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Run On: Episode 1

What sounds like a typical love story between a runner and a translator turns out to be quite atypical in this first episode of Run On. The cold rich boy is actually a crazy person, and the spunky poor girl is a loser. However, these characters are much more than their labels, and as their paths cross, it feels inevitable for them to fall for each other.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

A man and a woman start off their day running, and though there are parallels, their lives seem to vastly differ. Our male protagonist goes out for a morning jog, stopping to pet an adorable dog, and our female protagonist rushes through the streets, avoiding a yapping pup from biting her heels. While she applies makeup in the back of a taxi to attend a film festival, he goes to a salon dressed in a suit to walk the red carpet.

This is KI SUN-KYUM (Im Shi-wan): a handsome young man whose accomplishments as a track and field national representative are overshadowed by his more famous family members. Today, he escorts his mom, Actor YOOK JI-WOO (Cha Hwa-yeon), to a festival, and as soon as he completes his duties, he leaves to meet his teammates.

As the renowned “Queen of Cannes,” Ji-woo attends a radio interview, and the host asks about her partner this morning. She describes Sun-kyum as the man she loves the most, though it’s probably because he resembles her.

When asked about her next project, she explains it as a typical love story. She lists the different types of characters she might play, and the scene flashes to each of the four leads: the crazy person, the loser, the psychopath, and the piece of trash. At the end, Ji-woo adds, “To someone, a first love.”

Stumbling across the open radio event, OH MI-JOO (Shin Se-kyung) catches a glimpse of Ji-woo and immediately cancels her plans with her friend, PARK MAE-YI (Lee Bong-ryun). She finds herself a seat in the front and displays a message to the actor on her phone. To Mi-joo’s delight, Ji-woo reads her note out loud and calls her adorable.

While Sun-kyum’s teammates wait for him at a café, the youngest member, KIM WOO-SHIK (Lee Jung-ha), asks for permission to buy tickets for a movie. Another member scolds him for wasting money, but Sun-kyum arrives and offers to pay. Woo-shik practically has hearts in his eyes as he gets Sun-kyum a straw and praises his red-carpet look, but Sun-kyum hardly reacts.

Team ace KWON YOUNG-IL (Park Sung-joon) comments on Sun-kyum’s photos from the festival with Ji-woo. He calls him a slang term for attention seeker, but his criticism falls flat since Sun-kyum doesn’t understand him.

The three of them watch the movie Woo-shik wanted to see, and just two seats down the row is Mi-joo’s empty chair. Once the end credits roll, Mae-yi takes a picture of the screen with Mi-joo’s name listed as the translator.

Though she missed the first screening, Mi-joo doesn’t regret her decision since she saw Ji-woo, and she’s content with the photo Mae-yi took for her. However, her good mood sours when Director Han Suk-won casually greets them, and she wonders if he forgot about how they broke up.

Contrary to Mi-joo’s hostility, Suk-won appears to have no qualms about chatting with his ex and her best friend. He complains about one of her translations in his movie, and Mi-joo scoffs, defending her creative choices. Unfortunately for Mi-joo, their meeting doesn’t end there since she has to see him again at the after-party.

As Mi-joo trudges alone to the party, along the same street is Sun-kyum and his teammates at a restaurant. Though he notices the odd dynamic between fellow athlete Gyu-duk and Woo-shik, Sun-kyum stays silent.

Meanwhile, Mi-joo sits at the opposite end from Suk-won, but her attempts to remain inconspicuous fail since he calls her over to his side. Their university professor is here as well, and maintaining social niceties, Mi-joo thanks him for recommending her to translate the movie.

The professor huffs since he was actually against the idea and accuses Mi-joo of pandering to Suk-won now that he’s an up-and-coming director. Of course, the one brown-nosing is the professor who promises to write a glowing review.

Sun-kyum looks up the word Young-il used earlier and frowns at the results. He shoves his phone in his face, wordlessly demanding an explanation, but Young-il just sighs and feeds him more food.

After one too many drinks, the professor rambles on about movies, and Mi-joo blurts out her desires to go home. He gets offended and orders Mi-joo to pour him a drink. She suggests ending for the night and points out that he can’t even stand properly.

The professor flings a glass of water into her face and then lambastes all female translators for relying on their looks. To everyone’s shock, Mi-joo grabs a bottle, but instead of attacking the professor, she pours even more water over her head.

She demands an apology and derides him for his Joseon-era comment. The professor argues that she humiliated him first since she said it couldn’t stand up. He flails around, causing his toupee to soar through the air and land in Mi-joo’s hands.

As the others erupt into snickers, the professor threatens Mi-joo, but she’s had enough and storms out. She chucks the toupee to the ground, but picks it up again since littering is bad. Hearing a crash behind her, Mi-joo makes a run for it, and she bumps into Sun-kyum who’s standing in the street.

Her belongings scatter to the floor, and Sun-kyum helps pick them up. When he grabs her gun, she explains that it’s just a lighter, and he replies, “I didn’t ask.”

Suk-won runs towards them, and Mi-joo hides behind Sun-kyum, asking for just three minutes. Unsurprisingly, her hiding spot doesn’t work, and Suk-won drags her by her wrist to make her apologize.

Witnessing Suk-won’s blatant disregard for Mi-joo’s personhood, Sun-kyum points the gun at Suk-won and asks Mi-joo if the gun is real. She wonders if he’s trying to help her, and he tells her that the three minutes aren’t over yet.

His daring act only makes him look like a crazy person, but Sun-kyum cocks the gun and steps closer to them. In the distance, fireworks go off, and the sudden pop sends Suk-won sprawling. Using the distraction, Mi-joo makes her escape and leaves her gun behind with Sun-kyum.

After their training, Young-il and Sun-kyum bicker in the locker room, making sarcastic remarks about each other. When Sun-kyum leaves, a couple of younger athletes take Young-il’s side, but he bristles at their comments and reminds them that Sun-kyum is his friend, not theirs.

Woo-shik overhears the entire exchange and goes out to find Sun-kyum sitting on the track field. Sun-kyum already knows that the others must have talked behind his back, and Woo-shik doesn’t deny it since a lot of people hate him.

As a newcomer, Woo-shik turns to Sun-kyum for advice about his personality changes, but Sun-kyum tells him to blame others instead of himself. Woo-shik asks if that includes Sun-kyum, and he says that it does. Still, Woo-shik seems to like him and hands him a drink as thanks for the movie yesterday. He asks if he had fun, and Sun-kyum tells him that he did not. Ha!

Suk-won is surprised to see Mi-joo still at the festival since the professor took over her role as interpreter for his interviews. Swallowing her pride, Mi-joo stands outside the professor’s hotel room door with his cleaned toupee and asks to talk—unaware that no one is inside.

The professor and his wife find her leaning against their door, and he spares her a few minutes in the hallway. She pleads with him to let her act as Suk-won’s interpreter, and the professor agrees… if she can time travel.

She asks if he’s implying to the days when he had hair (pfft), and the professor nearly has a stroke. What makes her comment worse is that she’s sincere, and the professor shouts that he’ll never forgive her.

Mi-joo vents her frustration to Mae-yi and regrets her actions last night, especially losing her gun. She wonders if she should have brought something to the professor when she apologized, and Mae-yi scolds her for going empty-handed.

The next day at training, the coach praises Sun-kyum for lowering his time, and he scolds Gyu-duk and his friend for getting worse. The team moves on to weight training next, and Woo-shik arrives to the gym with a bandage on his face.

Connecting the dots, Sun-kyum follows Woo-shik to the locker room and shares his theory about what happened. He knows the coaches are careful with the athletes and Young-il only cares about himself. As for other sports, no one even knows who Woo-shik is, so that only leaves two people on Sun-kyum’s list: Gyu-duk and his friend.

Sun-kyum lifts up Woo-shik’s shirt, revealing bruises on his body. He presumes that the abuse has been ongoing since the three of them went to the same school, but Woo-shik denies it. When his lies fail, he blames himself for what happened and begs Sun-kyum to keep this a secret. Though frustrated with Woo-shik’s response, Sun-kyum simply advises him to see a doctor and take pictures of his wounds.

Mi-joo returns to the professor’s hotel room, but this time, she drags Mae-yi with her. She tells her friend to leave if she feels uncomfortable, and Mae-yi glares at Mi-joo since she could have said that sooner.

The professor’s wife answers the door and says that her husband told her to tell them that he isn’t here. (The wife hates him, too, doesn’t she?) Mi-joo mentions the red ginseng she brought, and the gift earns her a ticket inside.

The professor scolds Mae-yi for never visiting him after she started her own company, and she tells him that she felt no need to see him since she never learned anything from him. Caught in the middle, Mi-joo looks toward her friend then at the professor, and she jumps to her feet.

She screams at the professor, but it’s only to apologize for her behavior. She begs him to let her take over for the rest of the interviews at least, and he asks if she really wants the job that much.

Sun-kyum’s dad, Assemblyman KI JUNG-DO (Park Young-kyu), talks with the professor about an interpreter for his son. He requests for a poor individual since they usually don’t cause problems, and the professor says that he has someone in mind.

Mae-yi tells Mi-joo that the professor’s part-time job is a sham, but even if she isn’t being paid, Mi-joo thinks it’ll be a good opportunity to interpret for a national representative. Before heading back, she stops by a PC café to play shooting games and tells her online friend about her rotten luck. Another player posts in the chat about a limited-edition model gun he’s selling, and Mi-joo jumps at the chance to buy it.

Returning home, Sun-kyum finds a bag for him, and as he checks out the contents, he gets a call from his older sister, KI EUN-BI (Ryu Abell), who saved herself as “pretty sister” in his phone. She’s a professional golfer, and her plethora of awards and trophies line the walls of their house. She asks if he’ll be at the next family meeting, and he tells her that their mom’s manager already sent him clothes for the event.

As Eun-bi leaves the airport, an agent walks up to her and hands her a business card. They’ve met before, and Eun-bi allows her to take her bags. While the agent makes room in her trunk, she tells Eun-bi that she goes camping with her kids—hence all the gear—and Eun-bi comments on how she’s a good mom.

We’re officially introduced to our third lead, SEO DAN-AH (Sooyoung), the CEO of the agent with Eun-bi. She eavesdrops on their conversation through her phone and hears Eun-bi turn down their offer since she already has an affiliated club. She tells them to just take care of her brother, and Eun-bi turns off her phone.

The agent asks if she wants to be dropped off at home, and Eun-bi wistfully wonders if such a place even exists for her or Sun-kyum. She says that the two of them were always alone, and asks the agent to take her to a hotel.

Mi-joo arrives at the park to meet with the online seller, and one look at the creep hiding in the slide puts her on edge. In this case, first impressions turn out to be true as the seller comments on her gender and asks for the money first.

Seeing through his tricks, Mi-joo forces him to switch at the same time and successfully buys the gun. As she marvels over the craftsmanship, the seller offers to show her how to use it and wrestles the gun out of her hands. As soon as he has it, he pushes her to the ground and runs away with the gun and her money.

She chases the seller through the streets, and in her pursuit, she passes by Sun-kyum who’s on the phone with Dan-ah. In that moment, the world slows down, and Sun-kyum watches Mi-joo run past him.

He stops a passerby—our fourth and last lead, LEE YOUNG-HWA (Kang Tae-oh)—and borrows his tube art bag. Taking aim, Sun-kyum flings the bag at the seller and hits his mark.

Mi-joo runs to the seller, and after checking to see if the gun is safe, she calls the police. Young-hwa cautiously approaches the scene to pick up his bag, and Mi-joo asks if he threw it. See her pointed gun, he drags Sun-kyum over and explains that he did it.

Mi-joo thanks him for the help, but Sun-kyum asks her to forget what she saw. He then asks if Young-hwa’s stuff is fine, and Young-hwa shows them his unscathed thermos. They’re all so weird.

Since the problem has been resolved, Sun-kyum takes his leave, but the police arrive just then with their guns blazing—quite literally since they think Mi-joo’s model gun is real. She grabs Sun-kyum before he disappears and pleads with him to help her.

Despite his aversion to being caught up in this mess, he ends up at the station with Mi-joo and writes up a report. He asks if her gun might actually be real since there are perverts in the world who like breaking the law. She says that she isn’t a pervert, and he says that he didn’t call her one.

When he comments on how fake her gun looks, Mi-joo gets defensive and asks if he’s John Wick or something. Sun-kyum has no idea what that is, and his forthright confession of his cluelessness catches her off-guard.

Meanwhile, Dan-ah fumes in her office, wondering what’s taking Sun-kyum so long to see her. Secretary Jung informs her that he’s in police custody, but there’s another, more immediate issue on their hands… her brother, Seo Tae-woong, is here.

Tae-woong flounces into the office, ignoring Dan-ah’s belligerent greeting, and places a bag on her desk. She wonders why his fans like him and then asks why he likes her. He says that it’s because they’re family, and asks why she hates him. She answers, “For the same reason.”

Dan-ah tells him to beg for affection elsewhere, and Tae-woong breaks a pot to get her to stop. She doesn’t even flinch at his violence, and Tae-woong cries that he came to drop off some treats since they taste better fresh.

After he leaves, Dan-ah wonders out loud why her half-brother acts so dramatic, calling him either good-natured or plain crazy. She still eats one of the hard candies he brought for her, and asks Secretary Jung to reschedule her meeting with Sun-kyum.

When he asks if they should intervene in Sun-kyum’s case, Dan-ah tells him not to bother since the assemblyman will take care of things. Rather, she wants to know more about the interpreter the assemblyman hired without her consent.

The sun has set by the time Mi-joo and Sun-kyum exit the police station, and she apologizes for making him miss his meeting. She offers to buy him a meal, but Sun-kyum tells her that he isn’t hungry. She assures him that she isn’t flirting and just wants to repay him for his help.

He stares at her for a while—making her squirm underneath his gaze—and then asks for her number. She saves herself as “When hungry, tang” (which can mean “bang” like a gun or soup).

He becomes curious about her hobby, finding it strange that she values a fake. Mi-joo asks if only real things have meaning, then, and explains that she likes them just because. She wonders why he helped her, and he repeats her words back to her: “Just because.”

On his way home, Sun-kyum looks up what a “John Wick” is and discovers that he’s a killer. As for Mi-joo, she tells Mae-yi at home that she believes in destiny, especially when the guy is handsome. As if fate did exist, an unknown number calls her, but to Mi-joo’s dismay, it isn’t Sun-kyum.

The next day, Mi-joo arrives at the meeting place for her part-time job and stops to gape at an advertisement with Sun-kyum as the model. As his beautiful face stares back at her, she mutters, “Dang it. He’s not for sale.”

Dan-ah and Secretary Jung find Mi-joo loitering outside their building, and when Mi-joo introduces herself as the interpreter, Dan-ah gives her a quick scan. She thought the new hire had bought their way into the position, but one look at Mi-joo shows that this isn’t the case. She asks if she’s the gofer of the gofer then, and invites her out to coffee.

While they drink at a nice café, Mi-joo calls out Dan-ah for her rude behavior, and Dan-ah doesn’t refute it since she was mad about the situation. Mi-joo admits that she probably is the gofer’s gofer, but Dan-ah shouldn’t take out her anger on her.

Dan-ah agrees and tells Mi-joo not to worry about the job since they have interpreters at their company. Realizing that she just got fired, Mi-joo begs her to reconsider, and Dan-ah gasps at her sudden change in attitude. Dan-ah comments on how Mi-joo looks like she might even kneel, and then points to the grass. When Mi-joo stares at her in shock, Dan-ah laughs and gives her the job.

As Mi-joo turns around, the world slows down, and she locks eyes with Sun-kyum who walks towards their table. Hearing that he’s the athlete, Mi-joo calls it fate since this is already their third meeting. Sun-kyum corrects her, though—it’s actually their fourth.

During the film festival, he saw her fangirling over his mom and noticed her untied shoelace. In the present, he comments on her shoes again, but Mi-joo has no clue what he’s referencing.

She introduces herself officially as the gofer as well as his new interpreter and puts out her hand for a handshake. Instead of taking it, he makes a gun with his hand and shoots her. He mentions the lighter she left behind, and Mi-joo asks if he’s really crazy. He says that he isn’t and tells her his name.

 
COMMENTS

Visually and on paper, the show comes across as a typical love story of two different and beautiful individuals crossing paths and falling in love. The general structure of the episode still follows this skeletal outline, but the tone of the show is something else entirely. The banter between the characters is at times predictable yet unconventional. All the characters (and I do mean that quite literally) seem to blurt out the first thoughts in their heads every time they interact. Consequently, conversations jump around and don’t fit a linear structure. Two characters might start off on one topic but then something else catches their attention, derailing the conversation for a few minutes until they get back on track. There are also moments were no sane person would utter those words in that situation, but in this world, filters don’t exist. In some cases, this can be a refreshing twist, but it does feel jarring if you haven’t adjusted to the show’s tone.

This sense of idiosyncrasy can really be felt when the two leads meet. Both Mi-joo and Sun-kyum have enough traits to be stereotypical—she’s the plucky poor girl who needs the job while he’s the standoffish rich boy who’s all alone—but these generic boxes don’t capture the essence of these characters. Mi-joo isn’t just taking the job because she needs the money (in fact, she thinks she won’t be paid for her work) but because she needs to get back into her professor’s good graces. She’s poor, but it doesn’t define her as a person nor does it dictate all her decisions. Also, she isn’t a spirited “Candy” who faces all her problems through grit but a stalwart believer in her own self-worth who’s dedicated to her career. She might grovel when the situation calls for it and feel frustrated with her life, but she never once doubts her abilities as a translator. As for Sun-kyum, he might be quiet, but he isn’t a pushover. He says whatever is on his mind, and though his words can come across as mean-spirited, they don’t feel unkind because of the way Sun-kyum presents himself. His face always looks devoid of emotions, but because of this, his inquisitive questions come across as innocent rather than malicious. Thus, when Sun-kyum asks why Mi-joo would risk her life for a fake gun, he is seen as generally curious rather than judgmental.

While Mi-joo and Sun-kyum are definitely odd, I wouldn’t call them the strangest characters in the show. That title belongs to Dan-ah and her brother who were bizarre from start to finish. As Dan-ah mentioned, her brother is either a really innocent kid who hasn’t mastered controlling his emotions or a psychopath who constantly needs affection. If he’s any indication of the rest of her family, then the whole Seo household is filled with egotistical and violent children playing grownups. Dan-ah is more interesting than her tantrum throwing brother, but she’s still just as weird and selfish. She didn’t help Sun-kyum when he was at the police station since his dad would take care of the mess, but when the assemblyman’s meddling involves her business, she reacts. Dan-ah only cares about herself so far which also explains her attitude towards Mi-joo. At first, she dislikes her because she was the assemblyman’s hire, but when she realizes that Mi-joo does not pose a threat, she readily hands over the job when she begs for it.

Overall, the first episode of Run On was an interesting introduction to this world and its characters. From the surface, the show looked like a glass of water—familiar, clear, and unassuming—yet with one sip, that impression changed completely. I can’t tell just yet if the show is a new type of drink that will quench my thirst or if it’s actually sparkling water that’s lost its fizz. Hopefully, the show can live up to people’s expectations and deliver a fun and unique story. At the very least, I’m sure the drama will be a feast for the eyes because no matter who you look at—either Mi-joo or Sun-kyum—the pretty is blinding.

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Yeeey is up. I really enjoy the premier episode.
All of the characters are weurd indeed. The conversation is definitely full of quirks but enjoyable for me. I know this drama is not for everyone but i cannot wait for our character journey.

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I really liked the premiere, and when I finished episode 1 I immediately wanted to watch episode. I had a permanent smile on my face while watching, and loved how weird are our leads. Yes, we've seen them before in other dramas, but they are slight differences that I'm liking so far.
I even had Into the ring vibes regarding how weird and cute our leads look together, I mean, they look at each other saying: isn't this guy weird?

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Sun-kyum super straight face definitely brings Seo Gong-myung to my mind! And yea, finding it really cute that they both think of each other as weird ^^

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Right??? I could'nt wait for the next episode though I hardly understood the 1st episode. And hey I have started into the ring and into 2nd episode and yes the ML's are similar and at the same time feels different.

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I, of course agree, this show was weird but in a good way!!!

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I was the same! Grinning the whole way through and eager for the next episode. There's something so clean and fresh about the optics of this drama - I'm intrigued and hoping for a fun run.

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I really enjoyed the first two episodes and like the two main leads. I think that I will really enjoy this drama.

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This show is surprisingly refreshing to watch! I loved Im shi wan's character. He is such a wierdo, but a lovable one.

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The first week's episodes remind me a lot of Be Melodramatic with the quirky-to-the-extreme characters and the indie, slice-of-life feels. Am really enjoying the "jumping around conversations", as @lovepark puts it, the dialogues makes sense but it's pretty weird at the same time and made a lot of LOL moments.

Sun-kyum seems to deliberately keep his distance from involvement with other people, and loved it that he was kinda unable to stop himself when it comes to Mi-joo. It took him some time before deciding to point the gun at Suk-won, but how cute it was that it took him mere seconds to borrow & throw the art tube once he realized it was her.
Also, it cracked me up so bad when the honey water thermos appeared from the tube! No wonder the thief goes down so hard ><

It's like he has a problem with expressing himself and she got the problem with being trapped in her current situation, so will she help "interpreting" him to the world while he'll make her able to "run"..?

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Yes yes the comparison to Be melodramatic! I feel it too! Their bizarre banter with each other. The characters dynamics also fun too. Can't wait for Sooyoung and Taeoh to meet😍😍😍.

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I’m said in my comment that it had Into the ring vibes, but you are right about Be Melodramatic too.
I love the conversations, and the quirky humour too.
I hope it goes on this way!

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Woah I didn't notice the similarity in the banter till you highlighted it here. The quirky banter is quite similar to how it was in Be Melodramatic.
Only Record of Youth came to my mind but that is more of a cheesy conersation rather than quirky.

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I noticed because both first episodes of the dramas made me go "what is wrong with these people?" ><

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They gave me Be Melodramatic vibes too. I remember watching the first episode of Be Melodramatic and wondering "What in the world are these people saying?" I got used to the "Jumping around conversations" and weird dialogue there, which perhaps prepared me for the weirdness in this drama.

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"so will she help "interpreting" him to the world while he'll make her able to "run"..?"

It's interesting... now I hope the show will go this way...

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but these generic boxes don’t capture the essence of these characters.

You're totally right @lovepark! After watching episode two, I kept on thinking if we've seen these type of leads before. We certainly have but it's not enough to describe them as such. I love the banter of each character, may it MJ to SK or SK to DA or even DA to MJ. It feels refreshing rather than forced.

Cannot wait to see more of these characters and so happy that it's being recapped!

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Loved the premier. And Im shi wan is defintely a treat to eyes. Somehow I find him very starngely attractive. And the chemistry is very good with the leads.
And looks like I'm in trouble. I very rarely live watch. And with the few shows I live watched I was happy to wait for a week for the next episodes but I just want to marathon it. I can't wait for the next episode. I credit the leads for that.
And I was a soo young bias and generally liked her character except when she was mean which is most of the time. Lets see how her character goes.

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Sooyoung is so sexily charismatic as meany Dan-ah! Seriously thought she was going to make Mi-joo kneel before she laughed it off. Guess her bark is worse than her bite for those who really know her, like her half-brother and Sun-kyum. She talks like she's out to make the world her enemy and I'd really like to know why...

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Yeah I found her very intriguing. But I felt very bad for her brother.

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Yay!! Recaps by @lovepark!!

I enjoyed the pilot episode so much. I love our weirdly quirky leads and that everyone is so unfiltered.

The humor in the show works for me.
I laughed so hard at the bar scene. The professor is an ass, but that situation and music/BGM was hilarious. And then the fake gun scene!

It felt like Too many characters were introduced in one episode. But by episode two things were much clearer.

Fingers crossed. Hope the show continues to be good.

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It is not a rich story, I wonder how they would make 16 episodes butt I did very much liked first 2 episodes. Story telling is somehow very calm and keeps you there. I liked both female leads. Our main male lead is was annoying at first episode but OK get warmer at second episode 😁Mi joo's life seems veery real life like 😁

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Agree definitely not what I expected from the posters and trailer. It's a bit dark and I quite like it. I'm not sure what to expect in a good way.

P.S. Im Shi-Wan looks so good in the final shot. Button down white shirt and khakis. And Dan ah's style is impeccable. I want her look.

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I knew Im Shi Wan was good-looking, but I never found him attractive before until now. That scene of him walking over in his white button down shirt. *fans self* It's sort of amazing what a simple button down shirt can do. I remember watching Ghost Detective and salivating over Choi Daniel in his dark blue button down.

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Thank you for the recap, I really enjoyed this premiere week and I definitely warmed to SG by the second episode.
I love how we were introduced into the action straight away and the conversations are so much fun.
Love that the drama is tackling some pretty tough issues from the beginning and I can't wait to see more.

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I like how Mi-joo can objectively see that Sun-kyum is good-looking. Let's not pretend that these actors are not handsome!

It was hard to put a finger on the first episode, but your commentary, @lovepark, accurately puts into words the things I felt and noticed. It's not just the conversations that jump around, but the scenes too and it took pretty much the entire hour to get used to the random rhythm, though I do hope the director will not abuse the slow-mos. I'm glad I stuck around because the second episode is even better once I know what to expect.

Also, Im Shi Wan and Shin Se Kyung look adorable together even when their characters are having awkward conversations.

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I also like how Mi-joo knows she's pretty and they didn't turn her character into a "she doesn't know how beautiful she truly is"-type. They aren't beating us over the head with her self-assurance, but I appreciate she isn't some insecure candy but an actual adult woman.

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Run On is definitely that light and simple Romcom I need for my quite harsh week (with Hush and Queen Cheorin) but it was more interesting than I thought it would be. In this first episode, I was caught off with Im Siwan's character because I couldn't get it whether it was his acting or I just need more time understanding the character and after delving into episode 2 it is definitely the latter. It was fun and light but also interesting! 2 episodes and I'm sold!

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I always wonder if it’s his acting, he generally looks like he didn’t hear what the other person just said to him. It’s weird.

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Yeah lol the first episode really gets you lost with his character, but the second episode definitely gets everything in the right place

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I felt the same thing about his character in the first episode. In the second, the lightbulb just went off in my head and everything just made sense.

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I know right?? I don't think there's any exact moment for it but after you watch Episode 2 everything just clicks about the character. Maybe it's the way they potray him being cynical and skeptic better so you understand why he's sort of detached from his surroundings

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I'm so loving this show.

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That last scene, he is so awkward, cute, different and delightful. I found myself rewinding some of his scenes which I rarely do.

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I didn't notice the whole jumping around in the conversations and mashed-up scenes, but methinks I might be because I'm currently watching Be Melodramatic, 'cause it's the same style. Zippy, quick, bordering rude, dialogue and zoning out of context. It craves full attention and is delightful. However, I don't really appreciate that everyone's like that (except our wonderfully quiet fourth lead) so I hope the show tones it down a notch. Shin Se-kyung fits this role expertly, she can be a bit of a hit or miss for me but this is definitely a hit.

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Realy enjoyed the premiere and the characters,like them all...Sun-kyum is quite a weird character but strangely charming...Can't wait for episode 3!

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At first I didn’t know what to make of the drama and then by ep 2, I got how it is trying to be thoughtful, which the recap alludes to.

What definitely helped was reading another review which described the drama as “What happens when everyone speaks Korean and yet no one understands what each other is saying. Would love be the interpreter?”

I can now see what the show is trying to do with the weird dialogues. But ep 1 didn’t do a good job of showing WHY these people are the way they are or what motivates them to act so it was very hard to get.

For example, why is Im Si Wan so expressionless? Speaking of ISW, man I didn’t know he was so good looking. Or is that part of the setup?

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Thanks, lovepark. I'm glad i'm not the only one to think thoughts like: Do people even talk like this? I have not had a glimpse of other shows mentioned here, like Be Melodramatic, etc. So it all came so new. Hope the weird vibes are carried on and explained with interesting backstories and boring tropes (eg hell-sh professor) kept to minimal. Yes, if anything, I may stick for the pretty. Love that blue jumper dress on SSK.

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I'm in for the quirkiness and the strong SL female. I think she might give Veronica Park a run for her money (at least I hope so).

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I will admit, the only reason I decided to watch this show is because both leads are so, so pretty and the trailers were really good despite the show's plot description being so stereotypical. I'm glad I gave it a chance though because I actually really liked this premiere! I was smiling through the whole thing, which surprised me. The second episode is even better than the first.

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i really love this...the characters are so unique and not typical...i heard this is writer's debut drama..i'm looking forward for fresh new kind of drama that you can enjoy easily

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I have been anticipating seeing Siwan again in RUN ON and I wasn’t disappointed with the premier episodes.
I went back and rewatched episode one to make sure I got the characters right and I did catch Sun-kyum’s first smile when he saw his sister’s name on his phone.
This is the second drama I am currently watching (along with THE UNCANNY COUNTER) that is dealing with bullying. It must be endemic.
I am enjoying all the leads so far.
Mi-joo’s profession is dealing with words and language so I would expect she would be the one to carry more of the conversation.
Sun-kyum has grown up in a household dominated by three egocentric professions (if you will): politics (father), acting (mother) and sports (sister and himself). I can see that for self-preservation he has turned in on himself a bit but he is not anti-social. He listens and observes and yes is a bit eccentric. I am enjoying Siwan’s portrayal of Sun-kyum.

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I've been looking forward to this drama as serving up some lighter fare to top off a heavy year, and in many ways it does deliver this. But there's potentially more depth here than expected - it feels familiar for many of the reasons @lovepark and Beanies have mentioned but thus far does feel like a fresh take on those themes. So easy to digest but with some interesting flavors.

I love the bluntness and the jerk of some of these conversations. In that, I also hear some echos of Ko Moon-young and Moon Sang-tae - the directness, unvarnished discussion of two people who aren't parsing words. I like that both are relatively comfortable with who they are and what they do and want, aware that they are very different from each other and also unfussed by that. This show is working for me right now, and I'm looking forward to this week's episodes.

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I agree. The directness of the leads and some of the other characters is refreshing. I hope it keeps it's quirkiness all the way through.

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Ah you added stars to my eyes! I wasn't exactly sure how I felt about the pilot, I liked it but couldn't pinpoint why. Ep 2 solidified what I liked about the show, but that's later.

Thank you for this wonderful recap of ep 1 - I wonder if that's why Netflix tl went with "when hungry, bang" instead of tang since a casual watcher would get bang reference more with the whole gun scenes. Smart choice on the tls part I think. It still maintains the essence of the scene even if the bang tang pun is lost. Bang has his own flavour. Bang like gun, bang like room. Bang like make a noise. So call when you're hungry, ring me when you're hungry. It found its own humour in the translation.

Anyway I didn't notice all the parallels & details in ep 1 since I was still taking it all in, & couldn't figure out Seo Danah at all. I liked her brother more than I like her. He can be a good guy since he actively seeks affection & does little things to show his care. Danah might find him an ally, a friend if she just gave him a chance.

That painter x appreciator gives me Rich Man flashbacks. This might give us the fleshed out story I wanted back from that awful drama.

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Hello,

First of all, I just want to say thank you for the Recap of the drama! You guys are awesome for doing recaps on Kdramas. I usually prefer to read it before deciding if I want to watch it.

One thing that I want to point out was that you may have used the wrong names here. It talked about Tae-woong and Dan-ah's at the office, but then the name suddenly changed to Mi-joo who is our FL. I was quite confused after reading it. So I just want to clarify it it's was still Dan-ah and not Mi-joo.

"Tae-woong flounces into the office, ignoring Dan-ah’s belligerent greeting, and places a bag on her desk. She wonders why his fans like him and then asks why he likes her. He says that it’s because they’re family, and asks why she hates him. She answers, “For the same reason.”

Mi-joo tells him to beg for affection elsewhere, and Tae-woong breaks a pot to get her to stop. She doesn’t even flinch at his violence, and Tae-woong cries that he came to drop off some treats since they taste better fresh.

After he leaves, Mi-joo wonders out loud why her half-brother acts so dramatic, calling him either good-natured or plain crazy. She still eats one of the hard candies he brought for her, and asks Secretary Jung to reschedule her meeting with Sun-kyum.

When he asks if they should intervene in Sun-kyum’s case, Mi-joo tells him not to bother since the assemblyman will take care of things. Rather, she wants to know more about the interpreter the assemblyman hired without her consent."

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