan-ki stands in front of the slides tightly holding the microphone, but he’s unable to get a single word out. His anxiety rises with each passing moment, until suddenly his dad’s voice yells at him from the past to “Speak up!” We see a young Hwan-ki sitting in a parlor for a haircut, silent in the face of his father’s commands to speak. His father finally told the stylist to do whatever she wanted. Angry at his son’s inability to express an opinion, his dad decided to make the choice for him, which ended in an unfashionably curly mop (a la Gu Jun-pyo in Boys Over Flowers) that got him bullied in school.

In the present, the host exhorts Hwan-ki to stop wasting the judge’s time, and Hwan-ki thinks to himself that everyone fears being looked at to some degree.

We flash back again to a school Christmas event, where Hwan-ki stood in the first row of a choir. He looked nauseous at the attention while his father recorded the proud moment. In voiceover, Hwan-ki says that his father didn’t want to allow him the tiniest bit of fear, since he dreamt of making him into a global business leader. That’s why Mr. Eun had bribed his teacher to let Hwan-ki get all the attention.

When the chorus paused to let Hwan-ki sing the solo bit, the silence stretched on as Little Hwan-ki obsessively wondered if he would make a mistake. His thoughts devolved into guilt for getting the part unfairly and for ousting the best singer in his class, who had deserved to sing the solo. At the gestures of an increasingly frantic choir master, he finally started singing and then pitched too high on a word, causing everyone to start laughing. As the rest of the chorus resumed, Hwan-ki stood silent and embarrassed while his parents looked away, ashamed of him.

In the present, Hwan-ki’s anxiety and discomfort is terrible to watch. Finally, he drops the mic and thinks, “At least, I satisfied one person.” Glancing at Ro-woon, he runs out. Ro-woon doesn’t feel as smug with her revenge as she had hoped, and thinks to herself that this isn’t what she wanted.

Hwan-ki shuts himself up in the office, and no amount of knocking opens the door. Woo-il tells Ro-woon not to be too disappointed and walks away while Yoo-hee stands outside with the staff, finally having managed the crises at home. All five troop off to a restaurant to drown their sorrows in soju.

Kyo-ri sighs that the man she was so scared of turned out to be a huge coward. Sun-bong rues that no one will hire him now because he works for Silent Monster (since it’s just a shell company). Yoo-hee apologizes for everything, but Ro-woon says that it’s her fault, since she made Hwan-ki do the presentation. She had thought Hwan-ki should do it himself.

Yoo-hee defends Hwan-ki by telling them how detailed and warm the presentation had been. He’d even written a script that Yoo-hee just had to memorize and deliver. We see in another flashback that Yoo-hee had worked through the night, even as she took care of her children. We go further back in time and see that Hwan-ki had given the choice of employee to do the presentation some thought—he’d analyzed Yoo-hee’s strengths and believed she would do the best job.

Yoo-hee cries now that she’s a failure as an employee as well as a mother, since she didn’t take her children for the flu shot on time. Ro-woon comforts her.

Hwan-ki gets a call from Ro-woon’s phone, and someone ominously tells him that he has all his employees and that Hwan-ki should bring cash. The kidnapper-sounding person turns out to be the owner of the restaurant (cameo by Choi Dae-chul), where all five employees are completely wasted.

Hwan-ki sighs before getting to work sending each employee off to their homes, taking extra care to take pictures of the taxi number plates and the drivers for safety. Sun-bong turns out to be a hilariously weepy drunk, while Yoo-hee tries to kiss Hwan-ki, thinking he’s her grown-up son. After seeing all of them safely off, he heads back for Ro-woon, only to find her sitting outside the restaurant, watching him.

She wonders how he knows all of their addresses — has he been secretly observing them? She stands up unsteadily and works through her thoughts. Why is he never in front of people? Is it because he can’t?

Hwan-ki looks caught as Ro-woon says that she used to think he looked down on people, but now she wonders if he’s actually scared of them. She totters closer and says that she knows people like him well. Everyone in her family, except she, are people who “quietly keep their place.”

Referring to their conversation earlier, she says that if he just stands in his place quietly, no one—let alone a hundred people—will ever notice him. “Just by watching,” she tells Hwan-ki, “you can never protect anyone.” Then her eyes droop, and she passes out in his arms. He grips her tightly.

 
COMMENTS

Ah, my heart! It bled for Hwan-ki as he stood in front of that audience trying so hard to get the words out. His fear and frustration was palpable and utterly painful to witness. The moment he gave up, I felt his disappointment in himself. It was such a heavy burden to bear, and he’s been carrying it since he was a child. I really appreciate the way this show revealed the abuse of his past. It hurts to see that a naturally shy child was threatened and terrorized into developing a social disorder. With more understanding parents, Hwan-ki may have grown up quiet and unwilling to draw extra attention to himself, but perhaps he wouldn’t have withdrawn so completely into himself.

I’ve begun to like Ro-woon, and I credit it entirely to the increasing glimpses into her past with her family. Previously, I felt angered by Ro-woon’s obstinate insistence that Hwan-ki was a psychopath, but in this episode, I could easily forgive her leaps of assumption. She’s naive, but not stupid. She’s fixated upon the idea that Hwan-ki was responsible for Ji-hye’s death, but she isn’t ignoring the signs that Hwan-ki isn’t the man she thought he was. Which of us is reasonable in the middle of blinding hatred? I like that her growth and awareness is gradual.

What concerns me is that she seems to be developing a crush on Woo-il. Much like Hwan-ki, I view Woo-il as an attention seeker who uses his charm to manipulate people. He has a language of phrases and gestures that are used in perfect constructions to get the result he wants. The way he says “Do this for my sake” makes every request personal, intimate. The way he puts a hand on people’s shoulder, making them feel like the sole focus of his attention. The smiles he flashes and the ambiguous way he states things so that they can be taken another way, with no blame on him.

I’ve repeatedly thought that he could have easily chosen to dispel the ridiculous rumors about Hwan-ki, but chose not to. He says just enough for people to remember that he defended his friend, but nothing more. In a way, I think Woo-il believes that he should have been born with everything that Hwan-ki possesses but can’t fully utilize. From Hwan-ki’s perspective, his friend has not only taken over the company, he’s actively trying to take over Hwan-ki’s place in his own family.

This episode undoubtedly had the best ending yet. I’ve been waiting for someone to point out the obvious, even if they knew nothing about Hwan-ki’s disorder — that just maybe, he’s afraid of people. I suppose Kyo-ri never really understood Hwan-ki’s confession, she was just touched by his apology and the flowers. I’m glad that Ro-woon was the first to make the connection. Being prejudiced against Hwan-ki and laboring under none of the fear the rest of the staff feels, Ro-woon has been observing him closer than anyone else.

Whether she’s willing to admit it or not, she already knows that he’s nothing like he’s been painted. One hopes that Drunk Ro-woon’s insights are remembered by Sober Ro-woon the next morning. For now, I’m cautiously optimistic that this is a well matched pair, after all.

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Every time he pulls his hoodie over his head my heart breaks. Because I do the exact same thing when I’m feeling depressed or when I want to avoid people.
When he froze on stage, my heart broke. Because I’ve written a character just like that, had to put myself in her shoes to get the emotion out into the writing, and holy shit man, I can feel it watching him.
When he flashed back to his father yelling at him, my heart broke! How you could see that he’d been shutting himself off at such a young age!
Every time someone jumps to a conclusion about him, or pushes him in the wrong way, my heart breaks! He knows where he is weak, he doesn’t enjoy it, he wants to beat it. But I hope the others around him slowly begin to understand his predicament else they’re gonna continue unintentionally hurting him and continue breaking my heart. Obviously one of the core conflicts for him is going to be facing all his unbearable feelings, all the things he goes out of his way to avoid feeling, but I’d like it to be in a way he can grow from it rather than being shoved into the limelight because our heroine thought she was getting petty oblivious revenge. I think we will see that. I’m betting on decent character development anyway, the way this show has been set up implies so.

Where else did my heart break? Woo Il and Ra Won had a couple of really great lines to Hwan Ki this episode, RW’s “If you just stand there and watch nothing will happen” for example, but like, he WANTS to do thingS? He wants to act!!! It’s just hard! And every time he tries something bad happens and then he retreats again. And I just UGH. The look on my face in those moments must be so tragic. Why must I feel so many feely feels things? Look at my heart, Hwan Ki? You see? It’s all in little pieces because of you! Because I get what you’re feeling, it hits so close to home, it’s scary.
Also bloody Woo Il and his slithery, slippery words. Always twisting something to benefit him. *mutters* I just want to strangle him.

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“Just by watching,” she tells Hwan-ki, “you can never protect anyone.”

Thats the thing - you can't guilt introverts into becoming social. i suffer from social anxiety and its hard to explain to people when they give useless advice like - just make an effort, just try, don't stand there be proactive etc etc ...

its the same here. its not as if he is unaware. she is not saying anything groundbreaking. he is probably the most self aware person in the building but you really really cannot just push introverts into action. it doesn't work like that.

i can totally empathise with hwan ki. that scene when he was pushed into presentation, it just broke my heart. there are so many things about this show that hit so close for me. But if they are going to have the heroine bulldoze the hero into 'discovering his true potential' ... urghh... i want to see him take baby steps but i'm pretty sure i'm not going to like how they go about it.

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Exactly! I'm not the introvertish type but i've have a niece who is and believe me i don't see her changing next year. She feels dissappointments and failure a hundred times so she retreats whenever she feels she has 'failed'. If the writer goes the 'love-makes-him-a-jolly-good-extrovert' route, im gonna break something. Hwan-ki's employees have to understand and protect him first before he can take those baby steps

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I have the same concerns as you don't worry. I am very aware you can't push someone to socialize, hyper aware even.
So far I like that they're taking his character in baby steps, and I don't like that the other characters at this point in time seem to be trying to force him to do things.
I am HOPING that particularly RW will come to realise that she can't push him to do things.
On the one hand the set up of the show seems to be that they will bring him out into the open in a way that is natural for him. On the other hand, I know that Kdrama's can screw with what was originally a good idea and fall back on tropes, and that it could still swing the other way and ruin the character. But at this stage it's too early to tell and I like where they're taking HK's character so far.

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Your second paragraph hits home so much! People tell me to not be depressed, or to just socialize more to "fix" my anxiety issues. Sorry, but can you tell me HOW that's supposed to just *poof* make me all better? I can sympathize with Hwan-ki so much (while not to the extreme portrayed here, I know how it feels). I have over-analyzed situations and relived missteps before. It gets to feeling like the tiniest mistake is a huge, soul-wrecking event. Then I look at it again and chastise myself for thinking anything I do is important enough to warrant notice from anybody. Before long, I'm so worried and unconfident that I'm paralyzed by my own crazy thoughts. All from a tiny mistake! My mind becomes a prison. I know if I've done wrong; for it to be pointed out or seen by others, it's just that much worse. So HOW can "just getting out there" be a solution? Yup. I get Hwan-ki, as I'm sure many others do. So much heartbreak from this episode alone, which makes me still want to hug him and give him a huge mug of cocoa with loads of extra marshmallows. I'm waiting for the next episodes to see how they approach his phobia(s). It can go either really well or really terribly. Stay true to the character and allow him to slowly develop skills to cope with the world outside his penthouse door!

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"...My mind becomes a prison..."

As I read those lines, i was like "EXACTLY" .
While I'm not exactly like Hwan-Ki, i can relate to/understand some stuff that he experiences and your comment too just had me thinking.

I never thought of myself as an introvert...like, sometimes its hard to meet new people but then there are people i get comfy with eventually...
And that feeling of stuff you do not being important... 진짜 알아요!

And thrn overthinking.....hoooomygooosshhh!!! I do that so much, its virtually a habit of mine to second guess myself....(has happened as i type in this comment)

But then, when i was younger i wasnt like this...not quite...can one get more introverted as they grow older?

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The only thing i'm curious about is how they'll start to date since he is an introvert

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I'm not sure I understand your question.

Introverts have friends--fewer than extroverts and perhaps more precious because they are so hard to replace, they date, they marry, they have children, stay married or divorce and they die--pretty much like, you know, normal people.

Hwan-ki is more than a typical introvert. He has a disorder, either psychological or neurological.

But even people with disorders, date, marry, etc.

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Introvert and extrovert are kinda personality. While extrovert more sociable and like in the crowded or attention, introvert more comfortable being alone or with someone they're familiar with. But everything beside that are same. They're dating, married has friends etc. It just the way how they spend their time. Harry Potter is an example of introvert while the twins bro of Ron are extrovert type.

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I think the dating part is not a priority because of the revenge mission she has for her sister. I find it interesting that it seems he knows she is there for revenge he mentioned that at the presentation

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wow. what an episode. he really had a terrible childhood. his parents didn't even try to help him. instead they pushed him into the social world without even checking if he could handle it. most chaebols are always like that. they want their children to become every magazine's front page. they want attention drawn to them and their companies and children. I am not saying it's wrong but at least before you push your child to the crowd you will check how much he can handle. I really felt bad for little Hk. such a shy boy......
waiting for the next episode.......

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Yeah I agree, his parents werent even supportive, like forreals! How can you be ashamed when your kid is feeling so embarassed on stage.

Even if you feel that the kid embarrassed you/ made you lose face i mean come on THEYRE A KID! Youre supposed to teach them and support them and let them know what theyre feeling and how to deal with it.

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Everytime Woo-il puts his hand on someones shoulder it instantly makes me feel uncomfortable

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He is creepy.ro won doesn't know what she's getting into.she is too friendly with him.what a fake judge of character.she trusts the killer and dislikes the innocent one

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I'm sorry but I don't quite agree. When I try to get to learn a person I don't jump to conclusions before really knowing this person.Regardless of how he/she might seem in the beginning.

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"When I try to get to learn a person".
She is not trying to "know" him for fun.
She believes that he's responsible for her sister's suicide. In part she is not wrong.
Actually she is giving him too much leeway for a supposed creep.

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I think you're overlooking the fact that HK has a psychological problem, which he's getting professional help for. As for Ro-woon's sister's suicide: HK actually went out of his way to make sure she didn't go to Ro-woon's play cause he knew she'd bump into Woo-il and his sister. And the details on her suicide are still sketchy as we don't know what she wanted HK to tell her?! And I'm not sure they mentioned how he knew she was going to kill herself. The fact that he still hasn't told her family makes perfect sense, as imagine if this were real life how'd you explain someone's suicide to a complete stranger? 'Oh, I'm sorry, I'm your daughter's boss and she killed herself because her boyfriend is dating my sister?'.

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Also, his sister is dating the jerk. She seems like a sweetheart, he's probably trying to protect her too.

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I'm glad they're skipping a week for Lunar new year. I'm a little conflicted about this series right now. I do find Woo-il so incredibly shady I want to smack him, and I'm having a hard time relating to our protagonists because I'm finding them painful to watch. I do think the acting on the part of the actor who plays Hwan-ki to be very good (I wish he were this good back in Arang & The Magistrate, but hey, experience).

It's just ... I want to slap almost everyone on this show and that does not make for a good entertainment experience.

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i'm not disagreeing with you honestly, but in what way do you wish he was better in arang? i felt like his lack of expressions fit that character since he was so cold & strange.

also i watched the first week but just read recaps this week & i still feel like slapping everyone LOL glad i didn't waste my time watching...

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Arang was my first viewing of Yeon Woo-Jin and his character there was riveting to me. There was such a sense of duality about his character and I credit YWJ for creating that feeling. I kept hoping for more for him! I knew then I would watch anything that actor did because I was left with such conflicted feelings about him. His were the best scenes in When a Man Loves and then came Marriage Not Dating which just put me over the top! I'm not going to remember Divorce Lawyer tho.

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I love him in Arang, too! IMO, he did a great job with a character that could be one dimensional if played by actor with less skill and depth.

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ARANG AND THE MAGISTRATE was the first role I saw Yeon Woo-Jin play, too. Joo-Wal's inexpressiveness was apropos, given his employment and how he came to the job. But when he finally remembered Lee Seo-rim... Dang! YWJ really made me feel for this creepy guy.

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Exactly! I thought Yeon Woo-Jin was superb in Arang. And why did I think that? Because any actor who can make a serial killer sympathetic is giving a heck of a performance.

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This drama should have been titled 'introverted boss who breaks hearts'. Then i would have been prepared for my heart to get broken. I didn't prepare. Seriously Woo-il is scarier than any drama villian i'v seen in a while, i mean, other villians are so in your face, giving you creepy smiles and all but this guy is the worst. He is like poison, i always feel like slapping him whenever he's with Hwan-ki, having a friend like that will make whatever phobia you have to get worse.

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oh thank god im not the only one irritated with Woo-il. i feel like reaching into the screen and punch him. i can't even remember when was the last time i feel so violent towards a K-drama character. It's kinda a pity cos i like his face.

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"Introverted Boss

One day the clueless, loud and disrespectful heroine meets with a decent, calm, and introverted guy. The guy also has social anxiety and taking professional help about it. This drama is the journey of the heroine as she grows to learn how to act properly in social encounters, how not to judge everyone, and be respectful to others. "

I think the premise of the drama should be like this. Because it looks like the drama shows that the introversy of the boss should change, and it can change with a pushy girl. The way I see it, being an introvert is a character trait. The boss sure needs help for his severe social anxiety, but not for his introvertedness and not in a "love changed me" kind of help. He needs to seek professional help. The one who can use a "love changed me" type of character development is the heroine.

Also, even the heroine changes and boss gets over his social phobia, the two are a NOTP for me. She can change to be more considerate for others but she is so outgoing and this is her character that wont change. As an borderline introvert, I cannot imagine having a party animal type of boyfriend. The two character traits are just not a match.

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Agree.
AgrEE.
AGREE.

I dislike the female lead's behavior so much I can't watch.
Her cluelessness makes her a bully.
And I don't really care about her intent.
I'm reading until she gets a clue and the drama becomes bearable.

BTW I don't mean other folks should share my perspective, especially since it isn't what the creative team was going for.

But as a territorial introvert with an intense sense of privacy watching her makes me uncomfortable.

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This. I agree 100%.

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Me too.

Completely.

I'm a borderline introvert, and while I deal well with social situation, pushy extroverts like the lead girl make me run for cover.

She is indeed a bully.

Avoid. Avoid. Avoid.

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Totally agree! The female lead pisses me off so much with her inconsideration, disrespect and extreme assumptions. Furthermore that fact that she still keeps snooping after being caught in the act speaks volumes about her character. GAHHH!!!

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I think it also tells us a lot about what the writer thinks is permissible and forgivable.

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I feel the same way about the otp. For me, personally as an introvert, I don't think they would balance each other out. What he needs is someone who will quietly uplift him, not aggressively push their opinions on him.

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Agreed. As an anxious introvert,i painfully steer away from people like RW.who push and push but you're too polite to tell them to back off or else you'll get to hurt their feelings.

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Bully was the word I was looking for when thinking about why RW's character bothered me so much. People like her who don't think and just see the world through their needs annoy me to hell. HK is such a considerate person and RW is so thoughtless. Plus she bullies everyone she meets! I am so torn about this drama. I loved Another Oh Hae Young and Marriage not Dating. The heroines were the high point of the dramas and I'm so disappointed with the characterization of the heroine in this drama.

Maybe the writer is a introvert and has only had experience with pushy extroverts, so the characterization of the lead gal follows from that.

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I love how RW begins to understand HK by doing exactly what HK does best - quietly observing people and watching them from a distance. Her version may be of the sneaky, scheming kind, though, but at least she's not in-your-face as always. I'm glad she now knows he actually cares about his people, just not overtly. She has a long way to go before coming close to being my favorite Kdrama heroine, but she is growing on me.

And HK, keep those dance breaks coming.

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I totally understand Hwan Ki's character and feel for him. He's so aware of other people he's nervous of them. I do the exact thing he does; his intuition makes him an introvert. But I also feel for him so much, and can't help but think that so many of these characters are mean to him. I don't really like Ro-woon yet. Anyways, I'm glad to finally have such a cool kdrama hero to connect with like Hwan Ki. :)

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My goodness Ro Woon bothers me. As I watch and even read the recaps I start to feel more and more trapped and claustrophobic by her behaviour towards Hwang Gi. It drives me insane! More and more I think (even though I know it's actually quite debiliatating) - Um why can't he just be left alone to do his thing?

Woo Il your the Korean man version of SWF. I'm so glad HG is onto your narcisisstic personality. If only he can save his family and company from your evil machinations. It could have been the perfect partnership if not for Woo Il's narcissism.

So Ro Woon has always been a thoughtless, spoiled brat and that hasn't changed.

The people that I care about in this drama are the quiet, timid, sad ones. Like Ro Woon's sister, the secretary, Hwang Gi's sisters and Hwang Gi himself.

Also how many jobs to you have to get fired from before you learn you shoudln't skateboard inside your office? Apparently none.

I just despise Ro Woon. I try to feel sympathetic because she's thinks he killed her sister and she wants to expose him, but her behaviour doens't just affect Hwang Gi but everyone at Silent Monster.

Also to everyone in the company, if it wasn't clear before that Hwang Gi is the brain of 'Brain' will it be clearer now that Woo Il can't stay away from Silent Monsters business? I kept waiting for someone to ask him why he wasn't putting a bid together from 'Brain'.

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Ro Woon fits the, "Act first, Think Later" behaviour from some extremely extroverted people hahaha, in conclusion... yeah, she's annoying.

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My heart hurt seeing Hwan Gi freeze up in the presentation ;-; it hurts even more to see the people around him not understanding him its so sad ;-; I'm glad Ro Woon is finally seeing Hwan Gi as who he really is let's just hope she doesn't forget when she becomes sober.

I cannot stand Woo Il and I just want Ro Woon very far away from him he's honestly the worst type of person I wondered why Hwan Gi kept him as a friend but I know now that it's mostly because of his sister.

I hope we get to sww cute moments between Ro Woon and Hwan Gi soon

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Thanks for the recap.

I'm sure her behavior is all for the greater good, but I heartily dislike Ro-woon.

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I am also an introvert, so I totally feel for Hwan-ki. Fortunately, my introversion is not extreme, in that I can somewhat interact well enough with others. However, like Hwan-ki, I have an invisible border, that if someone inadvertently crosses, would lead to some awkward shuffling on my end. I think I am also better at writing my thoughts down than verbally expressing them.

That said, I really wish this drama didn't have to focus on a romance that could 'change' the lead male. Because in reality, introverts also fall in love without having to change their core being.

This would've had more impact if it's a story of how an introverted boss brought out the best in his small team, and how they conquered the giants by working through--and despite--their insecurities together. Well, we are still in the early parts of the drama, so I hope the trajectory will improve in the succeeding episodes.

I hope Hwan-ki overcomes his paralyzing fear and the trauma his unsupportive family has caused him all those years.

I also hope each member of his ragtag team, including the female lead, will have their growth arcs as the drama progresses. Hwaiting!

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Every episode from here forward needs Hwan Ki busting sweet dance moves to kpop. I need this in my life.

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Yes! So much awesome there!

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Anyone notice Yoohee's family picture. Kim Ji Suk is the husband, isn't he?

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hahaha yes!!! i just wanted to write the same - a happy ever after XD

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And her apartment is Jinsang Apartment, lol.

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Really? Totally missed it. How awesome.
I loved him in that. I loved THEM.

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Oh, man. I do hope they won't make Hwan Ki turn into an extrovert at the end.

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Completely random, I know, but the song the boss dances to (Troublemaker) has a lot to answer for - it launched my obsession with everything Korean!

It led to K-pop (one half of the Troublemaker duo was then-member of BEAST), then naturally, K-dramas (when I learned that BEAST member Doojoon did dramas like 'Splish splash love' and 'Let's Eat'!)

And the rest, as they say, is history...

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Hwan-ki is the boss, so that gives it a different dynamic (one in which Rowun is completely out of line) but it's not actually unreasonable to think that someone who works for a PR firm should be able to address the public.

I'm curious as to how much effort people think that others are supposed to put into "understanding" another individuals disorders--particularly internalized, emotional ones that are not articulated. Should one be expected to do research on best practices for another person's disorders/challenges? More importantly, how much should other people be expected to "care" about how you're affected by your disorder?

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I struggle with finding the answer to that too. When is it the introvert's responsibility to step up (yes, it's hard AND unfair, but we work with the cards we're dealt with) and when should other people draw boundaries?

I think the only solution is mental health awareness. More people should be aware between the difference between "shyness", introversion, social phobia, etc. They don't have to adjust their whole life to accomodate the sufferer, but they can at least NOT do unnecessary things that will make the anxiety worse. Case in point: the parents who think they can pressure/scare the shyness out of Hwan-ki.

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Claps to you, mary!

MH Awareness is everything. However, even knowing symptoms, because people shouldn't diagnosis people, no one will ever know the extent of the disorder one is struggling with until they share it.

I think the greatest outcome is Hwan-ki becoming confident enough in his mental health state to tell people. Not discuss, but just an announcement, i.e. when he gets 5 new workers.

It's taken me over a decade to be honest and many months after my diagnosis to be willing to share.

So as a person who pro everyone's mental health, I would be proud and content with that devrlopment.

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festerfaster - Thank you for the lovely recap!

We are being brought so painfully into Boss's disorder. I wanted to crawl under the same rock with him so I could try to calm him down.
Let's all buy him a big rock where he can safely stay until he feels it's safe to come out.

I like RW more, too. Though when she has her pony up and she pouts, she could be 14 years old. Not sure if that is what they want, or not. She looked a lot more mature with her hair down.

Even though Park Young Kyu was in the last episode, I keep feeling Protect the Boss vibes from this ep. Remember how Poor Cha Ji Heon (Ji Sung) had to deal with anxiety and figured out how he could eventually do presentations? I thought that show handled his development well, no overnight cures, but lots and lots of work on his part. I hope this drama follows the same path for HK.

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I love this drama so much. I'm sad we're not getting any this week because of the holiday. I hope all of Asia enjoys time with their family.

I know people are on the fence about it or feel the drama they came for isn't the drama they are watching or the femail lead is too much ..... too much what idk in specific. But I will say she's very present.

My expectations were a slice of life drama focusing on the conflict between roles, rules, and you. Subtle conflict to massive ones.

Let's address the fact that my preferred title is My Sensite Boss. Shy is okay but doesn't hit the real issue. But it's much better than introverted.

My diagnosis/character analysis/solutions

Hwan-ki - a man who as a child was a shy introvert who was hyper self-conscious. Depending on his mbti, he could have been deeply feeling then. If however 5 year old Hwan-ki may have only was tortured thoughts, 7-present age Hwan-ki also had to deal with being highly sensitive in a low sensitive environment. And his 20+ years developing and growing agoraphobia.

As an adult, He shies away from people. He gets energy from being alone. Others drain him. Another reason they drain him is because he's playing with a bottomless pit of thought every time he goes out. Finally, he goes somewhere safe and allows him to feel the emotions, pain, awkwardness he has gained from the last venture out. And the only thing he can hope for is one less bad thought on the next outing, whenever that may be.

Which I totally get. I'm not a introvert. I'm slow-to-warm. I was hyper self-conscious and sensitive from age 3. I don't have to deal with the shame of not being like everyone else because my family ranges between outgoing introverts to self-conscious extroverts. And even with friends and acquaintances, they know me not talk doesn't mean much other than I'm not in the mood. So while I'm not an all black wearing 24 hour night owl, I do understand the desire to hermit and stay within the zone that has semi protected you for 30 years.

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Now moving on to rest of the cast.

Ro Woon - a full on extrovert (not derogatory, I love my extroverts. I'd be stuck without them.) She is outgoing. She is brash & rash. She's young. Most likey, her life until now has included shy extraverts who powere through, extraverts, outgoing introverts, or even plain introverts. But I don't get why she's worse than any other female lead we've seen.

She lives in doubt of her own talents and usefulness. She never got her achievmeets recognized. And the only person who cared for her (I know her parents love her but it's different) committed suicide without a reason or signs.

~~~
I have to interrupt myself to tell you more about me so you'll have a better understand of my read on her.

I'm a bipolar introvert - I don't say that joking. I have bipolar ii and it affects my introversion. From "wow, I haven't left the house in 4 days" to "its only been 40+ hours since that person messaged/called" to "I wonder why I can't put my hand down in class" to mania-lead "they letting me lead this conversation. I have been talking for full minutes. Or people pop in but I'm the main here."

I have friends who lean a little more towards Hwan-ki, again because of mental illnesses. I don't fully understand why it takes them so long to do things it takes me a while to do.

I mean, yes I hate let's say a solo presentation. If it's a topic that's new and interesting that helps. But I will procrastinate, do some research, procrastinate, procrastinate again, research, tyou it up and hope all go well.

My friends who have been through this endless times and would be willing to give me the gist lecture the day it was annouced and know their habits to fight them don't do this. They procrastinate, they procrastinate on the previous procrastination method, they sleep, they read, they cook, they bake, they research for 20 minutes, write up. And get mostly decent average. But what always gets them is the fact that they have to do it.

I just don't understand. I understand initial procrastination. It's my motto - p, do, and reward with p. But if my task is going to take me 6 hours I'm good with the system. If theirs is going too maybe top an hour, procrastinate once, finish, and don't think about it until the assignment.

Even within the introversion umbrella there is confusion and feeling like the other person is an alien.

Second, I have had the closest person to me die. The only person who knew what I needed before I did. The only person I never doubted her unconditional love for me. Even when I questioned my existence and how much a burden it was, I knew if others felt that way she would never. But leaving me would never be a light concern. The C Beast got her. But even dying in a hospital, half the woman she was, she made sure to write me a letter.

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I had the blessing of a decent size hospital stay to prepare. Ro Woon didn't get signs from the person she knew the most. I'm sure she knows eonnie leaving her wasn't a light decision. But there is the deception angle. What was going on to cause that to happen? Why didn't you talk to me, your sister-friend forever? And why Christmas? Why from your building?

Out of all the skyscrapers in the city. Ones that might have been quicker, less emotional, more epic. Whatever eonnie was going for. No, something happened her to cause the death.

Having dealt with suicide too long in my life and even having one happen but not close to me, I know there are signs. I can tell when my friends are off. When they seem to be fading, especially when you try to plan things. I can feel when they are in emotional upheaval. Between my relatives & friends I've heard of their survival through more than I can count on 2 hands. If I add the times, I've gotten sooooooo very close, adding feet might not be enough.

But I give out signs. Throughout the years, if I ever even got to the attempt stage survival or not, at least 15 people I know would have said there were signs.

No this suicide wasn't "normal". It would be related to depression & such but it wasn't a suicidal ideation sufferers suicide. It was a last ditch effort. Why? To get away from this company and family in a more permanent way walking out the door and cutting all tied

Combine my closest person with no signs and just a sudden death, I'd be blinded to a lot for my answers. She's doing better than I would. (I would be half of what she was done but I wouldn't be keeping as mentally sane.)

But this is a new ballcourt. She's never met a sensitive, shy, agoraphobia, introvert. She can't read him as he is because she hasn't been given enough signs for someone slightly unaware that all those less-valued traitsactually exist in real people.

Uri eomma lady needs the rule/role book to being a working mom. But more than her titles, being who she is. She needs that balance.

Since I love slice of life, grow with them stories, I can't wait until they start solving this. Hopefully with my solutions.

1) no magic fix. tell the truth you're comfortable with "I have a hard time with groups. I tend to talk myself out of decisions." - this rrevelation is great for his team but moving forward in life, let's skip eps 2-4 all the time. Be aware of how far the next goal is but also accomplishments along the way.

2) Ro Woon learns to deal with people different then her. That seems easy and immature. But her 24 year old self isn't out of step with college graduates or even corporate bosses. Learning a person's hang ups and helping them plan to make room for them or slowly eliminate them is a talent I think she's capable of having no magic cure

Eomma has had a taste of work. She loves her kids, she'll find a balance. Working with this...

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Just making it a stand alone comment.

This is the new Flower Boy Next Door that ice been waiting for.

Can Park Shin Hye leave the penthouse? And not for his parents or squash.

Can Yoon Shi Yoon tone down the full panda suit she was approaching him in and start off with a hat? Slowly giving him fluffy shields.

Can Kim Ji Hoon realize their non-method method are flawed? And help him with any of the knowledge they've gathered taking care of the hermit for 2+ years?

Still watching FBND after this but it's meeting my needs.
I identify with almost everyone, I don't trust you good looking hair up dude. And so far I trust that even the "side" characters won't be 1 dimensional.

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This is the episode that finally sold me on the show and got me off the fence. I was close to giving up because the first few episodes were SO HARD to get through. Watching Hwan Ki be completely misunderstood and Ro Woon being completely aggravatingly annoying and pushy and oblivious was making me so uncomfortable. But this episode broke my heart for Hwan Ki, and like so many others here, I "got it" because I've been there too. I'm a total shy introvert (not to his extent though!) and I knew exactly what he would have been feeling. I just want his employees to see him for who he really is (and not this distorted image they've created in their minds) and support him. I, too, do not want to see him be magically transformed into an extrovert. That would never happen IRL. I want to see realistic growth for him. Now I'm hoping to see some character growth for Ro Woon also, because she still has the power to break this show for me.

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Hello Beanies! This is my very first post on this site! Since I started watching Asian Dramas this has become my favorite site.

Now, hopefully someone can explain this to me. Its possible there was an explanation but Ro Woon makes me so cringey I could have blocked it. Why does she think Hwan Ki had something to do with her sisters suicide? It would seem that--especially after meeting his current secretary--that she would see that him having anything to do with her sister *at all* is unlikely.

What I'm finding that I dislike the most about her (and there is really just so very many things to chose (choose? I always get those mixed up) from) is that she doesn't seem to be learning--internalizing if you will--anything that she learns. In one episode (ep 3, for me) she seems to have had her hate-blinders removed and seems to understand him a bit more than before. And then in this episode, she's right back to where she was in the beginning bashing him relentlessly, literally.

I do like his former secretary but, why won't she speak up whenever her coworkers start going in on Hwan Ki? Is she introverted as well? He came to visit her in the hospital and told her with words that he has a social disorder that makes it hard for him to communicate. When everyone is going in on him how come she can't share this bit of info with the crowd? Or that skeeve Woo Il--if he weren't such a skeeve could have introduced the new boss to his employees with a, "he has problems communicating. Give him time and space" but he's a skeeve who's playing a long game (whatever that may be) and it suits his needs for employees and friends and everyone else to believe the worst there is to believe about Hwan Ki.

I do have a question about Hwan Ki. I know that he's an extreme introvert--but, when his staff leaves for the night couldn't he compose an email of what he wants/expects them to do the following day? Go over it as many times as his panic needs him to, hit send, panic some more, and then let the next day come? He almost wrote the email to Ro Woon to fire her that time but panicked and couldn't go through with it. I attributed it to her being right in front of him, though.

Sorry if I mentioned other episodes too often.

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I guess we just don't know yet why exactly she thinks Hwan Ki is responsible for her sister's suicide. I relaid on the drama to slowly show us the whole picture, episode by episode.
But so far... Maybe it's because he's a chaebol with a penthouse of his own (unlike Woo Il), maybe because the company rep came to the mourning to give her family money which seemed like a bribe of sorts considering not a single co-worker came along and there were no news regarding this incident => they hide something; maybe she just needed to focus on someone, to blame someone for that suicide because she just couldn't cope on her own, and this hatred gave her enough anger and motivation to keep going.

And about Hwan Ki not giving tasks to his employees - I think he can't do that? Like he never asked Kyo Ri to bring him coffee, he doesn't feel comfortable to order people around and thinks it's better to do things on his own. Before he was forced to directly lead a group of people, he relaid on his 'friend', Woo Il, to do all the bossing. That's just my thoughts though.

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I too am introverted and the biggest problem I see is that there isn't a single person in Hwan Ki's corner. Not one person who coaches him, tells him he can do it, AND respects him when he fails. Failure is OK. But I haven't seen a character who made him feel that way. Even his nice sister and the psychologist put pressure on him to succeed at overcoming his illness, even if it is well meaning.

The key thing he needs is a voice that encourages him when he takes iniative. Woo Il is so gross for the way he gets into Hwan Ki's head and discourages him when he tries to protect his employees. I can actually see Hwan Ki take three steps back after a much crucial step forward. Woo Il is a terrible friend (especially for letting his friend be blamed for his own wrong doing).

I'm most curious to see how Ro Won's discovery of her boss's social anxiety will change the way she treats him. Will it help her come to terms with what happened to her sister? Will she be the gentle encouragement Hwan Ki needs to overcome himself?

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I'm just curious about one thing. Isn't his former Secretay, Gyori knows that he has difficulties in communicating or socializing? He told her when she was at the hospital, but why does it seems like, Gyori knows nothing? Like she doesn't know why their boss is like that. I know he told her to keep it a secret, but shouldn't she understand his situation on that "Presentation" for the bidding? That he find it difficult to do it? Shouldn't she atleast take his side? Just curious ☺

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