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It’s Okay to Not Be Okay: Episode 6

And the twisty twists just keep on twisting. There’s so much to our ill-fated couple’s story — their dark pasts, their lingering ghosts — and the rate at which it’s unraveling is exhilarating. At the same time, the more we learn, the more I fear for the characters and their well-being.

 
EPISODE 6: “Bluebeard’s secret”

Kang-tae enters the cursed castle, finding Sang-tae passed out drunk on a couch. He covers Sang-tae with his jacket and then heads upstairs, towards the bedroom balcony where Moon-young is waiting. He joins her out there, and the first thing she says is, “How long have you known who I am?”

He thinks of all the moments she hinted at it, like when she mentioned that he grew up well. But ultimately, he says, he thinks he’s known since the first time he looked in her eyes. The fact that he’s been hiding this upsets her, and he reminds her of what he said before, about wanting to forget her because he ran away.

He’s only opening up now to get proper closure. So he turns to her and, though she doesn’t want to hear it, gives her a sincere thanks for saving him and an apology for running away. He never got to tell her, which is probably why he never got over her. So what, she asks, he doesn’t have feelings for her anymore?

For Kang-tae, his feelings don’t matter; he already has his hands full with his brother. Moon-young asks why he can’t just care for her too, and he answers, “I don’t want to be someone who is needed by others anymore.” He stalks off, back down the stairs, and she chases after him, threatening to kill him if he leaves.

Moon-young slips on a step, but Kang-tae manages to catch her, even yelling at her for nearly hurting herself. It’s a charged moment that is soon interrupted when an excited Sang-tae appears by the foyer. Sang-tae tells Kang-tae that he’s a live-in illustrator now, showing him the contract Moon-young gave him.

Moon-young gives Kang-tae a look that says I’ve got you now. Sang-tae starts rambling that he’s going to live here, and, growing frustrated, Kang-tae yells that this isn’t their home and tears the contract in two. Sang-tae is horrified Kang-tae ruined what’s his, and he explodes, shoving Kang-tae out the door, to the ground.

Sang-tae beats Kang-tae with his fists, screaming, “I’m not yours! I belong to myself!” and Kang-tae can only lie there shielding his face. Moon-young steps in, placing a hand on Sang-tae and urging him to go inside, and he simmers down.

Sang-tae goes back inside, leaving Kang-tae on the ground looking scared and heartbroken at the same time. Crossing her arms, Moon-young tells Kang-tae, “Your brother abandoned you. Now, it’s your turn to choose. Will you also abandon him, or will you let him lock you down your entire life?”

Emotionally drained, Kang-tae trudges off the castle grounds alone. He falls into a memory, of being excited to show off his new taekwondo belt. His mom was furious, however, because while Kang-tae was at taekwondo, Sang-tae got beaten up on his way home. Kang-tae took a few hits from mom, until he just lost it.

“My job isn’t to take care of Sang-tae,” Kang-tae exclaimed, surprising Mom. “I don’t belong to Sang-tae! I belong to myself!” Mom weakly shoved him back, daring him to say that again. And Kang-tae cried that he wished his brother would just die, dropping his belt and running away.

Mom fell to her knees, while Sang-tae grabbed the belt and went after Kang-tae. It wasn’t until Kang-tae reached a snowy field (and a very familiar frozen lake) that he stopped to acknowledge Sang-tae. Having cooled off, he smiled at his brother and then threw his toy dinosaur, initiating a game of catch.

They tumbled through the snow, laughing freely, unaware that they had an audience watching from afar — Moon-young. And Moon-young smirked as one long toss sent the dinosaur and Sang-tae over to a thin layer of ice. Sang-tae fell through, into the icy water, and screamed for Kang-tae to save him.

But Kang-tae was frozen in place, torn between helping his brother and letting him drown. Making a quick decision, he turned and ran, only to stop a few feet away. From her spot, Moon-young said, “Just leave. Leave him.”

With another quick decision, Kang-tae ran back and jumped into the water to help Sang-tae up. But once Sang-tae was out, he scurried off (maybe disoriented?) and left Kang-tae struggling by himself.

This was when Moon-young picked a flower and plucked the petals, asking if she should help Kang-tae or not. The final petal, interestingly, told her not to save him, but we all know that she did anyway.

Now at home, Kang-tae uncrumples what’s left of the torn contract. At the bottom, in Sang-tae’s handwriting, it says that Moon-young is to pay him with a camping car instead of money, because he has a little brother who hates to move. And overwhelmed with guilt, Kang-tae burst into tears.

Back at the mansion, Sang-tae is looking guilty as well, but Moon-young tells him not to worry — Kang-tae isn’t going to abandon him.

The next morning, Kang-tae is visited by Joo-ri’s mom, who’s surprised to learn that the brothers fought. Mom is ecstatic, however, that Sang-tae received an opportunity to be an illustrator. She can tell that Kang-tae is uneasy about it, so she takes his hand in hers and tells him that he shouldn’t have to worry anymore.

“It’s time for you to let [Sang-tae] do what he wants,” Joo-ri’s mom says. “You shouldn’t stop people from doing what they want or liking someone.” He lets this sink in, and aw, the way he looks down at their hands.

Later in the afternoon, Sang-in and Seung-jae knock on Moon-young’s door (carrying PPL treats), and they’re confused when Sang-tae peeks out and immediately slams the door on them. Sang-in barges in and confronts Moon-young, demanding to know what the caregiver’s hyung is doing here.

Moon-young reveals her plans of working and living with Sang-tae, and Sang-in nearly loses his mind. He tells her that she can barely take care of herself, and she just smiles. “I have my safety pin, so don’t worry,” she says, nodding to the door. They all turn to see Kang-tae there, carrying his luggage.

Once Kang-tae and Moon-young are alone, he sits her down to go over some conditions. One, Sang-tae will spend the weekdays here and weekends at the apartment. Two, Kang-tae will bring Sang-tae back the second he wants to quit. And three, Moon-young has to respect Sang-tae.

Moon-young promises to do so, but knowing promises mean nothing to her, Kang-tae asks how he can trust her. “I’ll keep it,” she assures him. “Because it’s a promise I made to you.”

We then see Joo-ri’s mom cursing herself for sending Kang-tae away. She hadn’t realized until later that the writer he and his brother were working with was Moon-young. And now, both Joo-ri and Jae-soo are upset that Kang-tae is in the “evil” Moon-young’s clutches.

While touring the mansion, Sang-tae brings up the fact that the boys have moved 18 times, and Moon-young asks why. But before Sang-tae can mention the butterflies, Kang-tae cuts him off and suggests they go see their bedroom.

Moon-young takes them to her childhood room, and they’re amazed to have an actual bed. The bed is dusty, as it and everything else hasn’t been cleaned in over two decades, but Sang-tae is happy. And if Sang-tae is happy, so is Kang-tae.

Meanwhile, at OK Hospital, Director Oh and patient Pil-wong, who are the cutest of friends, sneak off to a supplies closet for their nightly chat. But Pil-wong admits that he’s shaken tonight — as he was leaving his quarters, roommate Go Dae-hwan sat up in bed and creepily asked where he was going.

Sang-tae wanders through the mansion’s dark halls, looking for the bathroom, when the door to the basement slowly creaks open. He moves to go down, but a hand reaches out and stops him. He looks up at Moon-young, and she asks if he knows the story of Bluebeard.

“Once upon a time, a count with a blue beard lived alone in a huge castle. He was very wealthy, but everyone avoided him out of fear because of his blue beard. But one day, a poor woman came to the castle and said that she wanted to be his bride. Brimming with joy, Bluebeard brought out all the jewels and treasure from each room and gave them to his wife. However, there was one exception — the room in the basement. He warned her to never go into that room.

The narration continues that the wife eventually went into the basement, and in flashback, we see young Moon-young unlocking her own basement. While the wife found the corpses of Bluebeard’s previous wives, Moon-young found the corpse of her mother.

After Sang-tae returns to his room, he retells the fairy tale to Kang-tae and asks why everyone was afraid of Bluebeard. Kang-tae says it was because he was different, and Sang-tae wonders, “Is being different something to be afraid of?”

While that may be so, Kang-tae tells Sang-tae not to worry — Bluebeard is sure to find that special someone who won’t be afraid of him and who will tell him it’s okay to be different. Standing outside their room, Moon-young smiles to hear this.

The following day, Joo-ri is still angry and curses up a storm as she drives her mom to work. Mom tells her to just lash out at her instead of at traffic, and while Joo-ri doesn’t say it out loud, she wishes she could staple Mom’s lips together. Well, damn.

At the hospital, Director Oh attempts to get a response from Go Dae-hwan, to no avail. Nurse Park tries instead, and Dae-hwan finally speaks up: “She’s… so pretty. She looks like an angel.” Nurse Park asks who he’s referring to, and he says, “Moon-young’s mom.”

Later, Director Oh and Nurse Park discuss how Dae-hwan isn’t ready to face Moon-young again. Director Oh is curious about the choking incident, thinking it might be possible Dae-hwan was delusional and seeing Moon-young as someone else.

When Moon-young wakes up, she’s surprised to see that the brothers have started cleaning the place and even brought back groceries. She watches Kang-tae set the table, as if the sight is foreign to her, and says that she wants extra rice. He cracks a smile and obliges. Cuuuute.

Back at OK, patient Eun-ja is on the phone with her daughter, wanting to set her up with the handsome Kang-tae. Behind her, the other patients complain to the nurses that Eun-ja is always borrowing stuff and insisting her rich daughter will pay for it later.

Soon, Moon-young and the brothers arrive at the hospital and go their separate ways for work. While Sang-tae puts the finishing touches on his mural, Director Oh comes by and knowingly comments that there aren’t any butterflies. Sang-tae shrieks that the butterflies can’t come here.

Elsewhere, while Moon-young waits for her class to start, she feels someone staring at her. She catches sight of a figure and follows it out back, until she’s face to face with Eun-ja. Kang-tae, who’d been looking for Moon-young, sees them but stays hidden, sensing the tension.

“Why are you surprised?” Eun-ja asks Moon-young. “Did you already forget me? It’s Mom.” And with that one word, Moon-young’s blood seems to go cold. Eun-ja is offended she doesn’t recognize her, even if she did get a few plastic surgeries. Moon-young starts to ask if it’s really her, if she’s really back.

But then Eun-ja asks why she’s acting so strange after returning from her “concert.” Moon-young shakes with anger, realizing that this woman has mistaken her for someone else. She looks as if she’s about to hit her, which is Kang-tae’s cue to intervene. Kang-tae guides Eun-ja away, glancing back at Moon-young with concern.

After giving Eun-ja her medication, Kang-tae learns from Nurse Park that Eun-ja suffers from hallucinations. She believes that she’s the wife to a wealthy man, when in reality, she was a single mom who lost her daughter in a car accident.

In class, Moon-young isn’t listening to her students as they read their stories. All she hears is the phrase “It’s Mom” playing over and over in her head. She mutters for the voice to be quiet, but it only grows louder. It gets so loud that she has to shout for it to stop, subsequently scaring the patients.

Sang-in and Seung-jae stop by, wanting to talk to Kang-tae and settle things once and for all. Sang-in feels that Kang-tae is stealing his spot as Moon-young’s right-hand man, so he orders him to move out of the mansion right away. Oddly defensive, Kang-tae answers with, “I don’t want to.”

At lunch time, Kang-tae joins Sang-tae, Joo-ri, and Joo-ri’s mom to eat. At first, he glances around the room for Moon-young, and then he starts to bring up his moving out to Joo-ri. Playing it cool, Joo-ri smiles and says that she already knows. She asks Sang-tae for a copy of his book when it comes out, but Sang-tae tells her she has to pay for it. The group laughs, which is when Moon-young passes by the window outside and sees them.

Moon-young watches Kang-tae wistfully, until Eun-ja shows up and starts rambling that “that nurse” is seducing her man. Moon-young tries to walk away, but Eun-ja keeps insisting that she’ll take care of this as her mom. “Please!” Moon-young shouts. “Please stop saying the word ‘Mom.’” She firmly states that her mom is dead and describes how her body was found in gory detail.

Moon-young’s words trigger Eun-ja to see flashes of her real daughter’s death, and she faints from shock. A tear falls down Moon-young’s face, but her expression is as hard as ever as she walks past Eun-ja and leaves.

Moon-young stays in bed for the rest of the night, ignoring Kang-tae when he tries to check up on her. Kang-tae thinks back to her encounter with Eun-ja, her genuine fear when she asked if she was really her mom.

We then cut to Moon-young going into the infamous basement. She stares at what’s left of the blood stain on the floor, then at the portrait of her mom (which, argh, we don’t get to see!). Finally, she stops at the vanity and takes out a hairbrush — transition to the mom brushing young Moon-young’s hair.

Moon-young asks her mom why Bluebeard killed his wives, and Mom smiles as she says that they didn’t listen to him. Mom orders Moon-young to always listen to her, and Moon-young obediently agrees. Mom yanks Moon-young’s hair and screams, “Then why did you bring him here?!”

Moon-young wakes up from her dream (or does she?) to see the floating ghost hovering above her again. The ghost threatens to kill her precious prince, and Moon-young whimpers, stuck in sleep paralysis. Thankfully, Kang-tae hears her crying from his room and comes rushing in.

Kang-tae tries to calm Moon-young down, but she’s screaming now, telling him to run, to get out. She says this, yet she’s gripping onto his shirt for dear life. So he decides to listen to her actions instead, holding her close and saying, “Okay, I won’t go.” And as her crying ceases, he takes her other hand in his.

Epilogue.

We get a silent movie treatment for the story of Bluebeard, with Sang-tae as the titular character, Moon-young as the wife he tries to kill, and Kang-tae as the hunchbacked minion who tries to save her. Bluebeard ends up killing the wife, adding her decapitated head to his collection, and the hunchbacked man weeps in despair.

(Make sure to keep watching for the hilarious bloopers!)

 
COMMENTS

Okay, okay, fine, I love the drama. There’s no use denying it. It does everything I want it to do, only more and better. Moon-young and Kang-tae continue to surprise me, showing gradual character development while still remaining true to who they are. It’s a little more gradual on Moon-young’s part, which is expected, but Kang-tae… I’m telling you, something’s changing in him.

First of all, Kang-tae saying he was tired of being that guy, the guy who takes care of everyone — how heartbreaking was that? After years of taking care of his hyung, and pretty much sacrificing his own happiness, he just wants to be free. But at the end of the day, his hyung isn’t holding him back. Even Moon-young isn’t holding him back. It’s himself. He says he doesn’t want Moon-young to make him worry about her, when he’s the one who can’t help worrying. Whether it’s because she’s sad, she’s angry, or because she might get hurt. It’s moving, as it shows his feelings for her aren’t lost, but it’s also somewhat unsettling. I mean, his concern is almost like a reflex, like his mom beat it into him.

Then, the flashback, where we got the whole story of how Moon-young saved Kang-tae. (Ah, I love that she chose to save him even when the flower petals went against it.) To be honest, I couldn’t believe it — Kang-tae was presented with the opportunity to lose his brother, his biggest burden, and he nearly took it. His almost-decision to leave him behind has to be his biggest regret, right next to running away from Moon-young. The scene was hard to watch, not just because what he did was awful, but because it was so very human. We were seeing a person at their worst, at a moment of weakness after being pushed to their limits. And I can’t help but wonder if Sang-tae understood what happened and if he held it against him.

Kang-tae being Kang-tae, he couldn’t abandon Sang-tae even if he wanted to. He has way too much love to give, which is his biggest weakness, as well as his biggest strength. He has so much, in fact, while Moon-young has none, and that makes me want to push them together. Thank goodness Moon-young got the real Kang-tae instead of dream Kang-tae this episode, because wow, her mother is a literal nightmare. It’s still unclear what happened with the mom and what’s happening with her now. And while I do have my theories, it’s satisfying just watching these storylines play out. I just want to spend more time with these characters. See inside their brains, live inside their hearts, everything.

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The ratings this masterpiece of a drama is getting are absolutely atrocious. I wish Korean viewers would give such an important story as much love as they do to every corny revenge makjang Dramaland pumps out.

Anywho, Kang Tae’s declaration to the publisher dude that he wouldn’t step back from Moon Young’s advances? Plus the hug at the end?? Whoo, mama. It’s so refreshing to finally see Kang Tae embrace his feelings for Moon Young on a physical level. The preview for next week builds on that growth, so I am suuuuper excited for that. And more domestic shenanigans with the two of them and Sang Tae. Sans creepy Ghost Mama, please. *shivers*

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totally agree with the point on KT making pro!! gress!! ❤️

just wanted to say that ratings for TV programmes have been low across the board in recent years simply because the Korean viewers don’t really watch TV anymore. they too use Netflix or downloads to watch the show so ratings are really not reflective of the show’s popularity. felt that I needed to share the Korean perspective xx

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Yeah, online viewing is huge in Korea, especially with multiple digital platforms available BUT recent dramas like Crash Landing on You and Hospital Playlist have still managed to do well in domestic airtime ratings while maintaining a popular presence online. CLOY in particular had a dream run with 20%+ cable ratings, multiple #1s on worldwide Netflix platforms and glowing reviews from every news outlet in sight. This drama is just as amazing and deserving so I am quite disappointed that it’s not getting the same reception, at least rating wise :(

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There have been some high rating dramas this year already so the Koreans  do watch tv. They watch what is tailored to them like "Hospital Play List, Crash Landing, World of the Marriage although based on a BBC  series they find it relatable, Doctor Kim did well on the public channel, Itaewon Class etc.

This is a mix genre full of references to many foreign fairy tales etc. Maybe this is too dark and moody. Who knows but I wouldn't say that they don't watch tv just because they don't tune in to the dramas that I love.

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True! I think the reason may be the dark theme of the drama! I know a lot of people who avoid watching these kinda stories because they believe they need something happy during this hard time..
But I do love it. Saturdays n Sundays are my happy days^^

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Same here. I'm totally addicted and ratings doesn't change anything.
In fact, most of my favorites don't have high ratings like "Be Melodramatic."

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Am more baffled about how much controversy is drawing, which might be part of the reason for the ratings being so low. Any thoughts on why is being so controversial?

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The scene in episode 3 when the FL barged into the locker room and oogled and touched the ML’s body despite him saying that she should get out earned its first controversy.in the wake of #metoo issues, regardless of the gender, it was sexual harassment. And the creators are called out for glossing over it. There are articles abou this.

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I believe the production even pay a fine because of the sexual harassment complains. However, that's not the only controversy and some are a bit exaggerated imo: the plagiarism of Kim Jong Hyun's letter, am a Shawol and this is just eye rolling; GiDo being inappropriate cause he takes his clothes off and also sexual harassment??... I think some people are not taking the context into consideration. One more thing, while I do think that the show has been benevolent with MY's actions at times, I do not think the producers are intentionally trying to justify sexual harassment or encouraging it in any way. On the other hand I found really amusing how MY is being called a pervert (no kidding, I have read a comment that use that term) while almost every k-drama male protagonist get away with much worse.

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Like you, I do not understand the domestic ratings. The show is trending and was even # 1 in Netflix Hong Kong yesterday. This show might just turn out to my ultimate favorite Kdrama. I love the dark references to fairy tales. The actors are all great in their roles. Love the writing, directing and cinematography. I can feel the chemistry between KT and MY from E1. It is so intense. I can hardly wait for the weekend.

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The ratings situation happened with TKEM and it fared well over online streaming sites.

IOTNBO is loads better IMO than TKEM; that's why it's annoying that the local ratings are lower than expected (I want everyone to love it like I do and more) but I understand.

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Me too, i hate the ratings. I think it’s unfair given the quality of this drama. Finger-crossing It will rise to 10 at the end.

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I think people in general don't like to deal with "problematic" issues on screen especially when in society there's a little or non understanding of minorities as handicap people are. For them they're just burden and a very expensive existence with no profits for society. It's like a club drama where fans are enjoying everything about it and initialise discussion.

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Same. It’s ridiculous how this drama isn’t breaking rating records cause this is absolutely a gem. The editing, story, the plot, the cinematography, ost... anything and everything that is being put into this drama is really high class and deserves more recognition than just a drama known as starring KSH or SYJ. They are absolutely great as their characters. Don’t get me wrong. But I want this drama to get the recognition that it deserves for the way it’s telling this story and the production too!

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Am more baffled about how much controversy is drawing, which might be part of the reason for the rating being so low.

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what controversy?

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On a funny note drama style i was waiting the publisher to toss that water glass at Kang Tae

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Most commenters are guessing that the mental health theme and dark fairytales are reason for the low ratings. I don't think that is the case as there are people like me who are disappointed in the drama bc there is NOT ENOUGH emphasis on concrete, real mental health issues. 'It's Okay That's Love' did well, 'Parasite' has been lauded all over, 'My Mister' is a masterpiece - all of these deal w social commentary or mental health, these "problematic/dark" themes so to speak. Honestly I had to 1.5x this episode bc I was tired of the plot dragging and being so repetitive scene after scene.

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This is really interesting because when I was studying for our clinical psychiatry class, we studied mood disorders. The drama has shown both mania and major depressive disorder with psychotic features. Although the drama has mentioned only “manic episodes” which is usually associated with Bipolar type I, it was nice to see the two different perspectives of this. Mania with psychosis is rarely depicted, so not a lot of people know about it or how it happens. In people with severe episodes of mania, they may experience delusions and psychosis, which was shown in the episode. This is real and it is concrete. It’s just that not a lot of people have experienced it or are familiar with it. I also like how the the show portrayed the word “Mom” as a trigger. That’s how it felt for me, whenever I was triggered by something (medically-speaking). It is hard to put in words, but the drama showed how it felt to some people who suffer through that.

I don’t know what you mean about concrete mental issues, but the manner by which it is shown and depicted in the drama is similar to what I read in textbooks and what was taught in med school. Considering they used a guy to portray mania and a girl to show depression also agreed with the statistics. They may not be the main focus of the show but the one or two episodes portrayed it well, especially in terms of understanding why someone has depression or manic episodes). In terms of the overarching plot, the vibe I think the show is portraying the complexities of a character with ASPD—why someone may have that, what could influence it, the familial factors, and (I hope they touch on this) how someone may cope with it. people with ASPD are often portrayed as psychopaths, but that doesn’t erase the fact that there are people with ASPD who are not psychopaths.

Misaeng and IOTL were two amazing dramas, as well as Parasite. But honestly, between IOTL and IOTNBO, the former is actually the one that mentioned something slightly off. They were talking about how love is enough to overcome grief, pain, etc. which is true. But in a way, I found that it may be used to romanticize the struggles of people with mental health problems because love is just not always enough.

In IOTNBO, the past six episodes, the lead’s actions were frowned upon by the characters of the show. They go ad far as explicitly stating it multiple times to the main male character who is also aware of it from the very start and who had repeatedly called out the female lead for it. For me, the pacing is satisfying because as the episodes continue, the complexities of each character is shown—Juri. sang-tae, kang-tae, Moon-young, the father, etc. It isnt just about the two main leads but it isn’t like other dramas where different lovelines are introduced along with the character devt of each character.

If you continue with this show (and end up not dropping it), I genuinely hope that you would enjoy the drana. Keep safe. :D ♥️

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thank you for sharing your thoughts. after you mentioned this, i looked it up. i now have a newfound appreciation for the two episodes. anyway, i do agree with what you mentioned. i appreciate how the drama is showing us mental illnesses that are rarely depicted in literature. I see its stark difference from IOTL and My Mister. But I think the three dramas did justice to the mental health problems that they wanted to show. It's about time that people have a better understanding of mood disorders.

i'm grateful for forums like this because i get to learn from a lot of different people and their perspectives. :DD thank you to the two of you.

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Thanks for your comments. I'm not sure what caused you to bring up bipolar disorder or depression? bc I thought the only main character w a diagnosis is Moon Young w ASPD. But anyways I don't usually go into diagnoses in detail since obvi this is a kdrama but since you are/were a med student (hopefully U.S., like me?), our holy grail (lol) First Aid 2020 states that ASPD should involve criminality, impulsivity, disregard for others, and I just don't see that? She saved KT twice after much thought and seems to empathize with many characters including both brothers and Kwak Dong Yeon's cameo. She never actually kidnapped anyone, and her attempt to stab that pt in first/second ep was self defense lmao like she already thought that through. For me she seems to be depicted as having more PTSD with maybe a personality disorder (also a kleptomaniac for those shiny things lmao). Again, not really important bc I don't think accuracy of portraying diagnoses is actually a major purpose for this drama, only since you brought it up. My original point was just that ppl shouldn't assume that we don't like the drama bc we aren't willing to consider these "dark" themes.

Honestly, I think this drama is also going the same route of "love heals everything." Like that meeting in the rain scene that proved to her someone else knows what she's going through? And KT's hug dispersing her ghosts? Like, come on....

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Not OP but re: your second sentence, Kwak Dong-yeon's character was described as "manic" in the show, and one of the other patients (the woman with the shawl?) was mentioned as having depression.

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Re: mindy. Gotcha, thanks for clarifying! I was confused bc Sunkissed used the "Mom" trigger to describe mania w psychosis, but Moon Young is the one w that "trigger" and that's not her diagnosis so I was just confused.

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Oorr maybe this drama is just not as good or deep as y'all think?
Sky Castle, TWMC, CLOY all had good ratings and the first two tackled sensitive/controversial subjects
Psycho but okay is basically a romance drama in which not much happens. The aesthetic is really cute and all but derivative from things like Tim Burton so nothing new & visuals alone are not enough to get people hooked.
Mental illness is not realistically being portrayed as the FL is clearly not ASPD, and she feels more like a larger than life character, rather than a real person. Bunch of stereotypical patients in the hospital too, and the ensemble of patients is being used for comic relief a lot of times.
So yeah you might like it but deeming Koreans prejudiced, narrow-minded, corny or whatever for not liking some melo-romance with a pretentious/edgy coat is NOT it.

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Oorr maybe you just have different taste from us?

I don't agree with OP putting down the general Korean public tastes but also that doesn't mean you have to put down ours

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I'm not putting down tho just providing an alternative
i myself like it but don't find as groundbreaking as some ppl think hence find unnecessary the condescending tone some have torwards korean gp for not digging it

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Why would she not have the ASPD traits?
Many people do have larger than life personalities.

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She has some traits which are turning out to be red herrings to her real diagnosis as she has shown incompatible traits to that diagnosis. We've been having this discussion on reddit for a few rounds. The overall romantic tone and probable ending wouldn't be compatible with that diagnosis either realistically. People with that disorder don't improve and there's no efficient therapy approach to it in the literature -- in laymen words: she would never really change IRL just perharps learn to fake/lie better to be more functional or to not get caught.

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I think her official character description says she does have ASPD traits which led me to believe the writer wants people to believe she has it. That doesn't mean the romance will be realistic and many posters have said they don't want the story to pretend love will fix her mental issues. So far I think it has done a good job showing her as someone with very little empathy towards anyone including the object of her affections.

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It’s true that ASPD has poor prognosis, and currently, there is no effective treatment that can cure someone of it.

At the same time, it’s too early to assume about her case. We dont know if she received prior counselin beforehand. she knows she has aspd (and the creepy publisher/writer) and even if she has destructive tendencies, she is - to some extent - a functioning member of the society. i think once we find out what happened between her childhood and adulthood (basically her teens), it would be easier to make deductions about the possible ending route this show will take :)

ASPD is often associated by people with psychopathy, and i’m glad that a show is showing another aspect of it. it does not excuse their behavior, of course, but i appreciate how it shows the possible spectrum that could be used to better understand the behavior of people with personality disorders.

I hope that by knowing what happened to her childhood, we get a better idea of her condition. I’ve read it on Twitter and some reddit thread, and i agree that mright now, what makes people question her condition are based on her actions that have been triggered by her childhood (the Moon brothers whom she met beforehand, the girl who was hurt by her father in the similar manner that MY’s dad hurt her).

Once we get a clear picture of her childhood, i guess we can understand her more, as well.

Interestingly though, even if MY remains unresponsive to treatment, that has already been discussed in the second episode—when KAng-tae tells it to her face: she has poor prognosis, and drugs or injections can’t heal her. Honestly, when he told her that, it lost its romantic tones, and I ended up tuning in to find out more about the individual characters :D

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This drama isn't that interesting though.
Episodes 6 feels the same as episode 4 and this drama try to explain why people did it but there has no prior statement of why we should care.

I mean it's probably fun for the fangirl theory but the drama character hasn't changed and felt like another romcom.

The trope felt like it's there just to induce sympathy and eccentric feeling, like a decoration rather than real life. Probably just me who sees it that way, the trope is too transparent and it just not that exciting if you didn't read anything prior to this drama. The comments come because of character description than what the character did in the drama .

I understand the middle range rating

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You're not alone! I also find this to be just another romcom relying on a written-out character description so viewers can watch thru rose-colored glasses

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It’s hard to say for now how the story will go because we are still in the sixth episode. Personally, I like that a lot of people are already raising a lot of concerns this early on because we have 10 episodes to come up with a hopefully reasonable, realistic, and rational resolution.

Honestly, I don’t find the people in the hospital as comic relief. When I read their dialogue and how they talk to each other, I actually feel sad. I have friends who have been diagnosed with some of what’s in the drama, and it is more or less similar. They actually find comfort in it because it is similar to what they go through.

I’ve been talking about this to someone who has has a clinical rotation and experienced dealing with a patient with ASPD. He watched the show and was impressed with the portrayal. Each patient is not the same, but she displays signs of someone with ASPD. Perhaps, not the ASPD commonly shown in the case of psychopaths, which is a more severe form of ASPD. Hers might be a milder one.It’s just that, there are other factors like her trauma that we need to more about first so we can understand her character more.

Anyway, with regards to the resolution of the plot, I’m holding on to its title. It’s okay to not be okay. I don’t think Moon-young will be ASPD-free in the story (which is just right) because The prognosis is poor, after all. Maybe she will slowly learn how to cope with it, but she won’t act like someone who is not diagnosed with ASPD.

Again, I trust that they will stand true to the title of the show.

If it’s not your cup of tea, I hope you find a drama that will fit your taste. I am enjoying the pacing of the drama and how it develops and shows each character and their personal struggles. It explores different aspects of relationships that I haven’t seen in a lot of shows. however, If you do decide to stick with the show and continue watching it, I hope you find comfort in it :) take care

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Once again, thanks so much for your speedy recap @sailorjumun!

I think I could go on for hours about all the things that were great in Ep.6, but I’ll go for two.

1. It forced me to think again. I loved the parts of this episode about the contract between MY and ST which exposed and challenged my assumptions. At the end of Ep.5, I was quietly judging MY for abusing her power over ST. She got him to sign a contract, fully knowing that he has a behavioural development issues and therefore was less able to protect himself and his interests by “reading the small print” and considering his options. It felt like she had taken advantage of him and that initially felt so deeply wrong. I was completely on KT’s side when he came to take ST home and rip up the contract. BUT then the drama threw a brilliant curveball: ST was negotiating his contract (adding the clause about the camping van) and he was able and willing to defend his right to be his own person and make his own decisions. Then JR’s mum added the perspective of KT needing to support ST rather than deny him his chance. Suddenly, I was looking at the whole situation afresh: was KT holding ST back rather than defending the vulnerable? Where exactly is that line? How is this balance negotiated and by whom? Bravo, show, for asking those kinds of questions!

2. Aesthetics. How beautiful was the still of their four hands at the end of the episode? Just stunning artistry – communicating so much with just motionless hands: I need help, I care about you, we’re in this together etc. etc. I would take that still and hang it as a painting in my house. Please do loads more dramas like this PD-nim. Brilliant.

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True on ST and KT early fighting scene. I guess I'm the one who glad that MY offers ST a position/job that none of the world might do towards ASD person. People might sees as MY taking advantages of ST, but why cannot take a positive note from it? Perhaps ST is capable of making his own decision, he knows exactly what he wants (and already show it to KT). But, such opportunities are rare to find (hired as an illustrator) and somehow KT preferred him to go school instead of "hearing" what his brother really want.

Gladly ST knocked some nonsense towards his brother, reminiscing what he heard ages ago... MKT belongs to MKT itself. At this point, ST is growing while KT is chaining his dream. Therefore, he (KT) also close so many opportunities. I do understand that whole his life is about ST but both of them needs to move on. To grow further, to live according to their heart. Trauma will never heal, but it can be lessen. MY, ST and KT they need to open up more, face it upfront in order to be better.

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Totally agree with you. I also had those same feelings about MY going to far with ST, but then I also thought... his drawings are good, and it's been stated from the very beginning that the illustrations of Zombie Kid were too dark and gloomy. I'm sure if ST could "draw" that book it would be brighter (the scene in episode two when he goes to the book signing comes to mind, colours everywhere!).

Also the aesthetics... the colour palette in the castle has changed from darker to bright and pastel during the breakfast scene.

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Oooh, you are so right about the color scheme changing. Wow.

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Good point about the colors changing. Lightness vs darkness; stark vs colorful.

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I think the show deliberately wants to deceive us, making us view things from KT’s point of view that ST is incapable, MY is dangerous to ST (referring to KT’s cautiously warned MY not to get close to his hyung even though the reasons for doubting her is not too obvious). And then it kinda turns 180 on us that both show a great degree of maturity and thoughtfulness in drafting the contract. Especially MY, there’s no evil in her manipulation aimed at the brothers, or from my view point, she exhibits a great deal of understandings towards ST’s need by acknowledging him as a capable human being (which KT fails to see). This show embrace a kind of depth that i rarely see in Kdrama these days. I hope more and more people can see that!

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Agreed. But not deceiving us, it is just how we normally perceived it. Good things writernim is flipping the preconception for thought provoking 😅

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I agree the show is trying to trick us in certain ways, especially with the "supernatural" elements going on. I have to disagree that Kang-tae believes his bro is incapable. I think Kang-tae taught Sang-tae to fend for himself and be strong, but can't help but feel overprotective since that's the job his mom gave him and he also sees the way society is apt to treat Sang-tae in their ignorance of autism. Kang-tae is also confident enough to allow Sang-tae work small odd jobs and attend classes and workshops on his own. Unfortunately, things often go wrong as we've seen, and Kang-tae is always the dependable brother to help his Hyung out. I think it's natural for Kang-tae to feel protective. I think however he's definitely influenced by his mother's incorrect perception that taking care of his Hyung is what his life's about, allowing it to consume him. I'm sure his mother's traumatizing death has smth to do with it as well.

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Eh. I'm not going to give MY a pass in regard to her "contract" with ST. Yes, ST has agency and is capable to some degree but that is, basically, still a CHILD'S agency. A child would also be fully capable of demanding some provisions and declaring their independence as a person. However, we do NOT consider contracts signed by children as legally valid contracts and for a good reason; a child is not as capable of understanding the nuances and responsibilities as an adult is. And same concerns ST, he is not fully functioning adult with a full capability to comprehend what exactly he is signing, what are the small details and ramifications and so on.

MY is very well aware of this but she doesn't care, obviously. She is using ST to reach her goal and ST's semi-functionality does not lessen the awfulness of her manipulation in any way.

And I'm saying this as a person who loves MY's character. I just don't give her a pass when she does wrong. (But she is magnificent, make no mistake here.)

I do think that KT is holding ST back, too. But that doesn't mean that ST is capable of adulting on his own because it's quite clear that developmentally he is still somewhat a child in an adult body. It's just that KT doesn't give him enough independency although full independency would be impossible.

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Yes, you make some excellent points @arawn. And that's what I really like about this drama - it invites us to discuss and doesn't tell us what to think/feel. Honestly, right now I'm not sure exactly where I would come down on this contract issue, but I'm richer for having been forced to think.

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I totally agree, she knew exactly what she was doing and how easily manipulated Sang Tae is. She knows he likes her, he told her after all and she knows he can draw. It was a win win for her.

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Well said. I love MY's character a lot too but the show is letting her get away with some things that, in real life, would have major repercussions. Is a bit sad since the writing have been mostly good and consistent but I guess is a drama after all.

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I felt exactly the same too. As much as the character of MY awes me, I really didn't like the way she manipulated and took advantage of ST's situation.

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I totally agree that she is  manipulative but it came with no surprise because she has been manipulating people to get what she wants since the beginning of the show.

Do we hold her accountable or not considering that she has childhood traumas and possible ASDP that is probably contributing to her behavior?

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Honestly this is what I do like about the show.
I don't really think it condones her actions as a normal way to act, and certainly not as all ok or fine, but it does force you to look at them from a different angle, where you can see multiple POVs surrounding a situation.
Like her "kidnapping" the manic patient- objectively maybe not a good thing to do, but it also meant he could speak up about his father and showed us another level to KT and also to how MY thinks and acts.
There's a lot of possible nuance to breakdown from each action and reaction.
Was her contract with ST manipulative? Absolutely. Should we be okay with her manipulation? I don't think so, no. Does it make for very interesting storytelling, and is there so much more we can take away from everything because of it? Yes. Does it set up for fascinating and complex character relationships? Also yes.

*is suddenly reminded of Extracurricular ahhhh good show*

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I'm not a psychiatrist or psychologist but from everything that I've read about sociopath tells me that Seo Ye-ji is spot on with her acting.
Moon-young's behavior is that of a sociopath. She could even manipulate doctors like President Oh's patients.

Knowing that, I really like it that the show trust us with our own judgement.
Things are not black and white as the lazy me want it to be lol.
One minute she totally has my heart and the next minute she is pulling someone's hair out.

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i love this comment. i saw a lot of discussions on other sites about MY's "toxic" behavior turning them off from the drama & i was so confused.

i have never felt like this drama was condoning her actions? every single person in kang tae's life is telling him to stay away from her! that almost never happens with the more common aggressive leading men who are presented as romantic.

i've had a ton of moments where i am absolutely loving the show while clocking some really inappropriate actions. the key is in presentation - are you depicting these actions as neutral, problematic or romanticizing them? i'm impressed at how they've been juggling the developing romance with the couple's negative interactions.

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@kiara yes it will just be interesting to see from here on out how they choose to develop her, especially regarding those behavioral symptoms.

@paramount thanks! There's absolutely no reason why you can't have a character that is sympathetic, enjoyable, and also does wrong things. (I mean that's how tragedies, and also redemption arcs, are made for one.)
And honestly a lot of my favourite characters are all those things- I am typically drawn to more messed up characters, the ones that do terrible shit but are portrayed in such a way that they're either sympathetic, or you feel empathy for them in spite of their actions.
I think this show is doing a pretty decent job of that to be honest. We empathize with MY because of her childhood, and need for warmth, we enjoy her because she's hilarious and magnificent, but we're also wary of her because she is manipulative, disrespectful and oversteps the mark a lot.
And that's ok? She can be all of those things? Don't we all want complex characters? lol

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Totally agree with you, and from a strictly legal point of view that contract wouldn't be legal in my country as I doubt ST would have legal capacity to consent.

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Thanks Arawn, I wanted to say exactly that about the brother. The drama used another character's speech and one silly demand on the contract to try to make ST seem a lot more independent than he actually is when drama itself has already established that he isn't capable of making adult choices. He doesn't understand simple negatives or regular situations, it was a cheap way to give MY a pass for her actions.

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Hmm, I don't feel like the show is giving her a pass so much as pointing out that ST deserves a chance to explore his capabilities, and that she's offered him that chance. They've made it pretty clear that she didn't do so out of altruism, and that her behavior and motivations were gross.

And they also made a point of KT negotiating terms and conditions that protect his brother's interests from MY. I'd be SHOCKED if that doesn't turn into a plot point down the line.

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I also loved the extra bit where "the employer will acknowledge the employee as the best illustrator in the world," in MY's VO. That was a sweet validation of MY to ST: I see you, you are good at this, it matters to you. This ability to see people so clearly is one of the most interesting things about MY to me, especially when coupled with the fact that she nonetheless sometimes totally crashes and burns with them despite it!

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Agree! MY is smart and perceptive. She knows how to read people and their needs without sympathizing with them!

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Agree with you on both points. It's just heartbreaking when ST turned against KT.

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Moon young is a failing writer though. And she knows that. There's a lawsuit coming for her because she tried to kill the reporter, stores are pulling out her books and her agency has tons of problems.. Yet she still hired sang Tae as an illustrator (for a new book she probably won't get to publish because her image is now tainted). Sounds like she manipulated sang Tae to keep Kang Tae by her side because she knows he can't let go of sang tae

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-and not because the guy had promising talent for drawing.

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That's the view Kang-tae had when he told Sang-tae that he is getting to be used. I don't think her career is over. She can publish her book with success worldwide especially if she will turn the sign event accident from the side of the one who got abused into a wonderful story and tables would turn around. Plus with Sang-tae's illustrations it would be a total bestseller.

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World doesn't work that way. You might be the worst person on earth and if the product you produce is good, everyone will still buy it. Public image doesn't even mean that much as long as you don't murder/rape anyone

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It doesn't work like that OUTSIDE Korea. We are talking about Korea here, where everything is about image making. You must not be familiar with their culture over there.

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Big Bang. They had numerous drug scandals and still did pretty well. The only thing that actually crossed the line was one guy having a prostitution ring.

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Well not always raping goes unpunished... but you are so right.

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I'm not sure why they are letting this reporter get away with blackmail and  extortion? That's a crime itself.

I'm not convinced that revealing her ASPD is going to destroy her career. I see it as something positive, it gives hope to those suffering with the same condition but then I don't live in Korea.

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re listen to the conversation, the writer actually took out the part where he made sexual innuendos to Ko Moon Young in lieu of payment. I always thought he sexually harassed her when he insinuated that she give him something else for staying silent.

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Not her, but Sang-In. Who always solve everything with money. I am also not sure how Korean treats sexual harassment and bribery in real world (trust me, I am not a hardcore Kdrama as I only watched certains type of it). Does having a personality disorder truly destroyed one career? Why they succumb so much towards the book reviewer, even though he is definitely guilty too?

After many thoughts while watching this drama, I always stay as usual..."this is only happen in dramaland". Some context might not be able to apply in real world. By the end, I will just enjoying the drama, see how arc of this story will go. Whether it makes impact on real society, real judgement/ punishment, real situation, it is up to the viewer itself.

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Hopes of what tho? ASPD is not a disability just a personality disorder. The lack of empathy doesn't come in the way of being sucessful -- most likely helps it as some reserachs show that plenty of CEOs and people in power are sociopaths or psycopaths (which are extreme forms of ASPD -- though there are discussions regarding it, it's ok to describe as such for laymen for didatical purposes)

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I did some reading on the difference between sociopaths and psychopaths and I feel like that none of my friends are normal including me. We all have some kind of traits from both 😆.

You are right. I was thinking of her condition as a disability when I made that comment.

Still that reporter whatever the heck he is, is getting away with a crime and her publisher is incompetent and a waste of screen time.

Would I buy a book for a child if I know that it was written by a sociopath? Yes,
if I think it’s appropriate for a child. If not, then no.

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This she didn't hire him because "oh so talented" but because I was to use you to get to your brother...

Or what was the need to take him all the way to her house, get him to want to stay with her and so on....

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Everything you said and more and I just end up with same one word for this drama. Brilliant.

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well said! the ending was brilliant...

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I also like what they are NOT showing: mom's face. By keeping us in the dark about what MY's mom actually looks like, we "see" her more as a force than a person: a ghost, the voice in MY's head, an evil force, a symbol for MY's issues. We can also see her as another aspect of MY herself, as "mom" has the same long dark hair and elegant hands. Given Episode 5's nod to Psycho (with the stop at the Bates Motel) visiting "mother" in the basement is especially chilling.

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I completely agree with you and I had to go back and rewatch the earlier episodes and interactions between sang tae and Kang tae which took on a new dimension for me (which this drama is so good at making me do and revealing additional layers with every revelation and rewatches!)

KT’s confession to moon young in episode 5 that he smiles because sang tae is always looking at his expression to judge his feelings makes the opening scene of the first episode (and later interactions between the two where KT is always smiling at his brother) at ST’s school where he flips from angry to gentle even more loaded (and heart wrenching!)

And now, with ST’s revelation in chapter 6 that he is his own person, it makes sense why ST is always running away from school, which KT repeatedly sends him to because it equips him with the necessary skills to survive in society. But it’s not what ST wants to do and putting aside the guilt, he’s so much happier drawing caricatures in Jae Su’s pizza parlour. And the way his face completely lit up when he was given a whole wall to draw on!

While we all agree that moonyoung was certainly manipulative and hired ST for her own ends, regardless of that, it gave ST an opportunity to voice out that desire to live as he wants to, not as KT thinks he should (of course KT Is also coming from a position of love which makes all these characters so wonderfully nuanced), but as he wants to. And more importantly, it smacks Kang-tae over the head with a realization that he hasn’t really been listening to his brother, in how his caretaker role could have blinded him to his brother’s desires as a person. Who despite being on the autism spectrum, is very much a person with his own identity and quirks. And more importantly it sets up the journey for KT to slowly learn to let go - not to abandon his brother. I don’t think it is in his nature or character to do so, but to learn to step away from being a caretaker 24/7 and to step into the shoes of being a younger brother at times.

Darn you show for making me love you so much that weekends fly by and weekdays crawl by so excruciatingly slow.

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Thank you for the recaps!

Another emotional rollercoaster ride this week. Now it all makes sense why KT was so taken back when MY called him a hipocrite. He remembers her and MY witnessed the scene when he briefly considered running away and leaving his brother behind. How sad is it that KT always has to force a smile for the sake of his brother watching? It's become a habit and he does that in his daily life too, not only with his brother. I get the sense that he's at war with own emotions, exhausted, burdened and envious having to be the dependable one, ashamed and guilty for feeling so.

It was so satisfying to have MY throw KT's words back at him. He already cares about her way more than he's willing to acknowledge. He knows she's no good but he can't help but be drawn to her. It's great to see development and progress in their relationship with KT starting to genuinely open up to MY and showing her what familial care is like.

Watching the breakfast scene make my heart feel so full, just like MY's bowl of rice lol. It's such a simple gesture to have someone scoop you a bowl of rice but so heartwarming. Something MY doesn't get to experience often, if at all. MY isn't the only broken one in this relationship even though on the surface she may appear to be the one with more issues. MY may not understand emotions and unable to connect to people due to her isolated upbringing and her mother's influence but KT's defence mechanism is slapping on a smile and denying himself of any emotions. It's not much of a life he's living either. Both of them are starved for affection since childhood, both in denial when being called out by the other person. Which is why they need to be thrown together because each of them can see through and understand the other person better than they do themselves. They'll be pushing each other to change, face their fears and begin their healing journey.

MY was so affected by the ahjumma patient at the hospital because the lady actually remind MY of her mum or was the mere mention her mum enough to torment her? Could it be that her mum is still alive having faked her own death? This show does a good job at revealing little by little so I trust that all questions will be answered in due time. Just gotta be patient 🤗.

The ending scene had me in awe. So glad MY wasn't left to face her nightmare alone again.

Quote of the day: "Is being different something to be afraid of?" ST asked. As if the drama is asking us as viewers. This drama sure knows how to tug at the heartstrings.

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The full bowl of rice and KT smile was precious, specially when MY had told him before that she never ate, hehe.

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I’m excited that we’re going to see more into MY’s past and problem next week. It pains me to see how haunted she has been by her mother even though mom is dead (hopefully so, as that will focus the story on exploring and potentially tackle MY’s psychological problem instead of telling details, explaining the plot without much character development). I cried both when the brothers fight, and when KT hug MY at the end, it’s just so bittersweet to see KT starts to have willingness to embrace his feelings for MY.

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I am still really enjoying this drama. I love the great moments of humor sprinkled throughout the larger emotional story.

My one concern is with Seo Ye-ji. She is a great actress and in a previous post I commented how funny she is and what an excellent performance she is giving. My concern though is not with her acting but with her skinniness. When she was wearing that pink dress she looked way too thin. It totally looked wrong on her. I worry about the stars and performers who have to look so thin to be on camera. Even Kim Soo-Hyun looks about skin and bonesy. I realize that it is the nature of the business for performers to be skinny, but they should look healthy as well.

That said, absolutely still digging this show.

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Ye Ji is exceptionally slender and her ant waist is probably the smallest I’ve seen, but it’s the work of genetics and metabolism, not diet and procedures. There is a stark difference between women who are skinny by nature and those who do those wack crash diets that mess up your hormones. Ye Ji is undoubtedly in the former group so I would take her look in the drama as simply her looking the way she naturally is. Kim Soo Hyun has also been skinny since his youth, so it’s probably genetics on his end too. They both seem to have great metabolism and the type of lanky, slim build that lasts your entire life. Another reason why they match so well, to be honest.

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Even so, she's too skinny to me. A goddess, but too skinny. Even if it's just her nature, it's not really normal and show also should care the image it shows to vulnerable people.

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Bruh some people are naturally skinny. My bestfriend eats like 2 cups of rice per meal, her BMI is not what the charts should say but she is clinically normal. She is not pale, she is energetic (and sassy but I love her for that 😂), her FBC and U+E are all normal (you can't get more technical than that). Her mother, 2 older sister and heck, even her grandmother is like this.

Their is a big difference between unhealthy vs healthy skinny and it is usually pretty obvious.

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I don’t know, i have been watching her since ‘Save me’ and she looks the same and healthy to me. Maybe she does diet, maybe it’s just how her body is, we never know, but it’s important to not fat-shame or thin-shame anybody at all (not implying that you did though).

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I think she is naturally skinny

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I don't remember the title, but I saw a vid on Youtube something along the lines of"Who is Seo Ye Ji?" I remember it being stated there that she and her older sister takes after their flight attendant mom who has the same build. She looked the same in her childhood photos.

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I had the same thought. I don't know if you noticed but I think she was wearing some sort of slimming under thing. Her back looked funny like any extra flesh was bubbled there along her spine. It was visible a couple of times. I don't want to thin-shame, but I do feel like that level of skinniness is not really natural and creates bad feelings in girls/women. I hope she is making healthy choices. I'm more worried about her than hating on her. I know these actresses (and honesly the actors, too) face incredible pressure to maintain a crazy level of thin.

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@brainsandwich I'd like to point out that I have loved ones who look like that...with no exercise and only fries and shakes. I also know from following Kim soo hyun on social media and variety shows that that boy is hella fit and strong as eff. I've seen girls whose calves are the width of my arm and no, I don't think its "weird". The world has close to 8 billion people and we are all composed of different genetic makeup. I have also have seen girls with eating disorders and trust me, it is NOT the same. The sooner we accept that genetics plays a huge role in our appearance, the sooner we can create a safe and open space for everyone to be themselves without having to defend their choices. 😉

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I thought the pink snatched waist dress looked stunning on her. Reminded me of Lily James in her iconic Cinderella dress. As other people here have noted, some women just have naturally wee frames.

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I also had a friend who was naturally skinny (that is, until her mid twenties) so it could be that she just happens to be someone like that... but considering the crazy standards society pushes on female bodies (especially in Kpop etc) I also found her appearance in that pink dress a bit worrying.

Obviously we will probably never know if it's just her genetics or if she's starving herself - I just wish society would adopt a healthier body image.

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The blooper real was absolutely golden! After the rollercoaster of an episode, it was a welcome distraction. The cast looked like they were having fun. 😂 bluebeard and hunchback swordfight! 🤣

I was really disturbed by Moon Young's encounter with that patient. For a moment, I thought her mother was alive but then when it was established that patient was delusional and getting over the death of her own daughter. It made it more tragic and traumatizing for both parties. MY was definitely hurt and lashed out at that poor woman.

And that scene in the frozen lake, both Kang Tae and Moon Young rejected their dark impulses which gives me a lot of hope for this two.

MY's mother is scary. She must have been horrible for both her husband and MY to be scarred for life.

That ending scene when MY woke from her nightmare ❤

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And don't forget the heads on the back scene... during the bloppers... they were having so much fun!

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That is true! They can not help but laugh!

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I was so thankful for the epilogue scenes and blooper reel. It felt like it brought me back to the light after the very dark scenes preceeding it. I really hate that floating shot of Mom over MY.

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It has always creeped me out. I would hate for that to happen to me 😱😱😱

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I had the constant urge to repeat every scene of this episode and watch it in slow mo. I just wanted to feel everything.

That balcony scene..oh my! The conversation they needed. And Kang-tae's "I'm done being someone who is needed by others," awww.

Sang-tae's "You don't own me" speaks volumes. I think Kang-tae and his mom did a pretty good job of teaching Sang-tae to be independent, but despite that they still treated him as someone who'd always need them (which is understandable, of course). This scene is a good reminder that Sang-tae can really make his own decisions and that people around him should learn to trust him more. I'm also glad Moon-yeong saw that scene.

Knowing the whole story of what happened when they were kids gave a different feel and meaning to it. I said in the first episode that I like how this drama balances its reveals and mysteries, and I think that this flashback is a good example of how well it is used to tell a story. The same is true with the reveals on the mother's death.

Bluebeard is definitely a scary story to tell a kid and that explains Moon-young's behavior. We can just imagine how difficult it was for Moon-yeong to live in constant fear. I like that the story was not only used to show MY's memories but also to highlight how people can be harsh to those who are different. And that epilogue! Haha, this show surely never fails to surprise us.

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The flashback scene was utterly heartbreaking. From the very beginning: a happy KT who gets scolded by his mum who tells him he didn't do his job and that the only reason he could take TaeKwondo lesson was to protect ST... I totally understood KT's reaction saying his life is his. This is such a burden to put on a kid!!

And then we see the two brothers making up and playing together and having fun, because they are kids, they are brothers and they love each other.

And then the accident, and KT wanting to get free and thinking: this could explain everything and no one would blame me and I will be free, and I will receive mum's warmth... but he couldn't because he loves ST, and also he's been conditioned to take care of him no matter what, so he risks his own life.

And then he realizes he has no chance to survive because he can't get off the frozen water alone, and decides to let him go, another way of putting an end to it.

And then rescue comes in the form of MY.

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What i find most interesting about the flashback, beside what you’ve pointed out, is that it show how KT has actually regressed. What i mean is, when he was small, he had the kind of emotional intelligence and maturity to understand that he is his own person, he doesn’t belong to anyone. But now the grown KT seems to have lost his identity, maybe it’s not because ST has autistic and needs attention, but more because KT doesn’t know how to live without his hyung even though he yearns to do so deep down. How confusing! Now that MY bulldozes her way into the relationship between the brothers, i feel like KT can slowly learn to breathe now, and pay more attention to MY

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The back story of what happened between KT and ST on the frozen pond made me think that KT's world has revolved around ST to the point of neglecting his own desires and emotions out of guilt (for initially wishing ST dead and walking away after ST fell in). Hell of a way to live - would love for this to build up to some sort of acknowledge forgiveness between the two brothers.

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Keeping tabs on KT saving people from falling down stairs:
*Editor Sangin (ep 1)
*Slimy book critic (ep 2)
*MY (ep 6)
Kind of feel that it has some significance... The way MY described her mom laying on the floor bleeding and with twisted limbs suggests that she fell down the basement stairs, but of course, it's still too soon to figure out the details.
Am I missing someone? Can't go back now to check it, but I'd say that on ep 1 there's also an almost fall when KT and Jaesoo are having the Joker-talk on the street

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Oh, interesting! I didn't notice that.

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Thanks for sharing this, you really have a point!!

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Correction: KT didn't stop slimy book critic's fall (not that he deserved it)

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OMG THIS!!! LOL. Just watched episode 7 and you can add another scene in your list.😅

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Sang-tae beats Kang-tae with his fists, screaming, “I’m not yours! I belong to myself!”

-This scene wrecked me 😭😭😭

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same 😭😭😭 especially when it was revealed that KT said the exact same words lashing out at his mum when he was young in the taekwondo scene. KT clearly lost his way when his mum passed and with the idea that he HAD to care for ST ingrained in his mind, he was forced to take on the responsibility of ST’s caregiver when in fact, ST is highly independent and does not need it as much as we assumed. This episode is amazing because it offers an alternative perspective on the issue, that instead of ST needing to be cared for, KT might’ve actually been needing to care for someone because that’s all he’s ever known.

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KT is a natural caregiver so it also makes sense that it is what he does for a living. He has a natural instinct to care for people in a very patient and positive way.

But he also (as many caregivers do) seems to be able to do the same self-care for himself.

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Another scene hard to watch.
It made me think that whenever ST is angry he beats KT, and he wouldn't defend himself as he did this time. It could explain the scars we saw on his back on episode 1.

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I still don't like that MY used the brother to get KT and it worked so easily. Her obsession for KT is kinda creepy sometimes and not funny.

KT must be find what he wants, what will make him happy. For that, he needs that his brother works on his past trauma because he always will have to take care of him as long as ST will be afraid of butterflies.

Joori and her mother are so funny! I love their relationship, how the mother felt bad and guilty to her daughter when her advices were good.

The silent movie parody with all the heads of the actresses was so funny and the bloopers with the sword too.

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It was very manipulative but brought the story forward. We saw a lot of progress because of it. We knew she did it because it's a sure way to get Gang-tae leaving there too but pairing that up with the flashback, it gave us more understanding of the brother dynamics. Gang-tae hated his brother but could never abandon him. Sang-tae probably knows this too and feels bad thinking he's holding his brother down.

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Yeah, mostly people paint it as in that way...that autism person is somehow lacking or unfit in normal society. But, have we seen from their own perspective? I bet ST was all over the moon when he get the offer letter. I love that part so much...of how we should seen this world with not only your own POV. But rather sees it with many angles, one that might provoking normal society's judgement.

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Yes, thank you for pointing out that we need to see from the point of view of each character! That’s the whole point of the story! Most people are so hung up on how wrong MY is and how she needs to be held accountable for every wrong action. I get where they come from, but it will be a very different story if we have to ‘right’ every ‘wrong’ a mentally-ill person makes. It’s good that you know it’s wrong. But this show wants to teach us to step into their shoes, feel what they feel and sympathize. MY in her illegal contract with ST exhibits so much understandings and thoughts towards ST that KT should learn from her. Story is, in essence, a manipulation of perspective to teach us something, and in this case, to understand people with psychological problems, and to not dismiss them as either wrong or right based on one dimensional moral scale

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It’s like watching ‘Joker’ and all you can get is: “Joker is a bad person, why isn’t he dead?”

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this is such a lovely breakdown of what the show is trying to do. <3

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I have no issue with ST to have his own life and to work for her. But she didn't do it for him, she wouldn't care of him if he wasn't KT's brother. She used him to reach the brother, it's way different.

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Dr. Oh knows about the butterflies. I guess KT has told him and that's why he's asked ST about them and why they are not in his painting.

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I take it that President Oh meant for it as therapy for Sang-tae. Butterflies make flowers bloom. (Everyone is happy, happy happy).
I think he is trying to get Sang-tae to see butterflies in a different light because his only memories of butterflies are linked to the death of his mother, butterflies kill.
Here they give life to flowers and make them beautiful.

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Yeah, I know. It's nice to see he didn't choose a direct way to do the therapy but giving time to SG to trust him and adressed slowly some subjects.

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Heartbreaking. Our poor girl is so traumatized. "Run." Now we know the reason why young Moon-young ripped the butterflies -- to save her prince from Mom. Moon-young clutched onto Kang-tae's shirt like she did on the stairs when she begged him not to go, but this time, he holds her hand instead of tearing her hand away. OK Hospital is incompetent. Didn't nurse Byul lead Kang Eun-ja away? How did that woman find Moon-young to trigger her again? She was sleeping so well free from nightmares after the Moon brothers moved in.

I love this cohabitation, but I have to admit I misunderstood Ajumma's advice. I had assumed Joo-ri's mom meant for Kang-tae to let his hyung try to be independent and live on his own, so when Moon-young's safety pin arrived, I thought he was there to drop off Sang-tae's things. Which could've been a way to prove to Kang-tae that Moon-young can take care of him as shown by how she stopped Oppa from beating Kang-tae (omg, that scene made me so uncomfortable). Kang-tae suffers from guilt for momentarily thinking of letting his brother drown, but he should have ran to grab his taekwondo belt to pull Sang-tae up instead of jumping in the frozen lake.

I busted out laughing when Seung-jae snorted at Sang-in's "her man." I love CEO, and I believe Sang-in when he says he doesn't care about Moon-young for her money, yet I also don't believe he likes her as a man. Kang-tae answering "I don’t want to" is definitely going to get back to Moon-young, which I think he knows and doesn't care. I need Kang-tae to get to the point where he finds excuses to not go home for the weekends. Let's travel without a set destination with Moon-young.

Thanks a million for the recap, @SailorJumun!

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"I had assumed Joo-ri's mom meant for Kang-tae to let his hyung try to be independent and live on his own" and "he should have ran to grab his taekwondo belt to pull Sang-tae up instead of jumping in the frozen lake"
Thought exactly the same!

But on second thoughts, I guess that it's meant on purpose: KT is the one who can't let go of ST, and he chooses ways of helping him that are detrimental to himself. It looks like poor KT is wired to codependency

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We're three on that boat. I thought KT was bringing only ST clothes to the castle.

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I'm really loving Seung-jae! I think she's the best person for Sang-in and I bet he knows that too hahaha. It would've been nice to see her work with Sang-tae

And yes, the belt. He could've used the belt :P

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I want Sang In to cross paths again with JooRi... remember the pizza restaurant scene? It was so funny!

I thing Seung Jae would be a better match for JaeSoo.

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Oh, I didn't mean it in a romantic way. I just thought nobody responds that way to Sang-in and maybe he likes that hehe. And yes, Seung-jae x Jae-soo would be nice hmm..

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I also thought he would just drop off his stuff... but it makes sense that he moved in too. Sang-Tae has a lot of needs which Moon-Young is unaware of and even if Gang-Tae gave her a full list of them, there would be no guarantee that she would be able (or even willing) to give him the care and support he often needs.

I mean, she let him get utterly drunk when he first arrived, presumably without checking whether he is taking medication that doesn't mix with alcohol, whether getting drunk would cause him emotional or physical distress etc.

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‘Kang-tae tries to calm Moon-young down, but she’s screaming now, telling him to run, to get out. She says this, yet she’s gripping onto his shirt for dear life.’

- Now, this tore my wrecked heart into hundreds of pieces 😭😭😭

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Nice moments:
*KT climbing up all the way to the balcony to meet MY (instead of waiting outside like in the flashback);
*Moon brothers opening up rooms at the Cursed Castle, letting the light in, cleaning the dust, making food... How sweet that the male characters are the nurturers! That breakfast scene was heartwarming
*Sangjae's reactions to Boss SI are the best! When he says "Man", ah! She's so got his number
*KT and ST sharing the bed and having their night chats 💚💚💚
*that final scene, "-Go away! -Ok, I won't go", oh! 😍
*the epilogue, so goofy, so good! The heads! They must have had so much fun shooting it

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SangJae is such a wonderful character! She and Nurse Park are just my favorite side characters in this show.

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MY is such a willfully egotistical character in many ways, so how revealing was it that the first thing she said to KT when he came to her during her night terror was, "Run!" Her first instinct was to save him - juxtaposed and fighting against her other primal instinct, which was to cling to safety. I thought that whole last scene was really beautiful - the two of them battling their demons, but maybe starting to do it together? I am just loving the onion layers that this show keeps peeling away.

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In the beginning of the episode when MY and KT embrace at the stairs, MY also clutches KT's shirt in the same way she does at the end of the episode. In the stair scene, she says "don't go, let's live together". KT doesn't answer her question at the stairs, but I think he does answer it at the end of the episode when they are again in an embrace. MY is again clutching his shirt (the camera pans in on her grip the same way), KT clocks how her words (to run away) and her actions are different and says, "그래, 안 갈게" (alright, I won't leave).

His words first struck me as if he's answering a different question because of the use of "그래", since "I won't go" doesn't parallel "run away/get lost", but it makes a lot more sense if "alright/okay/fine, I won't go" is the answer to "don't go" from the stairway scene. I don't mean to say KT is intentionally doing so, but I do think it is a directorial decision to parallel, especially when considering the focus on her hands in both instances.

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Agree, the “그래” part was an answer to her pleading with him to stay by clutching his shirt tightly. So detailed, so good!

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Totally agree, great point! Here she tells him to run (after accusing him before of running from his problems and after he told her he regretting running away from her as a child), and it was like he was resolved: "Okay, I'm not running anymore. I'm staying. I'm facing this." The director is just killing it with the layers and juxtaposition!

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Excellent point about the men as caretakers and nurturers - I loved the boys cleaning the house, opening up the windows, making breakfast - like Disney princesses, lol

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Ahhh this drama just keeps on giving. I love how the fairy tales were nicely incorporated to the story. Ye-ji narrating it is even a plus!

It was nice seeing the flashback. All of them are technically still the same. Sang-tae cares for Gang-tae. Gang-tae is exhausted of taking care of his brother yet can never abandon him. Moon-young pretends that she doesn't care and puts up a wall but she really wants to feel warmth. It was super interesting that Moon-young helped Gang-tae when even the flower picking said no.

I feel like Gang-tae really needs to let go of his brother. He sees him as someone so fragile that he needs to protect him forever. That limits Sang-tae though. He is capable and wants to be acknowledged but Gang-tae won't give him that and he won't give himself the freedom.

The ending hurt so good! Her grabbing on to him while telling him to leave her behind, to run away from her and Gang-tae holding her and saying he won't go. ㅠㅠ Thank goodness for the bloopers. It lifted up my mood.

Thank you for the recaps! See ya next Saturday~

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Is anyone here keeping tabs on how many fairy tales will be incorporated? I saw red rose in dome glass (might be Beauty and the Beast). What about figure hanging in the tree and its shadow move?

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The Bluebeard epilogue showed MY as Esmeralda and GT as the hunchback (The Hunchback of Notre Dame)

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I saw @kiara post on the fanwall about a number of them. Check them out! Nice read.

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I love the way both MY and KT are evolving. They both have issues and they should look for proper therapy, but we can't deny that they are at least the trigger to each other to consider another life is possible: KT opening up to the possibility of another life and MY thinking her actions can affect others. I specially liked the way she reacted to the patient telling her she was her mum. Another time she would have been harsh as she is, but in this case she tried. It's not that she wasn't hard on her, but I saw the struggle to try.

I commented on the recap on episode 5 that I thought SYJ would be the actress playing also MY's mum (and thus the confusion her dad has), but in the scene where mum is brushing MY's hair and talking to her, we get to see part of her face (her lips and chin) and it's definitely not her. They may look alike, but they are not the same person.

I also liked the comedy in this episode: JooRi cursing her mum, SoonDuk blaming herself for sending KT to MY without knowing, ST and SeungJae teaming up against SangIn saying he opposes, Dr. Oh having a spy among the patients. Loved this little details.

And of course the epilogue, and the bloopers. Thanks so much to the director, writer and actors. It was pure joy to watch.

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I was taken aback when Joori cursed her Mom in her head. We know she has a dark side but still... also, when can we see full on evil Joori?

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I don’t think the show is going that way, although it can change. I mean: at the beginning I thought JooRi was a baddie disguised as a candy, but after this week’s episodes I can’t see her like that. Her tantrums because MY “stealing” her KT are too hilarious.

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aww if the extent of baddie Joori is tantrum Joori, that's too disappointing~

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Lol I don’t think I’d be disappointed at all. Yet another second lead being an evil bitch? I mean, that’s just meh. I like her tantrums a lot. And her whining. Like someone said in the previous episode - we are all Joo-ri in real life. Holds ourselves together when we just want to burst. She’s really grown on me so much this week.

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That part about Joo-ri's mom was funny. When she was advising KT to support ST, I thought "Aww she's so nice...even if that would put her daughter at a disadvantage, she still said what needs to be said." But it turns out that she didn't know hahaha. Of course, good delivery by Kim Mi-kyung.

And yes, that spy! Hahaha! I just remembered that when the assemblyman visited, the spy said that Dr. Oh should keep his promise of letting him leave the hospital. So that was all an act? Hahaha

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I have been visiting Dramabeans regularly since 2009, getting recommendations, catching up on recaps, giggling over the various comments. But never have I ever wanted to comment about a drama per se.

Over this time, I have also been watching Kdrama at 1.5 - 2x the speed - and for majority, even it the storys fantastic, you don't miss much with that speed.

This drama, however, is something extraordinary. Not only am I watching it normally, If I could, I would slow it down/extend each episode so I can savour every scene. The actors ARE the characters, the cinematography captures and holds you immersed in their world and each episode only gets better as we go. This is perfection.