Rating:
Average user rating 4.8
80

Forest of Secrets 2: Episode 9

As we’ve come to expect with this drama, the deeper we dive, the more tangled it all gets. Things aren’t looking so hot for some of our more ambiguous players as the kidnapping case threatens to unearth secrets long buried. One past case in particular has caught our determined prosecutor’s attention, and his interest is already putting some people on high alert.

 
EPISODE 9

We back up to Sa-hyun and Shi-mok’s conversation where Sa-hyun commented that they’ve won the investigative authority fight if Dong-jae is found dead and the police had something to do with it. The government wouldn’t risk starting that kind of war with the prosecution. Not that he’s saying he thinks Dong-jae is dead.

He tells Shi-mok that Tae-ha was cagey when he asked him if he had been looking into Chief Choi. Shi-mok is surprised that Sa-hyun asked Tae-ha directly, but Sa-hyun knew that’s what Shi-mok hoped he’d do after their conversation. He’s offended when Shi-mok indirectly indicates he didn’t think Sa-hyun was sharp enough to realize that was his intent. Ha.

Sa-hyun attributes Tae-ha’s being on edge about it to worry. Dong-jae went missing after following Tae-ha’s orders, after all. Sa-hyun asks Shi-mok’s take on it and is hilariously baffled when Shi-mok earnestly asks how you can tell if someone is worried.

Shortly afterward, Shi-mok gets the call from Yeo-jin about the kidnapper’s message – Soon-chang received it as a text – and runs out. At Yongsan, the officers gather to brainstorm. Judging from the color of the blood on the tie, they guess that Dong-jae is still alive. Yeo-jin brings up the possibility that the photo was taken earlier and sent only now because Soon-chang’s phone number was given in the video calling for information.

Yeo-jin orders Gun to cross check the locations of the Segok cops when the text was sent with the GPS data on the phone. Of course, being cops, they’d likely take precautions against being traced, but it’s worth checking anyway.

They wonder why the photo was sent. It’s unusual to show off like this. Team Leader Choi thinks the culprit must really hate Dong-jae to refer to their actions against him as “dishwashing.”

There are audible groans when Shi-mok arrives and joins silently. Yeo-jin continues on, speculating that the culprit must have seen the video since he knew Soon-chang’s number. He probably saw all the comments cursing him out, too.

If he’s doing this as revenge for something Dong-jae did, maybe he was angered by the online vitriol against him. That would mean the photo was taken recently, and Dong-jae could still be alive. Shi-mok wonders to himself what the kidnapper’s intent behind the note is.

Everything fades away, and Shi-mok imagines the kidnapper preparing the note. Are they trying to say they’re a victim too, and Dong-jae got what he deserved? Why the message if they already got their revenge? Is it because people are publicly supporting Dong-jae and assuming he’s a good person?

He’s pulled out of his speculation by Yeo-jin calling his name. She wants to know where to get records on which offices Dong-jae has worked in, but her colleagues don’t see how they can look into every person Dong-jae ever indicted in his career. And what if it’s related to something like bribery that wouldn’t be found in his case history?

Yeo-jin knows that the prosecution won’t hand over Dong-jae’s records easily, so she says they’ll leave that investigation to the prosecution. The police will keep looking into Dong-jae’s acquaintances and investigating the scene.

She gets angry as the officers all smirk and chatter happily about the prosecution having to do that extra work. The culprit sent the photo because they think the police are a joke. Aren’t they angry? Yeo-jin closes her eyes in frustration when they grumble that the prosecution probably wouldn’t look for one of them.

Soon-chang sends Shi-mok the photo before he leaves, and Yeo-jin compliments him for getting them this big clue. They couldn’t have received this without his video idea. At the Supreme Office, Tae-ha and Sa-hyun look at the photo the culprit sent, and Tae-ha orders the assistant to get a list of all the offices Dong-jae has worked in.

Finding it suspicious that this photo appeared right after they interrogated Dong-jae’s wife, Shi-mok asks Gun to procure her call history. Gun and Soon-chang decide to double check Dong-jae’s children’s statements saying their mom was home that night. Another cop throws out that if she had an accomplice, she could’ve stayed home as an alibi.

In the car, Gun and Soon-chang comment on how Yeo-jin sounds like a higher up now rather than one of them. Yeo-jin, meanwhile, ponders the meaning of the culprit’s message. What does the ambiguous “too late” refer to?

Director Shin and Chief Choi review the photo Yeo-jin sent them, and he observes that the kidnapper must’ve held a grudge against Dong-jae for a while. That could clear the Segok officers.

Chief Choi wants to give a public briefing about it, but Director Shin orders her to hold off. What if one of the Segok officers tried to make it seem like a long-held grudge to throw off suspicion? Chief Choi looks oddly upset. Elsewhere, Chief Prosecutor Kang gets a notification that makes him remark there will be a lot of “stone throwing.”

Shi-mok calls his prosecutor acquaintance at Dong-jae’s office to request any handwritten statements on file from the Segok officers. He asks if there are any rumors about sponsors or problematic orders Dong-jae gave, but she denies hearing any. However, she freezes when he asks if there any rumors about Dong-jae and women. Hmm…

Shi-mok and Chief Prosecutor Kang wonder if she’s protecting her mentor by denying there’s any negative rumors about Dong-jae. Chief Prosecutor Kang is surprised to hear that Shi-mok requested all Dong-jae’s cases where he had issues with the defendants be reinvestigated.

Chief Prosecutor Kang comments that no prosecutor is perfect, but in Dong-jae’s case, they’re sure to find problems in his past cases. If he returns, he won’t be able to work in the prosecution anymore. But none of that matters unless they can find him before it’s too late.

Chief Prosecutor Kang stands with his back facing Shi-mok as he regretfully admits he told Dong-jae not to bother coming to see him. Shi-mok thinks of Yeon-jae’s assistant claiming that Dong-jae needed more time to get the intel since he hadn’t met with Chief Prosecutor Kang yet.

But he doesn’t mention any of that and instead asks if Dong-jae caused any problems after Shi-mok moved to Tongyeong. Chief Prosecutor Kang says Dong-jae actually did well when he transferred him to juvenile investigations. As Shi-mok leaves, Chief Prosecutor Kang notes that Tae-ha must be happy they interviewed a cop as a suspect.

Meanwhile, Joo-seon reports to Yeon-jae that he’s still working on Chief Choi and is about to meet with Chief Prosecutor Kang regarding Hanjo’s lawsuit. Her assistant (a.k.a. Director Park) updates her on the lawsuit and informs her that Hanjo Engineering will soon be audited thanks to the prosecution’s investigation. Director Park says he’ll prepare their accounting team to prevent further audits and smiles happily when she compliments his foresight.

Elsewhere, Gun shows Dong-jae’s wife the photo and asks if it’s Dong-jae’s tie. She can barely look at it and manages a nod. She lets out a sob and suddenly grabs Gun’s arm, begging him to find Dong-jae. Gun eyes her suspiciously as she cries and gets her to write a handwritten statement.

Right after he leaves, he hears her talking to someone on the phone and asks for the call info to be checked. Later, Soon-chang shows him CCTV footage that shows her arriving home the night of the incident, but her kids are seen leaving that evening. Although that leaves a three-hour window where no one can prove her alibi, the footage doesn’t show her ever leaving the apartment. Gun clearly finds her suspicious and notes that her nails were immaculately painted, like they’d just been done.

Shi-mok joins Yeo-jin as she updates the investigation board with info on the Segok cops who are now scattered in different jobs and locations. They theorize about why the culprit sent the photo. If they’d wanted to show off, they could’ve sent the tie itself.

Team Leader Choi comes in and speculates that they probably didn’t want to leave any evidence, which is why they sent the photo instead of the tie. Even so, he’s never seen a criminal do anything like this is his 30 years as a cop.

Yeo-jin reiterates that the culprit may have gotten upset after seeing the video and all the people sympathizing with Dong-jae. This ups the chances of Dong-jae being alive, but where could they be keeping him?

Shi-mok listens quietly as Team Leader Choi and Yeo-jin bounce ideas back and forth. They’d likely have to live alone in a house and have a car no one else uses. Shi-mok brings up the possibility of an entire family being in on it if it’s a case of revenge.

Team Leader Choi observes that the wood floor in the photo isn’t common, and it jogs Yeo-jin’s memory. When she went to visit the Tongyeong drowning victim’s father, his place had hardwood floors. He was upset about Dong-jae talking “nonsense,” and she recalls a closed room off to the side.

Yeo-jin keeps that to herself for now and mentions the possibility that the culprit killed Dong-jae at the scene and put him in the trunk. If they haven’t disposed of the body, it’d be decomposing by now, and they’d have to keep others from noticing the smell. They’d need a controllable environment. Yeo-jin doubts the crime scene will tell them much since the culprit is likely hiding far away.

Shi-mok imagines the culprit approaching a terrified and bound Dong-jae. They could’ve cut off a body part, but instead, they cut a piece of his tie. Were they afraid? What if this isn’t revenge?

Gun pulls him out of his reverie by announcing they’re ordering food. There’s this awkward moment where, after Team Leader Choi jokingly chides Yeo-jin for caring more about the food than her colleagues, Gun casually says it’s not like she sees them as her colleagues anymore.

They start comparing the handwritten statements from Dong-jae’s wife and the Segok officers to the culprit’s note. Team Leader Choi points out the oddity of writing instead of typing the note.

Shi-mok notices a ceiling light in the photo and words that they can’t make out. Yeo-jin orders Gun to have forensics analyze the photo. She hopes to have the results before the briefing the next day. They’re all surprised to hear there’s a public briefing when they don’t have anything definite, but Yeo-jin says they all know why it has to happen. Everyone shifts uncomfortably.

The following day, Yeo-jin holds the press briefing – Chief Choi instructed her to gather reporters who had accused a cop of being the culprit and prove them wrong to their faces. Dong-jae’s wife and son, as well as his prosecutor colleague, watch as Yeo-jin details the investigation so far. She states that Dong-jae’s colleagues said he was set to be awarded “prosecutor of the month” for his good work. That’s news to Shi-mok and the Supreme Office.

The drowning victim’s father and the Segok cops also watch, and we hear Yeo-jin in voiceover laying out her plan. If the photo was a Segok cop trying to cover their tracks, announcing it publicly will make them think it’s working, and that could make them more prone to mistakes.

Joong-gi gets up as she announces the photo and shows the message, and he hops in his car. He notices someone tailing him and angrily gets out, but his partner holds him back. He doesn’t see Soon-chang pull up behind and start following him as he drives off. At the care center, Soo-hang takes the remote from an elderly woman and switches the channel, earning a suspicious glance from his boss.

Shi-mok’s colleagues are not happy about the briefing, but Director Shin and Chief Choi are glad to hear the public are no longer criticizing them. Yeo-jin reports that people are now focusing their ire on the culprit and Dong-jae. (It’s been revealed that he was investigated two years ago.)

Chief Choi worries that they’ll be criticized if they don’t find him, even though the likelihood that he’s alive is slim. Yeo-jin gets a text from Gun. He discovered that Soo-hang worked at a store owned by his uncle after his release, and it’s right by the crime scene.

Soo-hang’s alibi was verified, but they realize that the ex-chief’s supposed overtime log could be forged. Chief Choi promises to find out if it’s legit and tells Yeo-jin to bring the organizational chart from her desk. She can use it to find whoever doesn’t work overtime and get them to snitch on their colleagues.

After Yeo-jin leaves, Chief Choi suddenly gets a panicked look and goes running to her office without a word. She arrives just as Yeo-jin pulls some files out of her desk. She insists she’ll handle it and sends Yeo-jin off to the ex-chief’s store. Once Yeo-jin is gone, she shoves the file with the call log she secretly copied in her bag.

Shi-mok goes through Dong-jae’s browser history the week of his disappearance and finds links to several articles about Park Kwang-soo’s death. Tae-ha comes out of his office with Sa-hyun as Shi-mok calls Dong-jae’s assistant to ask why he was so interested in Kwang-soo’s death.

Sa-hyun notes how Tae-ha freezes and gets flustered. He hesitates on his way out to eat with the office, but he can’t question Shi-mok or get him off the call without arousing suspicion, so he leaves with his colleagues. But once they’re outside, Tae-ha abruptly says he has somewhere to go and takes off.

Shi-mok realizes that Dong-jae visited the spot where Kwang-soo died the day he went missing and heads out to get the case file. Meanwhile, Tae-ha goes to see a woman. While Shi-mok read through the case file, we flashback to when a truck driver found Kwang-soo dead in his car and called the police.

 
COMMENTS

Everything is now pointing to the Kwang-soo case, which throws a lot more suspicion on Hanjo, Tae-ha, and Chief Choi. I’m glad Shi-mok is clued into this case now because I’m really curious about what went down. Judging from the way everyone involved is working so hard to keep things quiet, whatever happened must be career ending or worse. All we know so far is that he was working under the table with Hanjo, and Chief Choi was involved somehow in the coverup after his death. So where does Tae-ha fit in? He seems the most worked up about all this, and he’s the least adept at a poker face, so I think he could be the weak link.

Even with the kidnapping and possible murder of a prosecutor, both the police and prosecution are still so politicized. It’s all about the investigative authority fight and power. Yeo-jin and Shi-mok seem to be the only ones genuinely concerned about Dong-jae, except Chief Prosecutor Kang, maybe. And surprisingly, Sa-hyun. He’s a lot more palatable now that we’ve gotten to see some sincerity. He’s more observant than he seems at first glance. I thought his loyalty was to Tae-ha, but he’s been throwing him some suspicious glances of late. I’m surprised by how much he’s helping Shi-mok, reporting back about Tae-ha’s dodginess surrounding Chief Choi. He may turn out to be a valuable asset going forward.

Dong-jae’s reputation is taking a hit in all this, and I just hope it doesn’t get in the way of the investigation. The police already have a negative view of Dong-jae, and now that seems to be spreading to the public. I guess his weasel-y ways had to come back to bite him at some point. But now it’s extending to his personal life since there’s a strong possibility he was having an affair with that prosecutor in his office. If so, that could make things even messier.

I still can’t get a read on Dong-jae’s wife. It’s hard to tell if her odd reactions are just due to the trauma of the situation, or if they’re due to fear of getting caught. She hasn’t expressed much fear for Dong-jae’s safety up until now, so her emotional outburst with Gun rang a little hollow. Of course, everyone reacts to these sorts terrifying situations differently, so it’s entirely plausible her nervous tics and stoicism are nothing to be concerned about. But Gun obviously finds her behavior suspect.

Speaking of Gun, he’s been getting on my nerves lately. He has such an us-versus-them mentality. He’s been the most hostile about Dong-jae since he came after Chief Choi, and he’s made multiple comments about Yeo-jin not being one of them anymore. Even in season one, his blind loyalty to his superiors caused problems and made him act stupid (when he stole that info from their team for his sketchy boss). I’d hoped he’d gotten over that but apparently not. I feel bad for Yeo-jin getting stuck in the middle of her field officer colleagues and the higher-ups. She clearly doesn’t feel like she’s one of the higher-ups, but now that she has more clout, the field officers are starting to isolate her. She’s handling it well, but it’s got to be stressful.

I wonder why Yeo-jin didn’t mention the hardwood floors in the drowning victim’s father’s apartment when she was talking to Team Leader Choi and Shi-mok. It does seem like a bit of a stretch that the grieving father could be responsible for the kidnapping given that Dong-jae wasn’t a prosecutor on his son’s case, but nothing can be dismissed yet. There’s still so much we don’t know. Granted, that apartment doesn’t look like where Dong-jae was being held, but that’s not enough to rule him out. *Sigh* So many possibilities.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , ,

80

Required fields are marked *

The prosecutors is handsome. I hope he is allright.

17
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

That comment speaks for all of us.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

pls leave me out of ur sin!!!!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well I think he's very handsome, but I've got to admit I'm worried about his welfare only insofar as its having an impact on other characters like Shi-mok and Yeo-jin... don't kill me...

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought he would be alright in City Hunter too. :(

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I loled when that came up! So true! I wanted to reach into the screen and like the comment.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Forest of Secrets - 9

I have to reluctantly say that I’m not disliking Sahyun anymore. He’s not just a pretty face or a puppy following Woo TaeHa because they’re mates. He’s not liking some things he’s seeing, and he’s acting like the prosecutor he is. He may be privileged but he’s not
corrupted or stupid. I like how we are being shown in little details how different is he from what we (at least I) had imagined when we first met him. On the opposite side I don’t trust a little bit WooTaeHa, Choi Bit and Chief Shin. They may not be involved in whatever happened to Dong Jae, but they are hiding something, and whatever they are hiding is not helping find Dong Jae.

I love how ShiMok keeps reconstructing the facts in his head, trying to find out what happened.

Why did Lawyer Oh told YeonJae that he had no issues with Choi Bit when he obviously did? Is Manager Park betraying her for her brother? Why do I have the feeling he’s hiding things from her? His face when she said “I only said one word an you know what needs to be done” felt like he was guilty of something, imo.

Talking about guiltiness… what about DongJae’s wife? The way she acts is suspicious, like she’s holding back some information: from the call she made the minute Det. Gun left the apartment, to the way she reassured her youngest son “it’s not your dad”… is it because even if it’s not DongJae it’s NOT about his dad? Is anyone else thinking she’s having an affair or had it in the past? An what was that conversation between Gun and Det. Park about her nail polish? It may be nothing, of course, just the way writer-nim shows us how investigation works: it’s never a lightning and an inspiration word that solves a crime but hard work and noticing all the little details.

Now we can see how all the cases are being related: the kids in the beach, the former judge now lawyer, Hanjo group, the dead prosecutor turned lawyer who also worked for Hanjo, the police officer suicide that wasn’t, the corruption. Totally exhausting.

On a final note, I was really hoping that ShiMok had a decent meal with the police officers.

16
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

With you on Sahyun! The past few episodes are making me see him in a different light too, what with his lowkey ways of trying to make sense and piece together small tidbits of information/observations. But then again I'm still keeping my eye on him too since the show hasn't really revealed much of him, yet.

9
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think that is this writer's strength. Giving us characters that we neatly pigeon hole only to show us that we were wrong about him/her. Both on the good and bad side.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am afraid the writer make us empathise with KSH just to reveal later that he is the culprit 😬
I rewinded the scene of SM and KSH coz it was so funny. Who would have thought Shi-mok is a comedy gold!

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am liking the new KSH who seems to be willing to ask questions. It isn't out of character for him to be suspicious of WTH after his obvious dodginess and considering they have been acquainted since lawschool days, he'd have picked up on any changes in WTH's behavior quicker than SM or us. What I am a bit wary of is his sudden willingness to chummy up to SM
It was only a few episodes ago, he was turning up his nose on a 'mere' prosecutor refusing his orders.he clearly believed in the whole old boys gang so what changed? I am guessing it's the disappearance of DJ that suddenly woke him up to a more democratic view of the work place hierarchy??...In the absence of DJ,I certainly appreciate the comic relief brought on by SH who's trying to co-exist but is flabbergasted by all things SM. But I do wonder why he's chosen to seemingly trust a guy who by his own estimation was guilty of insubordination and wasn't doing enough for the whole 🤔

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I found this season more procedural than the first. We see them doing a lot of investigation work. The first season had more "cliffhanger" at the end of the episodes.

Choi Bit and Tae Ha had clearly something to hide and Tae Ha is really bad to hide it. His reaction with Shi Mok being at Hanjoo was already suspicious. If Sa-hyun was the typical prosecutor during the Police-Prosecution reunion, he showed some integrity.

I'm kinda disapointed by Gun too. He was on the first investigation and if he didn't forget Dong Jae's mistakes, he always has doubts about police corruption even when they have evidences. He knows Yeo Jin and he should be more supportive.

"Shi-mok imagines the kidnapper preparing the note." it's me or his suspect looked like a woman disguised as a man?

Otherwise, I'm happy Shi Mok is investigating the ex-prosecutor's death because it was shaddy from the start and I was surprised there was no more talk about it.

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel like Kim Sa-hyun is a decent and empathetic man who has all these layers of wealthy, status, connections and privilege piled up on top of it all. It makes him shallow because it makes him oblivious. But with this case a lot of that has been pushed aside and we're able to see the real him below. It's as though Shi-mok has pierced through that thick layer of entitlement. He's one of the few people who sits and talks to Shi-mok properly and doesn't accept him at face value (anymore, he definitely took him at face value at first).

Woo Taeha and Choi Bit are dodgy as hell but you know I bet when they did whatever they did they thought they were doing the right thing even if it was in the wrong way.

15
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree with Choi Bit and Woo Taeha doing bad things for a greater cause. I don't see them doing it for themselves.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree with you about WTH and Choi Bit, they seem to have done whatever they did for the “greater good”.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I guess he's supposed to represent most prosecutors: decent human beings who can be a little stuck in their own privilege and who can smell the B.S. due to experience investigating liars.

Shi-moks are rare. There probably aren't a lot of weasels and prosecutors-definitely-hiding-some-big-corrupt-matter either.

I like how though Sa-hyun couldn't relate to Shi-mok, he's still nice to him and respects him. In another drama, he could have ended up being the office bully.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

philosophical question of could it ever be right in their context and if it was right only for the structure they were in and not the public

2
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

I spent far too long yesterday afternoon going, "wait, is it the right ting for the wrong reasons or the wrong thing for the right reasons" and I think now it's the latter.

I think they probably ended up doing the wrong thing for the right reasons.

But to answer your question, I imagine they believe that what's best for the system and what's best for the public are the same thing since the system can't service the public if the public has no trust in it.

But I guess we'll see how that falls out. I highly doubt either of these people acted for their own personal self-interest, even if I (and Shi-mok) will no doubt disagree that they did the right thing when it comes out.

3
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

yes i agree that they think it's best for the public (though machivellian in its way to achieve it so that then makes it own cycle like what you said lmao.) therein lies the problem though both that they believe that and the indoctrination and how that doesnt remove responsibility.

what do you mean though about not acting in personal interest? besides threat of death, what could it be besides part selfishness over a job? and that does matter, yes, but in the ways in which one chooses to keep going and ways in which one chooses to stop.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well, I don't see the character of Choi Bit "taking on Woo Tae-ha's guilt" because he took a bribe or was on Hanjo's payroll or because he was accepting favours for prosecutions. I mean sure you could argue that 'personal interest' is in the perpetuation of the system but i think that's an incredibly broad interpretation of it. What I'm saying is that I doubt Choi Bit in particular is covering up her own wrongdoing, although by doing so she's obviously committed a wrong.

0

it's inexplicable bc how can we have trust in it (we wont ever lol) if the right thing is to manipulate for trust.

historical materialism (or whatever postmodern stuff ppl in SK talk abt) is really evident in this work even though it doesnt make it to pal Marx's level (nothing will on this scale ofc.)

instead i cycle between the truth (my truth but i believe that's the truth bc im a b*tch) in this show based off the dIaLeCtIc—the state/(organized)religion is criminal and crime is not crime, punishment is antithetical to deterrence—and the sheer inexplicablness of it all. the state set itself up to be authority so we can't say what came first, the chicken or the egg set up by our circumstances bla bla bla circular logic THEREFORE the only answer is that you must reinvent. i don't think there's validity to our moral judgement and for me the show lets us explore that.

but that could be bc i've been reading a lot of philosophy and fuckin around in my house cos what else shall one do

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Honestly I think we could write a whole thing about Shi-mok quoting Crime and Punishment a few episodes ago, bearing in mind the novel was written in Russia in 1866 while the Communist manifesto was written in 1848. Crime and Punishment - and admittedly it's been a long long time since I read it - could be seen to be a response to what we now call neoliberal economics (though obviously the 19th century version).

If you haven't read it, I highly recommend it. In fact I should read it again myself, especially since I'm a good 20+ years older now and the world has changed vastly.

2

I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR THOTS. all i know about dostoevsky is brothers karamazov, i never considered that (but i dont know much about it.) reading a lot on naturalism, utalitarianism (went to c&m's wiki) so at least i know what this synopsis means loool

the other day i spent hours in this hole and it lead me to more information and realizing how much the US despised the USSR—reminds me of ch*rchill's OBSESSION with bengali people—bc of the idea of power and people

funnily enough that our hatred just so happens to be so integral to this (my) country's way of ruling and the massive influence we have over ROK and subsequently in their fuckin constitution.

spot on about the neoliberalism, just saw that he believed in private property etc that's a very interesting observation! god what a terrible cycle that seems to be. i don't see the world's history as cyclical because i think we allow it to be seen as such to approve of the misfortune. so all these different phenomena repeating through cultural and existential means are therefore ~on purpose~ (obvs) but reading the synopsis for the book, the idea of neoliberalism, and almost this desperate need of freedom but control it's always like....we qurstion "what do they want and how are they going to get it" but the wanting is the issue in the first place.

very smart and layered writing!!! ty for bringing it upppp. it woudl be cool to hear ur thots in gen on the book too! i hated school and learning so much bc it was so FUCKING BORING, even in college it was mind-numbing. but as disgusting as our idea of history is i wish i had paid attention to at least SOMETHING my god

1

i took a philosophy class and thought it was stupid and i still do in a way but th eprofessor was soooo nice to me but i dont remember SHIT about it...laughing @ my searh history now

1

Whole I agree that they were more about preserving the structure, I will not discount personal ambitions as also a motivator for their actions. Both CB and WTH have shown that they like the privileges of the high positions they hold and are okay bending rules and playing games to keep those positions.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Everything is now pointing to the Kwang-soo case, which throws a lot more suspicion on Hanjo, Tae-ha, and Chief Choi."

I’m wondering now what was at stake with the Heart Attack Prosecutor Park Gwang-su. Why did he die? Was it something to do with Hanjo's tax problems? If so, he must have discovered something in the process of working secretly for them and they had to get rid of him. But that seems excessive. What could he have found out that warranted his death, unless it meant the loss of the company or something to do with the succession crisis? We know that in Hanjo’s opinion he was indiscreet. He told his family about working for Hanjo, but we don’t know anything more than that.

Or was there an untoward accident somehow that resulted in Park Gwang-su’s death? But why stage an accident to cover up an accident? And what would have been revealed if the accident hadn’t been covered up?

Choi Bit is invested in covering his death up – is it only to protect herself? Or is it to protect the police? The latter seems more likely, but what have they done or failed to do? So far, it seems they have covered up a suspicious death and failed to investigate it properly. She was in charge of the station at the time, so she was the one to close the case prematurely. Who pressured her to do that? Was it WTH? Why? If her husband has a company that is connected to Hanjo, then if Park Gwang-su’s death posed a risk to the continued life of Hanjo, then her actions may have been to protect her family.
Woo Tae-hee is implicated – is it only to protect himself? Or is it to protect the prosecution? We know he has done some insider dealing with cryptocurrency. Who, if anyone, pressured him to pressure Choi Bit? Who are his superiors? Or was it a Minister? Was it personal or was it about the prosecution’s power? Was he also protecting his family’s dodgy dealings in getting rid of their cryptocurrency?

And Lee Yeon-jae is certainly touchy when Park Gwang-su is mentioned, and she had Choi Bit’s file in her desk.

How could they all have something at stake? Is it to do with a domino effect if Hanjo is endangered?

And what is ex-judge Oh Joo-soon up to? I don’t think he is incompetent. I think he is sleuthing. Kim Myeong-han, the Intelligence Bureau Director of the National Police Agency was accused of interfering in a case that the Prosecution was investigating. He gave his friend, Mr Park, Information about the case. Is this Park, Park Gwang-su? Was the case something to do with Hanjo? Is this why ex-judge Oh Joo-soon visited Kim in jail on Lee Yeon-jae’s instructions – to keep a lid on this “case”? Does this have something to do with why Park Gwang-su died?

And the dodgy police who probably killed their colleague – they were taking bribes. If they were in touch with nightclubs, mobsters, and drug dealers, then maybe there was some blackmailing of higher ups going on. Thinking back to the Assemblyman and his son who was being supplied drugs,...

5
17
reply

Required fields are marked *

You forgot the cryptocurrency decision, in which it was heavily implied that several key prosecutors - including Woo Tae-ha - had foreknowledge of the decision and were insider trading.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I only thought it was WTH who needed to cover for his family, but if it's several prosecutors involved, it's a stronger motivation for cover up. How far up the chain would that go and could Hanjo be involved?

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah, the cryptocurrency case. It would be lovely to have all the cases mentioned both in detail and in passing tie up together like a pretty bow at the end of all this confusion.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't think CB and WTH were directly involved in the death of persecutor Park, mostly likely in my opinion was to cover for someone very high up in the government. Exposure of this person's involvement with Hanjo would bring chaos to the current government. May be Park Gwang-su found out about it at the secret meeting and refused to go along with it?
What I got is the sense of guilt from WTH (did he introduce Park to Hanjo which was leading to his death?) and CB's decision to close the case was for the greater good. Remember CB mentioned about "being dragged into things"
Everyone has a reason to remain silent, hence become an accomplice.

4
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree, I don't think they were involved in the death, but they are involved in the cover up, and they are very edgy about it. You are right about CB. WTH may be more closely implicated.

My question is what's at stake for them as individuals and as members of their respective organisations? Why would they cover the death up?

I think the consequences for Hanjo and even the government are key.

4
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

There was a scene or two of WTH visiting an office whenever there is problems. who is this person, his boss?
The reason to cover up must be more important than personal implication. The president?

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm not sure, but most of the time I think he was just seeking permission to do stuff that isn't originally in the Supreme Prosecutors Office's remit, e.g. investigating DJ's kidnapping.

1

Yes I think Hanjo's involvement is key too, and even Lee Yeon-jae might not know what it's all about, hence her enlisting of that utterly useless Oh Joo-seon to find out. (Btw I see Oh Joo-seon as an older, quieter Dong-jae - always on the lookout for ways to enrich himself.)

If CB and WTH had done what they did "for the greater good", then it's possible that they'd done something that was damaging to Hanjo, e.g. prevented Park Gwang-soo from passing classified info to Lee Yoon-beom.

4
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, that's a possibility - they may have had noble protective intentions.

Just thinking through what we know of them so far,

CB's character - she's ambitious, smart, manipulative, not worried about distorting the truth for the sake of the public image of the police. According to the conversation with WTH, she's taken responsibility for something serious. She's a mother and does her own housekeeping. She is hiding something. Yet having said all of that, I don't think she is bad.

WTH - I don't know enough yet... At times, I've thought he knows Shi-mok's capacity and is sitting back, quietly amused to see him do his best; but recently he seems rattled by his capacity to dig up the dirt and is trying to block him.

If they did something to prevent Park Gwang-soo from handing on information, then they would surely have been more closely implicated in his death, as well as the cover up. I'm not sure about that.

With Oh Joo-seon, we've been shown some strange moments - his comment on the couple who took down the restriction line; his disregard of CB - didn't see her, but told Lee Yeon-jae that he had. (Or did I miss something?)

4

MTE AT THE SEEING HIM AS AN SDJ. they were totally hinting at it with the bar scene. lonely, alone, scheming, muttering about money lmao. dumdum

2

Ooh excellent parallel about OJS and SDJ. OJS definitely is an SDJ who made good.SDJ has always been trying but just falls short of getting to his goal. he's constantly thwarted by his lack of prestigious schooling,well earned bad reputation etc. whereas OJS seems to be a version of SDJ who knew how to climb high...and even in his retired days is on the lookout for more moolah and clout.

1

yes i think it is a question of why they did what they did (which i'm sure has sth to do with money. i mean lbr.) because they don't have as much power as who they are, they are just good at their jobs.

frankly, i don't think there is a good reason. considering that CB tells her she's not "dragging her into things" and instead molding her lets us know they're conscious of their mistakes. not only that, they keep doing things extremely unethical and unhelpful for the public so they can please their specific work and interests.

neither of them had the courage or werewithall to not do the same shit they saw, while hyj and hsm do have it and are disruptive forces. not only are they complicit if they got dragged into something (which people have choice and agency in though i understand bigger factors) but they continue to manipulate and subjugate. she didnt give a shit about the guy whose kid died, he didn't give a fuck about assemblyman. the self righteousness is stifling. contrast with LCJ and his being cowardly and knowing it. cut out the rotten roots

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

the case u mentioned before with the prosecutor along with the burning sun thing (trafficking) are the basis of it so i am sure you're right about the blackmailing.

isn't the something always loss of a job and punishment? getting fines, paying your taxes, and owning up to your losses (or running away or dying.) what else is at stake? in case of CB, her life is already at risk and honestly for a prosecutor. they know they could be attacked. imo, there's no reason other than the obvious ones—themselves and, possibly, their structures and the loyalty they must have. which is brought up a lot ("if he was just some person i know" "what about if it was a police officer and they asked for something to be expedited?" "what would you say to another person asking for a favor?") which brings the interesting point of what is acceptable and what isn't. hsm asking for a warrant because of a scam that someone has losses on is not equivalent to a rich person dodging taxes. we're constantly putting value judgement and reaffirming morality as complex but only in terms of a system. it doesn't go back the other way. genuine help and care has to have some transactional value.

the cryptocurrency could tie back to hanjo somehow. in the beginning lyj is trying to make things as not-messy as possible so they arent thoroughly investigated but she's still evading taxes which is why lcj put all the onus on beom to protect her. anyway uhhhhh money

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

also btw remember insider trading was also how hanjo and the kids got $ !!!

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

"genuine help and care has to have some transactional value" I couldn't agree more.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh wow...written up like this it all seems like a spider's web held together by good ol' greed and self preservation. Apart from the cases mentioned here,I am also thinking if the drowning case is also gonna come into play. During YJ's flashback of the visit to the victim's dad,we are again shown the shoes the young boy seemingly bought with his part time jobs. That doesn't really seem to fit. Just what kinda job was the kid doing that let him afford fancy shoes and a vacation to a seaside town...I am wondering if these kids were also somehow involved in the whole drug trafficking that keeps getting mentioned and there's been multiple cover ups that our weasel managed to accidentally uncover.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes!!! I've been thinking exactly that. I'm sure we'll come back to the "drowning" and the shoes, and I won't be at all surprised if they are connected to the drug dealer and the Assemblyman's son. Something else struck me in the last episode which has not yet been recapped, after DJs scene with the high school bully, but ....

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

There are so many suspects to Seo Dong Jae's kidnapping. I sure hope he is still alive.

I am curious to on the case with the former chief prosecutor. Looks like it will ruin a lot of the characters for good.

Too many questions and suspicions right now We are bound to get answers in the next episodes, right?

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Call me a sadist, but I’m thoroughly enjoying the investigation into Dong-jae’s kidnapping - how it's playing out in the context of the prosecution-police turf war, and the way different people are responding to it. I loved how Yeo-jin and Shi-mok settled the workload issue so logically and easily between them, and the way YJ managed to get the prosecution to do their share without needing to gloat (unlike the Yongsan cops - but who can blame them for gloating?). Also loved the conversations between SM and Kang Won-chul, and between Director Shin and Choi Bit, which I felt really illuminated the complexities of what they have to do.

I don't really have an issue with Jang Gun's remarks about Yeo-jin not being one of them any more, because I think he is right: the council and now this case are pulling her further into the more exclusive parts of the system, and I'm sure her principles and loyalties will be tested in the remaining episodes.

8
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

i don't even think it's that....they trust each other so much. they make each other laugh. he did things for her, they all do, and they respect her. hsm noted that it sounds like she wants to go back to field work. he joked because he didn't want her to feel bad from their chief's joke. he wants her to be okay and not burden her when he hears two men on her team talking about her. he's supported her through it all even in s1 when he fucked up about the computer. just like with hsm, she has a rship with gun that works and is incredibly beneficial.

he knows her, he's always gonna know her, and hyj is the type to not let people go anyway. the one thing is like i've been saying theyre just going to continue to do what they want which is seek the truth. and as much as all their peers (hsm and hyj) they have a little respect for don't want to rock the boat, they will go along. their personalities have changed but who they truly are i do not believe will.

i mean idk i guess i see it differently but as much as he DIDNT want to implicate any police person and none of them do ever and all...of them....questioned the young one about questioning chief choi (even tho they are clearly uncomfortable) it isn't hostility. he sees the bureau is not actually a pleasant place for her to be but acknowledges it as a destination she could want. isn't that part of being a friend, to let go? considering the convo they have in ep 10, i think that solidifies it

i didnt think about that re: kwc and hsm and director shin and choi bit :O the former is more about not rocking the boat and correct me if i'm wrong but director shin knows the risks but said to go further with the case anyway right?

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am also on the same boat regarding Gun and YJ. His comment about her behaving like a leader was factual and didn't sound mean spirited to me. She did step up as a leader and Gun just acknowledged what we all saw.
Her entire team,including the team leader knows YJ has immense potential to rise up the ranks.last epsiode,when the station chief announced YJ as the leader of the case,Gun uncomfortably looked between her and TL Choi coz he knew how uncomfortable it'll get for the TL to work under her and how it might change the perceptions about his friend amongst the wider team. IMO, he wasn't questioning her change but being accepting that his friend has maybe outgrown their old team and is going places,whether she likes it or not.
In a strict hierarchial work place, she's essentially skipping 2 roles to lead this case and while no one can honestly question her credentials,truth is, there is bound to be some squeals of discomfort during the adjustment period. Afterall it isn't even an official promotion and as YJ has mentioned multiple times,she is in a temporary team and is supposed to return to her old position after the committee is disbanded. It's a weird career limbo and it can be a balancing act trying to work with her old/permanent team while having a higher rank temporarily. I felt that Gun was just schooling their Hoobae on the subtle shifts in the power dynamic.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeo-jin showed her leadership this episode, didn’t she? She did talked a bit like Choi-bit without realising it. Not everyone likes it especially her close colleagues. It just shows how hard it is to achieve success in the male dominated organisation. I think her work in the administration and under Choi-bit is beneficial for her career, not an easy one but valuable experience. Tough time ahead of her though once she finds out what Choi-bit did but I can’t wait to see how it plays out.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

They ordered food and we don't get to see him eat??? TT__TT

I'm just glad that Shi-mok finally knows Drunk-Heart-Attack-Not Prosecutor's case. Which will tie in Choi and Woo. Then we'll have more clues as to why they're involve in this case together with Hanjo.

Yeo-jin and Shi-mok really shows to everyone how to work together without fighting or getting in loud arguments about who's going to this or that. Indeed, the greatest partners.

On a totally diff note, for those who watched Memorials/Into The Ring when the actor for Park Gwang-soo came, my brain told me he's a politician and wondered why he's here, not registering that he's Park Gwang-soo xD

7
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

😂😂😂 nice to hear. happens to me a lot. I get my drama lines crossed

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I had to remind myself I was watching FoS!

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yup, I was thinking who’s that guy - I know him. Then remembering the three stooges!!

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was expecting him to make me laugh!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

the hanjo thing—I NEED ANSWER N-O-W

i know ppl miss hsm and hyj together but i feel their trust and comraderie.

(the more time they talk on the phone the more i ship them in a non-serious way. boyfriends are to be seen and not heard)

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

wait that didnt make sense. heard not seen? but i dont want that either idk lmaoooo i just thot it was clever

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I especially want to see the step-bro! Why is he still hiding?

We definitely can feel the trust and comraderie despite not being together physically but I still want to see more.

Sometimes, boyfriends need not be heard?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This forest is thicker this season!! And Simok is gonna be chopping down ‘em! Chop chop chop

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

chopping ‘em down*

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The single best part of this writer is her ability to show that people aren't black or white. They are gray. An example is Dong Jae who is super weasels, but was transferred to juveniles and apparently doing a good job with the kiddos. Then there is Sa Hyun who on the surface is weasely, but we see he has layers. The same is true for all our characters. When Shi Mok realized he too was using his connections, when Yeo jin didn't stand up to her boss when she was supposed too. Etc etc. Excellent.

14
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Felt extra sad when I learned that Dong Jae was doing well with handling juvenile cases and even felt invested in them. We got a hint of that in last week's episode when he was dealing with the bully.

9
reply

Required fields are marked *

On a serious note though

This is probably the first time in a drama where you could count the trustworthy characters by one hand only. No one, even the minor characters are above suspicion. I got a feeling that:

1. The student has something to do with this. No way they made him look unhappy in his pictures without a follow up.
2. Park Kwang Su’s death cover up will be the one that ties up the entire story including the Segok case
3. Yeon Jae only knows some details but not who are the ones involved. That’s why she asked for Choi Bit’s file and asked lawyer Jun Seok to find out more
4. Dong Jae’s wife is being threatened to keep quiet perhaps not by the kidnapper but someone higher up because she knows her husband’s weaselly ways. Probably like the ex-con’s wife in Season 1 who got money because her husband “took” the blame. (The one who supposed to pretend to kill himself but actually did) The nail polish conversation is hilarious yet intriguing though.
5. Yeo Jin may move to a rural town after all these is done so she can be her happy doodling self again. To have two or three superiors disappointing her again can either break her or change her. Can both Simok and her move to the-place-where-Simok-is-supposed-to-be-transferred-to and be BFFs forever?

That said, who loved it when Yeojin ordered food that she’d know Simok would eat? And yet, we don’t see them eating and Sun Chang’s disappointed awkward face is all of us.

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

In this episode, Shi Mok used excel filter function to find filter out Dong Jae's search history on Park Kwang Soo. Let's give a round of applause to characters using real life computer skills. Let's use pivot table next time to organise the data!

I'm enjoying every second of this drama. I love how the scriptwriter is able to make this drama so interactive. I'm thinking about all the possibilities together with the characters. And this is what makes Forest of Secrets so fun to watch. It's a puzzle and we are all playing the game together, with bits and pieces of clues provided to us in every episode. However, with the right deduction skills, we can get the culprit right way early in the drama.

12
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

I noticed him using the Excel filter too! I also vote for a pivot table to make it's way into a scene.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Gosh we're all such nerds

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Erm that moment was an unwelcome jolt for me though. I just remembered some data at work I was supposed to trawl through 😅

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Have you seen the behind the scene clip? Cho Seungwoo looked like want to cry learning the excel lol
"I don't know... (grab staff's hand cutely). Please don't do this I'm computer-illiterate. I don't even have computer at home."

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I saw that! Cho seung woo is so funny!! Love all the behind the scenes videos!

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Petition to longer bts videos! We need it to holding on through the week..

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The only tech gripe I have is the characters using Internet Explorer. Ugh. Shows how corporate-y it is

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's hard to watch Choi Bit thoroughly using Dong-jae's kidnapping case into some sort of weapon for the police force to get their investigative rights. It was even harder to realize that most of the police force (and probably even some of the prosecutors too) thought that Dong-jae really has it coming to him the way he behaved so weaselly up until the end of season 1. From Chief Kang's comments, it seemed that Dong-jae has matured and mellowed down a bit in the last few years, but I guess not many people knew that (or believed that so readily).

But the most awful thing, personally, is how I realized that if I never saw the change in him this season, I would no doubt easily agree with the police's allusion. At least a part of me would blithely think "That serves him right," and that's just wrong. Justice should be about justice. Full stop. Our personal view on the victim and perpetrator shouldn't marr it in any way. Though I guess it was only human to think that way. And now I'm back at feeling like an awful awful person.

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

but what is justice? you're not an awful person, the police and the prosecution are to blame for every level of this. no person in the eyes of the law will ever be equal. it's not that he doesn't matter because he's bad; he doesn't matter because he won't help the cops. he didn't have it coming——he was annoying, possibly they care less, but the comments were planted, and blame is thrown around. the show coerces us into the feelings that they create which is part of why it's great.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

i am being polite when i say annoying he's not a good person and doesn't seem intent on really transforming himself but instead running from it to not feel bad for all the fuckin shit he did

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

i have some hot takes lmao. not rly it's just that i think that hsm and sdj's rship is a lot less about a bond and more about presence. the telling part is the convo w/ sa-hyun and the idea of worry (and noticing that wth probs doesnt give a shit even if hsm has less of a proximity to emotion) so it makes sense why he would question him being on edge. even if he is not as knowledgeable about his internal emotions (hsm) he didn't know sdj that well and sdj isn't a great person at all. frankly it would suck for me but i never felt attached to sdj in the way of liking him (i understand why people do) i think he's funny, witty, incredibly smart, and i love the fact that his intellect is appreciated even with his "poor" credentials. on the flipside———he sucks.

cb and wth got themselves into a mess. they were wrong but like that's their job so but the crux of the issue is WHY. and it seeeems like "natural mistakes" - drowning, cars, suicide have their place. and reasons for all to happen that aren't so straightforward. LAW, ORDER, AND CAPITALISM SMH

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

oh and hsm spent two years away. hyj has a much bigger capacity than being a cop allows but her ability to empathize even with shit she hates or at least tolerate others is good. i can't frame these environments as ethical or balanced or ones that make sense. i think that's where the walls of my feelings come in but if i see the world through hsm or hyj's eyes even in their settings, it would still be insanely flawed (i just feel different abt participation and efficacy and morality.)

when hsm was under sdj we got to learn about his penchant for bribery and women that aren't his wife and a broker and BS and kim ga young who was uhhhh underaged and basically just. he was the epitome of a disgusting male prosecutor. i think he attempts to honor sdj's wishes but he has a need for propelling himself. just like the rest of em. and they suck lmao. watching them is great. on a personal level i like how my worldview makes me interpret the show., because i can go with the emotional current and, in my mind, it adds to the artifice of this world. whether intentional or not, it's just affirmation that there's power in people but a structure has no interest in that.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like how they theorize possible scenarios as to what a clue could mean or what could have happened since some detective shows are like "this is the clue. It MUST have happened this way".

I wonder if the overtime case is more involved too. Where I live, the police had been involved in an massive long-running overtime scandal. There was a lot of feet dragging to get them investigated *side eye* and then the punishment was a "we will discipline them" *side eye*. It's probably all tied together.

Reminds me of this Community (Tv series) episode which was probably parodying some other trope where the characters, in order to get bulletin board set up, engaged in a series of favors and bribes. They needed the custodian to put up the board, but the custodian wanted a favor: unfettered access to the internet. So they go to the IT department for help with that, but the IT manager wanted a good parking spot first. So they met with the parking department, who asked for the power to veto carpool notices from appearing on the aforementioned bulletin board so more people will drive and park.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That whole OT conversation was ...chef's kiss. can't have been fun sitting in front of your superiors and laying out all the ways there are to cheat the system. Mad props to YJ to have done it unflinchingly . I did want to check if anyone caught if it was implied that YJ herself had used those tactics or was it meant to convey that she knew people who did?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I enjoy how this show challenges preconceived notions people might have about certain characters, like Sa-hyun. When we first met him it felt like he'd be this superficial character but there appears to be more to him as the series goes on. He still has his ego, but he's also good at his job. On the other hand, I thought Tae-ha was going to be a mentor-like figure for Shi-mok but now I can't get a read on him.

Also, my boy finally got to eat! (....off camera, I think)

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This episode was about perception. There were scenes where characters said/thought something but other characters pointed out deeper meanings.

YeoJin indirectly scolding the cops for being happy about not doing extra work but also letting the prosecution know that if they want investigative rights they have to pull their weight. SooChan didn’t get it and Gun explained it to him.

Chief Kang feeling bad that he didn’t make time for DongJae and thinking that DomgJae probably wanted to be friendly but ShiMok remembering that Hanjo had asked DongJae to find intel from Cher Kang.

How public perception on DongJae changed from his wife’s video to YeoJin’s press conference.

The whole discussion of DongJae’s wife’s nails!

Instances where how people are perceived steers events. It was very well done. I was a little impatient with the pace but once I thought of the show as a slow rumination/illustration of process and the work of being prosecutors and cops it was really interesting.

I’m still not happy that there aren’t enough scenes of ShiMok and YeoJin together. They seem to be more and more working in their respective worlds than with each other because of prosecution vs cop war over investigative rights. We only have three weeks left so I hope we get more of them working together soon.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Same! I was impatient, disoriented and feeling suffocated watching this episode. I didn’t understand why they slowed down the pace from the previous episodes.
I am worried if we have enough time to cover everything. Already passed mid way and we had little of Shi-mok and Yeo-jin. Their friendship is the heart of this drama. I understand the situation they are facing but I think the writer is teasing us far too long. Fans from everywhere are getting really impatient.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love how Shi-Mok noticed (and I bet he made a mental note as well) when Yeo-Jin said that she almost cried because she missed the food from that dumpling place so much. Maybe we'll get an episode in which he surprises her by ordering food from that place (maybe we'll also finally see him actually eat something lol).

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *