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Because This Life Is Our First: Episode 2

As our heroine is forced to face new challenges, she wonders if she’s been foolishly running down a tunnel with no end, and finds herself alone and tired. However, support comes from an unexpected source, as she comes to rely on her new housemate without consciously realizing it herself. Sometimes home is a physical place, but often what makes a place home is something intangible and beyond the four walls that cover you.

 
Episode 2: “Because this is my first kiss”

Ji-ho thanks Se-hee for telling her about the neocortex, even though she feels like she’s already failed in this life. She offers a handshake, and Se-hee accepts, wishing Ji-ho luck since everyone is going through life for the first time anyways.

Se-hee gives her a small smile, and in the spur of the moment, Ji-ho closes the gap between them and kisses him. The bus arrives, and she quickly gets on, leaving Se-hee staring after her in a daze—he’s just missed the last bus.

By the time Se-hee arrives home, Ji-ho is asleep, and in the morning, her room is empty when he wakes up.

Se-hee’s boss and friend Sang-gu calls, begging him to accompany him on his blind date today, but Se-hee flatly refuses. Sang-gu doesn’t understand why he won’t come since he knows Se-hee is just eating pre-made lunch boxes by himself, so Se-hee explains that these moments are like an oasis for him since he deals with people like Sang-gu all week.

At the store, Ji-ho shops for cleaning supplies while talking to her friend Su-ji, who tries to set Ji-ho up on a blind date since she has never dated, let alone kissed anyone before. Ji-ho accidentally lets slip that kissing isn’t a big deal, and Su-ji asks if she’s secretly seeing someone.

Ji-ho avoids answering the question and frantically hangs up. Returning to her task, she picks up an expensive tile and grout cleaner and buys it as a gift for her landlord.

In the park outside the apartment building, Ji-ho watches a couple kissing and remembers last night’s event, much to her embarrassment. She’s thankful that he was a complete stranger, and misses Se-hee passing right by her.

Ji-ho gets on the elevator and holds the door open as a man runs up to her. Once the doors close, both passengers look at each other for the first time, and immediately freeze. Not saying a word, Ji-ho and Se-hee slowly face the front and stand in awkward silence until they reach the fourth floor.

As Se-hee shuffles out of the elevator, Ji-ho crumples to the ground, mortified by the unlikely coincidence. Realizing that the apartment is the best place to avoid Se-hee, she decides to run home and notices the landlord’s large shoes in the entry.

She jumps up to greet her landlord for the first time, but is in utter shock when she sees Se-hee standing in front of her. They both ask the other why they’re here, and the truth dawns on him first. Ji-ho thinks that she’s in the wrong apartment, but Se-hee calls her number and hesitantly asks if she’s Yoon Ji-ho.

Meanwhile, Ho-rang’s boyfriend Won-seok prepares a hot towel to wash her feet, and she playfully tells him that her period just ended. They eagerly jump into bed for some fun times, but are interrupted by two phone calls, informing them of the housemate gender mishap.

Won-seok meets with Sang-gu, and both parties accuse the other for misleading them about the housemate/landlord’s gender. Sang-gu says that Ji-ho was described as a handsome former smoker, and Won-seok points out that Se-hee was called a quiet cat owner. Though both descriptions are technically true, it doesn’t rectify their current situation, and the two men slump back in their chairs.

Ji-ho and Se-hee return each other’s identification cards and explain that the names caused their misunderstanding. Suddenly Ji-ho’s stomach growls, and she desperately tries to hide it with a coughing fit. Unsure of what to do, Se-hee excuses himself because of “work” and quickly leaves the apartment. Alone, Ji-ho rolls around on the floor in humiliation while Cat watches her.

Ji-ho eats at the restaurant where Ho-rang works, and feeling guilty, Ho-rang blames Se-hee for having a pretty name. Su-ji points out that pretty names don’t belong exclusively to women, and Ho-rang agrees since Su-ji also has a pretty name, making Ji-ho laugh.

While Ho-rang grabs her water, Ji-ho tries to tell Su-ji about her kiss mistake, but her friend jumps to conclusions, asking if the landlord tried to hit on her. Ho-rang returns right then, and her two friends bombard her with questions about Se-hee. Shaking her head, Ji-ho tells them to forget it and resumes eating.

At the office, Se-hee watches Sang-gu eat Chinese takeout since his blind date bailed, and though Sang-gu tries to ignore him, he finally cracks under Se-hee’s silent glare. He asks what Se-hee wants from him, offering his cheek for him to hit.

Sang-gu can’t believe Se-hee didn’t call his housemate even once to check everything, and Se-hee berates him since the company vision is about dating someone via data, not phone calls or feelings. Se-hee says that the data was perfect.

More importantly, Ji-ho kept all his rules making her the perfect housemate, but Sang-gu points out that it was all under the assumption that Ji-ho was a man. As Sang-gu badgers him about whether Ji-ho is pretty, Se-hee gets a text message from her, telling him that she’ll sleep over at a friend’s place tonight.

Su-ji drives Ji-ho to her place for the night, but a call from her boss forces her to go back to work even though she could finish the task tomorrow. Ji-ho muses, “If it’s something you have to do, it’s better to finish it today.”

She asks Su-ji to pull over at the bus stop, and her friend advises Ji-ho to get rid of Se-hee if he dares to make a move. Watching Su-ji drive away, Ji-ho admits that it was her who made the move.

Se-hee arrives home, and to his surprise, Ji-ho is waiting for him. They sit awkwardly on the sofa, keeping a good distance away from each other, and she apologizes for kissing him at the bus stop.

Se-hee calls the kiss an offside offense, and Ji-ho asks if it angered him. He calmly explains that anger involves emotions, whereas forced contact causes people to feel perplexed and unpleasant. Ji-ho’s eyes grow wide at his words, and she stammers about not intending to attack him.

Ji-ho understands that she should leave right away, but she has nowhere to go right now. She promises to move out once she gets work, and apologizes one more time before scurrying to her room.

Ji-ho emails a drama director and sends another copy of her edited script, and closes her laptop with a sigh. Across the hall, Se-hee locks his door before going to bed, which Ji-ho hears, making her hang her head in shame. Heh.

In the morning, Ji-ho groggily answers a call, and bolts up when she realizes it’s the director. Rushing to the meeting place, Ji-ho checks her reflection before going in, but stops in her tracks when she spots her crush of three years, assistant director Yong-seok.

The meeting goes well as the director tells Ji-ho that he wants to make her youth drama Turtle Gosiwon, and afterwards, she relocates to Yong-seok’s car where he suggests some changes to the script. He thinks a Seoul National University graduate wouldn’t have such unrealistic dreams of becoming a writer, since becoming a writer is like walking in a dark tunnel.

Back home, Ji-ho looks at her old Seoul University notebook, and puts on her glasses to work on editing her script. She spends all day and night editing—her room growing messier as time passes—and starts to clean the bathroom grout to help dispel her writer’s block.

Ji-ho ends up cleaning every inch of the apartment, and the tasks help her with her writing as she runs back and forth between editing and cleaning. Finished with the script, Ji-ho cheers and plops down on her bed for a well-deserved rest.

At work, Se-hee receives a text from the bank, detailing his total loan amount and installments on his home. He writes down all his expenses and income for the month on a board, calculating that he’s around 300,000 won short this time. Thus, Se-hee cuts down on his expenses from insurance to food, but can’t bring himself to cut down on the cost of cat food.

Sang-gu enters the office, asking Se-hee what he’s doing, and comments on how it’s unbelievable that someone like Se-hee lives with another person, thinking him not capable of it. Se-hee rationally explains his plans for the future, which include his retirement and spending the rest of his life in that house, but to reach his goal and pay off his mortgage in the time he spends working, he needs a tenant to supplement his income.

Sang-gu points out that Se-hee isn’t getting rent next month, and Se-hee scowls at him, asking in an exasperated tone why that might be. Ha, cranky Se-hee is hilarious.

Once Se-hee comes home, he’s greeted by the adorable Cat and then looks frightened at the sight of Ji-ho, who has fallen asleep looking like a ghost straight out of a horror film. Looking away, he carefully closes her door, and as he gets ready for bed, he notices how clean his apartment is.

In bed, he looks over all the data he’s collected on his previous tenants, and the reasons for terminating past contracts range from personality clashes to negligence in duties. Ji-ho is Tenant 7, and scores an impressive 4.7 on Se-hee’s 5-point scale.

Sang-gu advised his friend to just live with Ji-ho if she was such a perfect housemate, but Se-hee told him there’s too big a risk to living with her. Remembering the kiss incident, Se-hee types “opposite sex” into his spreadsheet for Ji-ho’s reason for disqualification.

The next morning, Se-hee finds Ji-ho recycling, and though he tells her that she isn’t obligated to follow his rules, she wants to do it until she leaves. He asks her if she fixed the bathroom tiles and cleaned the windows, and Ji-ho explains her habit of cleaning when writing.

Se-hee then bluntly asks why she kissed him, and Ji-ho wonders to herself if he’s a crazy person. She asks why he’s asking that suddenly, and he tells her that it’s important for their future. She motions towards their neighbors chatting nearby, and Se-hee quickly catches his mistake, taking them to a more private area—a park with school children, pfft.

Ji-ho tells Se-hee that she just wanted to kiss someone since she’s never been in a relationship because she has neither the time nor the money to date. Since it looked like she might never get the chance, she thought, “Why not?” But after explaining everything out loud, Ji-ho realizes how crazy she must sound.

To her shock, Se-hee finds her explanation completely reasonable since, to him, relationships are costly, and in this scenario, she simply wanted the results without the cost. As long as she’s not looking for love, he thinks it’s perfect.

Showing Ji-ho the data he collected, Se-hee describes her as his ideal housemate, but she reminds him of her critical disqualification: She’s a woman.

Se-hee tells her that it’s no longer a problem since they don’t have the slightest chance of falling in love. They’ve already kissed and proven that there’s no spark between them, so nothing is going to happen. Just to make things clear, Ji-ho clarifies that he isn’t her type, and he quickly responds that she isn’t his either. She asks hesitantly if that means they can continue living together, and he affirms it.

Ji-ho informs Ho-rang of her living arrangements, but her friend is still worried since Se-hee is a man. Ji-ho reassures her that nothing with happen anymore, and when Ho-rang catches the slip, Ji-ho simply says that it’s a win-win situation: He needs to pay back his loan and she can’t afford a deposit on a new place.

Ji-ho arrives to work early and eager, but her mood soon deflates when the senior writer she worked for on her last drama walks into the room. The director says that Writer Hwang is only here to help, and tells Ji-ho that they’ll both be credited as main writers. Ji-ho pretends to be honored by her presence, but notices how the senior writer marked up everything in her script.

Se-hee comes home to see Ji-ho cleaning the floor, and loudly calls for her to catch her attention. He correctly guesses that work didn’t go well, and compliments her habit of cleaning. Ha!

Se-hee watches the Arsenal soccer game with headphones on, and Ji-ho watches from the side during her break. They both loudly groan when their team misses, and Se-hee asks if she wants to join him. She turns down his offer because of work, but in the end, watches the game with him.

Remembering Ho-rang’s question of whether Se-hee might be gay, Ji-ho cautiously asks him why he isn’t married, and he tells her that he plans to be single forever. She then asks how much longer he has until he’s paid off his loan, and Se-hee answers, “30 more years.”

She learns just how meticulous Se-hee’s plans are, since he chose an apartment close to a hospital for when he ages, planning to die in this very apartment. He also explains how her room will serve as his deathbed since it’s nicely ventilated… leaving Ji-ho speechless.

The next day, Ji-ho takes out the garbage and rides the elevator to the fourth floor with an older lady. When she walks towards the apartment, the older lady stops her since that’s her son’s place.

Pacing in her room, Ji-ho strains to hear Se-hee’s conversation with his angry mother, which mostly consists of Mom begging him to get married. Apparently, his dad threatened her with divorce if Se-hee refuses to marry. I guess that’s one way to motivate your child.

Se-hee walks with Ji-ho outside, apologizing for his mother’s sudden visit. She excuses his mom’s actions as a normal parent’s concern, but Se-hee has a more cynical outlook, interpreting such behavior as parents living vicariously through their children.

He assures her that she can simply ignore his mom and continue living in his apartment, but Ji-ho says she can’t possibly do that. She knows of an empty workshop, and with her new job, she’ll be able to get a room soon enough.

Ji-ho packs up her things while Cat sits in her suitcase (aw), and gets an email with some irksome news.

With Yong-seok’s help, Ji-ho moves into the dingy extra room of the workshop, and complains about the changes the senior writer made. Yong-seok isn’t sympathetic to her predicament, and accuses her of acting like an amateur. He belittles Ji-ho for graduating from a top school but living in a place like this. Why I oughta!

As Se-hee promises his mom to go on a blind date, he comes home to an empty apartment. He sees the goodbye post-it from Ji-ho, and forlornly looks at her room. In the workshop, Ji-ho tosses and turns in her sleeping bag, uncomfortable on the couch.

Se-hee and Sang-gu attend a friend’s wedding, and Sang-gu points out how marriage isn’t a big deal: You spend an hour for the ceremony and then go home, urging Se-hee to just get married once. Se-hee likens his statement to telling him to go to army twice, but Sang-gu argues that there are all sorts of marriages out there, like show window spouses, weekend spouses, and sexless ones too. The key reason he should just do it, Sang-gu reminds him, is that Se-hee’s father promised to pay off his mortgage if he got married.

Across the aisle, Ji-ho and her two friends attend the same wedding. At the reception, old classmates fawn over Su-ji since she works at a big company, but she turns down their compliments, mentioning Ji-ho as the real key figure since she attended school on a full scholarship. The old classmates ask what Ji-ho does, and Su-ji proudly says that Ji-ho writes drama scripts.

They ask what she wrote, but the mood quickly turns sour when none of the old classmates recognizes her past credits, which are mostly dailies and morning dramas. Su-ji demands that they look up the shows right now, but Ji-ho excuses herself from the table awkwardly. When Su-ji gets up to follow her, Ho-rang stops her.

Ho-rang finds Ji-ho at the bus stop and jokingly asks why well-off people want to be humble, too. Ji-ho wonders if maybe her major wasn’t a good choice, and perceptively, Ho-rang asks if she’s on bad terms with her writing. She notes that Ji-ho was always happy when she wrote, and asks if it doesn’t make her happy anymore. But Ji-ho can’t answer her question.

After Se-hee abandoned him to go to a blind date, Sang-gu bumps into Su-ji, and the contents of her purse fall everywhere. He helps pick things up, and notices a condom on the ground. He’s confused by the item since he swears he used it yesterday (ha), and Su-ji sighs in annoyance since that’s hers.

Sang-gu chases after Su-ji but loses her in the crowd of guests. He remembers her from a party, and can’t believe she didn’t recognize him.

During their script meeting, the senior writer describes a convoluted plot consisting of half-siblings, fake identities, and murders. They ask Ji-ho for her opinion, and she finally just speaks her mind, calling it a makjang. She asks why there’s a third-generation chaebol hiding in a gosiwon youth drama, hee, and Writer Hwang gets offended. But Ji-ho firmly tells her that she gets the final decision since this is her script.

In the evening, Se-hee comes home and notices Ji-ho’s missing presence from the backlog of recycling to Cat’s empty bowl. After feeding Cat, Se-hee stares at Ji-ho’s old room and thinks aloud that what they need isn’t marriage. Aw, he already misses her.

As Ji-ho tries to sleep, the director texts her to apologize to the senior writer, but she ignores his messages. Suddenly, the door opens and drunk Yong-seok staggers inside. Plopping down next to her, he makes the situation about him (of course) and blames her for messing up his first drama as a main PD.

Growing uncomfortable, Ji-ho tells him to talk when he’s sober, but Yong-seok abruptly asks if she ever liked him. He starts to make advances despite her protests, pushing her onto her back forcefully even though she fights and yells at him to stop. She struggles and starts to panic, and thankfully, Ji-ho is able to push him to the floor.

In tears, she calls him terrible, not because he played with her feelings for three years, made a fool out of her script, or flirted with her even when he had a girlfriend. It’s because all she wanted was a place to sleep, but he came and ruined that for her too.

With nowhere to go, Ji-ho considers calling Su-ji, but seeing her reflection in a shop window stops her. She narrates, “There’s a side which you never wish to show others, no matter how close you are with them.”

She goes to her old apartment next, but can’t ring the doorbell when she hears sounds of her brother flirting with his wife and coaxing her into bed. Somberly, Ji-ho narrates that sometimes family can be the farthest people to you.

Ji-ho continues her aimless trek and walks down a tunnel as cars zip past her.

Ji-ho: “When I decided to follow my dream, I thought my life would be like walking through a dark tunnel. But I didn’t know it was going to be this dark. I didn’t know it was going to be this lonely.”

With tears streaking down her face, Ji-ho cries to the heavens, asking how much longer she has to go, and crumples to the floor in sobs.

After wandering the streets of Seoul, Ji-ho ends up at Se-hee’s apartment and wonders why her body led her here. She turns to go, but finds Se-hee staring at her from a few yards away.

They watch the Arsenal game together at his place, and Ji-ho explains that she woke up from a bad dream where she was walking in an endless tunnel by herself. Se-hee answers in his usual nonchalant way, and Ji-ho asks if he’s been well. He says that he’s been all right, and after taking a sip of his beer, he poses a question to Ji-ho: “If you have some time, would you marry me?”

Ji-ho stares at Se-hee with a blank expression and narrates that all she wanted right then was to collapse into anything or any hole. She answers, “Yes,” and thinks to herself that all she wants for tonight is a good night’s sleep.

 
COMMENTS

The strength of this show is the subtle way they handle situations and characters. There’s a very low-key vibe that helps the show feel grounded, and despite what could easily become a wacky premise, the show chooses to be thoughtful about the lives of these characters and the events that lead up to their predicaments. The humor comes from small beats and juxtapositions that aren’t dwelled upon or milked for laughs, such as the way humor is drawn from the reaction by others to the character’s action. For example, when Ji-ho falls to the ground—mortified after seeing Se-hee on the elevator—a little boy enters and backs into the corner to avoid the crazy lady. Also, the show is great at making little situations humorous by making the characters act in the opposite way of what’s usually expected, which is especially evident through Se-hee and Ji-ho’s banter. Take the scene where Se-hee finds Ji-ho cleaning the floor because of a stressful day at work. In his usual candid manner, Se-hee proceeds to compliment Ji-ho’s cleaning habit as “ideal,” completely ignoring the fact that she was having a hard day, and then Ji-ho happily laughs and accepts his compliment. It highlights both the characters’ quirks—Se-hee often sees the world through his algorithms and doesn’t always follow conventional thought, while Ji-ho seems to accept this side of him and takes all his comments at face value without any ulterior motives—while I just found them funny because of their randomness. You would think Se-hee would continue his observation about her having a hard day, but he couldn’t care less about that and only focuses on what he thinks is important.

In addition to the humor, the show has done an excellent job so far of subverting gender stereotypes in a subtle manner. The most obvious example is the housemate/landlord mishap where Ji-ho was thought to be a man while Se-hee sounded like a woman. Without forcing it down the viewers’ throats, the creators show how Ji-ho and Se-hee are both humans who fall on a spectrum, and these misunderstandings of gender only occur because of arbitrary assignments of feminine and masculine traits. Just as guys can have “pretty names” and be quiet cat owners, girls can also be smokers and look handsome. Another source of destroying gender stereotypes comes from Sang-gu, which is an interesting choice. On one hand, he seems like a typical, chauvinistic male who’s preoccupied with appearance, but he also enjoys manicures and likes the color pink, both of which aren’t usual qualities of characters that fit his type.

As someone who loves shows because of characters, I think Because This Life Is Our First has a plethora of interesting ones that might actually have more nuance than initially shown. I unexpectedly found Ho-rang fascinating this episode because though she came across as ditzy in the beginning, she’s surprisingly considerate and observant. She could feel like the outsider compared to her smarter and more accomplished friends, but there doesn’t seem to be any bitter resentment or outward jealousy because she also understands that their lives aren’t perfect. She used self-deprecating humor to cheer up Ji-ho and also instantly recognized her friend’s source of woe, which requires her to understand Ji-ho as a person in order to know what makes her happy.

Ji-ho is shaping up to be a winsome heroine who tugs at my heartstrings. At the core, her struggle is a universal one that many people face. It’s hard to pursue dreams when everyone around you tells you otherwise, and even when chasing after something, the journey isn’t always rewarding. Even though she knew becoming a writer would be hard, it’s the feeling of walking down the dark tunnel alone that really destroys her spirit. She’s not necessarily lamenting her fate (though in some part, I wouldn’t blame her if she did because her father is infuriating), but is wearied by the fact that the end seems nowhere in sight and things seem to only be getting progressively worse for her. As she searched for a place to sleep after that horrible incident with jerkface Yong-seok, she realizes that she doesn’t even have this basic necessity, and there’s something sad about Ji-ho’s wish at the end just being about a good night’s sleep. It’s such a simple wish, but maybe it’s what everyone strives for in the end.

Overall, I’m most excited about delving deeper into our main couple and learning how their relationship will grow. It’s refreshing how Ji-ho and Se-hee aren’t starting off as enemies, but neither are they quite friends. They respect each other and have developed this undeniable attachment for one another (even if they haven’t fully realized it themselves), but as our two main characters have professed this episode, they aren’t in love or even attracted to one another at this point. They’re going through the process of knowing each other, and I’m eager to see love blossom between two people that isn’t based on carnal attraction, as they propel themselves towards contractual marriage that will probably require them to fool those around them. It’s not a unique setup, of two individuals pretending to love one another and then being unable to differentiate between what’s real and fake, but with these two lovable characters who are both earnest, awkward, and caring individuals struggling to reach their goals, I’m looking forward to seeing them eat their words and realize just how well they match each other.

 
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Oh thank you lovepark. You're insights into this show just added to my enjoyment. Let me echo your thoughts and say that I just love how this couple aren't at odds with each other from the beginning. Even though they're characters are eccentric they seem grounded in reality (in a relatable way). Even though the premise had me from the beginning, I am delightfully surprised at how good the writing is. So looking forward to the next episode.

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Your* their* sorry about my grammar lol ...it's early here.

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I also love that they aren't at odds and it's so nice that they already have a budding friendship and seem to understand each other. The tone of it this whether it's the comedy or serious scenes are also nice

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It's also refreshing to see two adults in K-drama who do not force the other to understand/accept their quirks, flaws, and whatnots. Instead, they interact based on mutual understanding and respect for each other.

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Yes, absolutely. I kept expecting the proverbial k drama other shoe to drop, and him to start torturing her based on their 'misunderstandings'. Instead, they are extremely courteous to one another, and do a good job listening to and accepting apologies and explanations. It's nice, because it feels like how people would react in real life if they actually got into a ridiculous gender confusion scenario. It's an unlikely situation, but made more realistic by both the believable explanations and the mature reactions.

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I found the character design of the man who is the co-Writer particularly insidious. Real life men aren't like that. We treat women modestly and respect their modesty. I may never look up to a woman but I will, and have, protected them and their right to innocence - sometimes at thankless cost to myself.

Men are already disrespected, demoted, and discriminated against in society; this kind of content that suggests that the average man lacks character is the context of modern society in millions of men commit suicide every year because the world hates them. In this sense, the portrayal of the Yeong-seok character is disgraceful.

I know that ninety percent of Kdrama viewers are women. However, you don't have to base the cultural norms in films off some feministic pretext that men are inherently inconsiderate. Instead, consider what you could gain in terms of viewership if you actually researched the hidden, deep, and complex thought-lives of typical men and cast characters accordingly? Do you have to cast a jerk in such a way that sends a message, 'uninhibited men are dangerous' - which is both untrue and hurtful to everyone?

To conclude: Make all characters real: protagonists, antagonists, side characters. This show does well with the protagonists.

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idk what you mean by 'uninhibited men are dangerous'

the other people in the drama, se hee worker, his boss, jiho's friend's boyfriend, jiho's brother is all different, they respect woman and the coworker is always portrayed as a shady person.

on the show, he didn't show to represent all normal people, he is an ass because him and not to say that all men are like that. He didn't make jiho say that men are all beast.

I don't understand how you take the conclusion that the side character is shown as what supposed to be a normal character when Jiho and another people knows that he is a bad person after they knew the story and the show still didn't give any saying about men in their statement.

Overall, what this show wants to say is that people are all different and just because they fit into the certain stereotype, they don't always the same.

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This comment is a joke, right? Because honestly what alternate dimension do you come from where male characters are not complex centers of 99% of the narratives out there, where male actors don't routinely get to plumb the depths of their characters and have beautiful redemption arcs and nuanced relationships? Where women are not often given the thankless roles of love interest/mother/caregiver over and over and over again?

Because honestly? I found Yeong-soek very, very believable in how predictable he was. I don't know if you have any friends who are women, but if you do, try asking them about the Yeong-soeks they have met. I bet you'll be surprised.

And I'm not even going to touch that comment about protecting a woman's (or anyone's!) right to innocence. What condescending bullshit, honestly.

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I can almost get where you're coming from that men are often shown to be unable to hold their liquor and their go to attitude is being handsy or forceful. However, that does not invalidate Ji-ho's and millions of real-life women's experience of sexual assault by drunk men. I think this show has done well to show a range of men and women. And, Yong-seok was already established to be something of a worm sober since he has been clearly flirting with Ji-ho despite having a girlfriend and looking down on her aspirations and dedication to her scenario. It wasn't like he was a perfectly decent man then suddenly became a jerk drunk, which I could see then it being a problem in representation.

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Do you live in this world where everyone else in db lives and where, yes, the huge majority of rapes and sexual assaults are committed by men?

Or are you typing from some alternate world, because that is what your comment sounds like. More concerned about the hurt feelings of men than the danger to women's life and safety coming from so many of these men.

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I knew Yong Seok was an ass but I really didn't expect him to try to force himself on Ji Ho.

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Yong-seok's attempted assault is a stark contrast to Ji-ho's impulsive kiss. She was horrified when Se-hee called the kiss an "attack" and she apologized that that wasn't her intent.

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Correction: He assaulted her. It wasn't an attempt. He did it.

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True. And I hope this issue won't get dropped merely for plot movement. I look forward to seeing him punished for what he did.

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Of all the recent dramas this is the one that gives me that little flutter of excitement as I'm watching while already anticipating what's to come. I love the low key connection the leads have, that has nothing to do with antagonistic bickering, or fighting for the upper hand in this relationship. It's about give and take, mutual interests and mutual respect. I adore it.

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And now I want to go rewatch😄

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Very well said. I am very much in love with the way the leads are bonding ❤ so natural ! and it is such a fresh breath of air to see them communicating and trying to solve the misunderstanding without bickering or hating each other..i didn't expect Lee Min Ki to have this beautiful chemistry with Jung So Min ❤

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"That little flutter of excitement" and for me, a pang of potential romantic tension that makes this drama so appealing and delightful. Her living arrangement with Se-Hee has become a safe harbor in which she can rest and recover from the hurt as a writer and as a woman. At some point in time, the calm and safety of Se-Hee's harbor will gradually evolve into including his love for her.

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Forgot to say that contract/cohabitation relationship dramas are my crack. I can't wait for the shenanigans to start.

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Yeah you really can't get better than that. I can't wait to see the reactions from all the people in their life when they tell them they're getting married.

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Same here i really can't wait to see them getting attached to each other and eventually fall in love in the middle of this marriage.

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I can't believe how many catnips this drama fulfills for me: cohabitation hijinks, contract marriages, smart/nice leads, meta jokes, the second cutest cat ever (mine's the first of course), deadpan humor, etc. etc.

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Me, too! Cohabitation hijinks and marriage contracts are some of my top favorites. In the past, characters that bickered were funny, but now I’m really appreciating the nice, quiet respect they have for each other. 😍

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What's your favorite cohab /contract marriage drama?

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Marriage Contract (I swear I'm not just picking it because the name says it all lol) - similar to this one in the sense that the two leads just need each other so badly on an emotional and practical level. It's a really beautiful drama about how the female lead changes the people around her because of her resilience and love.

Honorable Mentions: I Hear Your Voice (cohab), The King 2 Hearts (more like an arranged marriage than contract), Full House, and Prime Minister and I (minus the last like 2 episodes).

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yayy Marriage Contract! I loved that drama so much but I rarely see other people talking about it lol

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Same for me, Marriage Contract. Second would be Marriage Not Dating.

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Same crack. I got away from dramas for a year. One try of this one and i'm back to being addicted again.

Drama, you are irresistably good.

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Well, that escalated quickly. I didn't know that there would be marriage contract involved. But I'm a sucker for this kind of backward romance. Now that they've already put it out there, I don't want them to then brush it off as drunken antics or sleep-deprived rambling. I want to have my cake and eat it too, you know.

The friendship between our girls continued to delight me. They can't be more different, yet they are so supportive. I especially like Su-ji. She is fierce, loyal, confident, and proud to a fault. Just the kind of bestfriend you would want for yourself. Whether to back you up on an unwinnable argument. Or get angry on your behalf at your patriarchal father and your irritably irresponsible younger brother.

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YASSSSSSSSS!!! to your entire last paragraph. Ji Ho needs someone in her corner concerning that father and brother. I have a feeling, or maybe it's wishful thinking, that since she was paying part of the rent and now she's gone the brother and SIL will have to go live with their parents.

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There isn't a rent. They own the house...

JiHo just paid the deposit/ first payment and dad pays the rest of the mortgage...

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I'm sorry I wasn't more specific. I wanted to keep my comment short but forgot where I was.

She was paying the living expenses and maintenance costs while her brother didn't pay anything. Is that better?

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Suji is my girl. The female friendships here are amazingly real.

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I appreciate all the Sujis in my small circle. They can boldly deal with a lot of crap while I tend to get quiet and slink off when faced with overwhelming situations. lol

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I find this show interesting. I’m glad to see Lee Min Ki again, I love how weird his character is, the scene of his death in the ventilated room was very funny. However, I would like to be more excited about the couple and the female lead, but sadly I'm not, at least not for now. I’ve seen her in some projects, and I always have this feeling, and this is a personal feeling, that I'm seeing the same character, only in different situations, contrary to what happens every time I've seen Lee Min Ki, he's very versatile, and I really like that about him. I don’t know if she always chooses similar characters, or is that she turns all the characters into something similar, who knows?, the truth is that I'm feeling the same vibes about her here, and it was a bit disappointing, because I was really hoping to feel different about her, especially because I want the series to be good, because Lee Min Ki hasn’t done a full drama for a long time, and for that I want to, at least, enjoy it. For now I have my fingers crossed with the hope that the series remains entertaining, although, truthfully, regardless of everything, I imagine that I will see the whole thing just because of Nam Se Hee weirdness.

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I love the subverted gender stereotypes being used. Besides building the premise for the set-up, I also think it helps viewers relate to both leads. When characters are overly defined by gender stereotypes, it makes it difficult for anyone to relate to them, because so few people fit perfectly in those weirdly defined lists of checkboxes. So because both leads in this show fall more in a medium space, and are not made out as weird for not being "normal", they also come across as more realistic.

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This! ^_^

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Yay! It was worth the wait :)

I love that the two characters just *get* each other. I think this will become most important for Se-hee since he doesn't really have people around him who get him. However, I think Ji-ho will find just as much value from their friendship because as reliable as her friends are, I think she needs fresh eyes that see her value. It's the difference between your mom thinking you're awesome and your boss - like duh your mom thinks your cool, but this dude who has no obligation to like you does.

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This is so true! 😊

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yes, I also like that Ji-ho can relate to him and appreciate what his intention is even if the way he communicates isn't what or the way most people expect.
And I don't know if it can be really called a contract marriage yet, maybe it will be. But perhaps it will be just be an unconventional marriage. Mentioning contract makes it feel as if there is an end planned. And I really hope that that is not the case.

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Is this bad, but a part of me wants something new and different. Maybe these two interesting and quirky characters won't move towards the expected long-term romantic relationship or marriage that punctuates all these rom-com kdramas. Maybe it be an exploration of feelings, needs, and companionship or a significant yet passing relationship in both their memories...it could be more poignant and in line with the time be of this show. Regardless of where it goes, I am all in!

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*tone not time be 🤦🏻‍♀️

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Excellent write-up, lovepark! I think you really nailed what I like about this -- it's already on my watch list for being a cohabitation hijinks drama, but the fact that the two leads aren't antagonistic towards each other is fantastic. They actually like and respect each other!

I also like the drama-writing plot, where Jiho will have to somehow choose between getting her name out there with her integrity intact, or giving in to the money-making makjangness that the other head writer wants to stick in her drama. I'm sure this dilemma is one that a lot of drama writers face these days.

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Agree about the drama writers' dilemma 😢

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It’s interesting for me to see this portrayed here as I’m comparing it to another Mon-Tues drama over on another station, also about a writer who has to choose between the integrity of her story but this time it’s at odds with the producer’s version, which perverts her original characterization in the name of ratings. I feel like the real writers of both these dramas have some counter-transference going on with both their characters.

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And interestingly (in real life), I can't begin to imagine the struggle these writers have had to go through just so their stories can get the green light from the higher ups (and from their real life head writers-slash-butchers).

On the other hand, I sincerely wonder where to draw the line between a writer's passion for his/her baby project and a head writer's wisdom over what is marketable to the viewers.

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It's a very delicate balance. You want your creation seen but sometimes ignoring marketable traits can just lead to no one seeing it. You have to find how to say what you want to say while making it entertaining. I can't stand The Simpsons but I have to admit that they've lasted this long because they know how to mix meaning with mass appeal.

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Unfortunately, money talks, and so do advertisements, so that battle will be lopsided every time.

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I am enjoying this show so much. It surprised me but I love that it turned out to be so low key. I hope that the romance ends up being a slow burn.

I also like how it looks visually.

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That trash PD and main writer smh. Ok, but I did not know this show was gonna have a contract marriage as well, sign me up.

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I was surprised at how early into the show the contract marriage happened, and how low-key the proposal took place. Lol. Nonetheless, it's my catnip as well, especially when done right. Keeping my fingers crossed on this one. 🙌

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Me too. I love that it's all low key so we can relax while watching it.

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OMG!! That elevator scene!! Awkward!! Poor Se-hee looked like he just about wanted to climb up the walls. Haha. So embarrassing. lol 😂

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And when he locked his bedroom door afterwards ... Lol 😅

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I loved her face when she heard the lock turn "daebak!"

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that scene was daebak!

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It definitely subverted the old "lock up your daughters!" trope. ;-)

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Great scene. Loved the squeaking sound effect accompanying Ji-ho's bouncing eyeballs.

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Those hilarious sound effects made the scenes 100x funnier.

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Out of all the dramas airing right now, this is my FAVORITE!!
I love Ji Ho. She is so cute and likeable.

I'm also really interested in the relationship dynamic of our trio of friends. I can't wait to dig deeper!!

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I love your commentary about Se-hee complimenting Ji-ho about her cleaning habit. It's my favorite scene. It is hilarious how serious he was, but he was also so sincere about it. Ji-ho saw that sincerity and was just grateful for the compliment without being shocked or offended.

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This! And also I think Ji-ho felt good to have received a compliment (no matter how teeny) from someone who's not a friend. That after having a terrible day of getting her script butchered.

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Oh, oh, OH. Is this... a CONTRACT MARRIAGE? This is not what I signed up for, not that I'm complaining! I love contract marriage plotlines, and all the better that Se-hee is the emotionless type! The contract marriage plot isn't the most novel of plotlines, but it wasn't something I was expecting, and pleasant surprises are always good. (Though why does the good looking crush always end up being a jerk?)

I like how this show sort of breaks gender stereotypes to create humour - what with them thinking that a quiet person owning a cat HAS to be female, and someone who quit smoking HAS to be male. And also the fact that girls can carry condoms around too.

For me, not so much insights into the 2 characters yet (such as why Se-hee is so emotionless), but I really felt bad for Ji-ho when she was walking the streets and had nowhere to go. Sometimes when you feel so bad, you don't want your friends to see you in that state because their concern and pity will make you feel even worse (plus you don't want to be a burden), and she doesn't even have family to turn to. I related so much to her, which made me like her more.

So far, I'm still on board this show, and I'm gonna be tuning in to further episodes!

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I relate to not wanting to turn to a friend sometimes, when your almost to the breaking point and have been keeping a 'stiff upper lip', sometimes all it takes is one kind word or sympathetic look to turn you into an incoherent, blubbering mess.

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Been there as well. My memorable quote from this episode comes from this part as well as the part where Ji-ho said that sometimes, family can be the farthest people to you. :'(

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I want to co-sign everything you said, lovepark.

I'm not someone who normally laughs out loud, but I did when Se-hee said that he planned to die in her room because the ventilation was good.

I find the writing really lovely at times; Ji-ho's narration in the tunnel and while wandering the streets was so relatable.

I really like Su-Ji and Ho-rang and their friendship with Ji-ho.

Bring on the contract marriage. It's one of my favorite tropes, and I feel like these characters could really give it a fresh take.

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Yep, Se-hee's planned deanimation in the well-ventilated room cracked me up, and demonstrates his ueber-rational approach to even that major taboo, death. ;-)

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And he said it so casually too!

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This drama speaks to me. I also never want to get married and feel dating is a waste of time and energy. Se Hee forcing himself to text his blind date was so relatable like "what is the point of this?" While Se Hee has his house, his cat, and himself to take care of, I don't even own pets, so at least that's one less expense for me to worry about. I haven't planned which room I want to die in, but I do know I want to get cremated instead of buried. And like Se Hee, I sometimes want to get married just to get my parents off my back. Alas, this is a drama and Se Hee will eventually fall in love and change his mindset.

I admire Ji Ho for following her dream after graduating from Seoul National University. I could never take that risk. Thanks a ton for the recap, @lovepark!

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my goodness i found someone who thinks like me. Marriage held no appeal to me and dating is so tiresome. Imagining myself exerting effort to please a guy makes me shudder. Not that i hate guys but i'm too lazy to make an effort. And the only time that made me consider marriage is the 'concern' people around me bothering me about it.

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omg! aromantics unite lol. When Sae-Hee listed all the reasons to not get married, I had the most paranoid feeling, like someone's been listening in on my rants lmao. I've never wanted to get married, and relationships always seemed like such a burden. My mom used to act like it was a good thing when I was in school, but now she's starting to mention it more regularly, sigh. I'm not particularly awkward in social situations but I relate to Sae Hee so much it's wild.

I went to a pretty decent university and always thought I would become a lawyer, but before my senior year I had to take a step back and really make up my mind. Did I really want to sell my soul and live for money for the rest of my life? Or do I follow a path that provides no guarantee except being involved in what I love? Long story short, I'm in the tunnel right along with you, JiHo. Chin up, you're not alone!

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I bawled so much in that tunnel scene. Although for me it was more like choosing to forge a path after letting go of some toxic people (aka extended family) and realizing that it can be a lonely journey at times. But chin up, it is! :D

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I really hated yeonseok so much from when it was noticed that he'd been playing with her feelings all along, but I absolutely loathed him as he made her feel lower about herself and then to top it off with a cherry on the turd pie he sexually assaults her? how far would he have gone if she hadn't run out? what a jack ass!

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I despised him. Can we have the awesome "Ma Yi-Deum" from "Witch's Court" put him in jail for sexual assault??

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I really hope he is made pay for that behavior. God help him if her friends get wind of what happened.
.

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I wish she would report him

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I was already cursing at the screen whenever he appeared, but after the assault I'm wishing nothing but evil on his character. Something bad better happen to him, pronto.

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Yay!!!! I've been so excited to see what everyone's thoughts were for the second episode. Had no idea it would be a marriage set up. Love it! I've got a soft spot for contractual marriages. This drama has risen to the top out of all the current ones I'm watching. It was hard waiting for Monday to roll around. Thankfully it's tmrw!

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Where is this drama showing? Thanks.

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I am watching it on Vicki.

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DramaFever has it

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No, they don't. Viki has the exclusive license for this drama.

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VIU, VIU has the license and ep 1 is already free to watch

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Thanks for the recap! So we get both cohabitation hijinks *and* a contract relationship?! Consider me sold.

I feel like Sae-hee got a bit more room to shine in this episode. LMK is really pulling off the straight-faced comedy, in my opinion. Also, Sae-hee could easily come across as cold and heartless, but instead is still very likeable, if robotic. His casual observation that he plans to die in Ji-ho’s room, his reaction to Ji-ho potentially being sprawled dead on the floor being to simply close the door so he doesn’t have to see, and his completely random proposal to Ji-ho because who better to marry than someone you know you aren’t attracted to but know mathematically that you get along with? - All of those things cracked me up and made me take more of a liking to what could easily be a flat, lifeless character.

I do also have to say that I still am really liking our girl trio together and hope they get more screen time in future episodes.

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I started watching this show out of curiosity from a good review I've read about the first episode. And it did not disappoint. The character of Ji-Ho is relate-able and Se-Hee is definitely odd.

Over the weekend, I watched the Japanese version of this drama and I'm glad that they did not follow the characters of the Japanese version. So I'm really looking forward to watch this show and hopefully get a satisfying end to their quirky love story.

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I totally binge watched the Japanese version as well. First time watching a Japanese drama. I thought there were "some" similarities, but the Korean version seems to be standing on its own. So I don't know how much of an adaption thIs is? Thought all he characters were pretty different.

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I think you're confused. Are you referring to NigeHaji? This drama is not the "Korean version" of that drama. Fans have noticed similarities but officially there is absolutely no connection between the two!

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Everyone was saying this was the Korean version, so I didn't mean to say it was an actual remake. I never watched the Japanese drama we married as a job. Just checked it out cause people said t had similarities. :) but watching both I already think it's pretty different, so wojldnt consider it a remake.

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I just realised that the reaction JH gave SH when he said her room has good ventilation for dying in, might be a similar reaction to what people possibly give me when I say I've maybe sort of planned my funeral...

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Oh good, I'm not the only one either. I've told my friends how I would love my funeral to go down (my favorite foods, music, and movies). I think it would great to go "test out" coffins if I get old just to mess with people.

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I think it's the thoughtful way to go. The more an individual does the less their loved ones have to.

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I like you. You see it in the positive view! Most people just think I'm weird and worry slightly! hahaha

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I know this is a creepily late response, but preplanning your funeral is a gift to your family. So, I don't think you're weird. Well, not about this anyway.

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Doesn't everyone do it? I told my parents where I want my funeral and where I want my ashes to be spread. Very specific here.

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@leetennant, they do not. Even better if you have the wherewithal to preplan and prepay for everything so all it takes is a phone call or two after your gone to have everything taken care. Bonus points if you specify something that you want a sibling to do that will make them uncomfortable and a little creeped out. Just kidding. Maybe. Well, maybe my family is weird that way.

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@egads
You should pay your niece back for the Red Wedding by making her attend your funeral in something her new MAGA family will hate.

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The typos in that last response will haunt me.

@leetennant, you're a genius. I will have to ponder what it should be.

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...
@egads
Yeah so not at all what I was expecting these five notifications to be about/from...
Glad to know I can still weird even you out, just not about this. Pfft.

@leetennant no LT, everyone does not do it.
There are a certain group of people that understand my interest in the macabre, and even dabble in it themselves, but the amount of concerned looks I have got when I start talking about whether or not it's possible to gift your future children your skull in your will, or even just that one of my "tourist destinations" in Seoul was the National Cemetery...
People can be so boring.

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At one point in my younger days, I seriously considered building my own plain pine box and using it for storing my LPs until needed. (It was back in the 70s, the kind of thing you'd read about in THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS.)

Be sure to pick out your playlist. ;-)

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Totally. My playlist will be like 30% hymns, 20% American music, and 50% k-pop. If I can't convert any people to k-pop while I'm alive maybe I'll do so when I'm dead. hehe

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Hahahaha! How many songs are you gonna have at your funeral? Sometimes I wonder if we should just skip the talk and just have music, you know?

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@sicarius I would have the majority playing at the reception, but for the video montage and when I'm lowered to the ground definitely have music playing (most likely k-pop).

I could totally be able to summarize my whole life in song, but I think talking helps the people there so I'd give them some time to do so.

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Oh the no-talking thing was mostly a joke... pfft I know it helps the people there. :P
But KPop whilst being lowered sounds like a fantastic plan... I might borrow that idea haha

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I should play Shinee's "View" since it sounds close to "down down down down view" hehe or B1A4's "Rollin" since I'm "rollin in the deep" or if I want it to be sentimental I could go with FT Island's "To the Light" or Eric Nam's "Heaven's Door". My family/friends would probably appreciate the latter more lol

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When visiting Salzburg, Austria when I was in high school, I came across a beautiful little cemetery near the cathedral, complete with blooming flowers and wrought-iron crosses, and enclosed with matching fence. It was very peaceful and inviting as a final resting place, and I made the mistake of saying so aloud. My traveling companions busted my chops for the rest of the trip. ;-)

Since the idea of being six feet under makes me feel claustrophobic nowadays (I know that sounds nuts, as I'll be dead as a doornail), I'm leaning towards having my ashes scattered to the four winds on a mountain I love.

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Ooooh no don't worry! I love cemeteries too! Like, I actually some times actively seek them out because I find them interesting and peaceful! hehehe

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Hahahaha! Yes! *high five funeral buddies*
I've got a list of songs, and gravestone ideas, and I want a very simple coffin cos I want it to decompose properly.
My dad is just like 'cremating is cheaper' but I like graveyards so...

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well, in my case, I prefer a graveyard because here they are like forests with graves and I doubt anyone would clean-cut a graveyard. at least saves some trees. they have cut down 80% of the rest of them.

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^ right on. Hence (see bellow post) why I want a tree as my gravestone.

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Have you heard of that thing where you can become food for a tree after you die? I think some Italian artists designed it a while back if I'm not mistaken. The thought of becoming a plant after I die really appeals to me. Or a cemetery that is an orchard? Poetic.

If you could become one plant after you die, which plant would you be? I'd be a yellow rose bush, since that's my favorite flower. Either that or an apple tree.

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I'd like to be a cherry blossom tree in Korea, so I may have a chance of getting featured in at least one drama. 😂

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That is beautifully poetic. ;-)

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Lool @klurker that is somehow really beautiful 🤣

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YES! So story time- part of the reason I have planned my funeral is because I want a tree as my gravestone. Have wanted one as it for years, long before I found out it's actually a thing.
I love the idea of trees as gravestones, and then you can just put a plaque on the tree, instead of having som bloody expensive rock.
Personally, I'm partial to the New Zealand Red Beech tree. Or some other kind of endemic NZ plant (because part of me is rather conservationalist. The other part of me is not haha) and then around the tree I want lots of daffodil bulbs. That would be my ideal :)
Although an orchard cemetery sounds really cool... I wonder how other people would feel about eating the fruit of dead people kekekeke

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It'd be funny and horrific if the fruit tasted like the last thing the person ate. lol

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That's horror comedy content right there, that is haha

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Ewww omg
If I keel over right now my apples will taste like strawberry pocky? ...actually that doesn't sound terrible lol

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Maybe...let's modify it from orchard to 'garden' 😅

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^Oooh I like this idea haha.
(Also I'd eat an apple that tasted like strawberry pocky hahaha)

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Because This Life is Our First just returned my happy anticipation for Mondays & Tuesdays ... a rare thing indeed!

Hear my prayers, Drama Gods. I won't raise my expectations, so I hope you don't lower the quality of its writing & acting ... Make the magic last!

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This has turned out to be my favorite drama so far from the batch of premieres this week. It's a pleasant surprise as I went in with zero expectations.

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Love this drama already! First, cohabitation hijinks, now marriage? Aahhh love the cliche plot in this drama, but what makes it different is their characters. Ohhh and the cat is so cute! I love it too! 💕

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Lol I relate to that budgeting scene so much! No matter how broke I am I'll be damned if I change my Cats necessities. He'll always have the best quality food, treats and toys even if it means I'll starve! 😂😅 I also loved Se-hee's slow blink when Ji-ho said yes. I bet he wasn't expecting that!

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Ha. It felt like the most spontaneous thing he'd probably ever done, even if he had the data to back it up it seemed as if he surprised himself more

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Thank you @lovepark for the recap! It's so helpful because I know that there are times I miss things trying to follow with subtitles.
This last week had some great new shows, but this one by far was my favorite.
I love the relationship between the two of them and can't wait to see how it changes.
Can't wait until Monday and Tuesdays now!

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Thankyou for the wonderful recap and insightful comments. I couldnt quite put into words why im so hooked to the drama after 2 episodes. Reading this helped me rehash the watching experience. and that experience is a very good one. The writer and directly has that ease of telling a story with tack and subtlety. Se hee's character is so weird- and typical kdrama fashion could have blow it out of proportions and fun/weird scenes could have been 'milked' in crass fashion. But we thankfully didnt get any of that. I know it's just the first week but im so impress with the writing that i will now keep an eye on this writer's future works.

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Agree no cartoonish weirdos, just unique individuals. 😊

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I love your expression: cartoonish weirdos. He he😄

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So true!

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My favorite moment - when he told the cat, "What we need isn't marriage."

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OMG, this is totally a remake of the hit Japanese drama We Married as a Job. You've got the quirky male lead and the not doing well at work female lead who then get "pretend" married and works for him cleaning houses etc. They've changed a lot of details so I wonder if it will go in a different direction. But there's still that very quiet introspective jdrama feel to it.

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Oh good! It’s not just me who thinks that. I was surprised no one else commented on the similarities. I hope they don’t mess it up because the jdrama was a gem that dealt with a lot of sensitive subjects in a light but thoughtful manner.

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People have been mentioning it on previous posts about the drama :) You're definitely not alone!

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while i found Nigeru was a great, i still think this korean remake has more relatable character. and i love they don't just repeat the Jdrama, but add new originality to the story. the big idea is the same,obviously, but there's definitely some more in Korean version like the depth of characters (that i felt missing in most Jdrama) and the story still felt natural despite the wacky theme.

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This episode has the right balance of tender moments, heartbreak, sweet moments, and humor. I laugh at his "your room is my death room". He really did plan out his future. Then to crying out my eyes during her tunnel scene. That really resonates with me. I love that both leads have a mutual respect for each other. I like this kind of relationship. It's slow but it's budding. I love her supportive friends. I love how different both Se Hee and Ji Hyo are but they somehow compliments each other. I love the fast-pace and direction this drama is heading. Looking forward to tomorrow. :)

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Am I the only one, or did anyone else think he saw his cat on her lap and thought "Well, Kitty likes her so I need to keep her around."? 🤣
I wasn't sure if he was noticing her pajamas, Kitty on her lap, or both in that final scene.

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I was thinking the same thing, though I wonder if he was a tad bit jealous that Cat chose her instead of him. lol

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I would have been. I get miffed when my cat insists on choosing my sisters comfy bed over me

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The pajama. Who would go out of their house wearing one? Usually you'd change into something that is not sleepwear attire before going out. JH visiting him wearing only that is odd and he noticed.

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You're right, he probably notices everything, it's just that the people he's around assumes he's oblivious because he doesn't feel the need to share his observations

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@whatever. Apparently, you’ve never been to Wal-Mart.
http://www.peopleofwalmart.com/pj-party/

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😂🤣😂🤣 you speak truth

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Lol! 😂

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I think he noticed her pajama because she came to his apartment in the middle of the night wearing comfortable sleeping clothes.

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I watched with no expectations and end up loving it. Sizzling chemistry between the leads! I feel that they should fall in love soon. It has been a long time since I watched a drama that gives me a fluttering heart when I see the couple together. Cheers to another great drama!

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@lovepark, thank you for the recap. I enjoyed the first 2 episodes and I look forward to this week's episodes.

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The proposal was a such a sweet surprise, i never thought there will be a marriage plotline in this one. But, I LOVED IT. "if you have some time, would you marry me?" hahahaha, what a line.

I fall hard for this drama. Both leads are quirky, but awesome and relatable. Finally, a drama to pick up after months of hiatus. I watched all the dramas released this week, and this one is a defo a keeper. Fighting, Se Hee& Ji ho!

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I'm enjoying the drama.
Love the quirky reticence of Se-Hee.
More than anything I'm so happy to see Jung So-Min with an unfettered character in a drama I can enjoy without reservations.

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Forgot to say, "Hi @saya"

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Also, I love Bomi in this. She's hilarious.

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Bomi is a blast with her monotone voice, no-nonsense personality, and pink, pinker, and pinkest dresses.

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yeah Bomi is another comic relief on her own.

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Hahaha, yesss. She's been a total scene-stealer. Lol, she has such a funny dynamic with...pretty much every other character, honestly.

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What if it's our fourth life?

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