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Catch the Ghost: Episode 14

The truth and the Subway Ghost’s origin story is revealed at last. Both our chief and our newbie face heavy emotions as their family members interweave through the Subway Ghost’s plot. And they may find that they have more in common with the Ghost than they knew, as the fine line between culprit and victim asks they to question everything they’ve assumed.

 
EPISODE 14 RECAP

The police van arrives and the combined subway and Major Crimes forces flood into the hospital and head to Chul-jin’s room. But Caregiver Choi has beaten them there, along with Ji-seok’s mother who has followed her to the closed ward. Caregiver Choi holds her finger up to quiet Mom and tells her not to follow. They’re gone by the time the police reach the ward, and Ma-ri divides up tasks.

Man-jin and Soo-ho establish a checkpoint at the hospital entrance, Woo-hyuk checks the security footage, and Yoo Ryung goes through visitor records, all while Caregiver Choi sneaks through hallways with Chul-jin in tow.

Ji-seok heads to his mother’s room, but some patients in the hall mention that Caregiver Choi rushed off and Mom followed her. Ji-seok doesn’t understand why the caregiver would leave when he’d told her not to, and all of the other strange behavior she’s exhibited floods back to him, especially regarding her son and interest in the Subway Ghost.

Ma-ri spots and stops Caregiver Choi as she runs down a hall with a wheelchair, but the chair is empty and Ma-ri just asks for directions. Meanwhile, Chul-jin crouches behind a cleaning supplies cart, and Caregiver Choi waits until the coast is clear until she tucks him into the chair. She races to the elevator, her eyes widening as cops mill at the desk across the way until the doors finally close.

Ji-seok’s mom is still missing from her room, and that’s because she’s still wandering the lower levels, where she spots Caregiver Choi and Chul-jin. She follows after them as they enter a restricted basement area. Caregiver Choi guides Chul-jin to a stack of boxes in a corner to hide, and she promises to protect him.

Yoo Ryung finds no visitors recorded for Chul-jin, but the name of his weekly physical therapist gives Yoo Ryung pause. It’s Kim Hee-joon.

In the dark basement, Caregiver Choi scans the area nervously from her hiding spot, and then mutters in dismay when she sees Ji-seok’s mom hiding behind boxes nearby. Mom ducks down when a door opens, and a figure dressed in black slowly stalks through the basement. It doesn’t take them long to guess the caregiver’s hiding spot, and soon the figure stands above her and Chul-jin. They slowly remove their face mask and reveal themselves: it’s Kim Hee-joon (who let this guy out of jail?)

Back to Yoo Ryung, she checks with a Metro detective to see if he pulled Hee-joon’s family record. Yoo Ryung has just one question, if Hee-joon had a daughter who died. With the answer in hand, Yoo Ryung seeks out Ma-ri.

She reports that Metro has managed to recover information from the case, the victim was a girl named Kim Sae-rom — and this girl is Hee-joon’s daughter. They realize now that Hee-joon was the one who gave them the lead to Hee-joon, and his name appears as the physical therapist, who visited right before each time that Chul-jin was transferred.

Ma-ri calls Metro Station to get interrogations started with Hee-joon, but it turns out that Hee-joon has escaped, leaving an unconscious detective behind in his cell. Ma-ri now sees that Hee-joon has been establishing his alibi since the beginning, from recruiting the Grasshoppers and pretending to find the suitcase to planting Chul-jin’s prints on the coins and faking the shoulder twitch.

They can’t help but wonder why someone so thorough would leave their real name in the visitor records, and they realize that he planned to reveal the truth of his daughter’s death to the world after killing Chul-jin. They assume that Hee-joon must have taken Chul-jin, but Woo-hyuk arrives with security footage of Caregiver Choi. Ji-seok shows up too and gasps, recognizing his mother’s caregiver. Both Yoo Ryung and Ma-ri find the name familiar, and that’s because they just saw it in Hee-joon’s family record, listed as his mother.

In the basement, Hee-joon smiles at Chul-jin and mocks him with a shoulder twitch. Caregiver Choi stands to block her son’s path, but he pushes her aside and readies his wire.

Upstairs, Ma-ri briefs the team and tells them to look for restricted areas where Caregiver Choi or Hee-joon could hide. Yoo Ryung consoles Ji-seok, telling him that if they focus on finding the caregiver, they will also locate Ji-seok’s mom.

Caregiver Choi begs her son to stop, but he orders her out of the way. He notes that Chul-jin seems scared to die, and mockingly asks if it’s only fun if others die. Cut to a flashback to the day three years ago, when Hee-joon was just a carefree pickpocket. He grabs a wallet and smiles widely when he spots his daughter on the other side of the platform.

But the girl is alone, and Chul-jin, looking dirty and menacing, approaches the platform and knocks the lollipop from Sae-rom’s hands. Just ahead of Sae-rom, Yoo Jin stands as well, and she turns back when the lollipop shatters. It’s not just Yoo Jin here either; all of the other Subway Ghost victims stand nearby, but none of them do anything to protect Sae-rom.

Hee-joon moves forward in alarm, but a pair of handcuffs land on his wrists from behind. It’s Mi-ra, who has caught his latest theft in action. Hee-joon struggles against her, trying to keep his sight on his daughter across the platform. Mi-ra throws Hee-joon to the ground, and all he can do is watch as Chul-jin steps forward, and then his daughter falls backwards onto the tracks. His view of his daughter is replaced by the oncoming train, which barrels ahead without stopping.

Back in the present, Hee-joon asks why his mother is there, and whether Sae-rom’s murderers are working together. Because it seems that he blames his mother as well for his daughter’s death. He says that she was supposed to stay at home and care for Sae-rom, but she kept leaving her alone to work. He says that what he hated most in his own childhood was being left alone, and his daughter died because she was forced to go out on her own.

Hee-joon’s face contorts with sobs as he demands to know why his mother is protecting Chul-jin, and she says it’s because she wants to save Hee-joon. She says that she knows that he’ll take his own life as soon as he’s done punishing everyone else. Caregiver Choi reaches out to her son while Chul-jin makes a break for it, but Hee-joon follows after him and corners him. And all the while, Ji-seok’s mom watches from her own hiding spot, undiscovered.

Ji-seok and Yoo Ryung run into Nurse Park as they check restricted areas of the hospital. They ask her for other areas to check, and she mentions the warehouse in the basement. Nurse Park tries to ask if Chul-jin is somehow related to the Subway Ghost murders, and Yoo Ryung promises they’ll talk later as she heads to the basement with Ji-seok.

In that basement, Hee-joon recites the judge’s decision at Chul-jin’s trial: that he was suffering from a schizophrenic episode and therefore not responsible for his actions. Hee-joon says that he’ll sentence Chul-jin again, and says that for killing his only daughter brutally, he sentences the man to death. Hee-joon picks up a nearby pole, and swings it at Chul-jin’s head. Caregiver Choi tries to hold her son back, but her efforts go unnoticed as Hee-joon uses his metal wire to strangle Chul-jin.

Chul-jin’s body goes limp, and Hee-joon seems nearly as startled as his mother to see what he’s done. Caregiver Choi recovers first and crawls over to the body, taking the wire in her own hands. She says that she’ll confess to all of the murders, and let her son get away. But Hee-joon tells her no, because he still has things left to resolve before he dies.

When Yoo Ryung and Ji-seok make their way to the basement, all that’s left is a puddle of blood. Ji-seok calls for his mother, and finally spots a trembling stack of boxes, where his mother still hides. Ji-seok is distraught and forgets entirely about his mother’s delusions as he tries to hold her and make sure she’s not hurt.

He calls her “Mom” over and over again, and Mom begins to see flashes of him, both as Ji-seok and as his father. But this dissonance confuses her, and she begins to panic. Ji-seok’s tears and shouts only frighten her further, and Yoo Ryung pulls him back and reminds him that she’s not his mother right now.

She addresses his mother as a student, and calmly asks her if she is hurt and whether she saw anyone else in the basement. Mom lies and says no. And at that moment, her eyes light up. “I remember,” she says, looking at Ji-seok. His eyes widen, hopeful, but then Mom calls him, “ajusshi.” His face falls and he drops it into his hands, before reaching out to guide his mother back to her room. Yoo Ryung calls Ma-ri and asks her to set up a police line outside.

It seems that not only did Hee-joon orchestrate his own escape, he also made sure that the other Grasshoppers made it out of jail as well. He also set them up with a van and even Hyung-soo’s meds. And now they drive to the hospital and make it past the checkpoint without issue. In the parking lot, Hee-joon waits for them, wheeling out a large box.

Still in the basement, Yoo Ryung discovers a laptop set up in a dark corner. Underneath the laptop, a slip of paper reads, “I’m the victim.”

The Grasshoppers almost make it through the checkpoint, but at the last minute the cop asks to check the back of the van, and Man-jin recognizes them. The Grasshoppers drive away, so Man-jin grabs a car and follows in pursuit.

Yoo Ryung finds a video queued up on the laptop, and she recognizes the Subway Ghost victims first. And then she gasps, and she realizes Yoo Jin stands on the platform as well.

Back to the car chase, Man-jin calls Soo-ho for backup. Hee-joon sits in the back of the van with his box, giggling. But Hyung-soo begins to experience a dissociative episode as he drives, and soon the van weaves in the traffic as his child persona takes over. “I used to be tough back when I worked Major Crimes,” Man-jin says to himself, a determined look on his face. And then he speeds up and spins his car in front of the oncoming Grasshopper van. He jumps out at the last second, but the Grasshoppers also manage to stop and flee on foot.

This is where Man-jin falters, and he stops to catch his breath as the two surge ahead of them. But they stop in their tracks as Soo-ho arrives, stun gun in hand. Soo-ho gives his “dad” a wink as the two men take the Grasshoppers into custody. They seem elated, until they suss out what reason the Grasshoppers might have for being at the hospital. They return to the van, but Hee-joon and Chul-jin’s body in the box are gone.

Alone in the dark basement, Yoo Ryung watches the video of her sister. She sees Sae-rom move towards the track to escape, and Chul-jin turn to Yoo Jin with his whole body convulsing. He pushes at Yoo Jin, not Sae-rom, and as Yoo Jin falls forward, she falls into the young girl. The collar of Sae-rom’s dress tears off in Yoo Jin’s hands, and Sae-rom falls backwards onto the tracks.

Yoo Ryung clutches the note in her hands, and then turns at a noise: Nurse Park stands behind her. Yoo Ryung rises, and asks Nurse Park to tell her that nothing happened that day, three years ago when Yoo Ryung asked her to watch Yoo Jin while she went to an interview.

Nurse Park can’t tell her that though, as we flashback to Nurse Park asking Yoo Jin to wait for her at the subway benches. Chul-jin prowls in the background, and when she returns to the scene, Yoo Jin is kneeling on the platform from her fall, the train passing by.

In the present, Nurse Park cries as she tells Yoo Ryung she was too afraid to tell her what had happened. Then Ji-seok is there, and Ma-ri and Woo-hyuk too; Ji-seok asks Yoo Ryung what’s wrong. Yoo Ryung can’t find the words at first, and then she tells him that it was Yoo Jin’s fault that Sae-rom fell.

And where has Caregiver Choi gone? She’s fled on foot, her thoughts on the past as well. In one final flashback, we see what happened after Sae-rom’s death. A year later, the day arrives when Hee-joon will be released from jail for his pickpocket charges. Caregiver Choi hides at the platform where Sae-rom died, knowing that her son will go there first. She watches him from behind a vending machine, a small bouquet of flowers set out at the platform for his daughter.

But then a foot lands on those flowers, and Yoo Jin steps off the train by herself and sits down beside him. It’s the day Yoo Ryung abandoned her sister, and some weird twist of fate has brought her to Hee-joon. He spots a subway official passing by, and he uses his master pickpocket skills to grab the man’s keys. Caregiver Choi says nothing as Hee-joon drags Yoo Jin away to a restricted office nearby, and she hesitates at the door, not going in to stop her son.

Inside the office, Hee-joon finds the wire and begins to strangle Yoo Jin as she struggles against the filing cabinet. On the other side of the door, Caregiver Choi spots Yoo Ryung running towards her. Yoo Ryung asks if the caregiver has seen her sister, and Caregiver Choi says no.

Hee-joon sits with Yoo Jin’s body for a moment before he finds the suitcase in the office and loads her inside. He uses the stolen keys to enter the tunnel with it, his mother not far behind him. He drags the suitcase down the tracks, until a gasp from inside stops him. He unzips it and notes that Yoo Jin is still breathing inside. He reaches forward, as if he might strangle her again, but a clanging noise from behind him the tunnel stops him. Instead he grabs her necklace, which he promises to return to her, and flees.

The clanging noise was thanks to Caregiver Choi, who follows behind him. She finds the abandoned suitcase, and Yoo Jin inside.

Back in the present, Hee-joon’s promise that he still has something left to resolve has sent Caregiver Choi fleeing back to her home. A pair of red shoes sits on the threshold, but they’re adult shoes, not those of a child. Caregiver Choi calls out for Sae-rom, passing from room to room. It’s not her dead granddaughter, but Yoo Jin who emerges from another room.

Caregiver Choi embraces her, and tells her that “Grandmother” will take care of her. But Caregiver Choi needs to go get some money first before they run, and she tells Yoo Jin to stay inside and not open the door to anyone.

Moments after Caregiver Choi leaves, Ji-seok and Yoo Ryung arrive at her home. Ji-seok bangs on the door, and his shouts distress Yoo Jin, who holds the door tightly shut. But then Yoo Ryung also calls out, and Yoo Jin recognizes her sister’s voice. Her hand hovers at the lock on the door.

 
COMMENTS

It took a lot of far-fetched stretching to get Hee-joon and the Grasshoppers in place for this final reveal, didn’t it? It reflects pretty poorly on the police, that they let not one, but three suspects escape, and also managed to not notice Caregiver Choi as she fled the hospital. Commissioner Kim might want to consider yelling at someone other than Ma-ri for once to whip this department into shape.

But I’ve forgiven all of that. Not only do we at last have Hee-joon revealed as the Subway Ghost, but the situation that led to the creation of the Ghost is more complex than I anticipated for this story. Hee-joon isn’t a psychopath or someone with a mental illness, as all the misleads have tried to point us to earlier. He’s someone in pain, someone with a lot of anger. Someone a lot like Yoo Ryung.

A few episodes ago, I discussed the idea that Yoo Ryung’s behavior was like a vigilante, and in Hee-joon, we see true vigilante justice, grief taken to its extreme conclusion. Kim Hee-joon is the dark side of what Yoo Ryung could have become. They’re both ghosts, in name and in the way that they haunt the subway with little left in them except their grief. They both have felt helpless while a family member was hurt, saw bystanders offer no help and the police focus more on their assigned role than caring for the victims and those they leave behind. It’s the perfect choice, to make our hero and our villain two faces of the same coin.

I don’t condone Hee-joon’s actions; I’m not an eye for an eye kind of gal. He’s a smarmy jerk and a pickpocket. But he didn’t deserve to see his daughter killed. His frustration with the justice system is understandable, though misguided. I felt his pain as he was held against the ground, unable to do anything but watch. I can understand how he might be bitter, stuck in jail for a petty crime while also mourning his daughter.

I feel all the same feelings for Yoo Ryung as well. I understand how her past has driven her to take actions that are reckless and put others in danger. I understand her frustration with the police, even as I understand why the bureaucracy is in place.

In the end the only real difference may be in what these two people believe to be real justice, and how they approached serving that justice. The show has taken time in each crime-of-the-week to shine a little light on the grey areas. Subway Police can forgive a guy selling bootleg cds when they know he has to support his family. Bread Dad may be frustrated with his autistic son at times, but he never actually gave up on him. So often, the criminals were driven to act because of some way that capitalism screwed them over (and that includes even Ji-seok). In this show there’s a spectrum of grey, where anyone may have chosen a dark path.

Yoo Ryung has done her share of endangering others in her single-minded efforts to find her sister. But she’s also spent this entire show sympathizing with those she’s helped and taking time to care for them even as she wants to focus on the Ghost case. Hee-joon, on the other hand, chose a selfish path that considered only his own anguish. And thus, we arrive at our villain. I won’t be surprised if Yoo Ryung has to consider whether she can sympathize with him too once they catch him. As she held his note in her hand, I felt like she could certainly see him as a victim too.

Why do we have to hurt Ji-seok so much? Is it just because Kim Sun-ho is such a great crier? Seeing the truth of the Subway Ghost’s past hurt me, but Ji-seok still harboring hope that his mother might realize who he really is, only to have it dashed with a chipper “ajusshi…” That tried to break me. I don’t expect a miracle cure for his mother’s condition, but I wouldn’t mind it if they found a middle ground, where she may not recognize him as her son but can still include him in her life as Ji-seok, and not as his father.

And speaking of mothers… That is quite some mother’s love Caregiver Choi demonstrated. Grief took hold of Caregiver Choi as well when Sae-rom died, and she made a series of bad decisions, becoming a bystander who doesn’t help even when it means someone’s life is at stake (sounds familiar, right?) I couldn’t believe that she sent Yoo Ryung away while standing guard at the door where Hee-joon was trying to kill Yoo Jin. And now that she’s covered for her son until the very end, she may find that he’s willing to exact his justice on her as everything draws to a close.

Now we just need Yoo Jin to open that door. But while she’s probably happy to hear her sister’s voice, I’m worried that she might fear that her sister is still upset with her. It’s okay Yoo Jin, open the door!

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Heejoon isn't vigilante, he is violent narcissist who can't accept responsibility in the chain of events that led to his daughter tragic accident. Mira had nothing to do with what happened, how she deserved to be killed, and what the eff is wrong with YR that she blame YJ again when in the video footage it's clear it was tragic accident, at times like that I really can't with the writer, who must be incredibly removed from the world to not know how human's emotions work. Sloppy, sloppy writing in critical mass in this episode.

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I think human emotions are very complicated, not all of us feel the same way about the same situations, not all of us know how to translate what we feel into words or actions really! Yoo Ryung was overwhelmed with what she saw, having her sister be in a place where such a horrific accident took place must be terrifying!

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People feel guilty over things that are not their fault all the time or assign blame to others for things out of their reasonable power to control. I think the sloppyness and the lack of nuance of the writing prevented the drama from showing how human emotions are complicated and from figuring out the message the writers want to convey. Are they saying the YJ really has fault in this or just that YR feels like YJ has fault in this? Like, maybe YR had felt guilt in the past for things YJ may have inadvertantly done to offend people? The writing could have set this up earlier, but didn't.

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I think it was quite normal in the events for how Yoo Ryung acted even more when in the past weeks Ma Ri has constantly made sure to make Yoo Ryung feel like the last person on the world first for the mistake she did when she left Yoo Jin behind and after that Yoo Jin for sure is the one at fault for all the chain of events...Yoo Ryung is a young girl who deep down has acumulated a ton of regret from that event (aka 2 years ) and thinks of herself as a monster deep down...Ma Ri blamed Yoo Jin for the killer spree but what she was actually doing was blaming Yoo Ryung...Everyone reacts different and i found it normal how the poor girl reacted even when it was clearly a tragic accident...I would side eye a bit the bystanders,the one man who clearly wasn't afraid and looked straight at the scene without doing anything but didn't care to intervine...With all that Hee Joon stoped being a victim when he killed,he became a killer and nothing more and his mother is his complice by killing the poor Mi Ra and for keeping quiet..She only destroyed her son more by her silence...

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He's more a hurt individual from losing daughter which transformed into a narcissant psychopath in a sense. I mean even the other grasshoppers were manuipulated by him since he was trying his hardest to create an albi for himself.

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Thank you for the recap, @abirdword.

A few episodes back I talked about the Ghost and guessed his story exactly how it was shown to us this episode so I'm walking into this recap with puffed shoulders, LOL!

I have to say that my heart really broke for Hee-joon for having to see his daughter die like that, he must've replayed that scene in his head over and over again, and had the anger and resentment build-up when he was in prison. I think him attacking Yoo jin like that was an impulse of finding her in front of him at that moment, I don't think he had planned for it but because he once started it he couldn't stop himself! Of course, I, like abirdword, in no way condone his actions, he's hurt I understand but killing people and brutally like that should've not been his way for getting justice for his daughter, it should never be anyone's way of getting justice, period.

Also, I don't understand why his mom has kept Yoo Jin as Sae-rom with her? Is it out of guilt for losing her grand-daughter like that and wanting to save her from her son? But why call her Sae-rom? Why keep her away from her own sister?

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The idea that Yoo Jin is responsible is just pathetic. Sae-rom's death was a tragic accident, and Yoo Jin is in no way responsible for falling into her. HJ wanting to execute her is beyond warped. His mother covering for him is beyond warped.

And I understand that Caregiver Choi had to take Chul-jin from his locked room in order for HJ to be able to get at him, plot-wise. But wasn't it stupid? If he was in a locked room, wouldn't he be safer? So what if the cops took him? Wouldn't he be safer? How did hiding in a basement help him?

I really don't understand characters like Caregiver Choi (and her alter ego from another recent show). How does taking the blame for your serial-killing child benefit anyone? The killer goes on killing.

And while I'm ranting, isn't it a little much to think that HJ escaped from jail, ran home and got his laptop, queued up the video of his arrest and Sae-rom's death (which -- how did he get his hands on in the first place???), then tracked down his mother and Chul-jin, murdered CJ, then paused to set up the screen and video where YR would find it, before escaping. Seriously?

It feels like the writer had a beginning and an end in mind, and how she gets from one to the other doesn't really matter to her, as long as she stirs up the emotions she's looking for. I'm sorry, but I like well-thought out characters and reasonable plots, and I wish I didn't care about our subway gang so I could just drop this show.

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My sentiment exactly.

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The whole laptop thing really took me out of the story. I like how you mentioned the writer gets the story from one point to the other doesn't matter as long as she stirs up the emotions. I am very into this drama because the emotions really do come through as feeling genuine and some of the twists are very exciting and fun, but then I think about how we got there and where we're going, that sort of ruins it. The drama feels like a brainstorming board of good ideas, but the stuff that ties all the ideas together is incoherent. I can't help but think about how easily this drama can be improved.

Caregiver Choi - if you're worried about your son killing himself after he has killed everyone on his kill list, the best thing she could have done was to turn him in. I was pissed when I found out that she just watched her son take YJ away to kill her. And then lied to YR when YR was looking for her. It's not like walked into him stuffing her body into the suitcase. Lady, not only did you not watch your granddaughter properly like your son had asked, but you've made him into a killer in so many ways. HJ may have killed a bunch of people, but I still feel like his mom is the absolute worst. In the end, she even left YJ unattended even though she knew her son is out to kill YJ too.

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It's rich that none of them blame themselves for what happened. HJ saw his daughter alone on platform, instead of going to her, went on his merry thieving way, Mira the subway cop didn't see what has happening on the other platform and at this point there wasn't an way she could intervene, it's like they could just jump the truck, yet she was killed by him for what.

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Gosh! I can't proofread myself, I meant that none of them at that point could like, to jump the tracks with doors on their side closed and trains running.

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Yes, the writer wanted to start out with a revenge plot that tied into Jin's disappearance, but didn't put enough thought into culpability. Who really was to blame? He may have hated Mi-ra for holding him down, but who really was to blame? This drama could have been 10x better with a thoughtful approach to that question. Also, sorry, how does an embittered pickpocket turn into a revenge serial killer, even against an autistic girl? It's not so easy to just kill. And the coincidence of her stepping into his path at that moment is not as powerful as if he had targeted her and tracked her down. In fact, a drama that began with him targeting people with fragmentary glimpses of their role in the original tragedy, played out opposite YR'S search for her sister, would have been a much more compelling story.

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@lindag, it takes 5 to 10 minutes to strangle somebody, and his first victim is helpless young girl, I don't buy into his sob story the way writer try to sell it to us.

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I was dreading this episode for a long time. It's quite dark. Some scenes were hard to watch. It was episode three I said it was the lightest show I was watching, but since then especially episode 5, it became darker until here we are. I actually miss the comedy. Good job show, pulling me in like this and then not making me want to get out. This show just keeps on being full of surprises even as I think I understand it. Just wow. But it is just so cruel in the way it treats both Yoo Ryung and Ji Seok. Making me cry like crazy. I actually fell for red herring that Hee Joon wasn't the subway ghost and was surprised, didn't notice the clues that showed he was.
I will never regret watching this show regardless of everything.

I was a little disappointed they YR said it was her sister's fault. It wasn't like Yoo Jin pushed the girl in panic or some reason. She was pushed and fell on her and tried to steady herself even trying to stop the girl from falling. (There's nothing that she would have done that would have made her a killer, she just isn't someone who would do that. Yeah still not over people thinking that.) Then I understood. YR had been told so many times that it was her sister's fault again and again and then her realization on why Hee Joon tried to kill her sister so brutally, that she couldn't help but repeat what she was told again and again (God!). It was the shock and I don't blame her at all.

Okay so now that I have got all that out of my system, I am proud of YR. She kept a cool head, managed to figure things out all without panicking even calming JS (So many times it was the other way round that I am glad to see it this episode). And oh JS, he was terrified for his mother and then his mother almost starting to remember him and him hoping that she did. Thank goodness YR was there and she handled the situation perfectly using the empathy that she has that I love, (a little disappointed there wasn't more interaction between YR and JS's mother, I hope in the last episodes...) And JS let her handle it and calmed down. (Again so proud of her 😭).

Also I don't care what and why Caregiver Choi did why she did, whether it was grief over loosing Sae Rom and so trying to replace her with YJ, or guilt over her son trying to kill her and others, I am just glad YJ is alive. I can't wait for YR to finally reunite with her sister. Can't wait for Monday.

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Also despite doing so many things right (not having the mentally ill person being the killer instead it being the angry Hee Joon, developing the characters, keeping us guessing, etc), there are still complaints about things the show did do wrong and I understand. Also one can't please everyone. But I think this show already tried to do a lot, anything more couldn't have been handled in just 16 episodes. Yet 2 episodes are left and I am curious to see how it all goes, along with a happy ending for both the leads.

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Seriously how perfect do people want this drama to be?No one complains about such things to this extent atleast, in other thriller and crime shows but here every single thing is a problem? Oh FL isn't developing (she develops), then they are trying to tell us the sister might be the killer (no they are't), not well thought out (so many twists and turns, thought given to the characters), are they telling that the guy with split personality is the killer? (no turns out he's not), all that YR has done has been forgiven just like that (no JS thought she wanted only to join the metro that is it, but that was never the actual reason so he was okay with her lying cause he understood all no judgement), and so many other things. But no. Why is it not perfect? Cause it can't satisfy everyone. I mean its still a kdrama. There are worse yet still well loved dramas out there. I just don't get it. Is the fact that they don't like the FL the reason they are giving so much importance to its flaws than they generally would? I am not saying there are't faults, cause I know there are but still... Oh I would so liked to be proved wrong.

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I get where your coming from because I love the drama too. So much that it angers me to continue reading other's comments. Some people have been commenting negatively since ep 1 till this episode and it amazes me how they still watch the drama and find time to comment here about the downside of the drama if thats how they truly feel about the drama. If I were them, I would just drop the drama since all I can see were the flaws. Why focus there? What good will it bring? I think none. There two writers are newbie and this piece won them an award. I think Catch the Ghost is still a very good drama given that it came from unknown writers. I actually enjoyed it and is so much anticipating the last two eps and at the same sad to see the drama ends. Because I totally love it. What am i going to do once it ends? Hayys. Haha

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Sniff. A part of me will die, when this ends. It is that good. I regret nothing.

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Me too
Dont understand the negative comments
A lot of very poor dramas are popular because the leads are visually attractive
Here they don't like MGY so they keep criticizing the drama but hey MGY is one of the finest actresses in Korea go see her works😒😒

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So many things were going on but im glad they finally revealed everything. Blaming Yoo Jin is just not right, its totally not her fault for what happened.

Another thing (to which it is really and extremely stupid), i just cant get over the fact that they let that subway door wide open with just a flimsy thin line to keep people away from it. The sheer danger alone is terrifying, especially when a subway train is passing by in high speed. That the subway didnt take more measurements to garantuee the safety is beyond stupidity. That door needed to be barricaded until its fixed but no just let it wide open. Blame the damn government. This was something i couldnt ignore no matter if its a drama.

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Where I'm from, there aren't any subway doors. Anyone can fall in and some people have been violently pushed. I'm always jealous to see places with subway doors.

What I don't get is why the subway door opened before the train's arrival. I thought the point of those doors were to prevent people from falling in and they should automatically open when the train comes to a stop, so the door opening would align with the train's open doors. Then the subway doors close immediately after the train doors close.

Was there a malfunction with the doors?

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Yes, I think there was red tape hanging between open doors.

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Thanks! I didn't try to look too close at that scene (both from HJ's flashback and from the security tape) and didn't want to replay it since I get squeamish thinking about getting run over by a train.

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I find it ridiculous to say that Yoo Jin is responsible for Sae-rom's death. YJ was pushed and fell forward, ACCIDENTALLY pushing the little girl. I think the bystanders were more culpable than anyone because they did nothing. YJ is autistic and was just as scared as the little girl. But that still doesn't give HJ the right to murder people; though I must admit, I do understand his rage. But more than anything I want to see the sisters reunited and YR and JS as a couple. They would be so awesome together as they support each other and help each other with the care of their loved ones.

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I agree with all that you said. Especially the part About YR and JS.

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I did wonder how the trial for Sae-rom's death was conducted. I'm guessing they didn't have a real trial or else they would have called in everyone who was there as a witness and Mari would have found that all the victims were associated with that tragedy, right?

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It depends on SK law but even if not, their personal infos should be in investigation files as they would be required to give their statements after the accident. But that's the details that writer didn't pay attention to.

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I really love this show and most of the characters. I will watch to the end and I'll be glad I did.
That said--It takes a certain kind of narcissism, arrogance, and total disregard for the feelings and lives of other people to be a pick-pocket or any sort of career thief in the first place. People who lose their wallets lose family pictures, special notes, tickets, their I.D. Their lives get turned upside down while they try to cancel all their cards and get new I.D.
And he was sending the wallets to fences using them for forged ID, so we add identity theft to the mix. "Capitalism" didn't do this to HeeJoon (nor was it the cause of anybody else's misery). No matter what your economic/political system you live under, so long as it's not an absolutely bloodthirsty tyranny, basic morality and consideration for others is possible. Heejoon already showed he didn't have that. I think his mother is probably a large part of the reason why- she left him alone too much as a child and is willing to stand guard over the door and lie to the victim's sister. What a horrible woman.

Anyway, the narcissistic, arrogant, pick pocketing HeeJoon is old enough to have a ten year old daughter- he's not some teen-ager on a lark. If he wasn't a thief, he could have been with his daughter or made arrangements for her to have better care. Instead of fighting his arrest he could have immediately given in and then told her to cuff him and go chase down the crazy dude harassing people- there was time, if he'd explained instead of fighting.
The selfish people standing nearby who did not try to protect a child should be ashamed, but not dead.

And I totally agree with the commenters who are baffled by the sudden appearance of a lap top all keyed up to show the footage of the day SR died. It knocked me right out of the story trying to figure out where he'd been keeping it so that he could break free of jail, run fetch it, and then set it up. Where did he even carry it?

It would have made more sense if he had the file on his phone and sent it to YR when he was ready.

I still like the show. =)

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This drama is what got me out of my slump
It's highly addictive
So much thriller in the last episode I couldn't breath
Love the lead couple so much , love MGY and KSH was my first time watching him that I binged chief kim while waiting for new episodes and I fell in love with chief kim , how did I miss this gem
Am happy am back to watching dramas

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what is song when ghost met yoojin in subway in the past?
its not in the instrumental pack that released :(

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