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Witch’s Court: Episode 2

It’s always hard to adjust to change, and Yi-deum’s prickly personality doesn’t make things any easier. Navigating a new department with new coworkers and a new boss is further complicated by the arrival of a case that may not be all that it seems. Our heroes have vastly different methods when it comes to problem-solving and this is the first test of their teamwork. Will they rise to the challenge?

 
EPISODE 2 RECAP

Yi-deum marches reluctantly down a hallway, a box with her nameplate and desk supplies in tow. Coming to a stop in front of the Crimes Against Children Unit, she lets out a depressed sigh just as Jin-wook steps up behind her, carrying his own box of things.

Ignoring his pleasant greeting, Yi-deum asks if he’s also been reassigned. Smiling, he affirms this but she walks off before he can say anything else. Catching up to her, Jin-wook tries again to introduce himself properly but Yi-deum curtly replies that she doesn’t wish to be involved with him and ignores his attempt at a handshake. To this, Jin-wook cheekily points at the plaque in front of her new office which bears both of their names, hehe.

Office manager Mi-young greets them, and before Jin-wook can ask Yi-deum which desk she’d prefer, she slams her things down and struts out of the room. Following Yi-deum out into the hall, Jin-wook earnestly asks why she hates their new unit. Taken aback by his genuine curiosity towards something she finds so obvious, Yi-deum points out that immediately after messing with Prosecutor Oh, they were both reassigned to a department that nobody wanted, which only promises all-nighters.

Jin-wook disagrees that this is his punishment and in disbelief, Yi-deum dares him to convince her otherwise, promising to call him “oppa” if he can. Without missing a beat, Jin-wook informs her that he volunteered for the position, quickly adding that he doesn’t like it when women call him “oppa,” so she needn’t bother. Clapping in mock appreciation, Yi-deum congratulates him on willingly working in the department nobody wants… just as their new boss Prosecutor Min walks up. Oops.

We cut over to a woman on video call with her two young sons as she searches frantically through piles of paperwork. This is Prosecutor JANG EUN-JUNG, and she grows increasingly frazzled until she finally threatens to take her sons’ toys away unless they hang up. Looking up, she notices her team members, Prosecutor SEO YOO-RI and investigator GU SEOK-CHAN, and laughs awkwardly.

Everyone convenes in a conference room for a briefing and Prosecutor Min warns them that these cases require a lot of work, and their department was created to expedite the process so that victims of these devastating crimes didn’t have to relive their trauma more than absolutely necessary. She ends by saying that the more they suffer, the less the victims have to. Yi-deum waits anxiously as everyone gets their assignments, but when it’s her turn, Prosecutor Min asks to speak with her privately.

Alone in Prosecutor Min’s office, Yi-deum quickly apologizes for her earlier comments, explaining that she had actually applied to a different department. Prosecutor Min wonders why Yi-deum hadn’t expected this result after humiliating Chief Prosecutor Oh, and when Yi-deum starts to defend herself, Prosecutor Min cuts her off by saying she’s heard rumors about the way Yi-deum manipulates the media to garner attention.

Prosecutor Min goes on to say that this unit was created to protect rape victims, so Yi-deum won’t have the opportunity to boast about her victories in front of cameras, and that if she doesn’t like it, she can always resign. Yi-deum quickly backpedals, announcing that her dream is to retire as a prosector, and promises to work hard.

Out in the hall, though, Yi-deum scoffs and grumbles that when her two years here are up, Prosecutor Min will be begging her to stay. She bumps into Prosecutor Jang, who asks if Yi-deum received a special case from Prosecutor Min. She didn’t, but she doesn’t deny it.

Extending her hand, Prosecutor Jang says she hopes to get along, commenting that she’d never expected to work with the “infamous” Yi-deum. Ignoring Prosecutor Jang’s outstretched hand, Yi-deum excuses herself and stalks off, canceling a call from an unknown number as she goes.

At a graduation ceremony, a female professor hands out best thesis awards while a young man watches from the hallway with a menacing glare. Afterwards, he storms into her office and demands to know why his thesis wasn’t accepted. She coldly tells him that it was below the standard and though he begs her to look at it again, she’s firm that her decision is final.

When he refuses to leave, she gets up to go but he blocks her path. She calls him a disappointment and he shoves her, causing her to fall back on the couch. Her tone fierce, she demands to know what he’s doing but grows nervous as his eyes trail down her body to her skirt… and everything freezes as we switch to Mi-young briefing Jin-wook and Yi-deum on the attempted rape case.

Playing a CCTV clip, Mi-young explains that the act was interrupted by the arrival of a female student returning the professor’s laptop, and in the video we see a girl open the professor’s door seconds before the young man (which we now know is the professor’s TA) comes running out. Jin-wook asks if they have any more evidence and Mi-young admits that they haven’t inspected the young man for DNA yet, so all they have are the tape and the witness testimony.

At the university hospital, Yi-deum sits down with the victim, Professor Sun, to record her testimony. Quietly, Professor Sun tells them that the TA came to her office reeking of alcohol and with a crazed look in his eyes. It was almost time for the building to be closed from the outside and fearing being locked in with him, she had decided to leave.

In a flashback, she had told him they’d talk tomorrow, but he’d blocked her path, saying that she couldn’t just leave. She had gently repeated they’d talk when he was sober but he had pushed her back on the couch, causing her skirt to rise up. He had then held her wrists down with one hand, and in the present, she lets her words trail off.

Crying, Professor Sun admits that she was ashamed, but her expression suddenly grows hard as she recounts the words he’d said to her: “Women born to wealthy parents will never get over themselves until they are taught a lesson.” After that, she had told him to stop, threatening to sue him, but he had responded by choking her.

The scene cuts to the distraught TA, Nam Woo-sung, vehemently denying the accusations to Jin-wook in an interrogation room. Calmly, Jin-wook tells him that being emotional won’t help and that instead, he should explain his side of the story. Shakily, Woo-sung admits that he’s in debt from tuition and the past two years had been a struggle. He desperately needs to graduate and we see in his flashback that Professor Sun had called him and his thesis worthless.

Enraged, Woo-sung had shoved her against a bookshelf and strangled her. Admitting to the assault, Woo-sung denies that there was any sexual contact and Jin-wook exchanges a glance with Mi-young, who pushes her laptop forward. Jin-wook pulls up the CCTV footage that shows Woo-sung running out of the professor’s office. Woo-sung grows visibly nervous as Jin-wook wonders why his shirt was open if no sexual interaction had occurred, but he remains adamant that he’s innocent.

Back in their office, Jin-wook mulls over the case. When Yi-deum arrives, he greets her and she responds by dropping a stack of papers on his desk with an order to complete paperwork for their case by tomorrow morning. At Jin-wook’s confusion, Yi-deum explains that she’s technically his senior, so they should divide their work accordingly. Somewhat amused, Jin-wook agrees but puts the papers back on her desk, stating they still need to investigate further.

Yi-deum argues that while the assailant’s testimony is spotty, the victim is persuasive, not to mention that there was a witness. However, Jin-wook points out that the professor is in charge of Woo-sung’s thesis, so it’s unlikely that he would try to rape someone with the power to determine his future. Additionally, Jin-wook feels there’s something different with Woo-sung, but Yi-deum cuts him off and demands hard evidence. She tells him that he may have previously been a psychiatrist, but in the courtroom, evidence is what matters.

Before Jin-wook can argue, Yi-deum’s phone rings and her friend tells her she’s about to be evicted. Apparently, those calls she’d been ignoring were from her new landlord… whoops. Yi-deum runs out, promising to be back in an hour.

Jin-wook reviews the CCTV clip, looking thoughtful as he watches Woo-sung run out of the office, drop his phone, and then step back to retrieve it. His own phone rings and Jin-wook tells the person on the other end that he’ll be there right away.

Cut to: Yi-deum sitting across from Jin-wook in the realtor’s office, having just learned that they’re landlord and tenant. She asks about the apartment she’d seen him go in the first time they met and he cheerfully tells her that one belongs to his mother and Yi-deum’s apartment belongs to him. She thinks to herself that he’s showing off that he owns two apartments.

Jin-wook continues that his mother had suggested he collect rent since prosecutors don’t make much. Looking thoughtfully at Yi-deum, Jin-wook whispers something in the realtor’s ear, who then informs Yi-deum that Jin-wook has offered to lower the price for her. Unfortunately, despite his best intentions, Yi-deum finds his offer outrageously overpriced.

Walking out together, Jin-wook tells her to let him know when she decides on her move-out date. She looks over at him pathetically, then takes a deep breath and shoves him up against the wall. As he rubs his jarred elbow, Yi-deum laughs and says she hadn’t wanted to seem petty, but she’d barely been able to get her deposit by taking a high interest loan from the bank. Additionally, she still owes student loans, and skimps on clothes, cosmetics, and meals.

Grabbing and shaking him by the collar, Yi-deum cries that she’s barely surviving and asks if he can’t cut her a better deal. Jin-wook sheepishly argues that he’s already giving her a great deal and as her yells suddenly deepen into a monstrous howl… she snaps back to reality, having imagined the whole thing.

Yi-deum says that since her landlord wants her out, she needs to find a new place instead of returning to the office… but the anger is completely lost on Jin-wook, who agrees that’s probably a good idea. He starts to leave but suddenly turns back and Yi-deum smiles pleasantly, hoping he’s reconsidered, but Jin-wook asks her to look at something strange he saw on the CCTV footage.

Back at work, Jin-wook replays the clip for Yi-deum and he wonders aloud why, after just being caught attempting rape, Woo-sung didn’t grab his dropped phone and run, but stood and stared at the screen for two full seconds. Uninterested, Yi-deum guesses he had cracked the screen but Jin-wook asks her to think again and something in his tone gives her pause. As they both stare at the monitor, she realizes that either Woo-sung’s phone had just rung, or he was in the middle of a call.

As it turns out, Woo-sung’s call records show he was talking to someone when the attempted rape occurred and Jin-wook and Yi-deum run off to pay the caller a visit. Having assumed it was Woo-sung’s girlfriend, the two are surprised to discover the caller is a man. He tells them that Woo-sung has a bad habit of leaving his phone on after a call and they had still been connected that night.

The man confirms that Woo-sung is not the assailant, but the victim of the rape, and that he’d recorded the call proving it. Yi-deum asks if Woo-sung was aware there was a recording proving his innocence, why he had chosen not to share it. The man twitches his fingers nervously and Jin-wook notices the ring on his hand—the same ring Woo-sung wears—and correctly guesses they’re dating.

Woo-sung’s boyfriend explains that Professor Sun would surely look for the person that submitted the tape, discovering Woo-sung’s sexuality and destroying his career. Jin-wook promises to try and convince Woo-sung, but Yi-deum cuts him off, pointing out that the phone is now evidence and she can just get a warrant—unless he wants to hand it over now.

In the interrogation room, Woo-sung listens to the recording with Yi-deum and Jin-wook, clenching his fists as we now hear Professor Sun hitting on him while he begged her to stop. Yi-deum stops the tape and tells Woo-sung that his charges will be dropped and Professor Sun investigated, but he refuses. He tells them that he’ll be forever branded as a weak man who was assaulted by a woman, or worse, outed as a homosexual.

Yi-deum starts to argue but Jin-wook speaks up and says that the reason rape victims come forward is because they want the perpetrator to be prosecuted and suffer even a fraction of what they did. He then says that he had suspected Woo-sung of being the true victim from the start, because he had seen a trait shared by all rape victims: self blame. Then we see flashes of Professor Sun touching his leg and hair, kissing him, pushing him down on the couch and ripping open his shirt, all the while smiling.

Jin-wook:“From the moment it happened until now, you were probably blaming yourself. Because I’m gay, because I’m a student, because I’m not manly enough. But Nam Woo-sung, you didn’t do anything wrong at all. It was Professor Sun’s fault.”

Breaking down in tears, Woo-sung says that even with his testimony, there’s no guarantee Professor Sun will face punishment, but Jin-wook promises to do his best to find evidence, starting with his testimony.

Investigator Gu rummages through a clothing disposal bin and finds the shirt and pants Woo-sung had worn the night of the assault, from which they pull Professor Sun’s fingerprints. Jin-wook also tells Prosecutor Min that the eye witness testimony was proven to be false. Confused, Yi-deum wonders why they’re taking the long way around when they have the recording evidence. When Prosecutor Min says that would risk exposing the victim’s sexuality, Yi-deum asks why that matters.

Reminding her that Woo-sung was willing to be framed for rape in order to keep his sexuality hidden, Jin-wook asks what Yi-deum plans to do if she tries to use the recording and he refuses to testify. Quickly jumping in to prevent further argument, Prosecutor Min suggests they use the evidence they’ve collected so far to get Professor Sun to confess.

Professor Sun sits in the interrogation room across from Yi-deum and Jin-wook. Yi-deum shows her the fingerprint evidence from Woo-sung’s clothes and questions how it’s possible when Professor Sun had claimed Woo-sung had held her wrists to prevent her from fighting back. Jin-wook adds that the witness testimony had also been falsified.

Changing tactics, Professor Sun asks if they’re accusing her of attacking a healthy young man but neither prosecutor is budging and they urge her to confess for a lighter sentence. Suddenly, she drops the weak victim act and menacingly asks if they really expect her to become a female rapist. She stands and informs them she’ll be getting a lawyer.

Elsewhere, former Chief of Police Jo Gap-soo has returned to being a lawyer, and after winning his most recent case, announces that he’ll be running for mayor. Back at his law firm, a young female lawyer, HEO YOON-KYUNG (Kim Min-seo), informs him they just received Professor Sun’s case and he’s surprised that she’s the assailant and not the victim. He’s tickled further to discover that the prosecutors on the case are from Prosecutor Min’s division and suggests that Lawyer Heo take charge.

In a meeting with the judge, Jin-wook requests a closed trial in order to minimize damage to the victim. Lawyer Heo pipes up that her client is the one suffering, because she’s already been branded on the internet as a female rapist. Jin-wook points out that his argument supports a closed trial, and the judge agrees, but Professor Sun says that the scandal has already lost her her job and her children. Tearfully, she asserts that the only way to recover her family is to prove her innocence in a public trial, but Yi-deum scoffs that being found guilty in front of everyone should be a bigger concern.

With neither party willing to bend, the judge decides to carry on with an open trial. Out in the hall, Professor Sun drops the victim act and storms up to Woo-sung, slapping him across the face. She vows to destroy him for all the crap she’s going through before spinning on her heel and walking away.

Lawyer Heo catches Woo-sung, asking loudly if he’s okay before leaning in to whisper, “Why do you want to win against a weak woman? You should stop here before something bad happens.” Yi-deum calls her on trying to threaten him, but Lawyer Heo says she was merely giving him advice.

The trial begins and Jo Gap-soo smiles at Prosecutor Min from his vantage point as the judge announces the case. Jin-wook makes his opening case and Laywer Heo has to remind Professor Sun to look like a victim because she’s glaring daggers. As soon as Jin-wook finishes, Lawyer Heo denies the charges. She argues that it’s ridiculous for a middle-aged woman to sexually assault a healthy young man and that he not fight back.

They move on to the fingerprint evidence and Jin-wook points out that the residue left behind shows that there was great force used, but Lawyer Heo submits a reenactment tape where the “victim” is fighting the “assailant,” resulting in roughly the same residue levels. Jin-wook is annoyed, and although Professor Sun smiles to herself, Yi-deum seems strangely unperturbed.

Next, Woo-sung takes the stand and Yi-deum questions him. She plays devil’s advocate, asking why he went to Professor Sun’s office late that night rather than waiting until the next morning (he was anxious and final decisions on thesis were due by morning). He says that he had asked why his thesis failed and Professor Sun had offered to show him the corrections she’d made, but while he was looking through them, she began to touch his thigh. Yi-deum argues that it could’ve been unintentional, but Woo-sung clarifies that she had been squeezing his thigh.

When asked, Woo-sung answers that he was not aroused and continues that Professor Sun had then begun kissing him. Yi-deum asks if he had enjoyed it and when Woo-sung replies that he hated it, she asks why he let it continue instead of pushing her away. Pushing, she asks if he saw the professor as a woman, since he allowed her to even remove his clothing despite claiming to hate it.

Growing angry, Woo-sung points out that his thesis was on the line, but Yi-deum wonders if it’s really more important than his pride as a man. He asks her if she knows how much his tuition costs, and how many hours he needs to study to achieve his doctorate, asking what he was supposed to do if he upset his professor and got kicked out. Unrelenting, Yi-deum argues that if his degree was so important, he should’ve endured until the end.

Finally, Woo-sung breaks and says he should’ve done just that. If only he had allowed it to happen, his thesis would’ve been accepted and he wouldn’t have to be in court. “I… was wrong,” he says, struggling to hold back tears.

When Lawyer Heo takes her turn, she tries to play on the idea of revenge. She asks how he felt after his thesis was rejected and pulls up some comments he’d made on social media complaining about Professor Sun. He argues that they’re taken out of context and the judge agrees, but Lawyer Heo has a different goal. She points out that he only messaged one person and asserts that the young man who received his messages is actually his boyfriend of three years and that he’s gay.

She feigns a technical mistake and flashes a picture of Woo-sung and his boyfriend kissing before pulling it down with a quick apology. Furious, Jin-wook calls her out on invading his client’s privacy, but before the judge can even say anything, Lawyer Heo continues that while a straight man would’ve either enjoyed the sexual advances or fended them off, a homosexual, who doesn’t like women, could only have plotted to frame an innocent woman for rape. Enraged, Woo-sung lunges at Lawyer Heo and begins to choke her, and has to be dragged away.

Lawyer Heo is satisfied, but oddly, Jin-wook also catches Yi-deum smiling. Professor Sun is next to take the stand and she cites her privilege and prestige, asking what she could possibly gain from raping a student. When it’s Yi-deum’s turn to ask questions, to Jin-wook’s horror, she presents the phone call recording. There’s nothing he can do, even as Yi-deum explains that despite initially opting against using the tape out of respect for the victim, the defense’s invasion of his privacy has already exposed the matter of his sexuality, and therefore there’s no reason to withhold the recording any longer.

As Yi-deum speaks, Lawyer Heo thinks back to the day before when she’d noticed a phone on the bathroom sink in the courthouse, and witnessed a series of messages from Jin-wook to Yi-deum advising that they have Woo-sung seal his social media accounts to hide his connection with his boyfriend. At the same time, Jin-wook comes to the same conclusion as he remembers Yi-deum asking to borrow his phone before running off to the bathroom, and then her odd smile when Lawyer Heo had exposed Woo-sung’s sexuality.

Jo Gap-soo watches with amusement, and Prosecutor Min with disappointment, as Professor Sun shakes with rage and terror while the recording plays. She declares it a fabrication and shrieks that she’s being framed as Lawyer Heo glares daggers at Yi-deum. Jin-wook looks to the victim, who sits in hollow defeat, a single tear tracing down his face. The only happy face among them is Yi-deum’s.

Court dismissed, Jin-wook rounds on Yi-deum for her betrayal, accusing her of leaking Woo-sung’s sexuality. She doesn’t deny it, saying that regardless, they won. Jin-wook repeats her words with disgust and demands to know whether she even cares how Woo-sung felt. Looking him in the eye, she asks why she should: “I’m a prosecutor, not a lawyer.”

And with that, Yi-deum struts out of the courtroom to face the waiting reporters.

 
COMMENTS

Wow! What an episode.

This show covers such delicate material but it’s done so tastefully. I love the twist in this episode where the actual aggressor was a woman against a male victim, because this is a very real problem that often goes undiscussed due to gender biases. As ridiculous as Lawyer Heo’s argument was, it is a sad truth that people do tend to think that men cannot be sexually victimized, especially by a woman. The added layer of Woo-sung’s sexuality only made the ordeal more heartbreaking because of the lengths he was willing to go to in order to keep his secret safe, and the way it was used against him, both by the defense and the prosecution.

Professor Sun, on the other hand, made a fantastic villain. She was cold and calculating, playing up the image of a weak woman to her favor. Wealthy and entitled, she felt that she could get away with anything and although the method was wrong, it was so satisfying to see her exposed.

Some may disagree, but I adore Yi-deum. She definitely made mistakes in this episode and I fully expect her to pay for them, but despite her flaws, I admire her spunk. She’s not afraid to call others on their crap and despite her sassy exterior, she has her fears and insecurities. She feels like a real person with a twisted ideology on justice and a moral compass that doesn’t point due north. I’m excited to watch her heal and grow. On the flip side, Jin-wook is too pure for this world and I’m looking forward to him guiding Yi-deum back on the right track.

It’s only the first week, but so far, I really do like this show. Here’s to hoping it keeps up the good momentum!

 
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I'll probably play devil's advocate but I actually somewhat support what Yi-Deum did. I mean, here is a rapist and a case against her. If they lost (and I believe that would have happened) she would go free and be more careful next time. So, prosecutors should have taken in consideration not only this victim but the other potential one, as well.
To say it shortly, I agree with what Yi-Deum did, but I hope getting her name out there was a pleasant bonus and not a main goal for her actions.

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I agree with her too but I kind of wish there was some other way to get justice without outing the defendant. But no matter how many times I try to find another way, he will get hurt... Yi-Deum is incredible though. Impressively manipulative. I really couldn't get mad at her whilst characters with the similar personalities infuriate me. Good job, Jung Ryeo-Won!

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I agree with this

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I agreee. !!. you are not supposed to like her tricks but i cant help myself and be impressed when she baffles her opponent.

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Am with you. I've said this on the OT and will say it again: As the prosecutor she represents the state and not the victim. Her job is to get the (rightful) conviction - that's how she justifies the salary she is being paid. The victim cannot demand that crucial information be withheld, only that the proceedings be held in camera. Which was asked and denied.

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Also - I think she is searching for her mother. Which is why she wants to get her name out, and says it boldly and clearly, each time. Speculation ^^

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Yeah, not that the lawyer's arguments weren't ridiculous, but they were losing that trial and the victim would've ended up a convicted rapist, which definitely wouldn't have been good for his future either. Yi-deum was being ruthless and has zero empathy, but it was a terrible situation for the victim overall, and at the very least that woman will be in prison

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Agree with you. Like she said, she is a prosecutor. Her job is to punish the crime. I am feeling sorry for the guy tho, because she plays dirty (because she orchestrated it) but that professor must be punished and everyone doesn't make it easy for her to punish the professor. I am little bit conflicted with the way she deals the case, which is why this drama is so deliciously satisfying. I guess this theme (sensitivity towards the victim vs prosecuting the bad guys) will be explored more in the future, and Ma Yi Deum's journey will be gratifying to watch, because we will be dealing with 'uncomfortable' issues like this.

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I totally agree with you as well and I'm glad someone actually feels the same way about her. She's really gutsy and her method may not be right but it's definitely satisfying to see her take down the villain even if she has to play dirty too. Not to mention jung ryeo won plays her so well I can't help but love her

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I love it 😊😍😁

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I like that this drama goes into grey areas. We want the professor to be punished for what she did yet we are the the consequences of using the phone call may cause even more harm to the ta.

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This might turn out to be the best legal drama of 2017!!!

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Crossing my fingers and hoping for that !

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I am so intrigue with this show and loving that I am so drawn how the writer will keep it satisfying. The last two drama series I watched that tackles sensitive issues were Signal (though with “powers.”) and Romantic Dr Kim. This is a proof that Korea does not have to buy and remake an American drama made by American for Americans.

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Damn what an episode !You really dont want to be on the other side of her dangerous smirk....because that means you just got played and your ass handed to you. I love her. She ticks off all the making of a badass character. Morally grey and cunning.

The 1st episode was very good but what got me really impressed was the 2nd episode .They handle a very sensitive and unique case , suprised they had the guts to do in that conservative country.
As I already pointed out , I love this type of morally grey character. Obviously you are not supposed to like her when she uses those unethical tricks but you cant help yourself and be impressed when she pulls it off :p .. atleast for my case. . And at the end when she says that why should she care, She is not a lawyer , She is prosecutor.. you are not supposed to like her at that moment but she still manages to look like a badass..
I felt kinda sorry for the victim but it would have been very hard to prove her crime without that solid evidence and they were already loosing. And was kinda disturbed by victim's choking tendencies. He admits to chocking the professor when he got angry and then after that he tried to choke the lawyer also...

Anyway I hope they continue to resolve a case per episode rather than dragging a case for multiple episodes and I hope we see more of her being evil , using tricks and also her becoming better person
NOW wait for the next episode begins 😣😣.
P.s just pointing out in Ma Yi

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I'm worried that he might choke yi deum because he's angry with her.

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Jung Ryeo-won is great as Yi-deum! Her acting is so spot on. I've seen her in Bubblegum, but she's so much better here.

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That court scene was so complicated and played so well. I was so worried when Woo-sung reacted to the prodding by Lawyer Heo and grabbed her neck. Nearly all the characters were in the wrong in some way, and I was uncertain how the trial would end. I do not know if there was a good way to resolve the issue.
I do wonder though, there was the female student who was a witness, what did she really see, and why did she not come forward in the end? It seems like she maybe only saw a brief moment of the struggle, did she assume that the male was the instigator because of gender biases?

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It could be a gender bias or she is also a student of the said professor and was told to be quiet.

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it was mentioned in the episode that she gave a false testimony in favour of the Professor (most likely in return for better grades)

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heol.daebak!
yi-deum reminds me so much of lawyer Jang Hye-Sung (I Hear Your Voice) - fierce and...okay, (sometimes) savage ^^; i am loving her already and yass! finally! there will be a kdrama which i'll look forward to every week (forest of secrets left kdramaland just months ago and it already felt like forever); Witch's Court, thank you for reviving me ^^

P.S. I wish the cast and staff all the best!

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YES!!!

I am so happy with the way this case was handled, and the material in this case. The gay man was not demonized, shunned by his prosecutors, or portrayed as a caricature, and the show tactfully explained the unfortunate consequences of being queer in South Korea. You just don't see this delicate portrayal in the majority of dramas (*cough* SWBDS *cough*). I think the last drama that really impressed me with their handling of homosexuality was TGW - and Yoon Hyun-min played the gay man! A coincidence?? I love Yoon Hyun-min

And also showing that sexual assault does not just apply to women, but can happen to men as well?? Icing on the cake.

I really hope this drama continues to show us these complex cases. Don't let me down!!

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sorry what drama was TGW ??

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The Good Wife

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As always, watching a flawed character is always so interesting because they're much relatable than those who are already perfect and can do no wrong.

On the other side, I felt bad for the TA, as you've mentioned when the trial ended no one was smiling except Yi-deum. I get the feeling that after this trial, the head of CAGU may not give her cases despite her capabilities.

But still, kudos to Jung Ryeo-won for making an easily irritating character on paper to be such a charming bad-ass.

She feels like a real person with a twisted ideology on justice and a moral compass that doesn’t point due north. I’m excited to watch her heal and grow. --------- did you read my mind?

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A moral compass that points straight at herself.

I'm look forward to see her gain some humanity. I wonder what will have to happen to bring her down enough for her to be able to see other people as more than obstacles in her race to win.

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I can't stand Yi-deum, I've worked around an attorney or two like that before. She cares mainly about herself and has a heart of stone. She doesn't care about the victim. I will continue to watch for her comeuppance.

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This might be my drama crack after tkl. I know Yi deum character might not be some people's taste but I guess I can relate based on the things she's been through in her life. She knows that as a woman opportunities for you are so limited to the extent that is kinda scary,for her to be successful she has to let go of the human and moral aspect of her life. And also for her to get her moms attention, which is why she's always mentioning her name before the reporters. And her method of winning might not sit well with some but sometimes morality has to be let go for justice to prevail that is to clean a dirty system you might have to play dirtier and smarter. I adore jin-wook but I guess life hasn't really dealt with him that much cos he's just too pure and he believes so much in the system but in reality there is thin line between morality and justice. Can't wait for the next episodes to see how these two will later balance with each other

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this is totally on point ^^

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Totally agree !

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And her method of winning might not sit well with some but sometimes morality has to be let go for justice to prevail that is to clean a dirty system you might have to play dirtier and smarter.

If this was an American drama, this scenario while still reprehensible, would be slightly less problematic. We have been dealing with these issues in the public sphere where it's generally more acceptable to be gay. The problem as played out here is that the scenario is framed in a conservative society. So saying that morality has to be sacrificed for justice to prevail is like saying which hand do choose to get chopped off because you'll definitely be loosing one. The trade-off for getting the conviction was not worth it. In Yi-deum's mind she is a prosecutor, not a defence lawyer, so the end justifies the means.

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yes it does feel like she just killed the victim in a different way. or at the very least chopped his left hand instead of his right hand like you've just said.

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I don't really agree with the comment. I refuse to believe that we have to let go of humanity of humanity to win a case, in this case the boy was in a vulnerable situation and his position needed a careful consideration, which yi deum refused to acknowledge. I would say jin wook was in the right track and we need sensible people like him in these sectors too IMO who isn't just thinking about the cases for own selfish reasons. Even in the first episode she agreed to help the reporter 'only' after she got to know that the promotion isn't happening. I don't think justice should be served only when it works for our benefit. Suppose the case is about a girl who got pregnant as somehow and keeping it a secret from the society, what will she face if someone like yi deum precariously exposed it ? Also since there are prosecutors I'm sure if they gave more time to this case it was possible to win even without the information. But I guess that's the purpose of this show. To give her the lessons she need to be a better prosecutor who work for people. We do need people like jin wook who's so perceptive and understand how yo handle these victims since he has as a psychiatry background.

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*we have to let go of humanity to win a case.

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I like the case presented in the second ep cause it's something that people like to brush off but the homosexual touch is idk, a bit unneeded or I feel like it's an easy way in the storytelling to feel more sympathised with the victim.

In one way, I hope it's not there cause I want to see a drama when a straight man just get accused by a woman. I mean a straight man that actually can control their urge without any other implication and just because they don't want to do it with her. There is also this stigma that if a man doesn't want to be with a woman, they are 100% gay which also unfounded, some people just don't want to do it with that woman.

In another way, this case shows that Yideum stands on her own ground without caring much about the victim, especially when she knows that she is on the right side.

For the case, I think the recorder needs to be out there for the better cause that woman is dangerous and he is a victim, it just I hope it doesn't need to be that way [hurting the victim].

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There is also this stigma that if a man doesn't want to be with a woman, they are 100% gay which also unfounded, some people just don't want to do it with that woman.

I agree with you. This is why adding that the victim is gay cheapens the crime against him and takes away from the serious case of (heterosexual) male rape.

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I agree with what you're saying, straight men can absolutely be assaulted and raped by women.

However, I think the homosexuality of the man was brought to illustrate the need to keep this case private and consider victims. By exposing his homosexuality, Yi-deum essentially ruined of the victim life and career just to win her case, since being gay in conservative South Korea is extremely not accepted. The case illustrated the need to consider the victim's feelings during cases (publicizing his homosexuality ruined his future) and especially Yi-deum's lack of consideration (winning her case and punishing the woman was more important than protecting the victim).

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yeah I understand their message for this ep regarding yi deum but I just hope that this two-issue can be separated.
This homosexuality-related case can be brought in for almost any other cases [even robbery] and not just sexual assault but by using it here, it still upping the agenda that straight men definitely can't be raped by a woman.

I feel like they missed the opportunity since I saw many people get called for alleged sexual harassment when they are the victim of a hatred and false accusation.

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the thing is that her department IS focused on sexual assault. there definitely other crimes that could happen to homosexual males just as easily as heterosexual males but Yideum wouldn't be involved in it so there would be no point to it in this specific drama.

Also it's not like it doesn't happen to homosexual males either, it does happen and I'm glad for one that it's talked about in a drama.

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oh yeah, it definitely related because the department is focused on the sexual assault, that 's why I think that both of them can be a different case.
It doesn't always need to be related to the victim sexuality and the character who is homosexual can't always portray as the victim, there is another way as in robbery + sexual assault or the homosexual couple become a witness that is unwilling to testify rather than a victim.

I don't necessarily dislike this route but I think they just missed a mark to make it better.

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@xiaojingyan—Given that the prosecutors work in CAGU (Crimes Against Girls Unit) instead of something like SVU (Sexual Victims Unit), I wonder if they would even take a case of male rape. The only way the writers could address it was through this makjang.

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I'm counting down the days to episode 3. And keeping my fingers crossed that the TA doesn't attempt to harm himself. Because something tells me present Yi-deum wouldn't give a sh!t if that happens. But I still am intrigued by her and how everyone at work will handle the aftermath of the case. Plus, she seems to have caught Jo Gap-soo's attention which is in no way a good thing. Nothing screams warning signs like the man who possibly raped and killed your mother actually approving of your actions.

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How much do I love that Ma Yi-deum is not the perfect protagonist? So so so much! She's so very flawed, which is why her growth and redemption will be even more beautiful to watch. I don't necessarily agree with her actions, but I understand where she's coming from. I also like that so far, she's been acting consistently to her character. Overall, I don't see any complicated plotting yet, but the story is flowing smoothly. Good start.

We know so much about Yi-deum and virtually nothing about Jin-wook so, even if he is the "better" person, I'm having a harder time connecting to him. I hope we get to know more of his backstory in the next couple of episodes.

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I was really torn with this episode. It combined two very controversial issues in one making it all the more controversial: male rape and homosexuality. In that way, I think it was done more for the ratings than it was done for the sensitivity of the issues. I'm really annoyed and think I might end up rambling, but here goes.

I should preface by saying the following. Rape is rape, no matter who it's done against and who perpetrates it. Furthermore, reports of rape cases are still relatively low in relation to their occurrences. Having said that, even in Western societies, male rape is viewed as: something that cannot happen to men or flipped to being an achievement for men. If it's viewed as rape--forced and unwanted penetration etc--then there is a stigma attached to the victim. He is suddenly not strong enough or man enough to prevent it from happening to him.

I have not spent any length of time in Korea, however, I have lived in very conservative countries where homosexuality is either illegal or it can cost you your career and more. What Yi-Deum did--or more accurately what she was written to do--was utterly reprehensible and cavalier. I can only venture to guess what might happen to Woo-sung now. What annoyed me most though is that LGBTQI characters are rarely represented in K-Dramas. It would be unrealistic for every representation to be a positive one. Furthermore, this could unfortunately be life. We can't cherry-pick when reality often gives us bitter pills to swallow. But why would you combine the rape case and homosexuality in one!? It felt like the easy and salacious way out. If the object was to dislike Yi-deum, they succeeded. All wasn't bad though. The gay couple were not caricatures and were portrayed as committed to each other. I also really appreciated that the Jin-wook was the voice of reason in this whole mess. For a male character to be sympathetic to and fight for a male victim of rape who happened to be gay was awesome. I feel like I made little sense in this whole comment but argh, I'm annoyed. I finally get to see some LGBTQI representation, and it turned out to be this.

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Nope. You made perfect sense in your comment and perfectly articulated every single thing I was feeling about the episode. Thank you.

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"What Yi-Deum did--or more accurately what she was written to do--was utterly reprehensible and cavalier. I can only venture to guess what might happen to Woo-sung now." - Exactly!

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I agree. Yi-deum is right that her job is to get a conviction, and I agree with others that say that as a prosecutor, their duty is to uphold law and represent the state. However, never does Yi-deum herself say that. She says she is a prosecutor, and in theory yes they uphold law. Prosecutors also want to get a conviction no matter if the one prosecuted is guilty or innocent. She used her job as a reason to not care about the victim, she never said she did it because it was her duty. SHE did it to win and get attention. Thus, the question isn't so much if the action was good or bad, but the INTENTION behind it.

Not to mention, she is never about doing the right thing. She is about winning and thus being right by default. If she had been on the rapist's side, she would have been just as happy (I mean, did you ever see her take the rape victim seriously? Or the way she rolled her eyes when she found out he was gay? She only cares if it is about her, even the reporter's case last episode was because she was afraid for herself). She is the villain's goon that just happens to be surrounded by good people, doing everything just to win.

I hate her personality and intentions, but as a character I am intruigued and want to see how she develops. I hope most of all that she is not easily forgiven. Not just "I'm sorry I was wrong", I want everyone to remember what she did, because she can never fully realize what she did outing someone to a sensationalist and conservative country, not to uphold justice as an actual prosecutor, but to win and get attention. And as I said last episode, she can claim she did it to find her mother as much as she want, but that only explains her actions; I personally would be ashamed to have her as a daughter if I knew what she did.

If she does these despicable things with her selfish intentions and is forgiven just because she regrets it or says sorry, she is not relatable because she is "flawed" or grey. She is a Mary Sue.

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Agree 100% with everything you're saying @Pensola. Thank you and thank you!

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I hope most of all that she is not easily forgiven. Not just "I'm sorry I was wrong", I want everyone to remember what she did, because she can never fully realize what she did outing someone to a sensationalist and conservative country, not to uphold justice as an actual prosecutor, but to win and get attention.

I'm not going to hold my breath for that one. Well, actually, given that the we see all these actions early on, it is a possibility that her hopeful contrition would be something meaningful if it happens later on. It's just that K-dramas have an abysmal track record of showing meaningful repentance for villainous acts. But given the story and being one of the leads might change this.

In hindsight, I was really wrapped up in what happened to Woo-sung that I didn't really put her previous actions and motives into context.

Reading many of the other comments, I'm reminded of the adage "the law is an ass."

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I don't want her to give some meaningful contribution to be forgiven, I want her to work her butt off to prove she at least understands the severity of what she did, and still not be trusted or liked. Right now the people at CAGU admire or at least respect her, but I want them to glare at her and ignore her, and she will not care because she does not mind as long as her goals are kept. But over time she understands, but she still has to work to prove to them that she has changed, but they won't get convinced. She does not see the big picture; she does not even see the picture, she is looking at a hand-mirror of herself this entire time, while her pencil is making a mess of everyone's hard and genuine work.

I played Tales of the Abyss once, where the protagonist is a jerkass who accidentally did something horrible and loses everyone's trust. He regrets it and vows to become a better person, but everyone and even his best friend treat him differently and never let him get away with it, even when they eventually admit he changed for the better. I want that to happen to Yu-deum. Being "relatable" is not about not being a perfect person and getting away with it. If I am to relate to the female lead when she is a selfish, ego-centric villain (because I honestly do not think she would blink an eye on working for the man who raped her mother, and only reason she would react would again be selfish - That is HER mom, not someone else's!), I need to have the world not bend its morals to forgive her. She MUST work to earn forgiveness, and that is why I don't know if I will like this drama. Because as you said, kdramas rarely show these kind of people deserving the repentance they get ("Rooftop Prince"'s sister springs to mind), but the actor is doing such a good job making the character despicably self-confident and ego-centric that I almost expect them to make her get kicked in the face.

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I definitely get you with her having to work her butt off and earn forgiveness. However, reminding someone time and again of their past misconduct in the face of their real hard earned change is tricky. Sure, we must not forget less the sins of the past be repeated. On a macro level that's much easier to do. On a micro level, it's like having a criminal record. Hmmm...well, when I think about it that way, it does make sense--totally subjective of course.

Tangent: You're a gamer!? W00T! The only Tales game I've played is Tales of Vesperia.

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Hmm, this seems like a very bloodthirsty way of looking at it. Requiring this kind of abject and repetitive humility in the face of someone's sincere repentance seems cruel.

Also, I'm not convinced that Yi-deum did anything that wrong in the first place to warrant this level of hate. She did her job as a prosecutor. Let's not forget that Professor Sun is a rapist and has probably done this to other people/will do it in the future. Yi-deum is doing what she can to protect society from that. There is a lot of worth in that even if she was doing it for the wrong reasons.

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@hades Yeah, I am probably just very angry with her because of how wonderfully the actress played her with that smile and attitude. Considering what she did - taking someone's agency away from them and reveal it against their will ONLY TO WIN FOR HER OWN SAKE - and still smile like that, I want it to at least stay for a long time. Not the rest of the series, but longer than two episodes. I am reminded of "Seven-Days Queen" when Yeok lied to Chae-Kyung (for her own sake in his mind, which is more than I could ever say about Yi-deum), Chae-Kyung said that she could no longer trust Yeok completely, even if she never loved him any less. And that stayed for the rest of the show. She loved him just as much and tried to help him, but when he rescued her and told her to trust him, she said "No, I won't trust you. Protect my family and then rescue me, then I will trust you." It was not in a mean way, but she was honest in the fact that she couldn't trust him to actually protect her and her family even if she wanted to. (and in the end, knowing how real history went down, he couldn't)

And yes, I play games! I liked Vesperia's graphics, but its protagonist Yuri was what I'm afraid they will make Yi-deum; he did bad things and killed people for HIS version of justice, and for the greater good. But as soon as his friend's life endangers the world and she begs him to kill her to save the world, he refuses because then the greater good matters not. And NOBODY brings up his hypocrisy and treats him like a cool, mysterious Robin Hood.

@Jibber Jabber Drama, I think I said it earlier, I know a prosecutor upholds the law. But ignore that and listen to what SHE says. She said she did it to win, and only brings up being a prosecutor so she doesn't have to care about the victim. IF she did it to uphold the law, I would disagree with her, but I could at least understand it. But she is not doing this to protect society, she wants to win in a flashy way to get media attention. If she had been prosecuting against the gay man, which she was initially, she was just as happy without really caring about the other details. If she won that case and the victim got branded as a rapist, she wouldn't care because it is not about upholding justice for her, it is about her side winning and her getting the glory for it. The only good thing about her is that she actually worked for the glory, instead of hogging it for something she didn't do. But even then, again, SHE was willing to let him get branded a rapist, it was the male lead who worked hard to find evidence against the rapist, and she used it for her own glory.

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@pensola

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this one. Prosecutors are out to win their cases, so I don't mind that Yi-deum was doing it only to win. And I know her motivation wasn't to protect society, but that's what the result was- that's what I think has worth.

And your point about her working to prosecute the gay man and wanting to win- that's her job. That's due process in action. It is for the defence to present the better case and for the judge to decide on the arguments.

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But why would you combine the rape case and homosexuality in one!? It felt like the easy and salacious way out.

Well said, @hades! I call bullshit on this faux-progressive inclusion of a gay rape victim. It could've been worse but Woo-sung's suffering is still a means to illustrate differences of character between Yi-deum and Jin-wook.

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Can I just point out how ridiculous it is that the perpetrator was allowed to sit across a table from the victim/survivor (in the scene before the judge)? It's ridiculous and completely insensitive - if a woman was the subject of an attempted rape, there is no way the accused would be allowed that close.

Also, the evidence in Court is rubbish as always. Unverified, speculative tapes, last minute evidence, no affidavits, statements, police involvement. :D The lawyer in me laughs. Dramaland's Courts must be incredibly free - to be able to hold a trial within 3 days, and to not bother with procedure and evidence.

I love Ma Yi Deum, and am super passionate about the subject of the show, but legal procedure as always, leaves me laughing and cringing at the same time. ^^;

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Hahaha I gave up wishing for more realistic legal procedure in the drama.

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As a nurse, I struggle with medical shows in this exact same way.

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what did you think about RDTK though?

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I personally would love a highly unrealistic drama that took place in a library (titled "What happens in the library, stays in the library"... we were a little bored that lesson) with just a punch of weird shenanigans. However, it helps that I haven't found that many dramas or shows about libraries to be tired of. XD

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I feel people are being too lenient on Yi-deum. Yes, a prosecutor is all about preserving law and giving justice to criminals. That is their duty. But being a prosecutor is Yi-deum's job, she does it because she wants to win, because she wants the attention from the media, because then maybe her mother will see her. A mother that no doubt will be HAPPY to know all the despicable things Yi-deum has done and is willing to do without a thought in the world to find her. NEVER does she say she did it because a prosecutor upholds law. She said she did the questionable thing to win, and that she does not care about the victim's feelings because she is a prosecutor. Not that she did the questionable thing to uphold law as a prosecutor. People just say it like that was her intention, but it was not. Just like she never would have gone against her sexual predator of a boss if she did not feel angry for being lied to.

It is important to think why SHE does it, because she did not choose to become a prosecutor for law. We are easy to forgive bad behavior because of the intention behind it, but should we forgive a morally bad behavior for morally bad intentions because of the legally good results?

You know who else did not become a prosecutor for anything but for their own goals, mostly money? The villains. And while I am excited to watch the female lead dance on the edge of becoming a full-on villain, I want to make sure she DESERVES to be a hero, and not just because she is surrounded by good people and thus she MUST do the good thing. Because right now I am fully willing to believe she would have happily been on the female rapist's side, no matter who was the victim, because for her it isn't about protecting the innocent and the law, but to win as quick as possible for the media attention. I can understand people liking her as a character, but excusing her borderline homophobic behavior for her own gain isn't necessary.

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I know right? It's like a lot of people believe that because she was professionally 'right', we don't need to check if what she did was ethically or morally right. Being ousted when you're not ready, especially for a student who had clearly stated that he wouldn't be able to get a job nor can he afford to continue going an extra year in his school, is in itself a death sentence. It's terrible enough being a woman in society, but it's even more terrible being a gay person in a conservative society. Yi-deum will go on her own way, patting herself on the back and giving interviews whilst Woo-sung will be lucky if he survives through this, considering he can most likely kiss the only job he'd been hoping to get goodbye.

I also find it interesting that people can be appalled at Yoo-bum's behavior to defend a man who he knows is guilty of killing his baby brother but can't find that same level of outrage for Yi-deum outting a gay man and taking his agency from him. Is it because there's that subtle belief that 'it's no big deal'? That it's something that can be sacrificed to guarantee a win?

I hear you that she did her job as a prosecutor. And I hear you that it needed to be done to keep the rapist off the street so she wouldn't prey on another victim. But my question is this. After that very public trial, where the man's sexuality was revealed against his wishes, which LGBT+ person in the closet do you think will want their case referred to that unit ever again? Because it's just like Jin-wook said. Victims already blame themselves as it is. And that's one more thing Woo-sung will blame himself for. That he should have kept quiet, and taken the fall for something he did not do. After all, a secret he had kept for so long and wasn't ready to share with the world right at that moment would have still remained a secret.

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Exactly! And you are saying something even more true, that now even less rape victims will be willing to contact CAGU because they are afraid something like that will happen, especially non-straight people. Yi-deum is not looking at the whole picture that everyone need to paint together; she makes a mess of the painting while she looks herself in the mirror trying to imitate what she sees, and thus everyone else's hard work is ruined (horrible imaginary, sorry, but it sounded good in my head :P).

I actually find it fascinating how Yi-deum is well aware of how she as a woman is treated, but rather than finding it unfair, she goes along with it and works around it, without understanding how other women might refuse to do the same. For her, it isn't about supporting other women or marginalized people, it is about every person being for herself, even if she has to work twice as hard for half as much.

What I find interesting, is that people HATED Yoo-bum when he first defended the murderer, then thwarted a little when he showed signs of regret or at least self-awareness. But as you said, people are willing to defend Yi-deum without her showing even an ounce of self-awareness or care for her actual duty, only pretending that she does her duty when all she does is getting attention. I do feel like it has to do with multiple double standards; she is a Strong Independent Woman, so we give them more leeway because they are "badass", and she was on the Good Guys's side (by force; again I am sure she'd LOVE to be on the rapist's side if she knew the Good Guys wouldn't use the tape, because in her mind, that is an easy, flashy win), and her action was "just" outing someone's sexuality, and not defending someone who murdered his younger brother, would kill his sister and poisoned over a hundred cats. Honestly, people caring more that Yoo-bum defended a cat murderer than Yi-deum outing a closeted homosexual in a conservative country would not surprise me, unfortunately.

I'm just bugged that people don't understand the difference of "liking a character" and "approving of their actions", so they feel the need to excuse and explain her actions away as something logical and in the end for the ~greater good~. But it is okay to like a horrible, ego-centric and objectively flawed character without condoning their flaws. My guilty pleasures involve some horrible people and behavior that I would never accept in real life, but I am okay with that because just because I like second male leads like "Seven-Days Queen"'s Yeonsangun, doens't mean I condone the the atrocious things the character and real-life man did.

I mean, Yi-deum isn't relatable in any way for me (1. not being perfect is not relatable, it's freaking being normal, 2. if you relate to a borderline homophobic asshole who only works law for her own selfish reasons and who is fine with letting rapists get away because she is not involved, you need some more self-reflection),...

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Very well put. I have already accepted that unless a person is queer or an ally, it is always hard for them to consider that LGBT+ people are a minority whose rights deserve to be protected. Part of that right is being able to clothe, feed and shelter themselves which newsflash, if Woo-sung's without a job, he can't be able to do neither.

I so feel you on liking a character but also being fully aware of the amount of shadiness that the character brings. Case in point, I admire Cersei Lannister. That woman is the queen B. Strong, Independent, Callous and ruthless. A queen in her own right. Do I kid myself and try to justify her actions? No! What she's done, and the things she plans to do are abhorrent and as much as I like her, I am not going to kid myself into thinking that oh well everything she did is justified in sitting on the throne and avenging her kids. Another morally grey character I love? Annalise Keating from How to Get Away with Murder. And although Annalise has shown that she has a moral compass of some sort and there are some lines she wouldn't cross, she has still done some shady things that I am not blind to. Do I find her flawed and powerful and strong and brilliant and ruthless and woman? Yes. Do I think her perfect? No. Am I blind to her flaws? No. But I like her. Honestly, I hope Yi-deum really does get to self-reflect and grow as a character in the course of the drama and I hope they do it well enough and show remorse so we are carried along with the journey. Jamie Lannister was an incestous prick who pushed a child off a tower in an attempt to kill him, in the very first episode. His character and redemption arc have been a thing to watch and I do believe it would all come full circle when he pays the uptime sacrifice of his life to protect Bran (my theory. There's nothing in canon to support this). So yeah, I hope Yi-deum does get that development, but I also hope she retains her personality. I would take her as an Annalise any day, any time. Have her still be driven, and ruthless, and brilliant and strong and powerful, with just a hint of grey and a willingness to do almost anything to win a case. The key difference being 'almost'. Call me old fashion but I do think what differentiates a hero from a villain is the moral compass they should possess.

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👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽

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I actually agree with you and @itenoria on this point. To be honest, I don't see WHY his sexuality is relevant to this case at all. The recording of rape is very relevant, and should not be withheld. "Just because he was on the phone with a gay man, he's gay by association?" That's the line of thinking we are told to buy, the reason for orchestrating the whole big "reveal".

But It's irrelevant. He was on the phone with someone and the proceeding was recorded. How did they know each other? Friends, acquaintances, met through common friends, etc - the nature of their relationship isn't relevant. Frankly, if this had been explained to the judge beforehand, she'd have agreed to the in camera proceeding.

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"Just because he was on the phone with a gay man, he's gay by association?" That's the line of thinking we are told to buy, the reason for orchestrating the whole big "reveal".

The sad thing is is that I thought the same thing, but quickly dismissed it after.

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Because it was given only a brief mention and then just accepted by all characters without question. :/ The show gave the audience no time to dwell on it.

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I totally agree. It was simply a case of asking to talk to the judge privately and explaining Woo-sung's reasons for not wanting a public trial. But Yi-deum didn't try hard enough to get a private trial because still keeping in line with her actions, she wanted the publicity and the chance to be able to say her name aloud so as to possibly find her mother. Very interesting considering her boss had already warned her prior that in their unit, there won't be focus on the interviews, press briefings, etc because of the SENSITIVITY of their clients who have been through enough as it is. Yi-deum though seemed to have missed that memo.

I also think the reason they didn't want to submit the recording on the phone wasn't just because Woo-sung was on the phone with a gay man, but I think they had brought their relationship into the conversation at some point and had probably flirted which is why his boyfriend said he had considered removing HIS (apologies for the caps. I don't know how to italicize words on DB) own part of the conversation.

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Thank you! I've been going around for months trying to figure out how to italicize. Hehehehehehe.

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Yup. Yi Deum is a very competent lawyer. And she wants the publicity. So she didn't try particularly hard when they were speaking with the Judge. This doesn't condone what she did, but I think she has her reasons for wanting that publicity. And it's not just for a promotion.

You're right - there is probably more to the recording that does reveal their relationship. BUT none of that matters if the trial is held in camera.

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It has been theorized that she wants all the attention from the media so that her mother will see her and know where she is and hopefully come back to her. Which I understand and I could sympathize with her.

However, there is a line for everything. Yi-deum has shown no moral ground to stand on, because even in the first episode, her fear was never for the actually assaulted woman, but her fear for herself. She didn't stab her boss for justice, but because she was angry he lied to her. She was perfectly willing to let the victim be branded a rapist because she did not do proper work (imagine if that came out in the news papers! wrongly-accused man in jail because of sloppy work), she indirectly outed the victim's sexuality just to make a bigger spectacle. And as said, she could probably have convinced the judge for a closed court, since she has more experience and knows what could be used and said. But she didn't because she only wants attention. For finding her mother, yes. But again, who else joined law for other reasons than justice and to protect innocents? The villains.

There is explanation for someone's asshole and downright villainous behavior and then there is excusing it, and I wish people weren't so ready to excuse her actions just because they want her to be less of a villainous dickhead, because liking a character does not equal condoning their villainy.

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I wondered that while I was watching.

The rape was recorded because he was on the phone with someone. Why did the exact nature of the relationship between him and the other guy matter when using the phone recording as evidence? The phone call itself didn't reveal their relationship and their relationship *is* irrelevant to the case, because, as others have suggested, a straight man can be raped by a woman also.

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I think they talked about how, if they used the tape, the rapist and the lawyer would after the trial find out who the guy is to punish him or the victim out of spite, and if they found out he was gay they would reveal it to the world to ruin his professional life. Again out of spite because they would lose. I doubt the relationship would have to be revealed in the trial itself. That is just what the lawyer did so that Yi-deum could shamelessly use the tape.

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I think the male lead or the victim said something about it. If they used the recording, the rapist or her lawyer would find out where it lead and eventually find out their relationship and reveal to the world that he was gay just to ruin him out of spite. It would be petty as all f*ck, but looking at the rapist and her defender I wouldn't be surprised if they did it. So they wanted to avoid using the tape for that reason, not because they would have to tell the boys' relationship to the court.

Yi-deum knew this, but she also knew she had the possibility to make a big flashy comeback to the media with a case of a female rapist assaulting a gay man. so she made the rapist reveal his sexuality instead, so they let go of the one thing they would use to ruin him after the court.

She still ruined him.

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Loopholes in writing? They can use this recording as evidence for in camera proceeding but no. None of these prosecutors are really smart. I wish the writing is smarter in this regard. Unless the writer plan to bring back this issue next. The victim is holding a grudge on Prosecutor Ma and trying to hurt her or anything. And this could be a plan of the writer to show how flawed Ma Yi-deum is.

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I mean, we have seen that the victim had some emotional issues and twice gave into them and tried to choke the people that angered him. It might be a foreshadowing to how he will react to Yi-deum later.

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I support Yi-Deum also. That evil woman must be put in jail. The victim i think he will appreciate it in the long run but for now he will be angry

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"The victim i think he will appreciate it in the long run but for now he will be angry"
If he lived in a not so conservative country he might, but in a conservative country like South Korea his life is ruined. He would have no job, unable to complete his studies, shunned by the society, has no income, no future... Just tell me how is he to appreciate it? He would have weighed up the risks before deciding to be branded a rapist his whole life, shut up in prison but lives with a clean conscience rather than being a free man with no hope, no future, and living with endless self-blame.

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I love this show, and it has officially brought me out of my slump. I've had a girl crush on this actress since MNIKSS, but have been disappointed in most projects she has been in since. However, I feel like she is completely made for this role. I love that this character is a smug, clueless, closed off person, but we know why and we love her and root for her. I love that she is confident and driven. I hope that she struggles with the changes she has to make. I really don't want her to turn into a simpering meek person. And I really hope she doesn't lose that spunk and all of the smugness at the end. Her delighted smile at winning was awesome, even though we know the cost. I'm so excited about this drama!

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@sunny, I so agree, I adore Yi-deum, what she did to her client was horrible, but she has khutzpa. I also like that she is not immediately stereotypically likable. Why does she have to be sweet and kind?

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She is a bad bad bitch... But i like her.. i never not liking jung ryeowon acting...

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I haven't watched this episode and I'm supposed to comment in the recap episode I guess....

I have a simple question... How old Yi-Dieum supposed to be? In the 1996, I assummed she's about 12 years old the oldest. But now, 11 years later (2017), she's already been a prosecutor. And looking at how she handle her job, it would be fair if we say she's been with the Prosecutor Office for at least 3-4 years. So, she became a prosecutor at the age of early 20s. I know it's a drama and she's a fictional character, but I couldn't help to try to do a simple Math 🤓🤓🤓🤓

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2017 isn't 11 years later from 1996. 2017 is actually 21 years later. so it means that she's around 33 years old by now with 7years experience as a prosecutor as she claimed. so all in all, the math makes sense :DDD

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Hahahahaha thanks!!!!!!!! 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️

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Your welcome!!! we always forget that the 90s is actually 20 years ago already

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Stop, don't remind us, you're making us feel old.... X'D

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I like this drama alot... so interesting.

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What an interesting episode! It's rare to see a k-drama really bring to light these societal issues. Yi-deum is a total bad-ass and quite frankly, not the typical morally upright character us drama-watchers love to root for. The fact that I still like her and understand her choices is testament to the writing and acting. There's so much room for character growth for both the female and male leads (in a good way!). I can't wait to see how Yi-deum develops more empathy and I want Jin-wook to fight back against her and guide her every step of the way.

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I love this drama already. And I want to say how awesome is Jung Ryeo-won. She really played her part extremely well and I think without her, no one could pull off Yi-deum this sassy and still likeable. Hell, Jung Ryeo-won is rocking the role. I agree that Yi-deum is not perfect but that's what makes her badass and cool. I like that she's not this all nice and righteous prosecutor without a single flaw. I like that she has tricks and isn't afraid to pull them. I like that she's flawed and proud. I like that she's not your typical female lead.

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I really like actress/actors playing badass characters without doing physical stunt. Exchanges of arguments are enough. Like Jung Ryeo Won.

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This drama gonna take over 1st place of timeslot soon!

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I was not going to watch Witch’s Court but the Beanie Buzz made it sound irresistible. I suspect this show has big ambitions. Korea's rape culture is toxic and this program is an extraordinary opportunity to address it.

But, good grief, why did Yi-Deum and Jin-Wook's first case have to include the despicable "Bury Your Gays" trope?! I imagine gay characters are rare in KDrama and this one has be a rape victim? Even worse, I fear Woo-sung's suffering will be a mechanism for Yi-Deum's personal growth.

That said, Yi-Deum is a compelling character whose intelligence, ambition, and self-reliance hides a lifetime of sorrow. As @xhuizini said, YD has a "moral compass that points straight at herself."

Jin-wook is a solid, temperate counterweight to Yi-Deum. No doubt he's smart as *uck, plowing through med school (a psychiatrist!) and graduating at the top of his law school. Better yet, his high emotional intelligence will help him navigate his new career and relationship with YD. No doubt she'll drive him crazy.

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Whoa, their first case was a tough one. It was insightful reading everyone's comments and seeing both arguments about Yi Deum. There was going to be consequences from the trial either way.

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Computer glitch accidentally deleted wee hour comment - how nice if error trials could be done the same...sigh! The poignant sexual-harassment-with-a-twist case to kick-start this drama had me on my chair's edge. It's about time to address increasing sexual crimes happening just as I am typing this. Ryeo Won's delivery as an unscrupulous self-reliant prosecutor with a traumatic background was meticulous, hope to see how she would handle more cringing cases later in the drama...this a must-watch eye opening story..gulp!😓

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I might be late to the party, but I just started watching this drama and with 2 episodes, I already love it! I'm glad that most beanies here support what Yi Deum did because it's true that she's just doing her job. That professor is a rapist and she needs to be put behind bars. Even Yi Deum did trick the lawyer, it's the attorney who took the bait, meaning the attorney is also using a dirty trick to win the case. So yeah, I completely support Yi Deum's desperate action to win the case.

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