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My Dear Youth: Coffee Prince (Review)

In 2007, a chaebol heir turned reluctant coffeeshop manager and a poor Taekwondo instructor fell in love, overcoming misunderstandings, lies, class differences and first loves. The show became a sensation that speaks for itself at this point, and catapulted its young cast into superstardom. Thirteen years later, My Dear Youth: Coffee Prince brings Coffee Prince director Lee Yoon-jung and some of the principal cast back together. In the two-part documentary, they watch highlight reels from the drama, talk about their experiences while filming it, and describe what it’s meant to them in the years since.

 
EPISODE 1: In the summer of 2007, we were…

August 2020. Gong Yoo (who played CHOI HAN-KYUL) opens the episode, walking into the Coffee Prince cafe after thirteen years, and that music just takes me back immediately—not only to watching this, my first K-drama, in 2009, but to all the moments of my life scored by this OST since then. (This soundtrack even had selected dialogues, and I would sometimes cry just listening to those again.)

Gong Yoo says it feels like meeting his first love again, which he’s conflicted about, because, “It’s like facing something I’d wanted to keep as a good memory.” He says he was reluctant to do this program for the same reason, but he kept seeing clips on YouTube and got sucked in.

The production team surprises him with Yoon Eun-hye’s sudden entrance, and they just stare at each other, moved—and I need a moment. “It’s Go Eun-chan,” he says with a delighted smile. The person who makes them coffee is someone who was inspired by the show to become a barista, and it’s a touching tribute to how deeply audiences connected to these characters.

It’s strangely emotional to see these two, back together in this coffee shop that looks a bit different but has mostly been preserved as it was when we watched them fight and play and fall in love here—and the same goes for Chae Jung-ahn (YOO-JOO) and Lee Seon-kyun (HAN-SUNG).

I’ve been watching these actors pretty consistently during the last ten years in different projects, so they haven’t seemed like they changed at all, but it strikes me forcefully, as I see them side by side with clips from the drama, how very young they were back then. They were babies. And maybe I was a baby back then too.

The documentary special has the actors film in three locations: Gong Yoo and Eun-hye, who meet at the coffee shop, Jung-ahn and Seon-kyun meet in Han-sung’s house cum studio, as I mentioned above, and Kim Jae-wook (SUN-KI) and Kim Dong-wook (HA-RIM) meet in a separate cafe, and the three groups rewatch iconic scenes from the drama, interspersed with interviews.

They also interview director Lee Yoon-jung, who shares some behind-the-scenes stories about the development and production of the show. It’s a real treat to hear about how she worked with Gong Yoo to get Han-kyul where he needed to be as a character—which included him doing a reading with Noh Hee-kyung, who read Eun-chan’s part! What an amazing story.

This first episode mostly focuses on Gong Yoo, Eun-hye, and their scenes together, which leads to a lot of laughter and awkwardness on the their parts. Gong Yoo says at one point, “We kissed a lot back then. I’m old now so I’m not embarrassed—” but Eun-hye interrupts that she’s embarrassed.

As all three groups watch the famous I don’t care if you’re a man or an alien scene, Lee Seon-kyun makes a high-pitched squeal, and Kim Dong-wook asks the production team wryly, “Why do you keep showing us their kisses?” I laughed so hard.

There’s a real sense that comes across of how close these people ended up becoming during filming, regardless of whether they fell out of touch in the years since, and how unique that time was in their lives. There’s an affection to the way Jung-ahn and Seon-kyun watch Eun-chan and Han-kyul falling in love, like an ajusshi and ajumma fondly commenting on the younguns they’ve watched grow up.

It’s kind of adorable and incredibly relatable, as someone who watched this for the first time in my early twenties, when I was in the baffled, amazed glow of discovering Korean dramas for the first time. A bit like falling love, now I think about it. I’m now more jaded both by dramas and life, but the authenticity of youthful feeling still comes through.

There’s something very heart-tugging about Eun-hye tearing up watching Eun-chan sob her heart out onscreen. It’s illuminating to hear how desperate she felt to do well after her embarrassment at the harsh criticism she received for her performance in Goong. It was why she threw herself so completely into the role of Eun-chan, and, as Jung-ahn observes, Eun-chan allowed Eun-hye to taste freedom again.

Jung-ahn says she herself was recovering from a bad breakup and didn’t want to work on anything at the time. It’s hard not to wonder if part of that went into her more difficult scenes in Coffee Prince. Gong Yoo says of the drama that it was healing for him; it reignited his passion for acting. “Everyone who did Coffee Prince together became bright and hot at the same time,” he says, which is why it was such an unforgettable experience.

EPISODE 2: Things we know now but didn’t back then

Part 2 focuses on the secondary love story in Coffee Prince, which was the second-chance romance between Yoo-joo and Han-sung. This storyline that required a lot of nuance in the telling to convince the audience to root for them to reunite, given their history. But Jung-ahn and especially Seon-kyun were incredibly good in their roles—as all the cast were, even the rookies—and carried it off with a level of emotion that rivaled that of Han-kyul and Eun-chan’s story, although with a very different vibe.

Just like the coffee princes and the cafe, Yoo-joo and Han-sung’s relationship was very rooted in that location, and seeing them walking around in that house again reminds me strongly of how much that place just felt like art and summer, freedom and melancholy. In the same way that the coffee shop felt like heat and tension, youth and dreams.

It’s interesting that Gong Yoo, Eun-hye and even Jung-ahn all say now that they weren’t mature enough at the time to really understand Han-sung and Yoo-joo’s story. But it’s so clear that Seon-kyun did get it, and he played it so well, in a way that Jung-ahn says allowed her to also rise to the same level of emotion. He jokes about it, but as they all watch the scene of Yoo-joo leaving Han-sung for the second time, they marvel at how good he was.

Chae Jung-ahn: The suitcase is too light!
Seon-kyun You should have covered that with your acting.
Chae Jung-ahn: [laughing] I should have. You shouted so much that I forgot everything.

Comparing Han-sung with his character in My Ajusshi, Eun-hye reflects that Seon-kyun is the kind of actor who always puts a bit of himself into each character he plays, while clearly differentiating them, which she feels is much harder than playing characters who are totally different each time. Seon-kyun, who says that it’s a rare role whose name he remembers years later, predicts, “I think I’ll remember Choi Han-sung forever. It was the last drama of my youth.”

I certainly will never forget Han-sung singing Tearliner’s “Ocean Travel” to Yoo-joo, promising a new and beautiful future for them where they’ll face the entirety of life’s joys and sadness together.

Then there are Kim Jae-wook and Kim Dong-wook, both of whom were rookies at the time they were cast in Coffee Prince, and who, along with the late Lee Eon (MIN-YEOB), captured viewers’ hearts with their performances as the princes who became as close as brothers. And of course they remember Eon, who was Jae-wook’s model sunbae, and who had felt constricted by the limits placed on someone with his physique in the modeling industry—and was excited to break into a second and hopefully more successful career as an actor.

It’s heartbreaking to watch his interviews post-Coffee Prince, where he talks excitedly about the opportunities opening up before him. His death only a year after the drama aired clearly affected them all deeply—they all recall with great emotion where they were and what they were doing when the heard the news of his accident.

The cast all talk about how starring in Coffee Prince was an incredible, unreal success—we’ve probably all seen footage of how halfway through the drama, the crowds outside the cafe grew so large that the cast would be mobbed when they tried to leave after filming every day. The sudden attention—and the lightning-in-a-bottle, perfect coming together of all the elements that make a show work—was so rare and overwhelming that for the cast and director, it became something not only to celebrate, but to overcome.

Lee Yoon-jung talks about how it sometimes felt like her nemesis, the show that all her future projects would be compared to, although she still loves it. All the actors struggled to reach the same level of success afterward.

It was particularly bad for Eun-hye, who had finally gained her hard-won acknowledgment as an actor, and had such an amazing experience filming it that she feared that nothing could ever be as good again. “I felt that I’d never meet another character as lovable as Eun-chan.”

It’s particularly hard to hear that given how she never did gain such height in her career after that, and the very different trajectory she took compared to Gong Yoo, who has done many critically and commercially successful projects over the years.

Dong-wook points out that actors are always at the receiving end: of love, of approval, of being chosen for roles. Seon-kyun puts it best, as usual (we call him The Voice around here for good reason). Acting is an inherently unstable career, he acknowledges, but he’s learned to take all his roles as gifts, or perhaps homework, given to him as if encouraging him to work harder and let go of his worry.

As if to prove Seon-kyun’s point, the documentary ends with Gong Yoo reflecting that Coffee Prince came to him at a time when, in the summer at the end of his 20s, he felt a bit lost. Ten years later, in the winter when he was 39, once again feeling lost and unsure, he became the Goblin.

COMMENTS

I haven’t rewatched this in at least six years, and I’d forgotten how beautifully the writing, directing and music created a seamless little world of romantic angst and unresolved sexual tension, youthful dreams and fears for the younger couple, and disappointment and broken hearts for the older one. I’m reminded again how perfect and once-in-a-lifetime the chemistry was, and how totally and authentically these actors just faded into their characters. Like Dong-Wook says, a lot of their dialogue could have seemed cringeworthy, but they pulled it off perfectly.

At one point Gong Yoo and Eun-hye say it feels as though they are Eun-chan and Han-kyul, watching their wedding video all these years later with their kids running around them. As though they, too, imagined that these characters lived on after the drama ended. That hit me, because it’s the feeling I sometimes get about the shows that really stay with me—as though these people have lives of their own beyond our view. It’s touching to know they feel that too.

We’ve talked since of the problems with genderbenders, particularly with ones where the hero and heroine fall in love while she’s still pretending to be a man. But putting all of that aside, one really revolutionary thing about this show in 2007 was how it broke accepted norms of gendered behavior in ways that still feel daring today. A heroine who ate huge amounts without apologizing for it, who was a martial artist and the breadwinner of her family but not in the least downtrodden or abused by her family. She refused to act “feminine”, followed her career dreams, but still got a traditional happy ending—one that she wasn’t forced to change her hair, her job, her clothing or her personality for. Han-kyul loved Eun-chan for who she was, exhilaratingly and extremely so. What other romance drama has dared to have its lead actress in no makeup for 95% of its run? I can’t name anything in the years since.

And it wasn’t just the leads’ relationship that pushed boundaries. Han-sung and Yoo-joo tried again after what many people see as the ultimate dealbreaker, and in contrast to the narrative that men always cheat and it’s the duty of the woman to take him back anyway, here it was Yoo-joo who strayed. And the show didn’t shy away from the wreckage she left behind her, and that she had to be willing to face if she wanted to have another chance with Han-sung. Nor did it ever make her into the trope of the wicked woman. Seon-kyun observes that he thinks this was the first drama in which he saw the woman propose to the man.

This show treated every character with mercy and understanding and nuance, and whatever was there in the writing, the directing and acting took it to another level and launched this show into the stratosphere. There is so much authentic, genuine emotion in every scene, yet the indie sensibilities of the lighting and the music, the understated moments of the characters just playing and being young together—that’s what stays in my memory. I don’t think I’ll ever let go of how Coffee Prince made me feel. And that’s why this show feels like the unforgettable summer of my youth.

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It was because of Coffee Prince that Yoon Eun Hye became one of my 3 favorite K drama actresses, including Han Hyo Joo (Shining Inheritance) and Park Shin Hye (You're Beautiful). I'm not sure what she's been up to recently, but I continue to wish her the best of everything in life.

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She is one of my fav actresses ever since. Actually, if I have to name my most fav actress it would be her. I loved her since Goong, and I just can't understand how come she got so much criticism from acting in that extremely popular project. She was terrific in that role. To be honest, I can't think of any other actresses being as cute and clueless princess like her.

And as @laica has pointed it out, it's extremely sad that Eun-hye never rose to that level of fame again after Coffee Prince. I just hope that she's still loved at least by me. She has done very well, and I'll forever be rooting for her.

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*hope that she knows she's still loved at least by me.

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According to what I remember, audiences had a lot of issues with her pronunciation/speech style in Goong. I personally love that show and it remains the only show I binged nonstop back-to-back, and I found her adorable in it, but I also didn't speak or understand Korean at the time so I can't judge that aspect. But I also can't help but wonder if she was particularly harshly judged for her acting because of her idol image from Baby VOX, in a way that female idols especially in that era tended to get worse than their male counterparts, IMO. (It also TOTALLY blew my mind when I found out that she was an idol with this super girly image, because I first encountered her as Eun-chan, and she embodied that character down to her bones!)

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That's new to me thanks Laica! I never really knew about the criticism and particularly in which area she got the criticism in. I don't understand or speak Korean either, I just remember that she was so beautiful in my eyes in Goong. I think I was a teenager back then, and the OTP was swoon-worthy. I only had problems with SFL as I think she was so wicked (and beautiful, yes). I also love that show very much.

While I was rewatching Coffee Prince for the second time there was one second that I thought to myself that Eun-hye was so great in this as I completely forgot that she had been in a girl group! She looked just like a tomboy there!

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Thanks @laica this is new to me too. This is just tragic. My intro to Yoon Eun Hye was in Coffee Prince and I watched Goong after I had seen her in coffee prince. I remember thinking that omg this is an extremely talented actress! I found her to be an actress with great range. I was so taken aback by her that I remover thinking oh this actress is going to be big! Like you said Laica, it’s just tragic that she never rose the level of fame post coffee prince. The coffee prince was one of my early kdramas now a decade ago. I remember being soo impressed and being imprinted by it. This is the drama that anchored me to kdramas and cemented my love for the cast. I have religiously followed their careers after this and while I liked most of the projects they were in thereafter, some project were just too meh even when I loved the actors to bits and projects (cue “Big”, “I miss you” etc).

Korea’s entertainment industry is so much governed by image that it’s just at feels like criminal. I remember googling eun the back in the days and mostly I came up is discussion forums where they gossiped about her “affair” with jong kook and how the audience preserved her to the “forward” type. I remember thinking even back then that wth Korea, grow up. And then she was diagnosed with some health condition that was not “forgiven” by the image police aka Korean audience. Think eun hye never could come out of the slump that her image in the industry created for her.

I echo @mmmmm in my hopes that eun hye knows she will forever be loved by us. She will always be our gongju mama or eun chan! I hope this special gets huge and she comes back with a bang after this special!

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Reading this and remembering when I watched coffee prince for the first time got me really nostalgic. Nowadays, I can’t quite catch that same feeling, but I love to replay some scenes from time to time! Great review :)

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@laica just know I love you and dramabeans even more for covering this! I have hovering cluelessly in YouTube and watching and rewatching clips of this without subs and it’s been killing me! So thanks a ton for covering this and making our lives a little better with every sentence, now I am off to reading!

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Aw. 💙 I knew I had to write about it when I heard it was coming out! This drama imprinted so hard on me (or I did on it, who even knows at this point). Such an emotional experience to watch this special.

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I know that feeling! At this point I have lost count of how many times I have rewatched coffee prince over the decade of kdramas in my life. It is one of those dramas that it forever be relevant and be a reminder of youth ❤️ I didn’t understand a thing they were saying in the special and remember being so emotional watching it, I lost it on the first part where eun hye came in to greet gong yoo! ❤️

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It's been about ten years for me too, and nothing has ever taken CP's place. Me too! I had to pause and just be in my feelings when she walked in at the beginning.

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❤️❤️❤️

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I was so in awe of all the actors on this project. It was only the 3rd or perhaps 4th drama I watched all the way through, although more recently on 2016. I was struck how organic it felt and that these characters felt so real. Even as I was watching the documentary, it was like the actors were watching not themselves, but actual real people. I totally understood what Gong Yoo was saying like it was watching your wedding video many years later. I’m glad we have a recap of it here. Everyone who has ever seen Coffee Prince should watch it!

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My heart swelled when I saw this :) It's a beautiful thing to be able to do a reunion after so long. It means that the show holds a special place in many people's hearts <3 All the men in this show became big names, the writer had a sixth sense! It's a classic for a reason. Has this indie feel complete with indie OST, and it captures the mid aughts so well. Whenever I revisit certain scenes, I get hit with a bout of nostalgia.

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I had no idea that yoon eun hye was criticized for goong! I still rewatch it at times and always love her there! Can’t imagine anyone else playing that character! I just don’t get it! Why and how did people criticize her?!

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Why and how did people criticize her?!

I know that that's something that you can't avoid living on this planet, but really.. how can someone criticize such a talented and lovely actress like her? That's something I just can't understand.

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I responded to this in my reply to @mmmmm above. It truly is a shame, I loved her in Goong too.

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Whoa! I literally finished watching the docu just now, and it was beautiful! 🥺
It reminded me how I loved Coffee Prince for breaking the stereotypes in 2007! It was and is still an authentic (story, characters) show!
We've witnessed growth from all of the actors involved and it was nice seeing them reminisce with us viewers what transpired more than a decade ago. I love how insync they were in their thoughts even though physically they had to be in groups, including the bubbly director. 🙈😍
I know Lee Eon is somewhere there, smiling (his eye smile!) and supporting everyone! 😇
Whew. I felt emotional after watching this, and to that someone who planned and thought of this documentary -- thank you!!

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I watched the first episode.. the entire cast is so cute. It was funny how Gong Yoo and Yoon Eun-hye were feeling so embarrassed seeing their kiss scenes, and Chae Jung-ahn is really sweet.. complimented all of them. Nice touch by Lee Seon-kyun wearing glasses and the black shirt. :D My favourite scene was their Java Jive song during their show.. hope they showed a little more scenes of the cast together in the second episode. Also its so great that they all have become successful, Lee Eon would have done well too I'm sure.

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I can't believe it's 13 years from now and Gong Yoo still one of my fave actors that's still active. After Coffee Prince spawned four Asian TV remakes (Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and China), it was now part of great K-drama legacy.

I felt happy to see how Coffee Prince was turn real-life actors into 30's and 40's year-olds and look what Coffee Prince turned out to be the only best K-drama reunion of 2020 (even if I think not the first or the first old K-drama with the real actresses/actors in real-life virtual reunion even through joined with other old K-dramas with real-life reunions on social media and online world to connect fans to remember its memories).

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I actually havent watched coffee Prince- my drama love started in 2013. But if its good enough to make a documentary about it after 13 years I think I’m going to cue it in my Netflix list

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Coffee Prince was one of the first dramas I watched, and it also introduced me to Dramabeans when I went looking for somewhere where I could talk about this wonderful new world I had just discovered. The rest, as they say, is history.

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I was pretty lucky as I picked it up for rewatch again just a month ago without knowing about this reunion thing beforehand. I can assure you that it is a really good show. For me, it's a perfect little gem. As Gong Yoo said 'it's like my constant summer.' It really is for me.

Whenever I'm feeling down, my first feeling is usually to want to rewatch Coffee Prince.

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Absolutely! It definitely holds up, to any amount of rewatches.

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Yoon Eun Hye was truly brave for taking this role. With how korean standards of beauty are and what's expected that a female should be, she basically went against all that. She played a tomboy, with a bare face with nearly zero femininity. Yet she managed to have a successful career after that. This drama will always be a favourite of mine. I'll always say if we're talking about convincing and successful gender bending dramas her and Moon Geunyoung in painter of the wind take the crown . They submerged themselves in the act and convinced us. Plus to add the fact that main cast went ahead to have successful careers after this warms my heart.
Can't wait to watch this

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I havent watched this yet, but Coffee Prince is the singular reason why I watch kdramas. It was my third drama after Boys over Flowers and Cinderella's sister. It was so freaking good and I just fell utterly in love with Gong Yoo(I watch Goblin for him and I hated that drama). It also made just fall in love with kdramas. So thank you Coffee Prince.

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Coffee Prince is like a first love to me in my kdrama watching career.

It aired not long after my starting things K. My first "live-watching" drama accompanied by all fan craziness, discovering Dramabeans and Soompi Forum along the way. Watch an episode and then read all the discussions available - the beginning of a new life that you Beanies are all familiar with now. I even visited that cafe in Seoul twice over the years.

It is always THE drama for me that none other can topple. Like Gong Yoo said - it's like the constant summer filled with the green, love, ambiguity, and most important of all - the youth memory. The beach scene will forever be my most favorite scene of all times. I am glad the drama hasn't aged like many others and withstands rewatch well.

Rewatching via Netflix is certainly a great idea. Thanks to everyone involved in making these interviews happen.

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The beach scene ahhhh I cannot! It kills me every time no matter how often I rewatch it

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I don't think I've ever seen an actor convey so much emotion as Gong Yoo did in the beach scene. I didn't need to read the subtitles to know what he was saying. Perfection!

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Thank you so much for this post Laica, it is beautiful.

I paid for my Viu subscription for a year just to watch this documentary. And I think it's worth it. I felt so moved watching both episodes of this. The documentary was very well-made, and it's like going to a reunion with your folks from a long time ago, and catching up on how people have been doing.

With different personalities and experience each one of them faced in life, these things made each one of the special and it's a gift to be able to get a glimpse at how they've grown as a person and as an actor after such the hit. Saying this might make me sound like a mother, but it almost seems like I've watched all my children grow up.

And I agree, again, with Laica, that that scene of SML singing Ocean Voyage is one of my fav scenes from the entire show. I love the song, it was perfect in that scene and for their relationship.

It's also heartbreaking to see Eun-hye sobbed that much at the party after they were done shooting. It seemed to be that she is a sensitive person, and that's why I feel particularly bad hearing that she got very harsh criticism both before and after her performance in Coffee Prince.

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Coffee Prince was the first k-drama I ever watched, the first love that I still remember fondly. I enjoyed watching this reunion. The scenes look a bit dated now but man, they still give me the feels. I feel a re-watch coming on.

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I love the way you write it Laica. Years of watching K dramas teach me to treat dramas like humans, they come and go. What thing that stay is the way they make us feel when we watched it. I'm not rewatching drama type of person, like I dont feel nostalgic over people or place. Instead of rewatching them, I like to revisit the feeling. And your writing does this: Ah I remember those feels. The reason why I still love K dramas after years and years.

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It's Kim jae wool not Lee jae wook... You tagged the wrong person... Can't imagine how

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Thank you so much for writing about this, my eyes welled up a lot while reading. Coffee Prince (together with Goong) will forever be a beautiful piece of youth in my memory, and it's such a comforting feeling knowing out there in the world it's the same for other people too. 💖

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💗💗💗💗💗

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Thanks, Laica, for writing about this, and really portraying the feelings the documentary brought. I also teared up often during the two hours, and not just during the sad scenes.
We were hosting an exchange student from Thailand and she introduced me to Goong, which I immediately loved. She and another exchange student came across clips on the internet and I asked what they were squealing about.
So we all watched together, desperately searching for episodes on pirate sites, well before Viki or Drama Fever. That was over 12 years ago, and as I searched out Yoon Eun Hye's dramas, I came to Coffee Prince, which will forever live in the #1 spot of my favorites.
Some kind of magic happened during CP, where the whole became so much greater than the sum of its parts. That magic is rare in any world, let alone in the world of entertainment.

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I fell in love with Eun-hye while watching Goong (my very first k-drama) and my love just solidified for her with Coffee Prince. I think I was around 13 or so and in my teenage mind I just felt that all roles should be played by her. I remember watching literally every drama back then (BoF included) and wishing she was the female lead. I hope she knows she is loved by many and realizes it's not too late for her.

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Haaist! lost my first comment. Thank you laica. love this piece. Love this documentary show. Love CP. Re-watched it dozens of time, including one-week before the docu. Ahh, the feels were still there. The documentary however revealed something for me why CP is memorable and a great classic for me. I did not know it was a female PD! No wonder all the right buttons were pushed for such an enduring drama series.

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It’s been a looong time since I’ve been here! My intro to Kdrama was Goong then Coffee Prince.... love both still they are like my go to comfort dramas... Eun Hye acts well especially in rom coms, well her dramas aren’t bad either! Back to Coffee Prince, I just love that the drama was revisited by the cast it just brings wonderful warmth thoughts. The OST still brings joyful thoughts and that was covered by you!

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Thank you for posting this! I coincidentally watched Coffee Prince for the first time just after the cast reunion came out, so it was super interesting to be able to follow up the show with the cast's reactions to it and memories of it 13 years later. It was a little strange that the reunion broke the cast up into pairs rather than have them all together (maybe because of social distancing?). I liked how Kim Dong Wook and Kim Jae Wook seem to have a punchy, friendly relationship still, and Lee Sun Kyun and Chae Jung An had a chill, easy vibe. But was it just me, or was there some strange energy between Gong Yoo and Yoon Eun Hye? And maybe it was the editing, but for Yoon Eun Hye to ask the marriage question right off the bat? I got some weird juju....

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Coffee Prince was literally the first kdrama (or drama in general) that I watched and it still holds the no. 1 spot in my heart. I've rewatched it several times and it still puts a big smile on my face each time. Yoon Eun-hye is very sweet and a good actress it's a shame she didn't have more similar projects to Coffee Prince. Unfortunately, Goong is not one of my favorites, Yoon Eun-hye's acting was good, she was sweet and adorable as always, I just didn't warm up to the overall plot nor most of the characters. Gong Yoo is also my favorite Korean actor and I wish he had even more projects because I just can't enough of him, the way he transforms into these characters is umatched to me.

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