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22

People with Flaws: Episodes 31-32 (Final)

All is fair in love and war, and sometimes, our leads have learned, war can blossom into love. There are a lot of ends to tie up in a short hour, but somehow the show manages it nicely. If everyone doesn’t get a happy ever after, at least they have learned that living with your flaws is possible with a lot of support and love.

 
EPISODE 31

Kang-woo wakes up first after spending the night with Seo-yeon, and he takes the opportunity to measure her arms and ring finger with his hands while she sleeps. He gets the giggles and wakes her up, and she’s so shy that she bounces him right off the bed.

He’s disappointed when Seo-yeon insists on going home before her brothers wake up. She succeeds, but she runs into Jang-mi and Mi-kyung, who are making bibimbap in the kitchen. Mi-kyung follows Seo-yeon to her room and finds the unworn lingerie, which makes her shriek that Kang-woo is really in love with Seo-yeon, hee.

Meanwhile, Kang-woo sits outside grinning like a fool at all the couples he sees. A voice intones that what he’s feeling is just hormones — ha, it’s the real Doctor Kim, who naturally doesn’t recognize Kang-woo and leaves him incredibly confused.

As soon as Won-jae lays eyes on Seo-yeon, he can tell something is different about her, though she denies his suspicion. Seo-joon and Joo-hee run in and drop to their knees, apologizing profusely for “causing trouble.” Won-jae and Seo-yeon jump to the worst possible conclusion, but eventually they get the full story, and Seo-yeon takes Seo-joon to see Hyun-soo and explain.

The truth is that Joo-hee wasn’t wearing heavy makeup and sexy clothes because she worked in the karaoke bar — she’s a fit model for an online store. Hyun-soo is impressed that Seo-joon didn’t put the blame on Joo-hee so that he could selfishly stay at Hyun-soo Entertainment, and reinstates him as a trainee.

But it turns out that when Kang-woo visited the building, he witnessed Jung-ho uploading the video of Seo-joon and Joo-hee, so Hyun-soo released Jung-ho from his contract. Seo-joon follows Jung-ho outside, angry that his former friend deliberately tried to destroy his career. He tells Jung-ho that someday they’ll meet onstage, and then they’ll compete fairly.

Upstairs, Hyun-soo tells Seo-yeon that Seo-joon is good enough to be a top star someday. Seo-yeon only gives him the stink-eye and warns him that if he ever makes Mi-kyung cry, she’ll personally kill him dead.

Kang-woo goes to the school to see Min-hyuk and pesters him until he agrees to have lunch, then Min-hyuk just orders several kinds of cake, ha. Kang-woo fusses about Min-hyuk’s health (and even tries to give him a blood sugar monitor), so Min-hyuk eventually agrees to cut back on the sugar.

Won-seok goes looking for Ho-dol and finds him running the Mr. Potato stand while the owner takes a bathroom break. Won-seok offers to buy one so that Ho-dol can say he made a sale, but Ho-dol wrestles with him and drops his wallet in a bucket of water.

Ho-dol takes apart Won-seok’s wallet to let everything dry, and inside, he finds the picture of Won-seok’s father. Ho-dol grins that Won-seok looks like his dad, and Won-seok preens a little at the compliment. Growing very serious, Ho-dol tells the photograph, “Thank you for helping Hyung-nim live such a great life,” and Won-seok looks shaken, in a good way.

Later, Ho-dol enters Won-seok’s room alone and finds the picture of the mountains that Won-seok keeps on his desk. He takes it to Won-jae and tells him that Won-seok asked him to give him the picture, tearing it up first. Won-jae reveals that the picture is of the place Won-seok had chosen to commit suicide, but he believes that Won-seok sent Ho-dol to Won-jae with the torn picture as a message that he’s no longer considering it.

After Ho-dol leaves, Won-jae texts to Won-seok: I got the photo. Did he change your mind? Won-seok answers almost immediately: He was grateful because I was living my life. (Oh, my heart.)

Won-jae goes to see Kang-hee at work since she’s not answering his calls. She’s inexplicably cold to him, and she accuses him of accepting her proposal too quickly because he’s after her money. She breaks up with him, but Won-jae says she’s lying and reminds her that he promised to stop her if she ever tried to leave him.

Kang-woo attack-hugs Seo-yeon when she shows up at his place after work, whining that he missed her even though they saw each other that morning. Seo-yeon gives him her three Mr. Potatoes, since she’s been unable to get them to grow anything but scraggly brown grass-hair.

Kang-woo is dismayed to learn that Seo-yeon hasn’t told her brothers about them yet, and he insists on going to her place immediately to get their formal approval. Won-seok is running late so Seo-yeon tries to bail from embarrassment, but Kang-woo blurts out that they’re dating, to absolutely nobody’s surprise.

Won-jae asks what Kang-woo does and it’s explained that he designs clothes, though he used to be the chief director at the school because he’s a Shinhwa Foods grandson. Suddenly all the puzzle pieces fall into place, and Won-jae realizes why Kang-hee broke up with him — because Kang-woo is her brother.

Later, Kang-hee finds Won-jae in her office, and he says that he’s figured out that his sister is dating her brother. Kang-hee tells him that she’ll stay with him if he wants, but instead he just apologizes. Kang-hee explains that she’s strong enough to break up but Kang-woo isn’t, and she says she’s glad Won-jae isn’t selfish.

Won-jae leaves, but Kang-hee follows him to give him one last hug. She says that she liked him more than she thought, and that that’s enough for her.

EPISODE 32

At school, Seo-yeon catches Vice Principal Park eating a bunch of snacks again, but this time he claims that Min-hyuk gave them to him. She takes them back to Min-hyuk’s office (HAHA, he’s testing his blood sugar), but he confirms Vice Principal Park’s story. Seo-yeon sheepishly tries to leave without him seeing them and ends up dumping them all over the floor, and Min-hyuk cracks up.

At his next therapy appointment, Kang-woo ends up with the real Doctor Kim, and he confirms his suspicion that he’s been seeing the non-doctor brother, Bang-gu, all this time. He freaks out, seeing the identical twins together, and he accuses Bang-gu of taking on his brother’s identity to make money.

But Bang-gu explains that Dong-gu, the real Doctor Kim, was missing for five years, so they assumed he was dead. He’d been there to pack up Dong-gu’s possessions when Kang-woo showed up, demanding treatment and tossing around huge wads of cash. Bang-gu apologizes, and Kang-woo promises not to turn him in, since he believes that the real Doctor Kim might not have helped him as much as Bang-gu did.

Ho-dol is having dinner with his dad when Won-seok calls him, and Dad grabs the phone to ask if Won-seok prefers pumpkin or chestnut. Won-seok picks chestnut and is informed that it means he’s stuffy. Ho-dol gets the phone back and tells Won-seok that answering pumpkin would have only resulted in a different insult, hee.

Won-jae comes to the bar to talk to Won-seok, trying to hide his face so he won’t cause a stir among the customers, only to learn that the bar is closed, lol. Won-seok notices that Won-jae’s smile is forced, but Won-jae doesn’t elaborate.

Kang-woo’s mother and grandmother want to have a meal and officially meet Seo-yeon, so Mi-kyung suggests she borrow some heels from Jang-mi to match her dress. Won-jae stumbles home drunk and asks Seo-yeon if she’s happy, and when she says she is, he says that’s enough for him. Awww, best big brother ever.

On the way to dinner, Kang-woo figures out that Seo-yeon’s heels are hurting her. The meal is awkward but friendly, though Kang-woo’s mom makes it clear that this doesn’t mean they fully approve of Seo-yeon yet. Kang-woo is still worried about Seo-yeon’s feet, so when he realizes his mother is wearing flats, he insists they exchange shoes and makes the whole table uncomfortable. ~cringe~

Hyun-soo and Mi-kyung are officially a couple now, and Hyun-soo finally shows Mi-kyung some of Kang-woo’s designs. She thinks he’s very talented but notices that he only designs men’s clothes, and they decide that Kang-woo is definitely a pervert. HA.

While Jang-mi is finally taking down all of her pictures of Kang-woo in her little apartment, Jang-mi’s mother finds her and muscles her way inside. But this time when her mother tries to manhandle her, Jang-mi screams and smacks her back, declaring that she’ll no longer let herself be bullied.

She says that she’ll give up her inheritance if her mother doesn’t treat her better, knowing that the only reason her mother wants control is because without Jang-mi, she’s nothing to Jang-mi’s father. She gives her mother a bank book and promises to deposit money into it monthly, and makes her leave. Good girl!

Min-hyuk meets with the mother of the girl who died due to his superior’s mistake. She tells him that her daughter used to call him Doctor Candy because he was always eating candy, and that because of him, her daughter had fun while in the hospital.

Choking back tears, Min-hyuk apologizes for telling the truth too late. But the girl’s mother says that she’s buried her daughter in her heart, and that it’s okay for Min-hyuk to let her go now.

He quits his job at the school and prepares to go work overseas, similar to Doctors Without Borders. He promises Seo-yeon that he’ll come back someday, leaving her with a friendly handshake.

Seo-yeon watches Kang-woo trim Mr. Potato’s “hair” and compliments him on his green thumb, which puts him in the mood. He picks her up to carry her to bed, but they run into Hyun-soo and Mi-kyung, who let themselves in. They say it’s their twenty-two days anniversary so they’re throwing a party, and Seo-yeon admits that she knew about it but forgot.

Seo-joon and Joo-hee agree to ride to the party with Jang-mi, terrified because she seems to be the worst driver. Meanwhile, Seok-min fails to convince Won-seok to attend the party with him, so he teases that he’ll just take Ho-dol instead, and Won-seok nearly kills him with his brain.

It’s officially the worst party ever, so Seok-min tries to liven things up by offering people his autograph. Not a single soul is interested, so he follows Ho-dol when Won-seok calls him to say he’s waiting outside, hee. Hyun-soo decides to put on some music and accidentally turns on Kang-woo and Seo-yeon’s “warming up” song. Kang-woo tackles him and grabs the stereo remote, and he shoves it down his pants to keep anyone from touching it.

Kang-hee arrives unexpectedly to see Kang-woo, and awww, Won-jae’s whole face just lights up. They sit at opposite ends of the bar texting each other, and as the night goes on, they creep closer and closer to each other. By the end of the party, they’ve agreed that eventually, after Kang-woo and Seo-yeon are married, nobody will care if they start dating again.

Min-hyuk comes to the party but stays outside (“The atmosphere is really weird in there,” LOL). He and Kang-woo get into an aggressively brotherly shoulder-check contest until Min-hyuk almost knocks Kang-woo into a wall. Min-hyuk is leaving tomorrow, and Kang-woo pesters him until he promises to call occasionally.

Three months later.

The siblings complain that Won-seok is always out on dates with Ho-dol, leaving them stuck with the boxes and boxes of sweet potatoes that Ho-dol’s dad keeps sending them. Awww… apparently, Ho-dol’s dad has come around, and he really loves Won-seok (Won-jae: “Won-seok should tell Ho-dol’s father that we’ve had enough sweet potatoes.” Seo-yeon: “He did. Twice.”).

Seo-yeon is annoyed with Kang-woo lately, because he’s always busy and won’t let her in his studio. She’s still keeping snacks in Min-hyuk’s old office — sweet potatoes, PFFT — so she’s happy to get a package from Min-hyuk with all of her favorite snacks. She takes the box to Kang-woo’s place, but when he doesn’t seem to be around, she sneaks to his studio and finds him there.

Kang-woo blocks the door, but Seo-yeon ducks under his arm and runs inside, ignoring his protests. She finds herself face-to-face with her wedding dress… the one that Kang-woo designed for her back when they were kids. Wow, it’s gorgeous.

Though it’s sooner than he’d planned, Kang-woo starts to ask Seo-yeon to marry him. But before he even finishes the sentence, Seo-yeon interrupts: “Yes. I’m definitely going to marry you, Kang-woo. No matter what.” Eyes sparkling, Kang-woo takes her hands and asks her never to let him go, and she agrees.

We see that everyone is still cheerfully living their lives — Hyun-soo and Mi-kyung are still together, Won-seok and Ho-dol go on dates in public and don’t care what anyone thinks, and Won-jae and Kang-hee are patiently waiting their turn. Seo-joon practices for his eventual debut as an idol, Joo-hee is still running, and Jang-mi has taken over feeding Antoinette the Invisible Stray Cat.

Kang-woo and Seo-yeon stare happily into each other’s eyes, and Seo-yeon thinks, “We complete each other.”

 
COMMENTS

Oh yay, everyone got a mostly happy ending, and with a minimum of fuss and drama, which is exactly what I wanted from People with Flaws. Everyone’s story was wrapped up in a satisfying way — Kang-woo and Seo-yeon will get married, Won-seok and Ho-dol have found enough confidence and support in each other to openly be together, and Won-jae and Kang-hee will find their way back to each other eventually. Hyun-soo and Mi-kyung finally got together, Min-hyuk found fulfillment in his calling, and even Jang-mi was able to break away from her horrible mother and take control of her life.

The show was fluffy and adorable from start to finish, though I’m glad that it dropped the toilet humor and let the characters’ “flaws” shine through. Those flaws are what make them so endearing, as (I believe) is the case with everyone in this world, and the key to happiness isn’t to fix your flaws and be perfect, but to accept yourself as already perfect, flaws and all… and maybe, to find someone whose flaws mesh well with yours.

My main complaint about the drama, and I’ve mentioned it before, is that it had waaay too many characters. And that’s hard to say because I loved them all, but a lot of them really didn’t contribute much to the story, and could have been removed completely without affecting the plot at all. It’s no insult to the actors, who all did a great job, but honestly, I think that Jang-mi, Seo-joon and Joo-hee, and both the real and fake Doctor Kim’s, could all have been culled. this would have allowed the show to really lean into other lovelines that I’d have enjoyed seeing more of, especially Won-seok and Ho-dol. In fact, I wish the character of Jang-mi had been saved for her own drama, because a mistreated illegitimate chaebol daughter trying to break free of her abusive mother by finding refuge with an average family is definitely a drama I would watch.

All in all, People with Flaws was exactly the sweet, fluffy show I needed after a string of very serious, very dramatic dramas. Sometimes you just want to watch a show that’s easy to follow, with cute characters and low stakes, and this show fit the bill. I was never too worried that anyone wouldn’t get what they wanted in life, and although many of them had dark backgrounds, they were able to find their way out of it and carve out their happiness for the future. But People with Flaws was far from simple, offering tough situations for the characters to weather such as the cultural acceptance — or not — of gay couples, and putting a lot of detail into its storytelling (for example, once Kang-woo and Seo-yeon got together, they always wore the same color). In particular, I was impressed with Ahn Jae-hyun’s acting… he’s been through some rough personal stuff lately, but his comedic timing was perfect and he made what could have been a very annoying character completely endearing and lovable. He stood out to me, but all of the actors did a great job (Cha In-ha was another standout, may he rest in peace), and made the drama enjoyable in a really unique way. I’ll miss them all!

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I have been on a drama slump this year. There have been long periods where I would watch nothing (including currently airing shows I have started). Nothing is hooking me as it used to during my early Kdrama watching years anymore. Some shows I like more than others (I really really liked My Ajusshi in 2018 and Search WWW in 2019) but that addicted feeling of can’t wait for the next episode is sadly lacking. It maybe partly due to the lacklustre romances (note my favorite shows, no romance or a very lacklustre one), I watch mainly romance, I rarely watch other types of shows. As I get older I get farther and farther away from angst, melos, depressing shows. The current state of the world is depressing enough as it is both politically and environmentally and I need a happy place to escape but that leaves the shows I enjoy few and far in between.

People with Flaws started during my big slump this year where I watched less than what I would normally watch in a week in about 10 weeks. So it was past its midway point when I started watching it. But it engaged me enough that I caught up. It wasn’t a great show. As a romantic comedy I didn’t like the romances. The main loveline was at best meh. The leads were the weakest links in the acting department and I don’t find Ahn Jae Hyun handsome. To be honest all Seo Yeon’s brothers were better looking than him. I have been disappointed with Oh Yeon Seo in everything I have seen her after Come Back Ajusshi.

I have been thinking about the comments on how this show felt like a weekender or would have been better as one. I think the ensemble cast and numerous possible loveliness give that feel (there were five possible couples including all Joo siblings and Mi Kyung and Hyun Soo). On the upside a weekender would enable all these storylines with great potential to be really developed (the delighful Kim Seul Gi was totally wasted here, and the oldest oppa and noona’s romance was a lost opportunity). On the other hand, I don’t know how the nontraditional storylines would fare as/in a weekender.

As I haven’t been watching in time and posting weekly I feel like I have a lot to say so I’ll probably post a few messages.

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I also feel the same about the main couple. Meh is a perfect definition for them.

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What was great about this show was the families. In that regard I felt the warmth I found in My Father is Strange. However, weekenders are also usually full of really horrible family members (who all conveniently transform by the end of the show) which this show delightfully lacked besides Jang Mi’s awful mom who was trying to prostitute her daughter! (and yes I do think she was a superfluous character).

I did love the Joo siblings as a family and the few scenes we got of their parents. They were a model blended family with a father saving his adopted daughter at the expense of his own life, with an oppa who always took offense when someone commented the siblings don’t look alike (not because blended families have such a stigma in Korea but because it would hurt his sister). These people were family if not by blood definitely at the heart where it counts. They loved each other and would do anything for the others’ happiness (thus the sacrifice of eldest oppa and noona).

Kang Woo’s family was equally delightful in a much wackier way. His mom was a total hoot, her interactions with Seo Yeon were laugh out loud with her going to a meeting intending to separate them and coming back with “wait a minute what is wrong with my son?!” and “You must not break up”, LOL. His dad was sweet and grandma was kind and insightful. The bickering relationship between Kang Woo and his quasi sibling cousin and rival Min Hyuk was warm and hilarious. The show definitely delivered on the laughs (besides the toilet humor of the early episodes that turned off many people! – if you are one them grind your teeth and pass the initial hurdle, the rest is worth it if you are looking for a warm family drama with a few laughs on the side).

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In my opinion the show’s most interesting storyline belonged to Won Seuk and Ho Dol. I liked it on so many levels. It was the most serious storyline and its inclusion in a free to air network show quite surprised me honestly. I did not expect one of the main characters to be gay (I didn’t know of it until I watched the first episode). It was really great to see this diversity in a mainstream show and have it not played for comedy but getting a serious treatment and story dealing with the difficulties of having to stay in the closet (in the case of the idol or Ho Dol’s bully who wanted to have his cake and eat it too) vs. coming out*, bullying, suicide. More shows and characters like this are necessary to change society’s perception and change the norms. I don’t watch many western shows but two quite serious shows I watched last year also had significant gay characters and/or stories: Years and Years from the UK and Total Control from Australia. The former had a major storyline of treatment of homosexuals in Russia. The latter had a significant supporting character who just happened to be gay.

*On coming out – This is doubly or triply more difficult in some societies – I have an Asian student who is unable to come out to his family, even to most of his classmates in a western country and constantly worried about what they would think if they knew, he didn’t come out to me explicitly either but asked my tutor whether I knew. I thought about him often when I was watching Ho Dol’s story. In the show Won Seuk’s father showed his greatness yet again. And even though we didn’t see the details Ho Dol’s father came around in the end as well and embraced his son’s boyfriend.

As a love story unfortunately Won Seuk-Ho Dol was not well developed for a number of reasons. One was lack of time in a 16 episode show that has so many characters to explore. But more than that they were in pioneer territory and were being cautious and conservative. Add to that one half of the couple is gone before the filming is over... Still, it still was one of the more touching stories of the drama. At the start of the show Won Seuk was a Casanova like his elder brother, but he was a nice guy at heart. He tried to protect Ho Dol from the beginning. By the time he ran off to the idol’s house to rescue him (LOL – typical romantic comedy scene!) I think he already had feelings for Ho Dol but the first time he saw him in the bar he was just being nice. When he plucked up his courage to go into a gay bar Ho Dol needed a friend, mentor, someone who would understand and support him and Won Seuk did not fail him in the end.

Unfortunately as great as it was to have such a storyline I couldn’t stop thinking of the late Cha In Ha while I was watching it unfold. Especially when the story moved into suicide territory. We don’t know exactly how he died but I hope acting in this project in his last months did not contribute to it.

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Thanks for the recaps and comments LollyPip. I agree Cha In-ha was a standout, I did like him in Clean with Passion for Now and was looking forward to his promising career. May he rest in peace.

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Thanks for this last recap (and all of them) and the comments. I've enjoyed them as much as the episodes.

I did love this drama a lot. It was a light, funny and full of lovely characters to enjoy. The problem, I also see that, was that there were too many characters that didn't add much to the show. JangMi and the Doctors Kim to begin, and even JooHee. I did like SeoJoon, as his part of the story was important in to the rest of the siblings.

I know the OTP was SeoYeon and KangWoo, but as much as I tried, I couldn't ship those two. I think they would have been better as friends, and I believe SeoYeon had much more chemistry with MinHyeok. I really do. But, I'm not the writer, so...

I loved the rest of the stories. I wish we had much more of all of them, MiKyung and HyunSoo who proved to be the best friends ever to their friends, really understanding and guiding them (well, some confusion in the beginning but they were there to support their friends), WonSeok and HoDol (how nice to see a gay couple acting as natural and falling in love in such a sweet way, how HoDol softened WonSeok is the sweetest thing of this drama to me), and of course WonJae and KangHee (thanks writer to hurry up SY and KW marriage so they can be together sooner, and complement themselves as no other couple in this show).

I will miss this show, it really put a big smile in my face in every episode. I also shared some good tears (WonSeok and dad in hospital, KangHee hugging WonJae goodbye). Love you, Drama.

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Lollypip, at first I agreed with you about there being too many characters. But the recently completed T-Drama YONG-JIU GROCERY STORE shows that IF you write tightly enough you can handle multiple characters very well- just do not waste time, as we did in this drama- having our main leads simply wallow in their trauma. I think at least 3 hours was effectively wasted on excess emoting. Time that could have been used to tell Jangmi’s story, for instance- I hypothesize that her purpose was to eventually match up with Min-hyuk, who, by saving her life, begins to realize that he really should be a doctor after all, while she immediately falls for him, pursues him even as he is still pursuing Seo-yeon, until he finally gives in to the reality of Seo-yeon and Kang-woo, turns around and realizes that she is right there- someone who is actually a far better match for him.

Unfortunately the writers wasted to much time having our main leads spin their wheels, and lost the opportunity to tell the story of Jang-mi and Min-hyuk (which would have been hilarious)- and instead have Min-hyuk go off to Africa to do charity medical work- which is absolutely insane because given how much pain he has suffered because this is what his parents did there is no way Min-hyuk could ever consider doing that. Such work is good and noble- but it is absolutely not for Min-hyuk.

As for Won-jae and Kang-hee- they are really already back together at the end- and actively figuring out how to get their families to accept them once our main leads have married.

This is not the first drama to have mis-allocated time. It will not be the last. I have a recommendation for the executives of K-dramaland: Hire some good editors to ride herd on your writers. YONG-JIU GROCERY STORE shows what can be done- that show had only ten episodes (time wise the equivalent of 12) and yet told the stories of multiple characters.

For all its flaws I enjoyed this show a lot- which is why I was disappointed in the failure to fully utilize some really amazing characters. This was a very good show that could have been a truly great show.

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Totally agree with you on all the time wasted on solving KW and SY communication problems. If only they had seated and talk frankly about their feelings, it would have been much easier and we could have had more time to spend with the other wonderful couples.

I also agree that MinHyuk decision to go to Africa as a doctor makes absolute nonsense (I think we've already discuss this in another comment, haven't we?). After all he's been through with his parents, I think that would be the last thing we would do.

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I definitely agree that this show wasted too much time on the main leads which could have been used much better elsewhere. The problem is the formula of leads getting the most amount of time in dramas. If the leads and their story is engaging and the side characters and stories are dull or boring viewers begrudge any time taken away from them, but there are cases such as this drama where the most boring story belongs to the leads. I would have enjoyed any of the side character's story more.

I was also shocked at Min Hyuk's choice and agree it was way out of character and made zero sense.

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You are right about the baleful effects of 'the formula'. It actually is counterproductive even to the story of the main leads- if you stop and think about it the only reason the story of Kang-woo and Seo-yeon got boring because of too much wheel spinning. Less screen time would have actually been more effective dramatically. Fleshing out Jang-mi's story would not have detracted from the story of the ML but instead would have added to it- because Seo-yeon would have been part of it for Jang-mi and Kang-woo would have been part of Min-hyuk's development. We would have actually seen more of the main leads character instead of being re-reminded of what we already knew. ' Less is more' is hard for a writer to do- but a fundamental rule to be followed if you are an editor. An editor was needed here. Had we had one we would not have seen the stories of Jangmi and Min-hyuk butchered because of time constraints.

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Even though I agree with a lot of what you're saying, I was actually deeply relieved that they didn't try to shoe-horn in a Jang-mi & Min-hyuk romance. I loved that she stood up to her mother all by herself and bought that building too. However, it would of course have been a lot better if that story line had been stitched into the main plot in some way. What they should have done was mirror the road to self-discovery that the other characters were on, and what we missed was the moment when Jang-mi realised she didn't have to listen to her mother, or impersonate Seo-yeon to be strong and independent. She could have had a chat with Kang-hee to help her out with the business side of the building purchase for example.

In terms of the side stories, the real issues I have, was that there were some important moments in the stories that we didn't get to see or were skipped over too quickly. We missed some of the main decisions in the Hyun-soo/Mi-kyung romance and I could happily watched much more of them.

Also - not that I want to defend all writers - but sometimes the leads demand a certain amount of time on the screen, that the writers might not have allocated to them originally.

But overall I actually thought that every storyline was interesting - even if they spent too much time on some and not enough on others.

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Thank you for the recap, @lollypip! It's been a wonderful journey for me to see this drama. As I've said before, the family dynamics is what I loved the most - being there to support your siblings in whatever situation there is. I like the endings for each character, specially Mi-kyung and Hyun-soo and the pair of Ho-dol and Won-seok. This shows that there are gay people who are living decent lives and don't need to be looked down on by others.

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It's not perfect but I enjoyed watching it. Kdramas have this thing about families that tugs my heart most of the time. One of the reason why I continue to enjoy watching them even if plots are recycled sometimes.

This drama touched some social issues and I like how they handled it.

A very emotional part for me was when Ho Dol shows the mountains photo and ripped it. Then Won Seok saying that someone is thankful that he's living his life and that was enough reason for him to keep on living. How wish that Cha In Ha was the one who found that reason/purpose...RIP.

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Thank you Lollypop for this recap (and all the previous ones) and thank you to all beanies who contributed and commented - we were not many to watch it, but we will remember it fondly (despite its flaws).
I like many things about this finale: first, not every character needed to have a love story, and not everyone did. Seo-jun and Joo-hee are friends and pursue their dreams with gusto, Jang-mi can finally create her own life. I have some hope for her and Min-hyuk in the future, if only because they are the only one who can pet Antoinnette the crazy cat!
I love that the elder brother and sister do not give up on each other - yes, they love their siblings beyond words, but their siblings love them just as much and will support them when the time comes and they need to convince the Shinwa family (that they will be double in-laws and there will be a gay brother-in-law).
Obviously, Won-seok and Ho-dol are my favorite pair, and I feel blessed that the crew had enough film to give their story a satisfying ending. Of course, it was really bittersweet to see that the character Won-seok had committed to live knowing that the actor Cha In-ah had passed prematuraly - it highten the fact that human life is fragile and precious.
As everyone so eloquently said, the time was not properly split btw characters, and I do believe that it could have been more satisfying should the lead couple brood offscreen while more screentime could have been granted to everyone else (Hyun-soo and Mi-kyung were criminally underseen in the final episodes!). Nonetheless, I had a lovely time watching all these characters, and it is a good sign that I was left wishing for more time with them!

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Thanks LollyPip! Thanks Show! You have made me smile from beginning until the end. Lots of adorkable characters that made me giggle. This may not be a highly recommended show but I thoroughly enjoyed it 😊

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I have to admit I struggled a lot with this show – more than any other I’ve watched recently. I think it suffered greatly from squandered potential and inconsistent writing. There’s nothing more distracting (to me) than a show that has a lot of the perfect pieces, but is just not put together well.

I think a lot of people have already touched on what was great and fun and entertaining about this show, but by the time I got to the last few episodes, I was just exhausted from the see-saw. The main ship sucked, the random dramatic family secret sucked, the extra minor characters like Doc Kim and Jang-mi were completely under-utilized so that they felt random and unnecessary. I was almost totally on board from the beginning – minus the overwrought scat humour – I felt like the tone was off-beat/quirky/interesting, but yeah… that unique twinkle was definitely lost as Seo Yeon and Kang-woo started getting more air time for their ridiculousness (and not the charming kind of ridiculous either).

I’m glad there were some people who enjoyed it. I think beyond its flaws (ha! Couldn’t resist) it had… something… I just wish that “something” had been more than what it had turned out to be (for me, anyway).

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a show with so much potential! the storyline is actually nice, the characters are cool and you have great actors.

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This show started off as a good one, and I initially liked the conflict. Toward the middle though, it felt contrived especially with the conflict among the main leads, it lost a bit of momentum, imo. I think what saved this show and made into an overall okay romantic comedy for me were the side characters. And I agree, some of them we could have done without like Jang Mi and Joo Hee, though their stories were also interesting and would entire interesting dramas. I wanted to see more of a resolution for Kang hee and The big brother. The end felt a bit lukewarm to me. But overall it was an okay watch that I dnt regret watching.

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'He was grateful because I was living my life.'

That scene makes me cried out loud for solid 30 minutes

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I am so bummed out that I was not able to really watch this show because the subtitles were being shown in English and Spanish at the same time and I could not follow it very well. It looked like a wonderful show and I was so excited because of the gay content, which I thought was groundbreaking in a Korean drama ( I know there have been some but not to this extent or in a positive manner, per se). Thank you Lollypop, because of your recaps, I was able to read the show, instead of watching it.

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I love it. I actually enjoyed the doctor's story but then I love twins. I love the fact that they all admit to have flaws but worked it out. My one complain- too long. I love happy endings. I am just glad this one ends well.

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I still Don't Understand why Kang Hee and Won Hae had to Break up just because Their Siblings were Dating Each Other???

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