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Tale of the Nine Tailed: Episode 9

It’s all about family this hour as our main trio find themselves trapped in their own minds, forced to confront their greatest fears. The brothers fight for their lives together in the agwui forest while our heroine reunites with her long-lost parents. All our gumiho lead can do is provide support, but it’s ultimately up to his brother and our heroine to find the strength of mind to conquer their fears. Otherwise, they’ll be stuck in their respective dreamworlds forever.

 
EPISODE 9: “Eodookshini (Ghost of Darkness)”

We open on Yeon heroically rushing in to save his little brother. Rang literally can’t believe it’s Yeon and demands proof. Yeon obliges by reciting an embarrassing story from Rang’s childhood where he peed his pants. Ha.

The brothers work together for once – although Rang does make sure to say he’s still going to kill Yeon – and hold off the agwui long enough to run.

Meanwhile, Jia finds herself transported to her parents’ car. They talk about little Jia’s hypnosis session and how the psychiatrist has never seen a case like hers. Jia’s mother cries in fear that she won’t be able to protect her.

Her parents notice little Jia waking up and give Jia her birthday gift: the carousel. Jia realizes they’re all headed to their doom and begs them to stop the car, but they can’t hear her.

In the forest, Yeon and Rang can barely hold back the agwui – Yeon’s powers aren’t working at all here. They cut some more agwui down and keep running.

Jia yells and cries for her dad to stop the car, but it’s useless. The car crashes just as in her memory. The imoogi and fake saleswoman watch from the sidelines. She expected Yeon to come for Jia, but the imoogi supposes Yeon figured out the game.

At the station, Team Leader Choi is trying to figure out how the fake saleswoman guessed his greatest fear. Jae-hwan and Sae-rom realize it’s just like an urban myth they’ve seen online about a “green juice ajumma” who asks about your greatest fear. You get hypnotized and hear a creepy ancient folk tune.

They haven’t been able to confirm the story since no one who hears the song wakes. Right then, the security guard runs in and takes them to Jia lying unconscious in the hallway. We hear the children singing.

Simultaneously, Shin-joo finds Yeon unconscious in front of the two doors, and Yoo-ri finds Rang whose face is scratched from battling the agwui. Inside the dreamworld, Yeon and Rang find a tunnel and temporarily escape the agwui.

Yeon guesses Jia is at Fox Ridge and hopes he made the right choice that will save her and Rang. Now that they’re safe, Rang grabs Yeon aggressively and asks what he’s trying to do. There’s no way he came to save him rather than Jia.

Yeon claims he accidently went through the wrong door. Rang knows he’s lying and just rolls his eyes when Yeon calls him a bedwetter again. Pfft. Rang tries to walk and falls in pain. Alarmed at Rang’s bite from the agwui, Yeon checks his forehead and finds he has a fever. Rang casually says the poison must be spreading. Uh-oh.

They hear the agwui, and Yeon realizes he only has an hour to get Rang out before the poison spreads completely. He ties a handkerchief around Rang’s wound and admonishes him for “playing with the imoogi.” They take off running again.

At the Snail Bride, Hye-ja recognizes Yeon’s state from what happened to her husband. At first, she thought her husband was hallucinating, but she saw the tiger bite that shattered his bones. Yoo-ri cries in helplessness and fear as she sees Rang’s wounds and can’t wake him. Hye-ja calls the being an eodookshini, a creature that feeds off the darkness within.

Jia wakes to her mother’s voice. Her mom says it’s time for breakfast and asks if she worked late. Huh? Guess we’re out of her memory. Just like when she was little, Jia guesses this isn’t her mother.

After a tense moment, her “mom” tells her to knock it off. She doesn’t want to be reminded of the accident that left Jia in a coma for years. Alarmed, Jia jumps up and examines her room, staring at the graduation photo of her with her parents.

Still skeptical, Jia hides a box cutter behind her back and asks her mom for walnut cookies. Ah, that old trick. Her mom steps closer and reminds her of her nut allergy. Jia drops the blade and begins to cry.

Outside, the imoogi likes the reunion but is surprised they’re not “fake” parents. The eodookshini supposes that’s not what she’s truly afraid of. Since they’re intruders in Jia’s dreamworld, they can’t stay long, and the eodookshini returns them to the mansion.

The CEO is worried because things didn’t go to plan, but the eodookshini assures him Yeon won’t escape. The mind is weak. When the eodookshini grabs the CEO threateningly, the imoogi warns her not to touch “his property.” His seriousness truly frightens her, so she hits and prostrates herself while begging for forgiveness.

Jia hugs her mom and cries. It’s fine if this is dream, she just doesn’t want her mom to leave. Her mom wipes her tears, guessing she had a nightmare. Jia apologizes for surviving alone. She’s been scared and lonely and even resented them for leaving. Jia sobs that she’s missed her mom and hugs her again.

It’s nighttime in the forest, and Rang isn’t doing so hot. But he won’t let Yeon help him as he struggles to stand. The imoogi likens the situation to phantom pain – when you start to feel that pain, “the door disappears.”

Rang can no longer stand and tells Yeon to go save Jia since it’s too late for him. Yeon frustratedly asks why Rang gives up so easily. “Because I don’t have anything I cherish.” He doesn’t have a first love to protect or a family he longs for. Yeon stares at him for a long moment before stating he came for nothing, then and now.

As he leaves, Rang declares he wants to be buried in their mountains. Yeon angrily kicks some foliage and keeps walking while Rang softly says he wants to go back to those days. He reminisces about the azaleas, unable to remember their taste.

Yeon marches back and yells at him to live to go pick some then. Rang wants to know the real reason he came, and Yeon finally answers honestly that he wants to save him and Jia. Rang doesn’t get why someone who tried to kill him would want to save him now.

Yeon sighs and crouches down to look him in the eye as he reveals, “My sword never misses. I never miss a target.” Rang’s eyes widen at the implication, and he blinks back tears. When Yeon says he’s leaving for good, Rang finally stands and goes to join his brother. He lets Yeon support him as they walk forward together.

Shin-joo meets with Taluipa for help saving Yeon and Jia, but Taluipa basically says it is what it is. Jia is with her parents, and Yeon is with Rang in the agwui forest. Taluipa is surprised Yeon still cares about Rang and worries he’s overburdening himself. Hyun Eui-ong reminds her that’s what it means to be a mountain god.

Taluipa is speechless when Shin-joo drops to his knees crying and begs for a way to save Yeon, even if he has to give his life. He promises to do anything. Taliupa smiles. That’s concerning.

He walks out with a (magic?) ribbon, and Hyun Eui-ong sighs at his eagerness to sacrifice himself. Shin-joo is confused about Yeon going after Rang instead of Jia, but Hyun Eui-ong observes that it’s family. There’s no place for Yeon in Jia’s dreamworld with her family, which Yeon must’ve realized.

Rang and Yeon can’t find an exit, so he has Rang start from the beginning. He explains about coming through his wardrobe into his old house, and Yeon puts the pieces together. Rang barely has time to process that they’re dealing with the eodookshini before the agwui find them, and they take off running again.

In her not-room, Jia wonders where exactly she is. She hears the thud-thud-thud of water droplets falling. In the real world, she’s lying in a hospital bed with an IV drip. Her team members are worried sick since the doctors can’t find the cause.

Jia takes notes, trying to piece together what’s happening. She remembers the fake saleswoman and how she asked if Jia’s greatest fear was Fox Ridge. Her dad pops in, and Jia jumps up to hug him. She goes to eat breakfast, seemingly forgetting about her predicament.

The forest is now covered in fog. Yeon guesses they have to cross the chasm to find the door. Rang is hesitant, making Yeon snap at him to pull it together and think. What’s his greatest fear? Rang admits his biggest fear is being abandoned since both Yeon and his mom abandoned him.

Yeon sighs and grabs him by the shirt. “I never abandoned you.” (Couldn’t have said that 600 YEARS AGO?!) Rang’s eyes fill with emotion. Yeon grips his shoulder supportively, and Rang sees a door appear. Yeon affectionately tousles his hair, and they prepare to jump across the chasm.

Only, Yeon doesn’t jump. Rang barely makes it, clinging to the ledge. From the other side, Yeon encourages Rang to survive and begins fighting the agwui. He’s bitten as he single-handedly holds them back from Rang.

A single agwui gets through and jumps onto Rang. It’s his mother. Yeon yells at him not to look – it’s not really his mom. Too late. Yeon breaks away and leaps onto the cliff face, grabbing the agwui. He wrenches her off Rang, and they plunge down together.

Rang screams and reaches for Yeon, but it’s no use. All he can do is climb toward the door. Rang wakes and struggles to crawl over to the wardrobe as he frantically says he needs to get to Yeon. But he collapses before he can go anywhere.

Eating breakfast with her family, Jia is so happy she hopes to never wake up if this is a dream. Her notes begin to disappear off the page. In the real world, her blood pressure spikes and doctors are called.

Watching her parents eat, Jia has a memory flash of Yeon at that same table, but she can’t remember who he is. In the real world, Shin-joo rushes into the hospital and steals Jia away. He takes her to Yeon at the Snail Bride and ties their wrists together with the magic ribbon.

Jia is pouring over a photo album with her parents when the phone rings. Oddly, her parents don’t seem to hear it. She follows the ringing upstairs to a phone (so weird to see a landline) in her room.

It’s Yeon, and he apologizes for not going to her. Jia feels she knows him but can’t remember. He urges her to figure out what’s going on so she can return to the real world. He’ll be waiting for her. We see Yeon looking worse for wear in some savanna with a charm written in blood on his palm.

Jia can’t shake the feeling she’s left something important behind. Her eye lands on the now dried mug wort Yeon brought her that day. Jia grabs a pen and freaking stabs herself in the hand because, apparently, pinching yourself is for wusses. She’s flooded with memories of Yeon, and finally remembers who he is to her.

Meanwhile, it looks like Yoo-ri called Shin-joo over to help Rang. He tells her it’s agwui poison. Yoo-ri sobs and begs him to save Rang – she’ll die if he dies. One look at her desperate face and Shin-joo kneels beside Rang’s bed to do what he can.

Jia rejoins her parents downstairs and watches them with a much more critical eye. She asks what her parents would do if they lost her. They vow they’d go to the ends of the earth to find her, and Jia promises to do the same for them. She realizes her greatest fear is parting from her parents.

With tears in her eyes, she apologizes and says she needs to go. They stop her at the door; she could lose them forever if she leaves. “Why are you abandoning us?” her mom asks through tears. They cry and beg her to stay with them – who cares if this is real or not? She doesn’t have to be alone. Jia argues she’s not alone because she has Yeon. Believe in Yeon, she walks out the door. Jia wakes up.

The eodookshini is livid they both woke and calls it cheating, but the imoogi thinks they won fair and square. Anyway, he achieved his goal: seeing Jia’s fears. As a bonus, they caught Yeon.

Jia holds Yeon as he lies unconscious, still stuck in that weird savanna. He narrates that this is his hell, a place wherein he’s alone and dying in a world without Jia.

Shin-joo finishes treating Rang and assures Yoo-ri he’ll be okay after a few days. Yoo-ri wonders why Shin-joo isn’t reacting to learning she’s working with Rang, and it dawns on her that he already knew. She’s surprised to hear he was beaten up by Rang yet still treated him. Shin-joo shocks her into silence: “I didn’t want you to cry.”

Rang wakes and immediately asks Shin-joo if Yeon has returned. At the hospital, Jia greets her worried teammates. Over the coming days, Yeon remains unresponsive. Jia, Shin-joo, and Hye-ja take turns staying by his side.

Yeon trudges on until he can no longer stand. He worries about Jia and thinks of the things he didn’t get to say and do with her. Yeon collapses and resigns himself to the fact he won’t be able to return.

The eodookshini enters Yeon’s dreamworld and scoffs at the supposed great mountain god. She laughs that his body will go to the imoogi and “make the world a chaotic place.” Yeon wakes up and asks if Jia made it back. The eodookshini only tells him after he kneels and begs.

She says Jia lost her parents and now will have to lose Yeon, so it would’ve been better if she hadn’t made it back. Yeon smiles and stands up no problem. Ah, it was all an act to draw her out from the moment he “accidentally” dropped from the cliff.

He turns her question on her, “What is your greatest fear?” She bluffs that she has none, but Yeon knows she’s dying because people have forgotten her. He taunts that his little brother didn’t even remember her name.

Enraged, the eodookshini grits out that Yeon will be stuck here forever. But she’s the one who can’t seem to move. Yeon gloats that she appears to have forgotten she’s in the mind of a mountain god. In the real world, the imoogi can no longer see them despite his connection with the eodookshini.

Yeon somehow reaches into the real world and grabs the imoogi, ripping a button off his shirt. He smiles, and the imoogi quakes with rage as Yeon promises to come for him soon.

When the eodookshini tries to escape, Yeon runs her through with his sword. She ekes out that Yeon “will be killing that woman with your own hands again. That is your destiny.” Yeon rolls his eyes and tells her to worry about her own destiny. In the real world, the imoogi watches the eodookshini disintegrate and smiles sardonically.

Later, Jia gets caught in the rain and looks up to see Yeon under his iconic red umbrella across the street. They smile at each other, and Yeon starts to cross the street. Jia shakes her head, vowing to go to him now instead.

She runs across the street into his arms. “I waited for you,” she says. Yeon drops the umbrella and kisses her (like a real kiss this time).

 
COMMENTS

I thought it’d take a bit longer, but it looks like Rang is back on Team Yeon now. All it took was Yeon being honest for once. I knew Yeon missed on purpose, but it’s about time those two had a real conversation about it after SIX CENTURIES. Why the crap couldn’t Yeon have said all this from the start? It literally took a situation where they would both die if he weren’t honest to get him to tell Rang his actual feelings and intentions. He let this fester for seemingly no good reason. I’m not blaming him for the whole situation – Rang reacted to everything in the worst way possible and has been terrible – but Yeon’s inexplicable refusal to clear up misunderstandings started the ball rolling.

I really wish we had better insight into Yeon and his odd decisions because his intentions often remain elusive. I think they’re trying to lend him an air of mystery, but it just makes him confusing. I have no idea why he withheld the fact that he didn’t want his brother dead and thought it was better to let Rang spiral. He’s often said cruel things to Rang like when he said he shouldn’t have saved him as a child. I mean, that’s essentially saying it’d be better if Rang were dead, but this episode showed that’s very much not how he feels. There must be a reason he’s behaved that way toward Rang for so long, and I’d have really appreciated the drama telling me what that reason is.

The same goes for some of Yeon’s decisions regarding Jia. This episode he did a sudden 180 and decided to end his charade about using Ah-eum/Jia and not loving them. I mean, thank goodness, but that changed quickly and with no explanation. What’s his plan now? He’s obviously realized the stupidity of his original plan, but per usual, we have no idea what he’s thinking. I think the eodookshini was a missed opportunity for Yeon’s character. I wanted to get insight into his psyche like we did with Jia and Rang, but instead he exerted his god-like powers to perfectly ensnare his opponents. Speaking of that, I’m confused as to what his abilities are. He’s no longer a god, so are his powers just due to how old he is? I would think he’d be stripped of his god powers when he was kicked out. Also, does it have no effect on a gumiho to give away their fox bead? All they’ve said is that the bead protected Jia, but we haven’t heard anything about how losing it affects Yeon.

I thought it was interesting that Jia and Rang’s fears were so similar. They’re both most afraid of being left by their family and having to endure alone. Of course, this plays out differently for them since Rang was willingly abandoned while Jia’s parents were forcibly taken. The lack of stability for Rang during childhood led to him feeling unloved and insecure, but Jia had the security of her parents’ love. She’s been able to hope and fight to find them all this time knowing they’ll be happy to be reunited with her. This episode really belonged to Jia and Rang as they each found the strength to fight their fears with Yeon’s support. From the beginning, I’ve been worried about Jia turning into a damsel in distress, and there have been a couple of situations like with the ghost girls where she seemed to lose her gutsiness. But this episode we got to see Jia figure things out on her own and find the strength to leave her perfect dreamworld.

Now that they’re all safe, I’m curious to see what Rang is going to do. He clearly doesn’t want Yeon to die, but what about Jia? I can see him being jealous and wanting her out of the picture, so that might mean working with the imoogi for a while longer. But if it puts his brother in danger, I’m pretty sure he’ll switch sides. Let’s just hope knowing his brother cares about him is enough to quell his fears and put a stop to his malevolent plans.

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Oh no. This is out already.
I really wanted to write a better comment on this episode, pre-prepared, but I see I am out of time.

Let's see if I can whip up one now.

I loved this episode.
It was fantastic.
I am still not over it.
It is easily the strongest, and best episode of the entire show to date, and quickly became my favourite episode too.
It made me love episode 7 and 8, and the dynamic of Rang and Yeon in those even more.
It made me love our female lead even more.
It was paced well, it was consistent in style (for once lmao), it had EXCELLENT THEMATIC AND CHARACTER EXPLORATION that was so important for everyone here, it revealed moves from our heroes to push the plot forward, it was dark, and sweet, and gripping and sad, all at once.
I loved it.

I love the symbolism of the Spirit of Darkness, the complexity of the fear and evil she represents. I love how this manifested for both Rang and JiA.

I loved that JiA had to essentially save herself. That Yeon knew she would shut everyone out, and TRUSTED her enough to have the strength to get out of her unreality herself. Because girl! Yes!

The whole episode was just about overcoming fear, about banishing darkness, through choosing trust and hope, and I am still not over it.

JiA's fear was being alone, but her nightmare was her deepest wish. To have to fight against what you want most, when it's right there in front of you, because it's not true, because it would be a lie, because you're not actually alone; that is so, so powerful.

And the brothers, oh my gosh.
Yeon chose Rang, because Rang needed that help, that extra strength, to be reminded that he is loved, to be told he was not abandoned, to be freed from the lies he had perpetuated for himself for centuries, because Yeon KNEW Rang would believe the lies that the nightmare was telling him.
And I loved the scene where Yeon gets angry at Rang for almost giving up. It seems harsh, like his words in past episodes, but it all comes together here. Rang has to want to FIGHT for himself, want to save himself, want to LIVE, and he hasn't for so long, he's been so embittered, and manipulated by lies, he has become defeatist, and Yeon tells it to him straight: no! get on your feat! Fight! Live! You want to taste azaleas again? Live for that! If only for that! Don't give in to the lies. Save yourself. (the parallels I'm screaming) And I think Rang's scenes here really brought home that message Yeon has been talking about for several episodes now. Rang, in a way, has to save himself, FROM himself. Yeon can be there to help him along, to tell him to keep fighting, to tell him that he never left him, and that he never meant to kill him (that stroke was on purpose to spare him), but Rang has to take that and run with it HIMSELF. And the imagery of Yeon taking Rang's Zombie Mother down to the pit, so that Rang is free to climb up the cliff- just wow. WOW.
How do I even find the...

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... words to break down this episode when I'm still spazzing internally at it.

On top of all this, you have Yeon, sweet sassy, always sarcastic Yeon, ribbing his brother in the midst of his inner psychological warfare, blithely saying he took the wrong door (he didn't ofc), snarking about having free time, to the reveal that this was all part of his plan, that JiA had to save herself, and Rang needed to know he was loved, and he needed to sacrifice himself, to vanquish the spirit of darkness, and find the imoogi, on his terms, in his own way.
The smirks at the end, the absolute madlad he is, feigning death and then mocking it, I love him so much.

I also loved the kiss. It was sweet. Not everything from the past episodes has been answered yet but that's ok. I like the concept of JiA waiting, in trust and hope for Yeon, like he waited for her.

JUST!
I LOVED THIS EPISODE SO MUCH. IF I REMEMBER ANYTHING MORE TO GUSH ABOUT IT, I WILL BE BACK, YOU CAN COUNT ON IT. AHHHHH!!!!!

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Nice writeup, but...
WHO ARE YOU AND WHAT HAVE YOU DONE WITH THE SH*TPOST LADY?

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Yes, where is our Sic?
Maybe it the evil doppelganger writing?

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Man, I really, really should force myself to write more positive essays shouldn't I... lmao

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SHIT IDK, SOMETIMES EVEN SHE ENJOYS THINGS FROM TIME TO TIME OK. SHOCKING AS THAT SOUNDS

*Aiiieee- you won't believe me, let's just go with @eazal's theory*

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🤣🤣🤣🤣

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Or rather, in a universe that allows evil doppelgängers, there will also be sugar plums and everything nice doppelgängers, by symmetry.

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I feel like I don't even need to write my own comment now because you basically just #NailedIt.

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Thanks so much for writing down all my thoughts about Rang. If we all thought why was Yeon so tough on him, and why he wasn't more clear with Rang, it's clear to me that Rang would only listen to Yeon if he WANTED to listen to him, and so far, he never wanted. It took him to be in this situation, almost dying and almost making his dearest one die, to realize that he needed to hear the real meaning behind Yeon's words. And he did.

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Yessssssss. It's that whole accepting help, accepting grace thing right. If the recipient isn't willing, forcing it doesn't work. They have to come to terms with it on their own.

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If you just whipped this one up, I would really really want to read that "better, pre-prepared comment."

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Lmao...

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I 100% agree with you and I wish you were writing the recap for this series as you seem to have a much better understanding of the story, writing, and development than quirky whose constant whining is getting monotonous. I'm just going to skip to read comments from here on in. Loving this series and really loved this episode! I watched it twice.

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Gosh just the fact that this show got THIS GOOD at episode 9!!!!! The absolute NERVE OF IT. HOW DARE IT. Lmao.

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I was screaming! I was literally screaming! This is what I want from a show when it's based on the supernatural!

It doesn't focus on the romance and there are so many different things happening and it's not the same everytime. There are new characters everytime, although now I think the imugi will take center stage.

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I'm still not over it. I've watched it twice and it aired two days ago. Lmao.

He will yes. Which will just make me want to punch him all the more, but oh well.

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For sure. Omg when Yeon asked the eodookshini "what is your greatest fear?" I shouted in my room at midnight (I'm sure someone heard me). Her character was so interesting. I hope the future episodes are as good as this

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Oh how the turns tabled!!!!!

I'm... cautiously hopeful hahaha. If it goes bananapants again, that's ok, cos I would expect that, if it doesn't, then it'll be the best early Christmas present. Either way I think I'll still love it no matter what.

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Only twice! Ha!

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Oh I'm sorry; there's still time for it to increase.

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I loved Episode 9 and 10. I was screaming when that juice lady was killed. Omg. That was so exciting!

I don't think Yeon was supposed to baby-feed Rang throughout. He supported him when Rang needed it and when Rang went and killed innocent people he had to be punished but Yeon couldn't kill him because of the brother aspect. The rest was for Rang to figure out but he didn't (like most of us really don't so it is just how it is).

As for the Jia thing, I am just glad the whole noble idiocy thing died. We didn't have a lot scenes where they were brooding for each other because the creepy side story came and everything was focused there. Also, a reason why I like this drama so much!

On a lighter (not so lighter) note, Kim Bum is so hot in this. 🔥🔥🔥🔥

I cant wait to watch that Imugi dead. I have theory that Rang will die, I have to prepare myself that.

P.S how cute is Shin Joo! He's the sweetest, most warm hearted character on this show and I love it!

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Oh I almost forgot:
SHINJOO HAS A HEART OF GOLD AND WE DON'T DESERVE HIM.

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All those looks ShinJoo gave to YuRi, and the way she was startled and how deeply he's concerned about Yeon and even so he takes care of Rang, just because he's such a golden hearted fox.

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Dude literally beat him to a pulp and he decides to save his lyfe I MEAN REALLY.

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Omg, I melted when at his expression when she was crying and begging him to save Rang. And then when he said he didn't want her to cry. I hope he doesn't think Yuri feels anything romantic for Rang. But both he and Yuri are a similar situation, dedicating their lives to a Lee brother.

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She runs across the street into his arms

While Beanies everywhere cringe and look both ways to check for malicious Trucks.

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😂😂 OMG !!!! So true...I was really half expecting a truck of doom to just pass by !!!!!

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Can you blame us? That truck is a menace :)

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Every Beanies has a trauma with pedestrian crossing.

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It’s already ingrained in us
We have to watch out 😂

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I was just, c'mon girl, the light is changing now, run for your life!

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Tbh with you... the TOD was the FARTHEST thing from my mind right then... lmao

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Omg yes! I was screaming for her to cross the street already instead of finding the slow motion staring romantic lol.

Sigh of relief when she finally reached his arms safely. The pain of Dal-mi's dad was too recent and I'm still wary of crossing streets and traffic lights.

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how DID know that is what we were all thinking? i actually looked for it for a second!

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I just loved this week's episodes. There were so many things I liked. Rang's realization of his brother's love, Jia's trust in Yeon and Shin ju. My god that man is totally a gem. The story just got interesting at episodes 9 and 10. It was well paced and well written and I hope we get answers for all the questions we have now. One particular thing I appreciate about this drama is the portrayal of its FL. We have seen so many damsel in distress but Jia is strong and have the will to fight even without yeon. I loved it when she overcame her fears her own & find the strength to escape from the world her subconscious created.

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On last note I am getting a bad feeling for Rang.. That we are gonna lose him at end of the series though I wish for the higher ups to somehow change that and give him a chance to live with his brother

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You're not alone thinking that :(

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I feel like it's the only way for him to go out. He has killed too many innocent humans. I do hope we'll be able to see his reincarnation. Maybe he'll end up a beloved puppy who gets to hang out with his puppy friend.

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I gotta say, both in this recap and the last one I feel like you're giving Rang way too much leeway? He literally is a mass murderer and he hasn't stopped for 600 years. Why he isn't in hell already is a question I have, but the fact stands that Rang has been murdering his way through the centuries and no amount of wounded puppy eyes can remedy that. The fact that Yeon was so "cruel" last time was imo appropriate, because Rang is kind of a whiny brat who needs to get a taste of his own medicine.

I loved that Ji-Ah was largely able to figure things out this episode by herself. I know that the in universe explanation was that Ji Ahs fantasy might not have allowed Yeon to join her and Rang needed Yeon there to defeat his fear but just from how the show delivered it it was clear that Rang didn't have the strength to defeat/overcome his fear on his own whereas Ji Ah was pretty much immediately suspicious of what was going on and working on how to defeat it. She was shortly overwhelmed, because her desire to see her parents is so great, but in the end with a little help from Yeon she could see that this fantasy is nothing but just that and that she is in fact no longer alone.

Rang meanwhile has to have everything literally spelled out for him, because he's too wrapped up in his own grief and misery to see the truth for what it is. I do love that once he does realise the truth (that a) Yeon never abandoned him or b) tried to kill him (even willingly)) he is immediately on the path to helping Yeon as much as he can.

Also!!! Can't forget the vet who is just the most true friend a person (or nine tailed fox mountain god) can have. Taleuipa better not make him pay an exorbitant price.

Also god, Lee Dong Wook letting out a bit of his "I am a very powerful being that doesn't hesitate to murder if the occasion calls for it" energy against Juice Lady and Imoogi was such a good look!

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I get what you mean about Lee Rang being a murderer... but I think he is a character that should be interpreted not as a regular human, but as a mythological gumiho: their value scale is simply not the same as ours. Foxes are animals, predators, and he's supposed to be a "demi-deity", someone with "a fractured soul" and a pretty low opinion about humans, from whom he only received hate

P.S.: this said, to be totally honest... probably if Kim Bum played him a bit less hot, my moral standards would be stricter too 😁

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I fairly think Hell will wecome him with a big suprise when he will stop cheating death and his bad deeds keep pilling up without remorse and Taluipa more than gladly will deliver it...Guess he lived till now on borrowed time and we clearly saw that one doesn't get away human or deity,might say more deities if they commit sins so doubt anythng would save Rang from perpetual Hell...
Like we saw what Yeon suffered for killing one "human".

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I guessed right! Yeon didn't try to kill Rang, he missed him purposely in the past. Yeon didn't save Jia because she could do it herself.

This episode was the wake-up call that Rang needed. Stop with selfpity and assume your own decisions.

I'm afraid for Shin-Joo, the debt thing for fox looks like a curse for them... I'm scared about what Taleuipa will ask from him.

For once, Yeon was one step ahead of Imoogi! \o/

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I can't tell you how many times I've rewatched the distracting foxes scenes, because I lost track of it. What an episode! It's the best one so far!

I think the reason we don't have so much information about Yeon doing what he's doing is because that's part of the deal he made with the gods. I think it's specially related to Rang: he came back to kill him, years had passed as Rang was a little boy when Yeon left, and we are talking about a gumiho... how long did it take him to grow, it may not have been 10 years but 50, and all that time Rang felt alone.

I'm getting prepared to lose some of my foxes, though. I'm so worried about ShinJoo's deal with Taluipa, and I don't see a future were Rang and Yeon can live as happy brothers.

By the way, I don't like Imugi at all. I mean, not because he's the villain, but I find him quite a plain villain. He's acting like a teenager villain: I want Yeon and whatever he has. I mean, child Imugi was pretty much scary than adult Imugi, tbh.

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Totally agree with you on the last part. The adult imoogi gives vibes of a spoiled teenager than a villain.

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IThanks for the recap @quirkycase! And I agree, I'm still not feeling the Yeon character after this episode, and I think I've figured why his relationship with Rang bothers me so much. If they were within the age range of normal siblings, I'd still find his behaviors as an older brother off putting (and I'm saying this as an older sibling, who, like Yeon wasn't perfect, and had some things to apologize for). But the further problem is Yeon and Rang aren't within a normal sibling age range. Forget Yeon being old enough to be Rang's father, he's old enough to be his several times great grandfather. And considering the circumstances under which they met, Yeon was definitely more of a father than a brother to Rang, and I really don't think Yeon took that responsibility as seriously as he should have. And so, despite the fact that their bickering is sibling like in tone, the subtext of their relationship is way more like that of a traumatized adult dealing with their deadbeat, emotionally unavailable parent. And I think that's why their interactions have often made me cringe. And unfortunately, they continued to make me cringe in this episode. Despite the palpable love between the characters (well acted from both actors), the way Yeon is written to engage with Rang is kind of grating, because he doesn't seem to think he has anything to apologize for.

His whole, I hurt you because you deserved it, but I didn't kill you so we should be good...just, dude. You essentially left the child you were raising (for romantic love, no less... and let's not forget that the servitude was his choice, Taluipa offered to free him, but he stopped her, because he chose to do this to ensure Ah-eum's reincarnation) to face horrific, traumatic circumstances that you directly caused by leaving him unprotected, and when you came back to find him apparently deranged as a result, all you did was physically wound him, and then when he's messed up by that, call him stupid for not realizing you weren't trying to kill him outright (gee, thanks, bro, you only left me mortally wounded in a ditch, and considering what happened next...yeah, not so great). Was I the only person who felt bothered by that? Because the issue is he didn't suddenly start treating Rang coldly after he'd become violent. Since they first met, he was alternating between being insulting and dismissive towards a frightened, wounded child, and then being overly indulgent of him (seriously, always letting a child win, and then fixing their problems for them instead of helping them grow, i.e. the kite scene, is not helpful). Yeon was basically responsible for raising this abused, traumatized child, and when Rang turned out twisted after suffering more trauma as a direct result of Yeon's irresponsibility, there's no, "I'm sorry I let you down," or "I shouldn't have left you." It's more like, "it's not my fault," and "if I hurt you, it's because you deserved it." That doesn't mean...

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( cont'd) That doesn't mean Rang didn't deserve be punished for killing innocent people. But as someone in a parental role, punishment without empathy or attempting to help the person come to terms with what happened to them, and why their reaction was wrong...it's just callous, and ultimately, counterproductive, because it causes only pain without growth, which was definitely true in Rang's case. And before anyone says this is a cultural thing, I too come from a non-western culture with a hyper fixation on honor towards elders, where that kind of semi antagonistic "tough love" towards children is the norm. But just because something is culturally acceptable doesn't make it any less traumatic for people who end up damaged by it.

And then there was the supposed episode highlight, when Yeon tells Rang, "I never abandoned you," and I'm like, really though? Cause I would like to see some evidence of that. You can't just tell someone you didn't abandon them when it seems clear to them that you did, because whatever secretive lurking you were doing without their knowledge doesn't really count. Twice Rang had to suffer the emotional fallout of his brother leaving him alone in horrible situations where horrible things happened to him as a result. And he's just supposed to take his brother's word for it? It would be nice if Yeon would just own the fact that his actions hurt his brother deeply, but he just seems allergic to apologizing.

I think a lot of people interpret this reading as letting Rang off the hook for being a terrible person, but that's not the case at all. You can be an awful guardian and your charge can be awful person, but that doesn't absolve the guardian of responsibility, especially when the child's awfulness developed as a result of neglect or lack of guidance or protection that you should have given them. Besides, the narrative already acknowledges that Rang is a twisted, sadistic, cruel, remorseless killer, as do the surrounding characters (and he's most likely going to die as a final punishment), so wanting to see Yeon simply take some level of responsibility for the role he played in what happened does not mean I think Rang shouldn't take responsibility for himself. They are both responsibile for the situation (Rang ultimately moreso), and it would be rewarding for the narrative to have Yeon acknowledge that.

So yeah, I just think a better written drama would address Yeon's behavior as an actual flaw worth exploring, because it's so gratingly present in the story. But hey, maybe that will happen. Maybe in the next episodes we'll fill in a whole bunch of gaps and see that Yeon was really misunderstood all along. But the fact that we've come this far, and there's no concrete reason for why he's made these choices is kind of bothersome. Especially when he's been shown to be capable of openly loving and cherishing and being kind and devoted to other characters (Ah-eum/Jia). If he'd been as...

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(cont'd) If he'd been as protective of child Rang as he had been of Ah-eum, they probably wouldn't be in this situation.

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Everything you just said and more....

I too was cringing, and I wholeheartedly agree... Yeon still seems to be in the I did nothing wrong, but obviously he did... Alot and still not seeing that or actually acknowledging that...

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I think it also comes maybe in play his nature as a fox and deity,he looks pretty detached and while he did take care of Rang he wasn't responsable for him,he expected Rang to fend for himself something that didn't correlate with Rang's values being a demi-human and expectations of Yeon as he clearly was his whole world and more of a father figure than brother and to trully accept would be for each to realize it,in this more Rang as he will never get what he expects from Yeon...Of course Yeon doesn't feel he did anything wrong or that he left him for a woman as doubt he took in his head responsability for him in the true sense...

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I have to agree with all of this and I really could not help myself from being over-protective towards Rang while fully acknowledging Rang needs to be hold responsible for all his deed. But as much as Rang need to be hold responsibility, it is also applicable to Yeon. Do not tell me he suffered enough with the death of Ah Eum because it is also the same as Rang who suffered by being abandoned thrice (once by his mom and twice by Yeon). The difference was Rang fight back by killing villagers who constantly trying to kill him hoping to be reunited with Yeon while Yeon wait for Ah Eum reincarnation but still retaining his power while being in contract with Taluipa.

For me, Yeon is also a problematic character that no matter how much the writer try to glorifying all his action, it doesn't work from my perspective. He is equally irresponsible by leaving his post as the mountain spirit for the sake of waiting and searching of Ah Eum's reincarnation. I also become to hate his snarky remarks because not everyone going to react unbothered by it and he needs to learn not everyone going to accept his action like he hopes they do. He is acting like he is above everyone and what he did means nothing as long as he did not directly hurting the innocent. Little did he realize everything starts going wrong because of his irresponsibility and not all because of Rang going rouge.

This drama got really huge potential at the beginning but really suffering from bad writing now. It got all the interesting characters but I could not help feeling most character suffer setbacks to make way for the epic love trope the writer trying to portray between Yeon and Ji Ah/Ah Eum.

What keeps me going now is Rang even though I don't really have high hope with how the plot setting him up to be.

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To explain Yeon's behavior in Asian perspective. Like a commenter said, Yeon acted more like a father than a brother to Rang, and that explained his behavior a lot more. In Asia... fathers are never supposed to be the touchy-feely type with their sons. Hell, it's even worse during ancient times. Long story short, if you don't get beaten up by your dad at least once in your lifetime, something is wrong with ypur childhood. Anyway, explanation.

Asian sons, like me, are taught that we should never show our affection directly. Maybe a pat to the back, maybe a 'good work' here and there, but never honest and affectionate hug or something like that. For example, my father once gave me a handheld console back when I was a kid. When I asked him if he bought it, he told me it was a gift (heh). It's so obvious that my father bought it for me, but he is so wrapped up in his face, proper 'Asian dads' conduct, and tough love, that he couldn't be honest about it (later on I realised he is probably also embarassed about it, heh).

And on the topic of discipline, Asian dads method is basically:
Father: "You are doing it wrong!"
Son: "Then what am I supposed to do?!"
Father: "Figure it out yourself!"
Basically they will beat you up whenever you stray too far away from the 'proper' path, but they will never ever tell you what the 'proper' path is, because that's the whole point of being 'self-sufficient' is. Is it healthy? Totally not, but hey, traditions. Which makes me think that's probably how the brothers' missing father probably raised Yeon as well, seeing that it would probably be around 1st millenium AD when said dad was alive (imagine how old fashioned he would be, *shudder*).

And finally, on the topic of Yeon and Jia. Tbh I doubt that Yeon has full control when he is in his personal hell. He might show us this show of bravado all he wants, but it is almost painfully obvious that he is affected by his personal hell. Because knowing your fear is one thing, but confronting it is another matter entirely. He is forced to realise that, nope, he totally won't be able to live without Jia in his absolute solitude, which is totally another Asian dads trope. A dad will never admit his mistake unless you 'break' him thoroughly first. Sorry, for the rant, but that's just my personal opinion on the episode.

P.S. Totally love the creepy children song btw. Gonna be my ringtone for the few next weeks.

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Thanks for sharing this.
I agree with you about Yeon really being in hell. He clearly said he didn't want to live in a place where AhEum/Jia is not, but when he realized it, he got stronger and that's how he could beat eodookshini. In fact, he tells her it was really hard to bring her to him, so to truly convince her that he was dying, he had to go through all the suffering. The difference is that he knew where he was getting into from the very beginning, while Rang and Jia didn't.

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I never thought daemunnori would sound this creepy. I love the song too!

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"Because knowing your fear is one thing, but confronting it is another matter entirely." This is probably the most concise summation yet of this episode. Thanks for the 'Asian Dad' perspective. It added the nuance I didn't know I was looking for to the brother arc in this episode.

Also think your point about Yeon's bravado is spot-on - he strikes me as a master of "fake it til you make it." As quirkycase comments, I would like to see more of the vulnerability/thought process/uncertainty behind his decision making to give a bit more insight into the character. But that's a minor quibble.

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Oh I love the creepy lullaby too, but I couldn't find it anywhere! We have something similar in my country - the kids sing it, but to me, it always sound like a horror movie intro :) Does anybody here know where to download this one from the drama??

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It's called daemunnori. Google it once maybe you can find it. It's a children's rhyme

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As a fellow Asian, I really appreciate you voicing this perspective. It's very important and is easily misinterpreted by those who aren't familiar with Asian culture. Thanks!

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Also Asian with Asian dad. I always find it weird that in korean dramas, they do depict dads and parents a little more openly affectionate (but not as affectionate as American tv dads) than the Asian dads I know in real life. Maybe it's because my parents are immigrants and my Asian friends' parents are immigrants too. We don't say "I love you".

So it is strange that that Yeon, who really took on the role of surrogate dad for Rang, went with the real life route in terms of how he took care of Rang than the drama life route.

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I'm just gonna chime in that gods and mythological beings losing power and eventually dying when people forget about them is interesting. I miss reading Rick Riordan's books!

I love this week's episodes, but I think it's really setting Rang up to die for his redemption arc. Yes, he was abandoned as a child and that warrants compassion, but yes, he also killed a lot of people... He isn't the real villain, but his actions have consequences that he should pay for, so he won't have a happily ever after here.

Shin-joo is a freaking gem! Taluipa better not mess with our boy!

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Thanks for the Rick Riordan tip! Forgotten gods losing power over being forgotten is also a major line in Neil Gaiman's American Gods (enjoyed the book a lot, the series adaption was ok, but my attention fizzled out without finishing the first season). Really like that concept of deities walking among regular people in the modern world, making ends meet the way they can

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Thank you for reminding me about American Gods! I started it way back and never got to finish... Might add it to my TBR.

As for Rick Riordan, he feeds my love for mythology. My favorite series are Magnus Chase (Norse) and Kane Chronicles (Egyptian). Haven't picked up the Trials of Apollo yet though, but I think he got stripped of his powers and has to live as a mortal as punishment or something.

Others I love would be Madeline Miller's Song of Achilles and Circe!

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That scene where Yeon reached out and grab imoogi, omo, SO badass! Was eye-rolling bad when Yeon walks and walks and walks, I mean, change the field to the desert and you'll have Goblin all over again... but then come smirky Yeon with a trick up his sleeve, oh yeah, manse for the twist! Am overjoyed show is being true to fox reputation as tricksters, and so sorry for thinking of you as slow, Lee Yeon!

So to summarize: Rang & Ji-ah survived some extreme therapy sessions and Yeon is pretty much in control of his subconscious to ever need a therapy ><

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This is hands-down my favorite episode to date. Everyone has nailed it with the commentary, but I would just like to bask in the glow of my favorite things:
- I love that Ji-ah figured it out on her own. I love that she saved herself. I've been a bit lukewarm about her up to now, but now I'm firmly in her camp.
- To quote @eazal: distracting foxes are distracting <3️️
- I really enjoyed the brother focus. Yeah, those convos were loooong overdue, but LDW and KB have such amazing chemistry and make the family relationship so believable to me. Yeon is frustrated and scolding, but clearly loves and worries about his brother. Rang realizing how much Yeon does care about him, his wistful yearning for the old days. The sniping back and forth that covers all manner of affection. This was played so well this week.
- I can't get over how well LDW uses his entire face in this show. His smirks, his grins, his lifted eyebrow, his head toss when telling eodookshini to worry about her own destiny...please keep giving me more of this, LDW, there can never be enough.
- As @quirkycase notes: when Taliupa smiles, it's concerning. I'm doubly worried now for both Shin-joo and Rang. I know Rang has done some majorly bad things and he majorly needs to be punished. But I cannot help the soft spot I have for him. I'm not saying he should get away with it, but I can't help the way I feel either.
- I'm glad they wrapped up the Yeon/Ji-ah separation thing neatly and simply. Instead of making a big production of it, we saw Ji-ah be an intelligent, thoughtful adult woman who put the pieces together and got on with it. The last scene was a great way to end what as a pretty intense episode, and I thought her telling Yeon that she waited for him was a great equalizer in their relationship. She may not have godlike powers, but she's whole, smart, resilient and steadfast. That counts for a lot. I somehow feel like they are standing more side-by-side than ever as partners in this fight, vs him needing to save her because of his guilt or a promise.
- Thank you drama gods for a normal kiss. I cannot stand that frozen-kiss-ssi nonsense that we still see from time to time - it doesn't have to be "after dark" style, but these people like each other. We know it, they know it, PD-nim knows it.

This was just such a great watch. I did not expect to enjoy this show nearly as much as I do. And I really enjoy coming here and talking about it with all of you so much!

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Jia's dream was amazing. Heartbreaking. And that phone call on the disconnected landline... that felt like coming right out one of my crazy-ass dreams 😂
Love each and every one of Lee Rang's scene, he's such an interesting character. Abandonment is a bitch, it's a hole inside people's hearts that twists their perceptions, and Kim Bum is playing a fenomenal broken puppy. And Lee Rang's arc... is just *chef's kiss. Keep on hoping Dramagods will find a way to keep him alive and adopting Puppy Boy

Loved the Eodookshini subplot, good riddance creepy juice ahjumma! You've done well in the little time you had to create havoc.
I'm adoring how caring Shinjoo and Yuri are, my faithful gold-hearted foxes 💚

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Also, the red ribbon was a nice touch! It comes from the belief in the red string of fate that joins your soul to the ones you'll have to find in your lifetime:

https://www.google.com/amp/brightside.me/wonder-curiosities/the-red-string-of-fate-a-beautiful-japanese-legend-140105/amp/

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I rewatch the disconnected landline part just to hear LDW's voice... so touching!! And man, he wrote the charm in his own BLOOD

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This was such a good episode. Those dreams felt so relatable, bittersweet.... Jia's family and her struggles between wanting to live in and believe in that dream world her subconcious created or returning to the real world and confront her constant feeling of loss. And the struggle to watch Rang coming to terms with his long upheld beliefs that he is the victim of the story and instead finding his own agency and will to live and change.

And my shallow, foxophile mind needs to add this: Lee Dong Wook is entirely at his prime right now. I am so utterly bewitched by his etherical charms.

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That's it, foxophile! <3 That's the term!!!

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My inner etymological nerd is sitting here, procrastinating, and trying to figure out what this would be in with a proper Latin or Greek prefix.

*...if Vulpinus is of or pertaining to a fox in Latin, from vulpes, volpis, volpes, and Alopex is ancient Greek for fox...hmmm, Vulpinophile? Maybe? Needs work hmmm.*

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A fine beginning of a fine case study it is, my queen.

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Thank you for focusing on that and not my new word creation "etherical" (read: ethereal)...

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I have never been so shallow before. But I'm totally falling for and addicted to LDW's face.

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LDW is just meant for fantasy!

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Don't beat yourself up. The shallowism is spreading rapidly in this comment section.

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I have nothing to add to all the great comments on this episode. It was just wow. I'm increasingly worried Rang will die in noble sacrifice and I really hope it doesn't come to that. Frankly, at this point, there's really not a single character I feel safe from impending doom. Maybe with the exception of the snail bride.

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I love this episode because it allowed the brothers to have an opportunity to talk about real stuffs. Also not just be flippant about their issues with the other. AND Yeon purposefully missed!!! We knew it all along except for the angry Rang. I love that Rang finally allowed himself to listen and wake up from his pity party.
You are right @quirkycase that its Rang and Jia's episode. I do like Jia's resolution on her fears. Yeon played a part in showing her the way out of that fake world but ultimately it was her who saved herself.
Plus I love how Yeon played the Eodookshini to lure the Imoogi. I so want to wipe that smirk out of Imoogi's face and glad that Yeon grabbed him by the collar and threatened him.
You better watch out Imoogi. Yeon is coming for you!

On a sidenote, I am worried for Shin Joo and what he exchanged for Taluipa's help.

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I'm wondering why Taluipa didn't seem too worried that Yeon could possibly die. It is what it is, lady?! I hope the Imoogi destroys your office and all your Leslie Cheung memorabilia. Wouldn't it be in her best interest that Yeon not die? Seems like Yeon is the only one standing in the evil Imoogi's way and none of the higher ups are lifting a finger to help curb the evil. I was insulted that she would only provide help once Shin Joo begged for it.

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Taluipa annoys me too. I like to think that she cares for Yeon too but sometimes her actions are harsh. I do not think the Imoogi has the power to destroy her office but more likely he can destroy her Leslie Cheung memorabilia 😆

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This! This is what I came to this drama for! Such a wonderful display of relationships that not only propels the plot forward (thank goodness), but grounds our characters through a peak into their pasts. Even the side characters had meaningful scenes both independent and intertwined with our main ones.

I love the brotherly love rekindled, which shows what we've known all along -- Yeon never abandon Rang and has always watched over him. I disagree that Yeon's actions don't make sense. Not all sibling relationships are best friend relationships, especially when one sibling had to act as a parent. With the large age gap and Rang's traumatizing childhood, all of their hybrid father-son/brother-brother interactions across the centuries make sense to me.

I do have to say that Taliupa is still not hitting the mark for me. Her motives are a mystery, and the show has only barely hinted at what's going on underneath the surface. I mostly find her annoying and only a plot device at this point.

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There's an interesting theory that Taluipa's dead son is the Imoogi: https://mindmeltonabun-blog.tumblr.com/post/633461535537315840/tale-of-the-nine-tailed-analysis-and-theories-of

"As previously mentioned, I had theorized that Taluipa’s son, Bok Gil, must have been one hell of a powerful being given that his mom was a powerful Goddess herself. As to what those abilities could have been, it is still a mystery. However, I feel like his powers would’ve been connected the ones Taluipa had (i.e birth, fate, and ability to see what others cannot see). Again, not much was mentioned about him other than he committed suicide and that his name was Bok Gil. Now let’s look at the Imoogi, we know that he has the power of life (bringing the bird back to life), death (sucking the life out of his nannies), and rebirth (being reborn as that boy).

We know that he was born in a leap year as well as being born in a place between the living and dead. The Imoogi could also see what others don’t see such as your soul and your deepest emotions.

If you think about it, when Bok Gil committed suicide, his soul/body was neither in the land of the living nor the dead. He was in between those two realms or in limbo. Connecting this to the fact that the Imoogi said he was born in a place between the living and dead, there is a significant possibility that Bok Gil is indeed the Imoogi. Furthermore, if you look at the kinds of power the Imoogi has and the powers that Taluipa has, you will find that they are strangely similar or related. If that doesn’t convince you enough then just compare the voice of Bok Gil to that of the Imoogi!"

Bok Gil can't have been reborn in the usual sense, but it sounds like the Imoogi was not born in the usual sense either. It's possible that there's some sort of loophole here. Anyways, it would explain Taluipa's connection!

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I think the problem with Taliupa for me is that she's just being played a bit one-note. Always yelling and smacking people. I feel like that's primarily a writing issue, but after a while the sour-faced slap-happiness does get a bit monotonous and loses its effect. That said, a part of me thinks she may start playing a bigger role as the show moves into the last 6 episodes.

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Yes, she's definitely been reduced to Yelling Ajumma instead of the powerful being the show claims her to be. Right now, she just seems like a bitter woman who needs to get out more (really, she hasn't left the building). It's annoying that we know she's a major player here but the writers haven't provided us with any tangible reason to believe that aside from people just saying she is.

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If it didn't feel like stealing from the Beanies that first came up with the term, I would be changing my username to Distracted By All The Foxes. I'm this close.

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I'm not puzzled by Yeon not saying these things to Rang sooner. From the very beginning Yeon has been trying to get Rang to take responsibility for himself, to have the desire to live and to fight for it instead of wallowing in grief and anger because of his past. You can fault Yeon for not realizing sooner that he needed to take a different path with Rang but his motivations are clear, at least to me. Even at the very end Rang almost died because he couldn't shake off the ghost of his mother. But the experience seems to have changed him and now he wants to live differently and to embrace what he has in the world right now.

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I really enjoyed this episode. In my opinion it was the best one so far. It really explored the psyche of two traumatized people, with their trauma materializing in different ways, but as we saw rang and jia were really reduced to their childhood selves. its telling that they began their nightmares as children. This trauma is what made them who they are.
I know others find Yeun's motives towards his brother confusing and as to why he couldnt be honest, but i have a theory. we dont know what exactly is in his contract with taluipa. We know he was given the order to kill his brother but failed . she does not seem like the forgiving type that would let a criminal go unpunished. Mabey his indifference was a way of protecting him or mabey there was an added clause in his contract made t to protect his brother in some way. hopefully we will learn more as time goes on.

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Taluipa was surprised that Yeon and Rang get along so its possible Yeon led her to believe that to protect Rang.

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What a great episode! Fun, emotional, and moved really quickly. I was also puzzled at why Yeon took 600 years to admit he saved Rang. At first, I thought it was supposed to be a secret. But then he just said it, so I wonder why he didn't say it earlier. I loved how Jia figured things out so quickly and without Yeon's help. Actually, she's much sharper than Rang and Yeon on figuring out that she's trapped in a dream. Then again, Rang and Yeon were preoccupied with zombies that can't be killed.

Shin-joo and Yuri are the real OTP here for me. I do wonder if they can ever have a relationship if each one of them has a fox brother that they put first before all else.

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So..I guess people said they hear the song before sleeping off?

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I'm empathizing with Yeon as a laconic but wounded hero. He saved his younger brother but couldn't be there to protect him when his violent actions ended so many lives and brought him to his fate. Yeon was chosen to punish him, but deliberately held back from killing him. And now, watching his brother sink deeper into evil, Yeon still comes NOT to 'save' him so much, but to 'help' Rang finally learn to learn to overcome the self-pity he's carried over all these years and find a motivation to push through his baggage and keep living. So far Rang's only goal in life has been to finally die by Yeon's hands after all. Yeon is harsh yes, but is being a good brother. He is also a gentle protector of little ghost girls, a guy who brings iced coffee to the chilly-hearted gatekeeper of the underworld, and happily makes rice for Jia---all caring behaviours that this God of the Mountain would have had before he was stripped of that position. Yes he is often petty, as we see many from the underworld are, but somehow he rings my 'byronic hero' bell....a hero that lives outside the bounds of society's norms, yet is charismatic and sexy, likely because of his refusal to play by the rules. Perhaps that hero is too old fashioned for some, but I'm enjoying the flashbacks to Rochester and Heathcliffe.

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