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Mr. Sunshine: Episode 19

Our villains prompt some tragic yet necessary sacrifices to impel the forces that seek to protect Joseon. The scattered pieces of the rebellion begin to unite under tragedy, and they’re learning that it’s not mere passion that will fuel their battle to success. The precarious nature of Ae-shin’s nobility seems to shake her world, but her suppressed passion and anger will soon infiltrate her enemies’ world in the only way she knows how.

 
EPISODE 19 RECAP

Dong-mae confronts Ae-shin in public and swiftly cuts off her braid. Enraged by Dong-mae’s vile act, Ae-shin takes a sword from his belt and sets it on his neck. Tears brimming his eyes, Dong-mae says her mercy — saving his life when he was a young butcher’s son — kindled a false hope, and that false hope is what sliced her hair. Ae-shin warns him not to underestimate her, saying that if she were to relive that moment, she would still save him but would kill him immediately if she ever saw him again.

Ae-shin tells Dong-mae to put aside his worries and simply see her as a noblewoman spoiled in luxuries. A hand gently guides Ae-shin’s sword away from Dong-mae’s neck, and we see that it’s Hina. She intervenes and tells Dong-mae that his black bird must keep trying to fly, alluding to his cryptic confession that he shot a black bird so that it couldn’t fly anymore. Hina advises Ae-shin not to draw any more attention and guides her away from the crowd. Glaring at Dong-mae, Ae-shin grabs her braid from his hands and follows Hina.

Hina uses Eugene’s handkerchief to tie Ae-shin’s hair and says that it belongs to Ae-shin. Disparaging Ae-shin’s devastation over her hair, Hina doubts that Ae-shin could save Joseon if she can’t handle her hair being cut off. She chides Ae-shin for choosing to hold a gun instead of more delicate things, since her gun is putting three other men in danger. Hina asserts that Joseon will inevitably fall into Japan’s hands and that Ae-shin’s involvement won’t change the outcome.

Ae-shin says that everyone lives in different worlds, with different priorities. She says, “In my world, Joseon, my family, the hair my parents gave me are all precious. I don’t know what world you’ve lived in, but I’m doing my best in my world, so don’t be so derogatory towards me.” Damn, that’s how you stand your ground.

At the hotel, Takashi confronts Eugene about the music box he found in Ae-shin’s room. He knows that it belongs to Eugene, and although Eugene plays dumb, he can see through his awkward act. Fortunately, Eugene is saved by the Japanese interpreter relaying the message from Ae-shin that she didn’t lose anything when her room was searched. Eugene misleads Takashi by saying that the music box must have been stolen from him during one of the many times his room had been searched. This clears Eugene from suspicion for now, but Takashi doesn’t seem completely convinced.

Soomi finds Eugene in his hotel room and discloses the secret she had been keeping with Ae-shin. She reveals that Ae-shin had been repaying a debt to Dong-mae as her proxy, and Dong-mae just cut off Ae-shin’s hair. Eugene sighs in stoic anger and assures Soomi that he’ll address this.

Ae-soon hears about Ae-shin’s haircut from the bakery, and she runs to Grandfather to tattletale about Ae-shin not properly respecting the body that her parents gave her. Grandfather find Ae-soon’s childish tattling unacceptable and goes straight to the source to handle this scandal.

When Eugene arrives at Hwawollu, he sees Grandfather beating Dong-mae with a broom. Grandfather threatens to show Dong-mae the wrath of a noble against a butcher if he gets near Ae-shin again, and Dong-mae silently takes the beating. After Grandfather leaves, Eugene enters and asks why Dong-mae would dare to cut Ae-shin’s hair. Dong-mae reveals that Wan-ik is trailing Ae-shin, and Eugene decides to restrain his aggression and call it even. But it’s Dong-mae’s unlucky day — Hee-sung runs in and immediately throws a punch at him.

Hina sits on the steps with a cigarette and wonders who will be the saddest: dongji (“Comrade” aka Eugene), dongmu(“Friend” aka Hee-sung), or Dong-mae. Hee-sung throws a couple more punches at Dong-mae, letting out his anger while Dong-mae takes the beating once again. Eugene leaves with a helpless look.

Grandfather comes into Ae-shin’s room and pulls away the handkerchief to reveal her shorter hair. Ae-shin apologizes, but Grandfather unexpectedly doesn’t scold her. He expresses relief that she didn’t come home like her mother and father, that she came home alive. Grandfather doesn’t speak any further, and Ae-shin cries in regret.

As Wan-ik contemplates the identity of the rebels he killed in Japan, Duk-moon informs him that the telegram from the Japan police has yet to arrive. Wan-ik doesn’t seem bothered by this, and he assumes that the telegram has been intercepted by another party because it shouldn’t take this long. With the help of Duk-moon, he recalls the name that Ae-shin’s mother revealed before she died: Go Sang-wan, Ae-shin’s father. He finally pieces together the relationships and realizes that Ae-shin is the daughter of the rebels he murdered.

When Hee-sung returns to the hotel, he finds Wan-ik and his father waving him down to join them. Hina has also been summoned and threatens her father to just drink his coffee before she brews him a new (poisoned) cup. She tries to avoid the meeting, but Hee-sung asks her to stay, since he’s in a foul mood. Hina and Hee-sung grudgingly sit by their parents as they hint at a potential marriage between the two and imply a bribe to secure Hee-sung a job with a Japanese railroad company.

As Wan-ik leaves, Hina warns him not to visit again, lest she serve him lethal coffee. Wan-ik suggests that she serve her remaining poison to Takashi and instructs her not to meet Ae-shin anymore, since he killed her parents. He leaves nonchalantly, and Hina hyperventilates at this news. Eugene finds Hina in this shocked state, and she quickly recovers her composure to greet him. He asks for a favor — that she “accidentally” switch keys to let him into Takashi’s room. She offers him the master key and comments that her hotel seems to be broken into often these days.

Eugene quickly searches through Takashi’s room and finds the music box in a drawer. Under the music box, he finds a list of names for a Joseon mob. As he reads the list, he recognizes the names: Go Sa-hong, Hwang Eun-san, Lee Jung-moon, Jang Seung-gu. The room bell rings to warn Eugene of Takashi’s arrival, and Eugene leaves just as Takashi keys into his room.

When Takashi enters his room, he senses something off and immediately checks his drawer with the music box and hit list. He looks reassured that both items are still in place, but he runs downstairs, still suspicious. When Takashi gets to the lobby, Eugene enters and makes casual small talk before heading to his room. Takashi doesn’t remembers seeing Eugene on his way back to the hotel and asks Hina what road Eugene takes, but she gives him the obvious useless answer of the front road or back road.

Dong-mae looks longingly at Ae-shin’s hair ribbon, but his brooding is interrupted by urgent news about Takashi at his dojo. Yujo informs Dong-mae that Takashi, an aristocrat Japanese soldier, seems to be seeking control of Jingogae’s (the neighborhood Dong-mae controls) commercial rights, and his presence drove out the Joseon people from the area. Yujo also warns Dong-mae about speaking Korean in front of Takashi, since he understands the language, and Dong-mae sneers about this curious nuisance.

At the dojo, Dong-mae introduces himself to Takashi and comments on how Takashi caused the disorder in Jingogae. Takashi says that the rejection of Japanese currency in a Japanese colony is unacceptable, but Dong-mae informs him that these Japanese banknotes have no value in Joseon. Takashi takes offense to being taught by Dong-mae and belittles him for his butcher origins. Dong-mae warns Takashi not to interfere in his district, saying that he hates two things: aristocrats and soldiers.

Takashi boasts that as the top official among the Japanese forces, trying to gain control of Dong-mae through fear and authority. But Dong-mae clarifies that he’s loyal to the Musin Society, not Japan, and degrades his aristocrat soldier status. Takashi pulls his gun, but Dong-mae immediately disarms him by flipping him to the ground. Takashi tries to reach for his gun again, but Dong-mae warns him that he could see his end if he picks up that gun. As Dong-mae walks out, he requests that Takashi take off his boots when he walks out, since his gang cleans the floors every day.

The innkeeper shoots an arrow to warn Eun-san about the hitlist Eugene found. As Eun-san’s apprentice releases the boat down the river, Eun-san remembers Eugene’s earnest wishes to keep Ae-shin alive and to let Eun-san live a long life. He departs with his assistant, and Eugene suggests that the innkeeper also escape. But the innkeeper remains loyal to her post to minimize suspicion of Eun-san’s escape. Plus, she’s waiting for someone (Seung-gu), and she worries about his recent absence. Before she leaves, she thanks Eugene for his assistance.

Wan-ik senses someone following him, and he uses his cane to throw his pursuer on the ground. He demands to know why he’s being followed, the man (one of Joon-young’s friends) admits that he’s seeking revenge for the innocent lives Wan-ik slaughtered seven years ago. Wan-ik laughs that Takashi was right about the lineage of Righteous Army members, and he seems glad that he found a lad to manipulate. He crouches down next to the cowering pursuer and asks how many more are after him.

Hina delivers a coat from the tailor to Hee-sung’s room, and he invites her inside, since they did go on an arranged date with each other. Hee-sung jokingly asks if she would accept his proposal, and Hina doubts she would accept a proposal from a man who’s tailored a coat for another woman. Hee-sung claims that the coat is just for a friend, and he wonders what Hina knows. She thinks about Wan-ik’s confession that he killed Ae-shin’s parents, and she says that she may know too much.

Ae-shin practices with her gun in a shed and recalls Eugene’s lessons as she goes through the motions. She sees a red pinwheel perched at the wall of her house from Eugene, who rides away on his horse. He comes back around and comments on her short hair. She asks if she’s more handsome, and Eugene acknowledges this. She says that she was hoping for another comment, one that starts with the letter ‘B.’ He says that he missed her (which in romanized Korean, starts with the letter ‘B’ – bogoshipda), but that’s not what Ae-shin was hoping for. A servant calls for her, and they reluctantly part with a wave.

It’s a rainy night, and Eugene catches Joon-young red-handed as he tries to open the gun storage shed. Eugene had been waiting for Joon-young, knowing that he would show up some time between the end of training and curfew, likely on a rainy night. He knows that Joon-young practiced at night to improve his shooting accuracy and gain access to the storage key, which was the initial intention for the forged documents. Eugene calls Joon-young’s plan foolish, since they don’t even know the real actor they’re targeting, but Joon-young demands that Eugene stay out of his way.

Eugene obliges and throws him the keys to unlock the gun storage, but he follows Joon-young, claiming that he’s headed in the same direction. Joon-young sees his friend at the other side of the tunnel, but Eugene stops him before he proceeds further. Eugene notices the tilt in the friend’s shoulder and presumes that his arm has been broken. Joon-young doesn’t believe him and tries to approach his friend, but the friend yells a warning to stay away because Wan-ik found them out.

A gun shot pierces the self-sacrificing friend, and Eugene pulls away a shocked Joon-young to bring him to his senses. He tells Joon-young that his friend just risked his life to save them, so he can’t just run out without a plan. He demands that Joon-young act like a solider and says that they need to save his other friends first. They run off to gather the other friends while the shot friend lays crumbled with a fatal wound to the chest.

Joon-young falls to the ground as his other comrades join him, and they wonder why Eugene is with him. They ask about the gunshot and their missing friend, and they deduce what happened based on Joon-young’s sobbing. Eugene tells the young rebels that they’ll lose something precious if they act solely on passion. He advises them to build their skills before pursuing revenge, and he gives them a choice: run away or find a way to survive there. The young friends mourn the loss of their friend as the storm rages on.

Wan-ik pokes at the dead rebel with his cane and regrets not being able to discover the young lad’s scheme. He resorts to his last option and tells Duk-moon to prepare a meeting with the head of the railroad company. He also asks Duk-moon to bring a map, since they’ll need to plan accordingly for the looming war between Russia and Japan. Wan-ik says that he plans on sabotaging Nobleman Go for this endeavor, and he forces Duk-moon to decide where his loyalties lie.

The next morning, Wan-ik enters Nobleman Go’s home with a mob of men carrying hammers. He redraws the railroad route on the spot, and railroad company head announces that Nobleman Go’s home must be relinquished to the government for the construction of this railroad. Nobleman Go rejects Wan-ik’s irreverent demands, but Wan-ik motions for the mob to destroy the home. Nobleman Go grasps his chest and seems to feel the pain with each blow to his home.

Ae-shin runs to Grandfather, and Aunt braces him as he weakly endures the pain of his crumbling home. Wan-ik collects his men and warns Grandfather to clear the land before he visits again to completely demolish his home. Ae-shin sharpens her gaze at Wan-ik, and Grandfather weakly instructs his servants to hold Ae-shin back and lock her up. She demands to be let free, but she’s pulled away and saved from her own impulses.

Grandfather gathers all his servants and distributes his land to all of them. He’s chosen plots of land that won’t stand in the way of the railroad, and he frees his servants from their service to his family. He asks that they promise to never sell their land to the Japanese, to defend the land of Joseon by passing it on to their offspring. The servants agree to the promise and mourn Grandfather’s surrender.

Duk-moon hits Ae-soon repeatedly for refusing to salvage any wealth from Grandfather and says that he only kept her in hopes of receiving some of Grandfather’s inheritance. Grandfather walks in on this scene and reprimands Duk-moon for using his fists against a woman. After witnessing this beating, Grandfather refuses to leave Ae-soon in Duk-moon’s household and drags her out. Duk-moon watches them leave with a grimace and thanks Grandfather for making his decision for him.

The mole servant from Grandfather’s household meets with Dong-mae to deliver another piece of intel. He regrets that he’s been kicked out of the household, since all the current servants just received a plot of land. He delivers a paper that he found when the Japanese soldiers searched Grandfather’s room — it’s a receipt of funds that Grandfather gave to the military. The mole assures Dong-mae that this is exclusive information, and Dong-mae presumes that the reason the mole was sent to him was to keep the mole’s mouth shut. With that, Dong-mae’s lackeys kills the mole.

Outside, our main servant watches this slaughter and meets eyes with Dong-mae. He remembers Eugene’s instruction to release the mole as soon as he’s discovered, since another person will take care of keeping the mole’s mouth shut. Looks like that prophecy came true.

Dong-mae and Eugene both meet with Grandfather, who pleads for their assistance. Grandfather offers Dong-mae plots of land and asks that he protect Ae-shin. Turning to Eugene, Grandfather reminds him that they both don’t want Joseon to lose and requests that he kill Takashi. Dong-mae asks why he’s asked to protect while Eugene’s asked to kill. Grandfather responds that Dong-mae will protect through thick and thin, and Eugene will kill with perfection. He says that’s the difference between one who will enter by jumping the wall (Dong-mae) and one who will enter through the door (Eugene).

Eugene asks why Grandfather requests the assassination of Takashi and not Wan-ik. Grandfather explains that it would be harmless if Wan-ik died in the hands of the Joseon people, but if Takashi died in the hands of the Joseon people, it would be justification for invasion. Hence the reason that Grandfather is asking Eugene, an American soldier, to carry the responsibility for Takashi’s death. Eugene calls Grandfather cruel, and Grandfather accepts this, saying that he intends to be the black bird in Eugene’s sky.

Observing the collapsed wall of the house, Dong-mae tells Eugene that Grandfather succeeded in keeping both of them away from Ae-shin by making one protect and one kill. Eugene looks at the debris and the fallen red pinwheel, and in a voice over he says, “It didn’t matter who would be the saddest. Although we were all walking our separate paths in life, we would reach the same destination. Since we loved her, we wished that she would survive, and thus, none of our ends would be a happy ending.” As we hear those words, we see Ae-shin sitting alone, locked in the storage shed.

The next day, Aunt enters Grandfather’s quarters to wake him, but his body remains still and an envelope with his will lies on the table. She cries for Grandfather, and we hear his will for a small wake but abundant food. He asks that they accept all who wish to visit with condolences, since everyone has contributed to his life. Ae-shin’s maid unlocks the storage shed and can barely put together words through her weeps. Ae-shin walks out and finds the servants in front of Grandfather’s quarters, mourning his passing.

Ae-shin tries to leave the wake, but her maid stands in her way. Ae-shin doesn’t try to struggle past her and remembers her Grandfather from the previous day. Grandfather opened the storage shed and told Ae-shin that the shed would remain locked until next day, knowing that she would try to get her hands on a gun that night. Since her father wasn’t this rebellious, he could only guess that she took after her mother. He handed Ae-shin a picture of her parents to keep, and he asked that she forgive him for his angry curse telling her to die when she refused to follow his orders. He pleaded that she stay alive. Remembering his plea at the wake, Ae-shin crumbles into tears.

Eugene sees the funeral as he rides by on his horse, and he takes off his hat to honor Grandfather. He sees Wan-ik and Duk-moon arrive, but the enemy’s arrival is overshadowed by the emperor’s grand entrance to pay his respects to Grandfather. Wan-ik eyes widen when he sees Emperor Gojong bow at Grandfather’s memorial, and he denounces the emperor’s deference to this old man, saying that this is humiliating for Joseon.

The emperor takes Seung-gu’s whip and hits Wan-ik across the face. He dismisses Wan-ik of any position in the royal court, and Wan-ik looks shocked at the emperor’s sudden reversal. Wan-ik raises his cane in rage, and Seung-gu knocks him down. He presses the cane on Wan-ik’s neck, and when Wan-ik vows to kill him, Seung-gu responds that he’s been waiting.

The funeral procession makes its way through the village, but they’re intercepted by Wan-ik and his mob. The mobsters beat the loyal servants, and Aunt cries in devastation while the sadist Wan-ik rejoices in the suffering of innocent men. Eugene walks through the rubble of Ae-shin’s home, and we hear the news that all of Ae-shin’s family scattered to their relatives’ homes, but Ae-shin disappeared that day.

At the hotel, Domi tells his older sister, Soomi, that Eugene has been gloomy recently, and Soomi presumes that it’s because of Ae-shin. Hina joins them and asks about their serious conversation. Soomi shares that their discussion of the atrocious offenses of Wan-ik against Nobleman Go. Sensing their indignance, Hina asks if Wan-ik is an evil person, even through their young eyes. Domi confirms this and says that many people are plotting revenge. Hina excuses them with a smile, but she can’t seem to hide her sorrow once they leave. She fails to light her cigarette and tries to stifle her cries of resentment.

Takashi praises Wan-ik’s successful riddance of Nobleman Go and asks about the whereabouts of Ae-shin. Wan-ik pitches his plan to trap her when she stops by to honor the ritual 49 days since passing and requests some forces to back him up in this trap. Takashi agrees to this plan and says that he’ll take care of the others.

A man holds the innkeeper at gunpoint and demands that she lead him to Eun-san’s kiln. She remains calm and tells him the price to escort him down the river. The innkeeper rows the boat at gunpoint and suddenly stops to tell the threatening man that this is the deepest point in the river. She rattles the boat, and they both go overboard.

The innkeeper climbs back onto the dock from the river with a knife in her hand, but she’s met with another threat: Takashi. She stands frozen at the end of the dock as Takashi approaches her, and he shoots her without hesitation. She falls into the river, and Takashi immediately regrets killing her because he needed information from her. But he doesn’t take the murder too seriously and instructs his soldiers to retrieve the body so that they can utilize it to get the answers they want.

Dong-mae tells his gang to stay behind while he visits the temple at Jemulpo, but they’re interrupted by larger gang walking toward them. Dong-mae recognizes the leader and immediately falls to his knees to greet his mentor, who calls Dong-mae his son.

The trolley comes to a halt when a body hangs in front of it from above, and we see that it’s the innkeeper’s corpse hung by a rope. Perched on the bridge, Takashi watches the Joseon people gather in fright, and he comments on how he’s getting a bird’s eye view of Joseon’s powerless history.

Kyle informs Eugene about the corpse that Japanese forces hung from the bridge and says that he recognized her as the innkeeper. Eugene immediately heads toward the hanging corpse with Kyle, and we also see Seung-gu racing on horseback. Eugene arrives at the site first, and Takashi welcomes Eugene as the first person to respond.

At the Jemulpo temple, Aunt and Hee-sung along with the relatives pay respects to Grandfather on the ritual 49th day. As they leave the temple, they’re met with an army of Japanese soldiers, and Hee-sung approaches them with his charming smile. They demand for Ae-shin, and Hee-sung translates to the family that they’re asking for someone they shouldn’t be looking for. Hee-sung says that he’ll signal for them to flee, but a relative’s fear gets the best of him. When the relative tries to run away, a Japanese soldier shoots him dead and the massacre commences.

Hee-sung helplessly hides behind a rock while the Japanese soldiers chase the relatives and shoot them one by one. It’s terrifying, but Servant stands his ground and swats away the soldiers with a mere broom. Attempting to help, Hee-sung tries to wrangle a gun out of a soldier’s hand. We see the first Japanese soldier fall next to him, but that’s not enough to keep the others away. Hee-sung finally takes the gun, knocks the soldier unconscious, and runs to help defend the family.

Inside the temple, the monks resort to their stash of guns (!!) as they prepare to defend their people. Aunt takes a bow and expertly shoots the enemy forces, and the maid uses a rock to hit the soldier that’s wrestling her fellow servant. She notices a solider aiming for Aunt, and she throws a rock at him to defend her. Aunt shoots the soldier, but only a second after the soldier shoots his gun and hits the maid.

Aunt looks shocked, and the servant crawls to her side. A soldier tries to attack him, but Hee-sung shoots the soldier dead. Hee-sung looks absolutely rattled by the bloodshed, and Aunt screams at him in warning of soldiers rampaging towards him. Hee-sung turns around to find three soldiers coming straight for him. OH SHIT.

The massacre continues to devastate the family, and Hee-sung breathes heavily as he accepts his fate. We see the image of his newspaper sign, the one flower that was on his path, and we hear the gunshot as Hee-sung drops his gun in surrender. But the three soldiers fall, along with multiple other Japanese soldiers, who drop dead in the hands of Eun-san. And he’s not alone – he’s joined by multiple other guerrilla Righteous Army fighters who shoot at the Japanese soldiers.

Hee-sung opens his eyes and turns to look at the roof, where a black-clothed figure in a hat shoots a gun from above. It’s Ae-shin, of course, and she expertly shoots at the enemy. He looks at her with the most solemn look, and she seems to pause in recognition of him.

 
COMMENTS

Yes!!!! At last, we’re seeing some real action, real consequences, and real revenge. I must admit that while I was thirsty for this battle, I was a bit overwhelmed when it actually happened. Maybe it’s because this show made me wait forever for this and decided that whiplash would make the best impact, so it let me saunter around the exposition and a distracting zebra for too long that I forgot that this show promised me something more epic. But I digress — I’m putting that behind me for now so that I can savor some good moments from this episode.

This episode felt like a tribute to Grandfather, but I’m all about it because he really stole the spotlight with his wisdom and patience. He did seem hypocritical throughout the episode as he was trying to make amends and ensure Ae-shin’s safety, but I’m willing to overlook that because it was clear that everything he did was for good. I got chills when Grandfather distributed his land to his servants, which transferred the power of Joseon to the people. With the looming Japanese invasion, it seems that the people of Joseon are the only ones that can really endure that pressure. I think these are the moments that I’ve been really waiting for because there’s something incredibly powerful about trusting the fate of your nation in the hands of the most humble — in all sense of the word — humans.

Grandfather entrusting Dong-mae and Eugene with protection and assassination, respectively, was cruel and hypocritical, but he really had no other choice. I’m actually a fan of Grandfather’s last wishes for these two because Dong-mae and Ae-shin are my favorite tragic pairing and because Takashi is a monster that needs to be stopped. He makes my skin crawl, and I will be happy to see him exterminated once his work in this plot is done. Eugene’s voiceover after his meeting with Grandfather was a bit unsettling as it foreshadowed Ae-shin’s death but also interesting because it implied that the three men would survive her to experience her death. I never doubted that Ae-shin would die, and I still think she’ll die, but I did think maybe one of the dudes would die with her. Do any of them die with or before her? Maybe they all survive her for the sake of the bromance? And then they all go to the U.S. where they spot a zebra on a lawn? Where did that come from? I don’t know — you tell me, show.

 
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I could hardly believe my eyes when Ae Shin grabbed his sword. I seriously thought she was going to slice off his hair, and make him bald....like my prediction last week.

The grandfather was cutting in his scorn for Dong Mae. I didn't like the reference to his butcher roots, and it dimmed his nobility in my eyes. Deep down, he's as class-conscious as the rest of the nobility, and that he's fighting for Joseon hasn't changed that one bit.

The last few scenes moved fast and shocked me. So much was happening in such a short time.

The part where Mori sat on the bridge with a leg trailing like a model was a bit funny, and spoilt the moment for me.

I was so worried for Hee Sung, but he survived. Yay.

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I'm not sure to have really understood all the hair part... Dong Mae doesn't want her to be hurt, so he cut her and she has to stay at home?
For the reaction of Ae Shin, I agreed with Hina, if she wants to save Joseon, she should think about what her parents really gave her.

I was surprised that the Grandfather asked Dong Mae to protect her. Eugene could protect her by taking her very far.

This episode was really interesting and the confrontation is becoming inevitable.

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Hina said what we've all been thinking in regards to Ae Shin and her lack of class consciousness as well as her being sheltered as nobility.

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I've gotta be honest, I've gotten on the anti Ae-shin train myself these days.

And yes, she actually has jeopardized all three of them, and does use all three of them.

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The cutting of Ae shin’s hair is confusing and yet I think it has several meanings that everyone of us watching understood, even if not on a conscious level: The reasons, (including but besides the cultural significance of the hair) – the main one being Dong mae making his mark (although at the same time, I don’t think he’s claiming her). I think besides him feeling like the hair is showing the world that he owns a small bit of her (yay, Ae shin for snatching it back) so it indicates protection – “don’t touch” to those who would hurt her; she belongs to him if only as one of his people. He cares about her so anyone harming her will have to deal with him. So it’s a warning of his protection to others because doing it on the street ensures everyone would know about it. It’s also is his way of showing her she has no choice in his decision to protect her, and showing her that she doesn’t realize how vulnerable she is that she couldn’t even stop him from doing that in full public view and no one else could stop him either so he feels she’s not qualified to be running around as a rebel.

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a woman's her hair back then was like a big FU to her parents. If someone else does it, the woman would probably hide at her parents house till it grew back.

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I was very shocked to watch the scene where Eugene memorized Japanese names of the list that he found in the villain's bureau and wrote down the names when he went back to his room.
Is Eugene the one who did not know Hangul and had a hard time to study it?
But when it comes to Japanese kanji( Chinese letters), the God of K drama must have occupied his brain. All the difficult names on the list was memorized and he managed to write them down. Even I who were quite good at Japanese kanji( at least used to be) would not be able to carry this miraculous mission.
I must pray to the God of Kdrama to descend on my children who have been having extra hard time with Japanese( in particular Japanese kanji.)😂

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EC can read write Chinese Japanese and English
You must have fast forward on that episode

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I must have forgotten the scene of him reading Japanese. I did notice he can speak Japanese. But this is precisely my point and my complaint of K drama. When did he have a chance to learn Japanese ? I bet that Navy college did not offer the Japanese course back then. If I were Eugene and I had a chance to learn another language, I would have chosen to learn Hangul over Japanese( but again it is very unlikely there was a school to learn Japanese back then). Besides it is very challenging to learn Kanji because the numbers are almost unlimited. I do know one Yale student who memorize a difficult Kanji by writing the kanji 100 times! While I viewed the list of names along with the names of where they come from( I think), I found some of Kanji are quite difficult ones. So it does not make sense that he can have a super photographic memory but had a hard time to master Hangul( remember his young servants used to teach him how to read them). I do not like this super selective super-human ability. But if the K drama god can make it true, then please do that for my kids also!! Please 😚
By the way it seems that Dong mae's boss is played by a japanese actor. If not, his Japanese is flawless.

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Keep in mind that Chinese characters were used to write Korean before Hangul characters were invented and they are also the basis of Kanji. Hangul is phonetic too, so learning it is super easy if you already speak the language. It makes sense to me he'd focus on learning Chinese characters that can be used for Korean, Chinese, and Japanese writing over Hangul when he never expected to go back to Korea.

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It's also possible that in his officer's training, because Eugene was Korean, they wanted him to learn the major east asian languages. He told them he was fluent in Korean, so they crossed that off the list, and the Japanese/Chinese instruction included spoken and written word.

That is, if he went to officer's training, and didn't just get his commission in battle.

On the other hand, Eugene was in the military for more than 25 years. That's a lot of time to learn some new languages. Just ask Hina, who's much younger, and even knows French.

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Because the US Marines were officially segregated (whites only) until 1949, I expect that Eugene got in as an enlisted man by claiming mixed ancestry and then got picked out for his intelligence and language skills by his officers.

And, spot on, a honest-to-god Korean speaker would have been an unbelievably valuable asset to a naval or Marine officer in the 1880s.

When people make fun of the intelligence of Marines these days, I like to point out that, in the 19th Century, an American soldier could serve thirty years without leaving American soil. Marines served on naval vessels. They had to be "worldly" and be able to handle different cultures and languages on short notice. If Eugene Choi even knew a little Chinese from working around a harbor, he would be a prize for any ship serving in the Asiatic squadron.

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@wesjfrank, thank you so much for your words. I just don't know enough about American military history during that era and how things worked internally. Given the move to the Pacific, I could see naval intelligence snatching him up, in whatever form it existed back then, even if his promotions came on the field and he didn't go to officers training school.
By any chance, do you know what the policies were regarding resigning commissions were back then? Somehow I felt that the service of fixed terms was a fairly modern development, and anyway given Eugene's probably 25+ years of service, I thought he'd have fulfilled his requirements by now. I only ask because later episodes make a big deal of his not being where he's supposed to be because of Ae-shin (hint hint, see episodes 21-22), and i wondered what your thought were on that. Feel free to respond in the latest episode recaps if you want. :-)

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I got the sense that Eugene was trying to hurry and write the names down quickly so as not to forget (I do this because I forget numbers easily). I agree with others here that we were given the impression that Eugene was well versed in Japanese and Chinese characters (although I understand there are thousands upon thousands of characters). But then there's always the truth: this is Kim Eun-sook Kdramaland. (And I love it so much.)

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I don't think it happened in a split second. The scene is fast forwarded; he might take a lot longer to remember and finish up the list compared to what's shown in the drama.

@78semra explanation also added to the plausibility of the scene.

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His bitter past might be one factor that he didn't learn Hangul earlier (before he met Ae-shin).

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Wow the last few minutes were intense AF! I was waiting for Ae Shin and gang to arrive earlier before most of her family members were slaughtered. Hae Sueng is alive and that makes me relieved.

I was quite underwhelmed about Eugene's reaction to Dong Mae after the hair cutting event. I mean I am not asking for him to resort to violence like Hae Sueng, but something...anything? Ugh! (would have helped if I actually understood the meaning behind Dong Mae's gesture).

As much as I root for the nobles in the revolution, Harabunim's stance is still the same as is Ae Shins. They are still in a world where society marks a clear line between the nobles and the rest. It dims the fight in my eyes a bit. But, oh well, history is history isn't it?

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I thought Eugene's reaction to DM was in character. He asked why and understood the motivation was to protect AS.
But I too don't quite understand what cutting her hair was meant to accomplish.

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I think Eugene`s reaction was really characterwise... he has already figured out Dong Mae`s personality and he is not an emotional man like Hui song...

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From Rooftop Prince, I learned/looked up that hair cutting is more or less a sign of being dishonored or exiled, though in the time period of this show many Korean men have taken to wearing it short western style. I would guess that having cut a few inches off her hair would in theory make her look like she'd cut her hair in shame or something and make her want to hide until it grew out and didn't look so obviously chopped.

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I agree. Eugene is supposed to be the logical and methodical one. He knows Dongmae enough to know that Dongmae wants to protect AeShin. Eugene's reaction of asking why and then deciding not to attack Dongmae made sense. I don't think Heesung knows about Dongmae giving the letter to GrandDad so he may not realize how strong Dongmae's protective instinct is towards Aeshin.

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I, too, was disappointed in Eugene's [non-]reaction but I think what's going on is Dong mae cut Ae shin's hair in the public street, knowing the gossip would mean everyone would know about it, thus extending his protection as having "marked" her as "his", or at least under his protection. I think Eugene understood this once Dong mae gave him the intel that Wanik is gunning for Ae shin's grandfather/family. But since it really didn't seem to afford her much protection at all, I'm back wondering myself.

One other thing, I also felt Dong mae was showing Ae shin how vulnerable she is that he could've cut her down in less than a second so she should stop playing hero. This fits in with the first part of the recap that explains Dong mae shot a blackbird to keep it from flying. As soon as I read that I eent "ohhhh" because at the time of that episode, I didn't understand if he shot her because he'd planned to turn her in or what.

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I think he was taken aback when he was aiming the gun and astonishingly realizing that it was her that he shot her in the leg instead, knowing it wont kill her. He did it to 'keep her from joining the movement again'. Now that you have mentioned it, I suppose he did cut her hair to punish her like he did when he shot her in the leg. I just wish the writers explained it a little a us in regards to the actual significance of the gesture. In the end her entire family was slaughtered. So it didnt work.

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Ep 19 was SO good. I thought the previous episodes was the best one but each episode just topped the other one. When Lord Go died, I was bawling. And when the king slapped the villain Lee Wan Ik, it was satisfying. I want either Kudo Hina or Ae Shin to be the one who finally kill off Lee Wan Ik. The scene at the temple was just, so good, it took my breath away. I can’t accept them having my kind, beautiful Hui Seung too! Not after the Gu Dong Mae scare! The slow scenes almost killed me. When it was revealed that the Right Army Team came to the rescue I was so glad. Please let all 5 of them live!! My heart can’t take it.

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This is everything I wanted to say in one comment. Ep 19 was just soo good! It had so many good parts and put me on an emotional roller coaster honestly.

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So the prediction is that AS will die...
I might predict that she would be the only one to live.
DM dies saving her, EG dies in battle, and HS dies doing something uncharacteristically heroic. But we shall see.......

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I've been going off Mr Sunshine for a while now. Just when I'd decided to drop it, Jang Dong Yoon entered the scene and I stayed. But this episode - I could only sit through about half before giving up and switing to something else. BUT now you tell me there's been interesting movement? GAH! Fine. Show. I will give you one last chance.

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I think he and his friends were brought onto the show at this late stage because they're going to be the only kids who survive to join the Righteous Army. And their descendants will be in Bridal Mask (Gaksital).

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I just finished Gakistal last week! Let me ask you, are the names of the Lordling Soldiers under Eugene's training, family names that you recognized or are you just saying based on Wanik's man informing him that the children of subsequent freedom fighters become the next generation of freedom fighters themselves?

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I just pretended...

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Okay, this episode was really breathtaking!
1. I didn`t really like the grandfather mentioning his status when punishing Dong Mae! but it actually showed how cultural stereotypes are deep and unconscious...
2. on the other hand, the grandfather explanation of why he appointed one to support and the other to kill was priceless... He concluded all the discussion going on about the character of Dong Mae and Eugene: the one who does whatever it takes and the one who makes no mistakes! the one who scales the wall and the one who walks through the door! real keen!
3. The last 10 minutes was an absolute Drama! The boat girl being shot filmed from above and the slow-motion entrance of righteous army and Ms.Haman being shot...OMG!
4. females not being allowed to attend the funeral made me boil in range!
5.
waiting for ep 20 recaps..cause it was a hell of an episode!

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Love all the intricate observations and explanations by @dramallama and the beanies in this thread.

I may not be able to come out with those but one thing for sure, I sacrifice a lot of v. Kleenex to get through this episode in one sitting. So show, please give our characters the much deserved happy ending. My sacrifice must amount to something right?

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Thank you for the recaps, dramallama!

This was such a moving episode for me; it was an emotional crescendo built on the solid groundwork the writer laid with the previous episodes. Grandfathers actions have been consistent with his character; I would use words like virtuous, righteous, and honorable rather than hypocritical to describe this nobleman. I feel he represents the best of Joseon, and he is truly loved by his emperor, his tenants and slaves, his peers and his rebels. ....everyone except Wan ik!

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The fear and terror, the helplessness, the anxiety, the instinct to survive, the uncertainty of knowing if this is how it ends for you and if right now is your last minute on this earth ...... totally encapsulated in the scene that unfolded in the temple grounds.

What a thing to witness as a viewer.

What an experience to have to live through as a citizen of Joseon.

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I can't imagine the atrocities the imperialist Japan did to Joseon during their 35-year period of colonial rule :(

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My son was 10 years old when he achieved his black belt in Tae Kwon do. One of the requirements was to study Korean history (guess who else had to study to help him?) and not only did the Japanese Empire try to make Koreans assimilate and embrace Japanese culture but they were not allowed their own culture. Give up their names, their form of martial arts, their art and all the while being told you must act and be Japanese but not being treated as Japanese but rather as second class citizens.

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This may not be a popular view, but I am not a fan of any drama modernizing history just to make it more palatable for our sensibilities. In the past, women were not allowed the same freedoms as men. Slaves and "lowborns" were looked down upon. History is full of inequitable treatment against the powerless by the powerful. (And yes, I realize most all historical dramas revise history to some extent.) However, I don't judge at this drama by my reality, but I try to allow characters in the drama to have the world view that was prevalent in their day.
Grandfather's giving of his land to those working it is about as HUGE an event/change as he was possible of making (at the time he lived.) He was born a noble. He lived trying to maintain the order he believed to be the correct one. In his world only nobles owned land. So his giving his faithful servants land to own was a big deal. He already showed how much he "evolved" by allowing his granddaughter to go learn to shoot guns and be a member of the righteous army, But, as he told her, he wished that she'd just marry some acceptable (noble) guy and be protected. So OF COURSE when the son of a butcher cuts off his granddaughter's hair IN PUBLIC, he is going to berate him. And (as we see from Dong-Mae's allowing this to happen) the respect he shows Grandfather. (Can you think of any other nobleman in this drama who could get away with smacking Dong-Mae with a broom?)

And poor Hong-Pa. When she emerged from the water with the knife I thought, "YES! She's alive." And then she's killed right away. And I feel so sorry for Gunner Jang.
I don't know why I keep watching this. My next drama has got to be something light and fluffy.

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I agree with you completely. You expressed your opinion eloquently. Grandpa's actions do not upset me, and I just see him as a product of his time. And within that context, he acts according to the dictates of his class/social status.

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A perfect example of this is The History Channel's depiction of The Yellow Rose of Texas (darn it, that's not the show's name but it is the legendary title character from the state's song that was in the show). Anyway, you have this black female character, just a few years post slavery (of course the show makes her a prostitute although nothing in history alludes to that) and white men are tipping their hat to her BEFORE her heroic action. Not that I believe they would've tipped it afterwards, but definitely not before. It's just not something white men of the period would even think of doing toward a black woman even if they were the kindly sort. You might find an abolitionist doing so but definitely not the hardened cowboys shown.

The point is, if I'm going to watch a show set in history then it's #1 goal, even before it develops its characters, should be to show me realistically what life was like back then. Even if it's a comedy, unless it is obviously "fusion" where the anachronisms are there to play up the comedy.

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I really like KES’ writing when she refers the three boys as Dongji (comrade/ Eugene), Dongmu (friend/ Heesung) and “그저 동매” (just Dongmae). My heart goes for “just Dongmae” who can never be comrade or friends with Aeshin ><

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Aunt with the arrows was a total bada**. And I have to admit, I'm only staying around for Dong-mae and Hina because they are the most interesting characters. We've just begun to really see the resistance and the show is almost over; like we've had 19 episodes of setup. Well better late than never, I suppose. The poor innkeeper and poor Seung-gu, he is going to be devastated. Now while Takashi is a proper villain (more than Wan-ik), I am so ready for someone to get rid of him. He is the type of villain where you actively root for his downfall. And Grandpa was a giant contradiction to me. He treated his servants kindly, but degraded Dong-mae for being a butcher's son. He wants Dong-mae and Eugene to stay away from Ae-shin, but then he wants them to protect her. I never could quite understand him. But that's how I feel about the show; I never could quite understand what it was trying to be.

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I loved arrow shooting killer aunt so much! I knew all that noble-lady archery practice couldn't be for nothing.

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Oh, I also like the part when Dongmae told Takashi to take off his boots when leaving the judo hall since his boys have to clean the floor everyday, haha. Classic example of Dongmae who always thinks about his people!

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Yes! This goes on my wall of great one-liners from this show.

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Ok this episode contained one of my favorite scenes in any melo type drama ever, and that was the king grabbing the riding crop and slashing Lord Wan-sik's face open and then stripping him of his appointment on the spot. Compared to many historical kings, this one feels like an impotent, ceremonial figure who is just keeping the seat warm. I don't know the history of the time period preceding this show to understand why the country is so weak that the Japanese soldiers are already running around doing what they want and the king is pretty much helpless. It kind of feels like the king know's he's on his last legs and is just stalling as much as possible while counting on the citizenry to eventually rise up. He does NOT seem to have an army to command.... So this one time where Wan-sik so incredibly and publicly overstepped his place the king got to correct him. Nay, HAD to correct him, if he had not stood up to him he might as well have abdicated on the spot in the face of Wan-sik's behavior.

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That's a good assessment of this Emperor from what I've read. The Japanese had murdered his Queen right in the palace just a few years earlier, and that was well before the Japanese were in charge. If you get a chance you should read a short recap of the history because it's harrowing, fascinating, and much more dramatic than the drama can convey.

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sorry, didn't intend for most of that to be italicized.

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The writer was brilliant in coming up with grandpa's analogy for Eugene and Dong Mae, it's these sayings/quotes/lessons that elevates her dramas⭐️ I agree with everyone that this episode was hella exciting and tragic too😳 The cinematography is breathtaking and now that the action has literally begun, this show will definitely end with a big bang!

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I think this episode explains that DM cut AS hair to protect her. DM mentioned to Eugene that he cuts her hair because LWI has been asking around about her (i.e. close to figuring out that she’s part of the righteous army)
The episode shows that the whole Joseon is talking about her hair being cut, so she’s being protected by all the people around her.

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That featured screenshot is hilarious XD

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So many interesting scenes this episode.

YES finally, tough Ae Shin is back. I was so proud of her pulling a knife on Dongmae and then showing up at the end to save the day along with the rest of the Righteous Army.

I was so impressed with Aunt shooting Japanese soldiers with her arrow. I guess that scene of her practicing wasn't just a throw away scene.
Dongmae silently taking his punishment from Granddad and Heesung made my heart ache.

I loved Granddad asking them to protect and assassinate as well as their reactions.
Heesung continues to be perfect I wish she'd married him but its too late now with her being singled out by the Japanese colonel.

I feel like I could go on and on about how awesome this episode was.

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Haven’t seen this weeks episodes yet but skimmed the recap and I CANT WAIT. I will definitely be watching the episodes tonight. I will be back after!

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Things I don’t get:

1. What did Dong-mae think he could accomplish by cutting off Ae-shin’s hair? I mean seriously it wasn’t going to make a difference to Wan-ik. Although it was fun to watch, the act itself seems silly in retrospect. (And yes I have read all the explanations of cutting of hair means in Korean culture).
2. Why didn’t the emperor fire Wan-ik from his durties earlier? His death didn’t seem to make any difference to the Japanese? Like what? Huh?
3. Why does Grandfather say he intends to be the black bird in Eugene’s sky. What does that mean? What does a black bird signify? (In some cultures one black bird signals death or a bad omen).
4. Why does Mori Takashi smile so cute? You’d think they’d find less cute gut to play him?
5. Why is Ae-shin being a sniper such a big deal when her aunt is awesome with the bow-n-arrow? Even though I get that it’s a sport (nevertheless), seems like her aunt is a badass too.
6. Why does Grandfather ask Dong-mae to protect Ae-shin? First she is a rebel and Dong-mae is not, and she is a pretty good sniper and she is not even gonna be around for Dong-mae to protect her. Huh? And oh…Grandfather knows Ae-shin is one of the rebels!
7. I don’t understand the beef between Dong-mae and Mori Takashi, why are they at odds? Isn’t Dong-mae supposed to do the bidding of the Japanese? Isn't that his job?
8. Mori Takashi keeps his hit list in this hotel room? C’mon!!

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2. I've spent this whole drama wondering why someone didn't kill Wan-ik. Why did the Righteous Army attack Dong-mae and Eugene but leave the obvious traitor alone?!
3. The black bird is a reference to when Grandad met Eugene as a child/slave and told him to not look up at black birds, basically don't aspire to things beyond your status as a slave.
5. I guess because Guns are still a big deal and the newest technology in weapons while bow n arrow is more a of traditional thing
6. Ae-shin is good with a gun but Dong-mae still managed to protect her in other ways, like him giving the letter to Granddad to let him know that someone was interfering with the Go family. Dong-mae basically has a whole network of people willing to give him info about Ae-shin.
7. Dong-mae probably felt disrespected by Mori Takashi plus Mori pulled a gun on him. Also Dong-mae has stated he is loyal to Musin Society (his gang) and not to Japan.

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I thought Wan-ik was bad but Takashi is on a whole other level of evil. And now we have Dong-mae mentor in town. You can't trust anyone.

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I always thought that the sentiment of going into the flame more, one step at a time, has some significance. So maybe in the end the one who manages to get the nearest to the flame is the one that is going to burn, out of the three frenemies?

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Eugene is the one closest to her emotionally

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Oh My... Seeing what Grandfather wishes for Dong-mae and Eugene, I'm afraid that I'm figuring out I will know the end of the character. Half-of the show, I started to think that Dong-mae would die while protecting Ae-shin. I'd only thought, Ae-shin saved Dong-mae once, and Dong-mae, with his hidden big love to her, would be able to make him a person to save her while risking his life. Dong-mae, in the future, may take the bullet that would hit Ae-shin. Oh my, why am I crying now... :((. I can't ready to let Dong-mae go....

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When my kids were young and my wife and I would come back from a movie, they ask, so how was it? And I'd always say, everybody dies.

It became a joke for my family, Here comes a new drama and they ask me, how does it end? no wait, everybody dies.

Watching Mr. Sunshine, I was hoping it'd be a love story with a happy ending. But the last few episodes, especially this past week, I'm getting that feeling that, in this one, everyone really does die.

I only saw four possible outcomes, only one of them happy, and Ae-shin specifically ruled that out in the preview after episode 20.

I won't say any more, because I want to be as spoil-less as possible, but we've all already watched episode 20. But I have to say, after watching this weekend, I really hoped that Eugene would finally turn to Hina and say, "Hey Hina, come to America with me."

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....but Eugene wouldn't try to sway her from her mission because he loves her as much as for what she is (a strongly-principled, sacrificing-for-the-greater-good descendant of her grandfather and mother) as for who she is.

Arggggh, the angst!

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I don't have a problem with that. My problem was that she approached him with a promise of one thing, when she really was planning something else. I'm going to stop here because I know this is really for episode 20, and I feel like people try to keep the recap discussions spoiler free.

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Eugene has from the start supported As shin in her role as a Righteous Army fighter. He is a soldier who understands sacrificing to a higher good, and he has been a teacher to her as well as the newbies in the emperors army. This has been consistent throughout the drama
......that's all I'm saying!

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wow wtf happened in this episode lol....but at least i can say things are finally getting interesting (lol)

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"Maybe they all survive her for the sake of the bromance?" LOL omg i shouldnt be giggling...but i'm giggling

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After @dramallama comment about Ae shin's death being foreshadowed, I realized that might be why whenever she and Eugene have a scene together, they're either not in the same frame, or when they are in the same frame they are always separated by some object. This is a deliberate choice of the cinematographer and director. I think it means they will always be separated.

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Thank you for your recap and comments, dramallama. When it rains, it pours. After a leisurely buildup, it now feels as if the action is being shot out of a cannon. Oh happy day. But first, I have to get something off my chest.

Two howling anachronisms drove me to distraction in this episode.

#1. As Eugene searches Mori's room, he rummages in a chest of drawers and finds the “Greensleeves” music box – along with a list of suspected Righteous Army members. Atop the chest of drawers is a small stack of books. One of them – with a rather garish (for 1904) purple cover bears an English title in a typeface that looks out of place for that time. The kicker: it's about New York Yankees baseball legend Yogi Berra – who wasn't even born until 1925. Marone!*

*Pronunciation hint:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUFcpoJ--wU

I'm wondering if Writer-nim is trying to subtly telegraph that everyone listed on Mori's hit list will survive just fine. The purple book is obviously stating “It ain't over til it's over.” Maybe there are other Yogi-isms (aka Berra-isms) lurking like Easter eggs planted by the props department. -- Or maybe its a subtle reference to the US Marine from New York City. He may have been born in Joseon, but now he's a Yankee through and through. ;-)

Could some of these be implied? ;-)
https://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/09/the-50-greatest-yogi-berra-quotes

ASIDE: It appears to me that Eugene has eidetic (“photographic”) memory. How he looks at General Mori's list of suspected members of the Righteous Army grabbed my attention. The way the slightly out-of-focus camera pans back and forth across the page instead of down and up the columns indicates to me that he was memorizing the form of the characters on the page. Eugene has not learned how to read hanja, as far as I know. I think he is committing it to memory for later transcription so that he can have a literate person read it for him.

#2. When Hina sits on the stairs outdoors with the maid and her brother Domi for a smoke, she gets ready to light a filtered cigarette. Cigarette filters were not invented/patented until 1925. Aigoo! ;-)

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yes, as a former smoker and also the daughter of an unfiltered Lucky Strike father smoker -- this was a glaring inacuracy.

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It's the little things. Gotta get them right. 😉

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Major spoiler alert for us nit-pickers: a document turns up in which the president in 1904 is listed as "FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT' rather than "THEODORE ROOSEVELT."

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Watching Ae-sin on the roof shooting and the beautiful music score was my favorite part of this serial. Who wouldn't fall in love with this girl !!! Her eyes speak million emotions.

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