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It’s Okay to Not Be Okay: Episode 3

After years of being away from home, our writer returns to retrieve the man who slipped through her fingers. And while she has no problem confronting him, it’s an entirely different story with the ghosts of her past. It’s a tough time for both leads, as they realize that their fears may be eating them up more than they thought.

 
EPISODE 3: “Sleeping witch”

Moon-young reunites with Kang-tae at OK Hospital, telling him she came because she missed him. On the staircase behind them, Joo-ri sees them together and gets a worried look on her face.

The couple go outside to talk, and Moon-young stands a little too close for Kang-tae’s comfort. “I’m just amazed,” she says. “You grew up well.” He asks if she knows him, and she simply says she’d like to get to know him better. Unamused, he then asks what she wants, knowing she’ll only leave once she gets it.

She smiles and answers that she wants him. He’s pretty and when she sees something pretty, like shoes or clothes, she needs to have it. She’ll do anything, whether she has to pay, steal, or take it by force. Before Kang-tae can respond (not that he could, after a line like that), Nurse Park calls Moon-young inside.

Moon-young meets with the hospital’s director OH JI-WANG (Kim Chang-wan), who wants to catch her up on her father’s condition. Director Oh is very much a straight shooter, saying that mental disorders accompanied by brain tumors are much harder to treat and that her father’s symptoms are particularly bad. Nurse Park tries to sugarcoat his words, but it’s unnecessary since Moon-young shows zero concern.

Director Oh brings up the hospital’s therapy program, which consists of many different classes — all except for literature. He was hoping Moon-young would come teach twice a week, maybe even spend time with her father. In the patients’ room, as Kang-tae is putting Go Dae-hwan to bed, another patient mentions that Dae-hwan’s pretty daughter arrived. Kang-tae takes in this information, as well as the scars on Dae-hwan’s hands.

Later, Kang-tae is changing in the locker room when Moon-young barges in all smiles and all eyes on his abs. Kang-tae pushes Moon-young out of the room, which is when Joo-ri passes by and sees them together yet again.

Once the girls are alone, Joo-ri asks what kind of relationship Moon-young has with Kang-tae. “That’s something I never understood,” Moon-young says. “How can you define a relationship in just one word?” It’s a relationship that’s been very close to death, that’s led them to surprise each other, but it’d be cliche to call all of this destiny.

By the time Kang-tae comes out, through with his shift, Moon-young is waiting for him in her car. She badgers him to get in so they can have dinner together, and irritated, he says that she won’t get through to him that easy. That’s fine with her; she says him playing hard to get will be more fun. But for now, she decides to leave him alone.

Night falls, and we see Moon-young driving down a winding path. She glances up at her rearview mirror, startled when she sees a woman in the backseat. But when she looks back, there’s no one there. She’s spooked once again when she nearly hits a deer, and she uh… has a screaming match with it to make it go away. Pfft.

Kang-tae and Joo-ri run into each other in their neighborhood, and on their walk home, Joo-ri mentions that she thought he’d be eating dinner with Moon-young. Kang-tae assures her that they’re not that close and that he’d rather spend his only mealtime outside of work with his brother.

Meanwhile, Moon-young finally makes it to her destination — the now dark, decrepit mansion that she once lived in. We hear Sang-in narrate, as he’s talking to Seung-jae in his office, that Moon-young’s father built the mansion to celebrate her birth, and in the middle of the forest so her mother could write.

Moon-young enters the mansion, and it almost seems to breathe back into life. She finds her old bedroom and plops onto her covered bed, muttering that she’s starving. Transition to Kang-tae, Sang-tae, Jae-soo, Joo-ri, and Joo-ri’s mom (Kim Mi-kyung) eating samgyupsal on the roof of their apartment building.

Joo-ri’s mom is beaming, happy to have three young men in her building who provide rent. She looks especially happy to have Kang-tae, giving him extra rice. Hm, guess Mama’s picked herself a son-in-law.

Back at the mansion, Moon-young is freezing in bed, and just behind her, we see that someone (or something) wrote “Welcome” on the window. A voice narrates the story of Sleeping Beauty, a princess cursed to sleep for many years. And as the voice continues, watery footprints lead up the staircase, towards Moon-young’s room.

Moon-young jerks awake and finds herself staring at a floating figure right above her. “This fairy tale,” the woman says, “tells you that you can never escape your destiny.” Moon-young is frozen in place, tears pricking her eyes, as the woman comes closer and closer, soon lying right next to her.

“The prince’s kiss.” The woman caresses Moon-young’s face. “I suppose he could break the curse. But don’t get your hopes too high. Because I’m going to kill that prince.” Moon-young then sees her younger self, staring into a lake, as that same woman sinks and begs for her to save her.

Moon-young jerks awake for real this time, shaken by her dream. She starts to sob when she hears a different voice behind her — Kang-tae. She imagines him cupping her face and telling her not to cry, making her smile. But in reality, we see that she’s calming herself down by doing the Butterfly Hug Method alone.

The next morning, Sang-in calls Moon-young to figure out some kind of game plan against her scandal. Moon-young tells him to use her father as an excuse, to say that she had to retire in order to care for him. And Sang-in is right on board, thinking this will make her fans want her to come back.

At OK Hospital, a new VIP patient is checked in (cameo by, eeee, Kwak Dong-yeon!). Kwon Gi-do is the son of an assemblyman, and he seems to be quite friendly with Director Oh and Nurse Park already. Apparently, he has manic syndrome, and he comes every spring due to his episodes.

Soon, Gi-do is stripping down in his room, showing off to the camera, and good lord, the bar covering him up. He gets well-acquainted with Kang-tae, revealing what got him in trouble this time — spending 20 million won at a nightclub and running off into the street, yes, naked. And we see the whole ordeal in hilarious detail.

Jae-soo gets his new restaurant, a pizza place, set up, where he also has Sang-tae drawing caricatures for customers. Sang-tae is worried Kang-tae will be mad, as they’re lying to him about Sang-tae going to school. But Jae-soo reminds him that he needs the money.

Moon-young holds her first literature class at OK, with Kang-tae and another caregiver keeping watch. She asks the patients what a fairy tale is, dismissing a man who answers “me marrying IU” (haha). Serious, she says that it’s, “A cruel fantasy that illustrates the brutality and violence of this world in a paradoxical manner.”

Moreover, a fairy tale isn’t something that gives people hopes and dreams, but a stimulant that makes them face reality. Once they wake up from their dreams and see life for what it is, they’ll be happy. Moon-young smirks at Kang-tae, who watches her incredulously.

In the break room, Joo-ri learns from Nurse Park that Moon-young is here to stay. Nurse Park could tell Moon-young couldn’t care less about her father, so she assumes Director Oh was right in thinking she’s only here because she wants something.

Cut to Moon-young looking at said something, Kang-tae. It’s after class, and Kang-tae is asking her if she really believes in what she said about fairy tales. She does, and she thinks that he needs to accept that he’s not satisfied; she can see desire in his eyes.

As Kang-tae walks off, Moon-young notes that he’s being cold when he was so warm to her last night. He turns back to ask what she’s talking about, and she explains that she dreamt of him holding her. She hilariously reenacts it and admits that she’s horny.

They’re in the main lobby, so Kang-tae tells her to lower her voice. But then she loudly asks, “Want to sleep with me?” He pushes her out of there as fast as he can — it’s almost a reflex now — but everyone’s already heard.

Now alone, Kang-tae gets Moon-young up against a wall and reminds her that he doesn’t have time for her games. So what, she says, if he had the time, he’d be playing along? She suggests he stop living a boring life and start having some fun; she knows he wants to.

He snaps that she doesn’t know him, and she calls him a hypocrite. He backs off as if she slapped him, and she wonders why he seems so hurt by the word. After all, everyone can be a hypocrite, living with hatred and not admitting to it. She leaves him with that, heading back into the hall.

Moon-young’s smile disappears, as she notices her father in a wheelchair up ahead. Her father cries out in fear, earning a nurse’s attention, but Moon-young walks on by without a second glance.

Sang-tae comes by to meet up with Kang-tae, but he wanders off when he catches a glimpse of Moon-young walking away. Before he can catch up with her, Kang-tae finds him and guides him back inside for a session with Director Oh.

At first, Sang-tae is nervous around Director Oh, but he loosens up when he’s asked about his toy dinosaur. Director Oh takes him and Kang-tae to a huge blank wall by the stairwell and asks that he create a mural of the hospital’s view.

Kang-tae isn’t so sure about this, but Director Oh insists, “This is my prescription for him.” To their surprise, Sang-tae is more than happy to do it, as long as he’s paid, of course. Hee.

That night, at home, Kang-tae sees Sang-tae stashing some money away in a secret box. He asks what his hyung is saving up for, and Sang-tae shows him a folded up ad for a camping car.

Sang-tae says that with a camping car, they won’t have to move every year. They won’t have to worry about the butterfly or about the landlord bothering Kang-tae. Moved by the sentiment, Kang-tae hugs him and reassures him, “I don’t need a house, car, or money. All I need is you, really. You’re my everything.”

The next day, the caregivers shake their heads seeing Gi-do’s assemblyman father on TV promising his audience to get rid of the mental hospitals. Speaking of whom, Gi-do makes a grand escape the second no one’s watching.

Gi-do reaches the parking lot, when Moon-young’s car stops in front of him. Gi-do does his signature move — flashing her — which doesn’t faze her one bit. Knowing Kang-tae should be on his way, she invites Gi-do to go on a joyride.

While Joo-ri is driving Kang-tae to work, they get the call that Gi-do escaped and that Moon-young took him. They see Moon-young’s car speeding toward them, Gi-do whooping out the sunroof. Kang-tae has Joo-ri stop her car, and he gets out into the middle of the street, making himself a barrier. Ack!

Kang-tae yells for Moon-young to stop, as does Gi-do once he realizes Moon-young is speeding up. She’s racing toward him, smiling with intent, and then hitting the breaks. The car stops a few feet from him, and he doesn’t even flinch. Joo-ri, however, falls to the ground, calling Moon-young crazy.

Moon-young rolls down her window and tells Kang-tae, “You’re not running away. Or avoiding me. I’m impressed.” She urges him to get in and join them, but he just yells at her to get out. She wonders why he’s always worried about her, and frustrated, he says that she makes him worry.

To that, she points out that he could ignore her. As if tempting him, she hits the gas again and zooms away. He takes Joo-ri’s car and chases after them, all the way into town. They make quite the mess, getting the police on their tail and wrecking up an outdoor market.

Passing Assemblyman Kwon’s election campaign, Gi-do goes up to the sunroof again and warns people not to vote for his dad. And (whether this is intentional or not), Moon-young stops the car at the center of the campaign and suggests they have some fun here. Without hesitation, Gi-do sprints for the stage.

Gi-do announces to everyone that he’s Assemblyman Kwon’s youngest son and the mentally ill one in the family, and his dad collapses in shock. Kang-tae finally appears, running over, but stops short as Gi-do’s speech turns emotional:

“I was the only stupid one in my family. But that’s not my fault. I was just born a little dumb. [Dad] hit me because I didn’t get good grades, he looked down on me because I couldn’t understand properly, he locked me up for causing trouble. I mean, I’m also his child. But he treated me like I was invisible. I just wanted his attention.”

Gi-do’s eyes have been filling with tears this entire time, but he grins again and cries that he’s gone crazy for real. His dad’s men hurry on stage to grab him, and he flails about as he dodges them.

Kang-tae is so captivated by the sight that he barely notices Moon-young approaching him and standing next to him. He’s imagining himself as Gi-do, smiling ear to ear and jumping around without a care in the world.

Moon-young breaks his trance, saying Gi-do sure is having fun. And Kang-tae quietly wonders if he should just give in and have fun with her. She turns to him, looking surprised, and then slowly smiles.

Epilogue.

Before, when we saw Gi-do’s memory of being chased out of the nightclub, he was actually running around the hospital, reenacting it all. Kang-tae was following and watching with a sweet smile as Gi-do announced to the patients that the “drinks” were on him.

Gi-do then headed into the gym, onto the treadmill, to “run away” from his dad’s men. He eventually jumped down, the excitement draining from his face, as he concluded that he ended up back here, in the hospital. Seeing Gi-do’s spirit diminish so quickly, Kang-tae’s face fell as well.

 
COMMENTS

Okay, if I’m crying now, in only Episode 3, I am doomed. After Gi-do’s colorful entrance, I did not expect the drama to turn that around and make it emotional. But I guess I should’ve known, this being Kwak Dong-yeon, who’s always been able to make me laugh and cry within the same five minutes. To be honest, I was hesitant to fully enjoy the drama’s humor, which has been surprisingly constant. I was worried the comedy would make fun of the characters with mental illness, turn them into stereotypes, and I’m relieved to see that that’s not the case. The arc for patient Mr. Kim, from the premiere, fell kind of flat for me, but Gi-do’s arc hit right where it hurts. The way his behavior was edited was funny (the bars, y’all, the bars), but after hearing his speech, his actions now seem sad. It made him less a character and more a person — a person who had issues and wanted to be accepted regardless.

We’re still early in, but I would really love it if the drama went therapy-forward. I think we’re already going down that route, and that’s great, but I don’t want the drama to just dip its toes and come out — I want that deep dive. Therapy can be surprising, for people with all different kinds, and all different levels, of worries and fears and trauma. Everyone can benefit from it, even if the only reason is to have someone to chat with. Yet if someone needs therapy, there’s this stigma that there’s something wrong with them. Which, okay, let’s be real, nobody’s perfect, just as Moon-young pointed out. I don’t think Kang-tae believes that he’s perfect, but I do think he’s acting okay when he’s not (roll credits). It’s understandable, since he had to take on a parent role at a young age, but he can’t just ignore his own mental health.

Moon-young has an extreme way of thinking (an extreme way of everything, really), but she’s right in saying that bottling things up can make people sick. Kang-tae is a strong person, and strong people can break. They can let loose, they can complain. I read a comment in the last recap, saying our couple truly is the perfect match, and I really liked the explanation. It said that Moon-young can help Kang-tae lose control and that he can help her maintain control, bringing balance. And since I like metaphors, I think of them as each other’s anchors. She’s the anchor that will set him free, encouraging him to live, and he’s the anchor that will make sure she doesn’t float away. She’s been the one pushing the relationship so far, to the point where it reads as toxic, so it’ll be interesting seeing where this ending will lead us, now that he wants to go all in.

In turn, I wonder if Moon-young will do the same and allow Kang-tae to take care of her. I want to talk about that dream sequence, and not just because it was creepy and gorgeous as hell. (Did anyone else think of the Bent-Neck Lady from The Haunting of Hill House?) I don’t think there are any paranormal elements, per say, but there’s no doubt that the ghost of Moon-young’s mother is all too real for her. I don’t want to jump to conclusions just yet, but it looks like Moon-young might’ve watched her mother die when she could’ve saved her. We know that her mother must’ve fed her thoughts of being cursed or being a monster, and the more you hear something, the more you believe it. Moon-young never received love, never gave it, never felt it, because she never knew how. Can people with her disorder technically feel love? I don’t know. Can anyone, besides those with the disorder, really know?

Anyway, it was the part immediately after, with dream Kang-tae consoling her, that got to me. On the surface level, she wants him for purely selfish reasons, and below that, the reason is most likely that she wants him to accept and love her. Still selfish, maybe, but we can all be a little selfish sometimes, right? I think she just needs proof that not everything she touches gets destroyed. And he was beginning to show her that by standing his ground in the street. He may be intimidated by her, and she may push him away, but I have a feeling he’ll always bounce back.

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I know anybody would BARELY read my comment given the amount, but i just have to scream about... DID YOU SEE THAT WHOLE DREAM SLEEPING BEAUTY DREAM SEQUENCE HOLY FRICK THAT IS SO INTENSE THEN SEO YEJI CRYING FOR THE FIRST TIME AND CRYING AGAIN LATER BUT WITH LITERALLY DIFFERENT CRY AND IDK WHY BUT ITSO HEARTWRENCHING I FEEL LIKE CRYING TOO???

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This is Dramabeans dear, be sure there are plenty beanies who WILL read every comment while eating meals or something 😅

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Dang, you caught me red-handed...

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Hey Mindy! I see you're here too.

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I'm everywhere. All the time. This website will never rid itself of me. My ghost will be roaming these posts long after the fall of humanity.

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Now I have enough material for tonight's dream where I dwell in the DB world like Wol Joo and then meet phantom Mindy. Ughhhh it's gonna be a blast in my dream world today.

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What Moon Young suffered was called sleep paralysis, not being able to move or speak while sleeping while fully aware it may not be real. Poor, poor girl! She is antisocial but I think most people here don't understand that antisocial isn't the of one kind and varies from patient to patient. There are variations in nature, extent and severity of the disorder. Some can be successfully managed with therapy, drugs and in most cases combination of both is required. Moon Young was born obviously with some form of mental health issue but I think she was severely neglected. I don't think her parents got her the treatment that was needed and that directly impacted her. It also gave her a deep wound. Moon Young may use her fairy tales as an outlet but she hasn't really dealt with her trauma or confronted it in a healthy setting. I felt for her when she did the butterfly embrace to calm herself. She does want at least one person who won't be repelled by her condition. Its not a bad or evil wish. However, she does go about it the wrong way. As for Kang Tae, care giving doesn't mean you forget your own needs or refuse to acknowledge them. Care givers are routinely asked to put themselves and their well being on top of the priority because you can't possibly take care of another person while you are breaking apart. Kang Tae does work as a nurse/care giver but hasn't really followed through with any of it. Its a huge burden that's crushing him. Although Moon Young sought him out for her own agenda, she was needed. Juri or his friend isn't nearly strong enough to bulldoze through his facade to make him see the truth, that he needs to rest, to take care, to build meaningful connections and a home and he can't run or move forever. Kwak Dong Yeon was amazing. I was skeptical and even surprised that he took on the role of a manic who likes to act like a pervert. But then as we progressed through the episode, his trauma, his history it became clear. It matters how are near and dear ones treat us. A kind word, a warm smile goes a long way to heal a person's heart. I am sure people took notice of how amazing an actor he is here if not before and I hope he gets better roles.

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As someone who has suffered from sleep paralysis, also it's important to note that what you see isn't 'real'. MY's mother isn't 'really' a ghost in the house. What's interesting about that scene is that her brain chose the image of her mother to show her when it was faced with the input it had. Being restrained, unable to move or speak, but believing yourself to be awake and completely aware. Her brain then concluded what was happening was her mother was holding her down. That speaks volumes - far more than her mother being a literal ghost.

Honestly, what your brain chooses to show you during sleep paralysis is fascinating (although not so much when you're in it). My brain once showed me an image of Weeping Angels. At which point I went "oh, I'm not awake yet, this is sleep paralysis" because, you know, Weeping Angels aren't real.

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I have a feeling that Juri is going to be really really really bad. Kwak Dongyeon’s Cameo made me cry too. That particular line, ‘I did silly things to get my father’s attention and it turns out I’m actually silly’ and Gi Do said it with a big grin and teary eyes. I didn’t intend to, but I was crying with him too.

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Juri reminds me of the 2nd FL from Gagnam ID. They have similar personality traits.

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Yes, I don't trust Joo Ri at all either.. 🤔 something about her doesnt ring right.. I think Moon Young knows what she really is..

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Sth about irks me about her but i don't want to give my verdict yet since she hasn't really done anything, just annoyed and possibly jealous of MY. but if she causes a misunderstanding between GT & MY then i'm gonna fight lol

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Ok, had written a longish comment about KDY and direction and the characters but apparently I didn't click send. D'oh.
I loved KDY and MY's 'crazy' chemistry in that frantic car ride (which btw shaved few year's off this scaredy 🐈's life, thanks show) MY's impulses going on overdrive when face with KD's manic energy, him inturn finding a person who matches (k,surpasses) his vibe. It was scary how perceptive MY is and how quickly she inferred what GD really needs . But that opportunity wasn't purely for his benefit,oh no..MY would have her enjoyment on every and ant situation. Her smirk at the ground when GD was embarrassing the heck out of his father- it was disdain at the hypocrisy of the polite society and pure glee she derived from being the imp. It was wonderfully done.
Also props to KSH for portraying GT's secret longing to break free. MY's casual comment on his hypocrisy cuts deep and we can see how he tries so hard to mold himself into the selfless brother. His self assertion that he really only needs hyung when faced with another indication of a lifetime centered around hyung's needs. Any one who knows his story sees him as this ideal person which is probably why he can't form any lasting connection. But MY sees his suppressed longing and untold desires and calls him out on it, which is probably why he has such a strong reaction to her. She threatens to pull out a GT who's tired of just being a good dongsaeng.

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I’ll admit, I wasn’t enjoying this episode as much as the first two, until they turned it around right at the end with KDY killing it as always. It really did make everything that came before better. KDY is always so expressive and I’d love to see him get the lead (in a non weekender, his couple on Never Twice was a big reason why I kept up with that show).

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I agree. I felt something was missing until the epilogue - and then I was fully on board again.

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First time commenter here! Been reading recaps on dramabeans for ages but this is the first drama to finally pull me off from being a wallflower.
What's impressed me over and over again is the empathy this show has towards mentally disabled people. Episode 2 showed us the world from Sang-tae's perspective in the musical montage, and it was honestly deeply moving to see how colourful and emotional his world was. In this episode we see the viewpoint of a person with a manic disorder, and in real life this person probably just gets written off as a chaotic presence that's bothersome. The way the episode ends really brings out the pathos, and how truly alone this person is, in contrast to the loud, brash exterior that's seen on the outside.
I love how nuanced the writing is treating Moon-young's character. It's impressive that she's taken the darkness inside her, and spun it into gold - her books sell like hotcakes, and people line up to buy her product. She's successful, and impressive. Her disorder obviously brings along issues with having boundaries, but it also makes her unapologetic. We even see this from her outfits - she doesn't ever dress casually, and everything is so over-the-top. It isn't just her clothes: her umbrella, her cigarettes are all so extra!
All said, I like how this drama doesn't put on the kid gloves around people who inhabit such extreme worlds. It takes them seriously, and doesn't just use them as plot devices to further the story of a person who doesn't have a mental illness.

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Welcome! Happy Beaning 😁

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I've never been more invested in reading comments than I am with this drama. I want to gush, analyse, hypothesise and gush some more. Bless this community of like minded individuals whom I'm positive just like me shouted to their screens, same girl same, when MY proclaimed "i want you because you're pretty "

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Thanks for the recap. That was quick.

Kwak Dong-yeon's performance here is awesome. I got tired just watching his manic episode which credits to the director for making us see it in the patient's eyes. The self-cam style is quite effective.

The "Do you want to sleep with me?" scene was funny. I kept replaying it. Don't we all wish to say things she really mean without regard for the consequences? For a number of times maybe we can exercise that, but it would be harmful if we do not have that filter - all id.

Awesome ep. I wish to lessen the scary scenes (not good when you watch the show alone, in the dark, after midnight) but I worry it would dilute the storytelling.

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I love this show so much, I had to sign up to comment this, but did anyone notice the book on the bed where MY is sleeping?One of the books is Haunting of Hill House and I think that the drama has a lot of references to the book. The book is set in haunted mansion with ties to suicide/death. I think it might foreshadow a future death in the drama.

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Thanks for this, I hadn’t noticed!

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that makes so much sense!!!! the whole cursed castle gives me the Hill House vibe. Ahhhh

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Welcome! And thanks, I would never have noticed that.

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Oddly, I was reminded of 'Phantom thread', a movie by Paul Thomas Anderson, where the male protagonist was accompanied by the ghost (mostly in thought and once literally) of his mother because he so dearly loved her. Although Moon Young's ghost mother from the past appeared for the opposite reason, it made me think how extreme lack or abundance of anything becomes haunting.

I know it's off topic but anyone interested in watching a well crafted and layered story, I highly recommend phantom thread.

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This episode really set the tone for the show. I think I'm gonna be really fond of the patients by the end of the show. I really loved MY's lesson on fairy tales. It was a unique perspective and I enjoyed. I love how MY is just so upfront about her desires. I know that that bluntness comes from her disorder but no one can deny that it is entertaining to watch. This episode's emotional force was so surprising, it felt like a surprise punch to the gut. I think Kang Tae's "hypocricy" lies in the fact that he works as a caregiver in a psychiatric facility and realises that the patients' condition is not their fault, he knows that communicating helps the patients but at the same time he does not give himself the benefit of doubt. He doesn't talk to others about how he feels.He doesn't even admit to himself that he may have desires and that he may need a break once in while. I have been saying this since the beginning and I'll say it again, these two are exactly what the other needs. They're not perfect for each other per se but the make each other confront their fears and that's what makes them fit, albeit a weird one. In this episode we can see that even MY needs comfort and affection. She sees KT as an object yes, but the scene after her nightmare showed us that she might be craving affection from him too. The look of relief on her face when she saw KT in her bed clearly showed that in that moment, she saw him as a person. Gi Do's pain in this episode was so raw, it hurt me where it hurts. I'm a student who is currently awaiting my exam results which will determine my colleges and his speech about being not being as intelligent as was expected was a bit close to heart. Although I have really supportive parents, the feeling that you are not doing enough or are not intelligent enough is still there at the back of my mind. My heart really broke for him, especially after he talked about how his father treated him as if he were invisible.

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Faster Recap wow 😲 and more Faster comments that poured in 👏🏼
As usual awesome episode with SYJ rocking sleep paralysis acting, Great cameo by KDY 👍
What hits me the most is the ending where KSH thinking of getting break from his tiresome life .Every Normal person has some craziness inside.
This drama has really set standards for kdrama in terms of acting,directing, cinematography etc .

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It seems important that MY goes to the house and sleeps there. She faces up to the inevitable terrifying nightmare. Going to the childhood house is like going back into one's memories and facing up to them, no matter how frightening they may be.

This ties up with the children's story in the first episode. He had to face his memories of being hurt and hurting others. MY does not run away from the horror of her childhood. She fights back - for example, when she was attacked. She's brave.

And in the morning did the house seem less of the dusty, cobwebby mess that it was the night before? I know things seem more frightening in the dark, but did anyone else notice that the house didn't seem so bad? Perhaps the house will come back to life as she comes more and more to terms with her horrible childhood.

BTW I agree with a previous comment about Joo-ri. She is more capable of doing something bad, and may have done so already.

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I agree with the fact that she is facing her own demons in this. She tells KANG-Tae to be honest with himself, but she also practices that in her own life. She is unapologetic in public, but she also knows her vulnerabilities and meets them head on. That’s commendable. It’s really uncomfortable to watch, as I’m usually a passive person, and would rather avoid conflict, but she meets it literally face-to-face.

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I don't agree with this actually. To me she's not practicing what she preaches at all. She's telling herself this whole thing is about possessing Kang-tae when in fact it's about the experiences she had as a child. She's bouncing around (being admittedly fabulous) but also being gravely dishonest about what she wants and why she wants it - even to herself. So, no, I don't think she's facing up to anything yet. Her whole external persona is a bravado she uses to hide from her trauma and from her fear.

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Watching Joo-ri and Sang-in in the same room together makes me nervous.
Joo-ri is going to ruin Moon Young's career if she knows what Sang-in knows.

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I'm so interested in how all the other characters react to Moon-young. For example, when the director of the hospital suggested she teach a class in literature, and she calmly refused (because he hadn't bothered to ask her what she actually wanted), both the director and the main nurse bitch about her behind her back. She's got such a temper! they say.

I saw no evidence of a temper. I saw a professional being asked to do her job without getting paid, who calmly pointed out that if they wanted her to do work, they should ask her what she wants. How is that something negative?

When in contrast Sang-tae asks to be paid for work that is not his professional job, they're all smiles. I find it so fascinating...

I know that some of this is cultural but it seems that all characters around Moon-young are continuously willing to subscribe the worst possible motives to her behaviour and never give her the benefit of the doubt.

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I’m that culture, a woman not automatically saying “yes,” whether or not she’s compensated, to a request is probably seen as being difficult or temperamental. I think kdramas make it a point to say this, so that we see it, and have a reaction to it. I felt the same as you. I thought it was very reasonable what she was doing. She’s not acting according to that paternalistic culture. Which is refreshing, but the other characters don’t know what to do with it, so they ascribe Her undesirable traits. I’m thinking she’s not really ASD either, but that’s how those characters see her.

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So agreed with everything written above! It makes me wonder how accurate her ASD diagnosis is - and how it impacts her behaviors growing up. The whole nature versus nurture has been in the back of my mind the whole time I'm watching this show.

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I don't believe she has ASPD for a second but to touch on the issue here. There is one definition of a witch that is basically just 'uncontrollable woman'. And that's who Moon-young is. And I frigging love that about her. Most of what she does is exactly that - just standing her ground when she's 'supposed to' be subservient or obedient. There is a whole real history of 'uncontrollable women' being declared mentally ill and even institutionalised and I'd say (I hope) that her ASPD diagnosis is framed within that culture. That is a story I am definitely here for.

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He's Gangtae, you can see young Gangtae sitting opposite MY at the convenience store scene. I think there's a reason ST being afraid of butterfly and MY tearing it apart, must be their common enemy or sth.

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Question of the episode - Who won the screaming match: Moon-young or the deer?

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The whole scene was just eerie. The mother's image on her rear view mirror and a screaming match with a deer in front of her car who seems to say Go BACK, YOU ARE NOT WELCOME HERE. Then we see Joo-ri purchasing deer milk. The taste of it is slightly salty and bitter.
Combine them all and it's the perfect recipe for nightmares.
Being persistent based on her condition helps her face her demons head on.
The butterfly hug at the end of it felt like a bit of victory.
Moon-young 1, deer 0.

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Now I can sleep in peace knowing she won the fight, thanks man for the analysis!

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Thank you so much for the recap.

I am so hooked on this drama. i usually only watch dramas after it has finished airing but I decided to watch the 1st episode just to see and I was hooked from the get go..

i like our two main leads, they are well matched. Often at times we have strong actor being lead paired with an actress who is not so polished. But this time around I feel the casting crew did a great job.

Ko Moon Young is playing a role I would say i usually dont like but I am absolutely loving her, rooting for her with Kang Tae instead of nurse Juri. not afraid to speak her mind. I loved how she unashamedly ogled Kang Tae's abs in the changing room. Her 'wow' mirrored my own and that final touch when she was being pushed out just had me shouting ' you go girl'. As mentioned in the summary above these two different characters will be each others anchors, feel both need it each other the same level.

i could go on and on. I am also loving Sang-Tae oppa.

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This drama is really hitting all the right spots for me. I don't even mind waiting for a week for the next episode because I binge watch all the previous episodes and cry all over again. It hurts so good and I am all here for it.

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Does anyone else think MY mom might be “The Butterfly”? Maybe she is not a psychopath that kills butterflies for fun, but she just really hates butterflies? I wonder if KT has repressed some memories?

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This show has a very specific, very intentional, very well-executed vibe - and I am 100% for it.
You go show, you go!

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Awesome cameo by Kwak Dong Yeon! I mean his character just broke my heart 😥. It is very sad to know that ppl like this actually exist, and that parents like his do exist too. Mental illness is somethg so important but so taboo, in almost every culture.
Just had to add: that VOLVO ppl was so awesome, speeding and hitting the brakes right before the obstacle, wooow! Changed from the very obvious ppl seen throughout the King!

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Oops! This drama has officially become too weird for me. I'm not saying the writing is bad, or the acting is bad, it's just not my cup of tea--I'll just move on to other dramas.

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Thank you for the recap, @sailorjumun 😘😘

IOTNBO

I’m rewatching so parts of Episode 3 before watching Episode 4– some observations:

- Moon Young’s house gives me “Beauty and the Beast” Castle feels
- At this point, I don’t question Moon Young’s feelings for Kang Tae (even though it seems a bit quick), but I do wonder how deep they are— he is the person she dreams of that brings her comfort right after she has her nightmare about her mom the first night she goes back to her family home to sleep (despite all the dust 😅😅), that has to mean something...
- Kang Tae’s conversation with Moon Young, about being happy when a person chooses to face reality, after she teaches her first class at the hospital is the total opposite of who Kang Tae is— he finds happiness being in some sort of a denial state about his brother, about their circumstances, about his own life... And then her straight-up confronting him about not being happy just hit the nail in the coffin 👌🏻👌🏻 She sees through him and exposes him, saying that she understands that he wants to let loose (“have some fun” are her words) and calls him a hypocrite, but then he tells her that he “has no time to play with her”, but at the end of the episode, we know that he asks her to go have some fun with him, and that look he gives her is SO TELLING
- Sang Tae asking how much he will get paid for painting the mural for the hospital— I forgot that he wants to make a lot of money to buy a trailer for Kang Tae so that they don’t have to move around so much anymore 🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺
- When Kang Tae talks to Sang Tae, he really is talking TO Sang Tae and not talking DOWN on him (it’s a world of a difference, especially in Korean speech culture!!), and it’s written all over his face that he really wants to get to know what his Hyung is thinking and feeling deep down inside and not have to just take his hyung’s words as is, but the thing with people who have developmental disabilities is that what they say IS what they really mean in their hearts as well—they hardly have the capacity to calculate and think of one thing and say another (in a way, Moon Young is like this, too, with her antisocial personality disorder)

“Does the President never catch a cold? Why does his dad’s vocation matter? It’s not like his condition is something he has to hide. You should not deal with with patients with such bias...”
- Nurse Park

^ This speaks volumes about the type of society that SK has about people with mental health issues and disabilities, and I’m so, so glad for IOTNBO for addressing it ❤️❤️❤️🥺🥺🥺

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I think MY became serious about him when she found out who he was.. That he was the little boy from when she was a child...

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I’m not totally convinced that’s she’s 100% sure they’re the same person yet, and I know for sure that Kang Tae doesn’t suspect anything/hasn’t connected the dots yet 🤔🤔🤔

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Actress for moon young's character is doing a good job . I think she's specially good at doing roles like this .I remember how much she iritated me being the princess in Hwarang .To be truthful I got interested in this because Kwakkie is playing a cameo here! ! !And he has done a outstanding act too. he was making me laughing my ass out and in next minute that scene on stage was saaaad ....Ok I'm going to continue to see thi drama .I'm really interested .

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This year, dramas really delve into major deviations! After necrophilia (Born Again) and zoophilia (Welcome), do we have a case of nymphomania here?

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God, the adrenaline rush is crazy in this episode. And the way it all exploded in a painfully poignant moment.

I think this is the point where the writing finally gripped me to along with the directing and acting. Oh, and Kwak Dong-yeon never disappoints.

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Mostly what I've got from this episode is - what @mindy said.

But, honestly, Kwak Dong-yeon stole this episode so completely from the minute he came into frame. And in a show with this cast that's no mean feat. The only other male actor today I think could have done that is Kim Jung-hyun and that's an amazing group to be a part of.

Honestly, this episode was extraordinary. And what can't be gleaned from a recap is the moment at the end when they're at the rally and she's engineered this moment of extraordinary catharsis for this person. Kang-tae sees that and we can just see him pondering for a moment what it might mean to let go for a second and just be in the moment rather than having to worry about all these other people all the time. He's a natural caregiver, a hugely empathetic person, and he takes care of other people permanently. And for the first time, somebody is saying that a little selfishness and destruction might not be a bad thing.

More importantly than that, Moon-young is manifestly not walking her own talk. She's constantly on Kang-tae to confront his traumas but she herself has spent her life running away. She also needs to take her own advice and have the courage to face her demons.

I do not personally believe she has ASPD at all. I'm hoping it's a deliberate textual misdiagnosis. Because what I'm seeing is a damaged little girl living large to cover her own fear. And I hope this show is as much about her confronting that as for him learning to stop running and confront his.

If I didn't make it clear, this was an amazing episode of television. But I'm still nervous! I can't help it. I've been burned too many times before.

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The recap was awesome. I liked how you described the main couple as each other's anchors. I think they are like Yin and Yang, Mun-yeong is yang and Kang-tae is yin. They complement each other perfectly.

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