Season

1
52

Run On: Episode 8

Run On continues to carefully unfold information about our main quartet — the more time we spend with them, the more we learn about what makes them tick, and why they interact with the world the way they do. A work commitment takes our heroine out of the city, and the brief time our couple spends apart serves to bring them closer together.

 
EPISODE 8 RECAP 

Mi-joo takes Sun-kyum’s wrist and leads him away from his father to their correct “place” in the theater. Assemblyman Ki begins to go after the two, but his wife holds him back (and you can just see the hearts in her eyes as she watches them leave). She jokes that Assemblyman Ki has been shooting his own little makjang drama with the couple and asks if he’s going to pour water on Mi-joo next.

Once they’re off the scene, Mi-joo stops and looks Sun-kyum straight in the eyes. She doesn’t understand why she always has to see him lower himself in front of others, and she tells him to prioritize and value himself more. She doesn’t miss a chance to ask why he was supposed to be meeting Dan-ah, though — but Sun-kyum only says if he was meeting Dan-ah, he wouldn’t have been talking only to Mi-joo.

Inside the theater, in the seats where Sun-kyum was supposed to sit with Dan-ah, a spiffy Young-hwa is anticipating Dan-ah’s arrival. But just as he finishes checking his hair in his phone reflection, he turns to find Mr. Jung in her place. Young-hwa nags at Mr. Jung, asking why he won’t give him Dan-ah’s number despite her permission to do so. Mr. Jung says it’s because he makes him uneasy, and then hushes Young-hwa so he can pay attention to the movie.

When the movie ends and everyone rushes to leave the theater, Mi-joo and Sun-kyum stay behind. There’s no discussion of this whatsoever, but it’s implicit between them that they’ll stay to see Mi-joo’s name in the closing credits.

Outside of the theater, a red and bleary-eyed Young-hwa sees Sun-kyum and Mi-joo exiting, and shouts to stop them. He waves to Mi-joo but immediately pulls Sun-kyum to the side, upset that Mr. Jung showed up instead of Dan-ah.

Sun-kyum asks if Dan-ah is the reason Young-hwa’s crying, but Young-hwa says it’s because the movie was so sad and he’s a sensitive guy. Then, Young-hwa asks if Sun-kyum arrived back home safely in the morning after drinking with him. Mi-joo overhears and asks Sun-kyum if that’s where he was that night. At the same time, Sun-kyum realizes that Mi-joo and Young-hwa already know each other, and the misunderstanding about the other night quickly clears up with Mi-joo admitting she let her imagination run wild.

When Mi-joo and Sun-kyum head out for drinks, Young-hwa perks up and insists on third-wheeling, even though it’s clear to him they were on a date. Sun-kyum even wishes he’d take the hint, but the three wind up going out together.

They don’t stay put out for very long, though, because by the time we catch them at the table, the conversation is going quite well. Mi-joo and Young-hwa rave about the film, and chatter non-stop — it’s completely clear these two speak the same language, and their conversation flows naturally and comfortably.

Sun-kyum, quietly listening, tries to join the conversation by informing them that he’s already seen the movie before tonight. Mi-joo one-ups him saying she’s seen it several times. They then realize they were actually at the same film festival where it was screened, and Mi-joo points at him to confirm if he really was there too. Sun-kyum points his finger back at hers, E.T. style. While Mi-joo is bewildered, Young-hwa notices the move. Sun-kyum is clearly trying to speak her language, but before they can address the weirdness that just happened, Young-hwa usurps the conversation again, and he and Mi-joo chat familiarly about college.

When Sun-kyum brings up Dan-ah, Young-hwa moons over her hilariously, and begs Sun-kyum for her number. Sun-kyum seems hesitant until Young-hwa plays back the recording he took of Dan-ah giving verbal permission to share her number.

It doesn’t get more legit than that, so Sun-kyum gives him the number (victory!), which Young-hwa enters under the nickname “Rapunzel.” He notices disappointedly that she has no profile photo, but decides it makes her more interesting. It turns out Young-hwa is the only one at the table with a profile photo; it’s the painting he’s working on for Dan-ah.

Meanwhile, Dan-ah sits at a chic bar, deeply focused on her book. Her phone keeps buzzing, interrupting her focus, so she checks to see a text from Young-hwa requesting she save his number — just so she knows who she’s ghosting. Identifying him by the profile picture of his art, she smirks and shows the bartender (a nice little cameo by Kim Won-hae). Dan-ah asks him if people really think a couple of profile photos can grab a person’s attention, and he points out that it’s clearly working on her.

As Dan-ah gets up to leave, she returns the book to the bartender, who agrees to keep it for her. He asks why she doesn’t keep her books in her own study, and Dan-ah answers that she would be embarrassed to openly own a book about anxiety, and prefers that her own remain unseen. The bartender stashes the book on a shelf that seems to be full of additional Self Help reading material.

Mi-joo and Sun-kyum walk home, and Sun-kyum asks her a series of polite questions about how she feels, when she’s leaving for the film site, how she’ll get there, and more. He mentions his car is fixed, but her curt replies make it clear she’s still salty. Sun-kyum is perplexed.

The next day, Young-hwa runs into Mi-joo at the neighborhood cafe, and their conversation is as friendly and relaxed as it was the night before. Young-hwa is impressed by her English skills asks Mi-joo to translate all the comments that are plaguing his social media account. Mi-joo confirms it’s Tae-woong’s fans asking about their connection, and Young-hwa is annoyed and grumbles that Tae-woong should just unfollow him.

At the gym, Dan-ah and Ms. Dong discuss their preparations for Eun-bi’s tournament. Dan-ah is thrilled that Eun-bi will wear her clothing while playing golf in front of the world, but Ms. Dong looks irritable. She asks Dan-ah if it was always her plan to discard Sun-kyum once Eun-bi joined the agency.

Dan-ah replies that she is fond of Sun-kyum as a person, but simply can’t afford to have an athlete she represents charged with assault; her agency is more important than her fondness for a person. Ms. Dong asserts that it could be better for the agency’s image to help Sun-kyum get back on his feet, since there’s nothing good about an agency that abandons its athletes. Moreover, she implies that Sun-kyum would do an excellent job as an agent, managing their athletes.

However, Dan-ah swiftly dismisses the idea, and says Sun-kyum would put the athletes first, whereas she would rather work with someone who puts her business first.

Dan-ah arrives home from the gym to a scolding from her father. He tells her she shouldn’t have hit Myung-min in front of their employees — that she should have done it discreetly.

When Myung-min tells her to treat him like her older brother, Dan-ah says she already does so in public, and he should be grateful. Dan-ah harshly reminds him that she’s ten months his senior, but due to the forgery of his birth certificate, is now legally deemed younger.

Their father says he wishes each of his children shared their good qualities, and Dan-ah jumps right in and says if they had the same mother, they might. “Unlike me, they’re the bastards.” Her father insists that he loves all three of his children equally, but Dan-ah isn’t listening — she’s distracted by wife number two setting the table for her mother’s memorial service.

Dan-ah furiously says the sight makes her sick, and Myung-min barks back not step on his mother’s generosity. Her father tells Dan-ah to let go of her hatred, but that gets her even more upset, and she says she’s never been invested enough to have such a strong emotion as that.

Dan-ah continues, saying that the reason she doesn’t expose her brother is for the sake of the company and her father only, and that she’s been working her ass off alone. When her father says he should just die, she scolds him for playing the victim. Her father then gets on his favorite topic of her getting married (suggesting it will also “set her straight” after coming out as a lesbian).

Dan-ah scoffs, saying she won’t even bother responding since she doesn’t even know where to start with him. She scorns marriage, saying it is a despicable waste of time, and disregards her father’s opinion on the matter. He jumps up and says all a father wants is the wonderful moment when he walks his daughter down the aisle, and after the briefest moment of pause, Dan-ah pulls away from him and storms out of the room.

It turns out that Tae-woong has been standing there the whole time, and he runs after Dan-ah to show the rice cakes he brought for her mother’s memorial service (aww!). Dan-ah mercilessly tells him to mind his own business and crawl back to America. Tae-woong says he will if that’s what she wants, and this only further enrages Dan-ah. Why does he keep coming to her despite her clear hatred? Tae-woong says that he’d rather have her hate than her disinterest, since everyone else in the family ignores him — hate is still a form of interest and attention. Poor kid!

Dan-ah gets in her car and zooms off. Alone, Tae-woong looks down at his phone exploding with likes and adoring comments. He whispers that he wishes he were dead.

Dan-ah finds herself alone outside the cafe, staring in at Young-hwa’s art. She muses that his painting shines even in the darkness.

The next day, as Mi-joo and Mae-yi prepare to leave, Sun-kyum is packing a bag full of prepped meals that he made for them (bento box style, so they can easily eat them on the go). Mi-joo looks touched by the gesture, but when she makes eye contact with Sun-kyum, she immediately looks away and says she’ll be off, refusing to let her annoyance melt. Mae-yi asks him if she’s still pretending to be pissed off, and he says he wishes she was just pretending.

Sun-kyum goes to Dan-ah’s office to meet Ms. Dong, who’s still ashamed of how the agency dropped him. He assures her not to be uncomfortable and gives her ginseng to thank her for giving him Coach Bang’s number. Ms. Dong says the coach was spotted with a certain team and asks if this is his handiwork. Sun-kyum is surprised, but Ms. Dong tells him that he has the powerful natural gift of motivating people — if only he knew he had such a gift.

Dan-ah comes out of her office to speak with Ms. Dong, and is surprised to see Sun-kyum. She says it must be fate — they should get married since she’s tired of the blind dates. Sun-kyum asks why she keeps insisting that he liked her before when he never did. With a straight face, she proposes that he marry her as payment for his misleading behavior.

Sun-kyum seems confused, but before their exchange is resolved, Dan-ah is back in work mode as if it never even happened. Ms. Dong remarks that she’s never able to quite tell if Dan-ah is joking or serious, and Sun-kyum agrees.

Mi-joo and Mae-yi arrive on the seaside film set to help out their PD friend, JUNG HEE-JIN (Park Joo-hee). Mae-yi recognizes the Korean producer, JULIE (cameo by Kim Jae-hwa,), infamous for being a rude translator who isn’t even fluent in English.

According to Hee-jin, Julie’s poor translating has already cost the filming team a lot of time. Mi-Joo tries to help in every way she can; we see her working long hours, and gobbling up one of Sun-kyum’s prepped meals while she stays on set late into the night to help.

Back in Seoul, we see Sun-kyum eating the same meal he prepped for Mi-joo and Mae-yi while doing laundry and keeping the house in order.

Mi-joo and Mae-yi arrive at their accommodations, and they’re both horrified by how dingy and dirty it is. They try to come up with a plan to actually be able to sleep there, and Mi-joo says they’ll lay on top of the clean towels and use a blanket she brought from home. When they open the bathroom, though, they both take a step back, revolted, and their reaction says it all.

Later, Mi-joo tries to settle to sleep, first checking her phone and wondering how Sun-kyum is doing. Similarly, Sun-kyum is wide-eyed on their living room couch, and also checks his phone. He types a message asking Mi-joo to recommend a movie that will help him sleep, but he decides not to send it.

When the girls wake up the next morning, we get another cheeky meta moment — Mi-joo gets spooked when Mae-yi is sleeping upside-down in the bed… with her eyes wide open.

Back in Seoul, Sun-kyum’s mother invites him to have coffee with her since Eun-bi’s treating. However, when Sun-kyum arrives at the meeting place, it’s his mother’s film set — and the coffee is actually a PR coffee truck most likely sent by the agency (and obviously, there’s no Eun-bi in sight).

His mother is excited to see him, though, and walks over to Sun-kyum with a smile. She’s in costume and makeup at this point, strategically splattered with blood (and incidentally looking happier than we have seen her thus far).

Sun-kyum says he heard she’s the first Korean actress to skin someone, and they chat about her violent film roles. This time, Ji-woo says she’s playing a vegan murderer, and she’s hilariously entertained by all her past killer roles. She even tells Sun-kyum if he agrees to cameo in her current film they can “slice together.” (Ji-woo is so quirky and fun here, she reminds me a lot of Mi-joo, and I don’t think that comparison is at all accidental.)

Sun-kyum and his mother sit together on set and enjoy their coffee and a chat. He asks his mother why she doesn’t scold him for being unemployed like other mothers would. She chuckles, asking if he misses her nagging, but says she doesn’t have the right to criticize or meddle in his life since he never criticizes hers.

Ji-woo reminisces on Sun-kyum’s childhood, thinking of the countless times she requested him to be good at home while she worked all day, to not bother Eun-bi as she prepared for a tournament, and to win a medal to support his father’s election. Ji-woo acknowledges that Sun-kyum did everything asked of him without complaint. With a mother’s insight, she says that even though he’s mild-tempered, she knows it wasn’t easy for him. Ji-woo is also honest about how she didn’t nurture him during his childhood; instead, she acknowledges that he raised himself.

Even so, Ji-woo recalls how exhilarating it was when Sun-kyum found something he wanted to pursue, and she concludes that the most she can do as a mother is to support him — just like he did for her. Ji-woo adds some humor to this touching moment, acknowledging it’s odd to say all this while splattered with blood, but her son says she’s always beautiful.

Sun-kyum announces he will bring a gift the next time he visits, and Ji-woo quickly says he should bring “her fan” (Mi-joo) with him. She adds he should treat Mi-joo well since she’s his mother’s fan. Ji-woo keeps it light, but the mention was on purpose, and it prods Sun-kyum to ask her why she married his father. Ji-woo sighs that it was because she loved him, and though they’re not on good terms currently, it may very well be because they still love each other.

When Ji-woo again asks Sun-kyum to cameo, he turns her down flatly. When she grumbles who he takes after to be so stubborn, Sun-kyum offhandedly holds his hand up, framing his mother’s face, while at the same time taking a sip of his coffee. Ji-woo agrees, and drops her chin a bit until it’s resting in his palm. These two are definitely two peas in a pod.

As Sun-kyum is leaving the film set, he thinks of Mi-joo, also on set, and sends her a message: “My mom told me to treat her fan well.” Mi-joo is tickled, and tells him that he should do just that.

Later that night, Mi-joo continues to go above and beyond on the film set, even staying behind after everyone else leaves for dinner. When they’re finally off the clock, Mi-joo, Mae-yi and Hee-jin sit in front of a 24/7 convenience store drinking beer and eating snacks. The others acknowledge Mi-joo’s work ethic, and then they talk about how hard it is to actually interpret properly on set, and they recall the hard working conditions of the past. However, all three of them seem to enjoy what they do enough to keep at it.

At the training center, Young-il looks at the photo of Woo-shik and Sun-kyum hanging in his locker and gives Woo-shik a call. Young-il checks in, says it’s uncomfortable with both of them gone, and encourages Woo-shik to work up his courage and meet with Sun-kyum.

It’s another day on the film set, and Mi-joo scrambles to jot down notes as the director and cinematographer shout out plans for the upcoming scene at a breakneck speed. It’s next to impossible for her to process and translate that level of detail in the few seconds she’s given, and when the scene doesn’t go as planned, the American cinematographer berates her. Mi-joo is deeply apologetic, but also communicates well, asking for a little more time to be able to do her job better. The cinematographer is more reasonable than one might expect, and agrees.

Dan-ah is leaving her office building when someone kicks a soccer ball over to her. She stops it mostly on reflex, and looks up to see Youg-hwa waiting for her nearby. He asks if she saved his number, and she repeats back his earlier line that she did — in order to be sure of who she’s ghosting. Young-hwa smiles at this, but Dan-ah quickly reminds him not to smile.

He says cutely that he smiles when he’s happy, and she can’t stop him — then he demands to know why she didn’t attend the premiere, and why she was supposed to meet Sun-kyum there. Dan-ah merely tells him to mind his own business and then asks why he came by. Young-hwa says he came by to show her his draft, but announces that now he’s not going to anymore.

They bicker over who has the authority over the draft, as Dan-ah’s curiosity grows. She claims that she’ll see the draft even if it means locking him up and torturing him — but Young-hwa is only excited to hear that she’ll make time for him, and smiles widely. She calls him a student again, and Young-hwa complains, instead saying she should call him familiarly by his first name (in banmal. When she cracks up and pretends to be horrified, he says “jerk” is okay too.

Young-hwa is miffed when Mr. Jung walks over, and gives him the stink eye. Before heading off, Dan-ah pretends she’s going to kick the ball right at Young-hwa. He quickly attempts to protect himself from the oncoming kick, but of course she’s just playing with him. When she runs off, Young-hwa smiles after her, totally smitten.

As the last shoot of the night wraps up on the film set, Mi-joo begins to feel sick, but doesn’t get a chance to rest, since Julie is chewing out the Korean staff. Julie demands to know which idiot hired an English-speaking driver when the director specifically asked for a non-English speaker (surprise, surprise — it was Julie).

They’re in sudden need of someone who is not an English speaker, a good driver, free, and presentable. And who checks all the boxes? Sun-kyum, of course. Mi-joo feels bad asking for a favor after giving him the cold shoulder, but she asks him anyway, and tells him she’ll finally make amends.

The next morning, Mi-joo struggles to get up as she’s stricken with a fever. Without a taxi or large hospital with an ambulance nearby, she drags herself on foot to the nearest clinic. The doctor tells her she’s overworked herself, and Mi-joo is given an IV drip.

Feverish, she tries to rest in the hospital bed, but the nosy ajummas the next bed over keep bothering her and pulling open the curtain to talk. Mi-joo struggles to close the curtain, saying that her head is pounding. She settles back down to rest, totally miserable, when the curtain is pulled open again.

It’s Sun-kyum this time (gah!). He explains that Mae-yi sent him to help her, and Mi-joo’s eyes well up with tears, comforted by his presence. He asks what’s wrong and how he can help, and she whimpers that the ajummas keep bothering her so she can’t rest. Sun-kyum says he’ll take care of them, and they chat while Mi-joo sleeps off her fever.

Later, as the two drive back from the clinic, Mi-joo looks better, but is covered in fever-reducing patches. She asks if she snored while she slept, and Sun-kyum shares that she kept calling out for her mother. Mi-joo sheepishly says she does it out of habit. She had meningitis as a child and shared a hospital room with other sick children. When all the other kids cried in pain, they searched for their mothers to hold their hands. Young Mi-joo, who had neither mother nor father, copied them to fit in.

Mi-joo says, “As a kid, you feel safe only when you’re part of a group. And as an adult, you live in fear of being ostracized.” She says that Sun-kyum’s probably never had to struggle with such fears, and jokes that maybe he’s afraid of bugs. He says in the past he wasn’t afraid of anything, but now it feels like he’s about to be afraid of something. Mi-joo thinks he means the bugs at their motel, but it feels as though he’s referring to something else.

Sun-kyum is beyond horrified when he sees the Korean staff’s shoddy lodging situation. Shortly after, he tells Mae-yi and Hee-jin that he’ll pay for the entire staff to stay at the nice hotel where the major staff and actors are staying. They can’t refuse his generous offer.

Sun-kyum stays behind to pack up Mi-joo’s things, and she calls him to make sure he doesn’t leave behind the leopard print blanket that’s on the bed. As Sun-kyum folds it up, he mutters to himself that it’s so obviously hers.

Mi-joo is resting in a beautiful hotel room (that bed of crisp white sheets sure is a world apart!), but she still seems feverish despite her treatment. When Sun-kyum arrives, she’s barely awake, but she notices that he’s at her bedside, cooling her with a cold cloth.

In her feverish sleep, she calls out for her mom again. Sun-kyum watches her intently, and then says “Ki Sun-kyum” each time she mutters, “Mom.” He says that from now on, when she’s sick or struggling, she should call out for someone who will be there for her from now on. Mi-joo rouses just enough to hear that, and whispers, “Ki Sun-kyum” (but not without also muttering that his name is hard to pronounce). “I called your name,” she says, reaching out her hand. He takes it in both of his, and Mi-joo falls fast asleep.

 
COMMENTS

Talk about a wonderful ending! There’s so much tenderness and subtlety in that bedside moment, I think a part of my heart just melted for keeps.

I’m not sure if it’s because this episode called out some specific moments, or because after reaching our halfway point that the drama’s themes are really sinking in, but wow — there’s so much to unpack!

The scene where Sun-kyum, Mi-joo, and Young-hwa meet and interact was particularly telling. I loved having these three characters together from a plot standpoint (because how fun are their dynamics?!), but their scenes together also told us a lot about the drama’s exploration of communication.

Even though Mi-joo and Young-hwa are practically strangers, it’s immediately clear to us how easy communication is for them. They share the same interests, industry, and even their college experiences. There’s no friction or opacity in any of their conversations.

This, of course, is the exact opposite of what we have during practically every Mi-joo/Sun-kyum interaction. Bantery and fun though they are, these two constantly deal with misunderstandings, missed references, and other bits of friction when they’re interacting. Their worlds are different, their frames of reference are different, and their personalities and ways of interacting with the world are also incredibly different. All of this adds a sort of strain to their interactions, broadly.

While I personally think Mi-joo stayed mad at Sun-kyum for much longer than was warranted, this is important to their story, because if these two are going to find their way, they have to learn to understand each other’s language. And here’s where I love that the drama is doing: the friction between our leads isn’t necessary bad. It doesn’t mean they can’t communicate. It doesn’t mean they can’t have a lasting relationship, either.

Rather, it’s more like the two simply have to understand how the other communicates. And the more we get of this drama, the more we see that happening. Mi-joo going out running with Sun-kyum because she realizes it’s his language. Sun-kyum realizing he doesn’t know what Mi-joo needs, so openly asking her (on several occasions) to tell him. It’s good stuff, and the drama is layered with so many details about translating (not just between foreign languages, but between people), that I could go on forever.

But I won’t, because there’s Dan-ah and Young-hwa to talk about! I had no idea where this love line was going to go in the beginning, and it’s taking such an interesting turn. I find both characters completely refreshing, and I love their dynamic. I’d be lying if I said I knew how they were going to make this romance work, but Dan-ah is such a live wire, I will watch with anticipation.

I used the word refreshing to describe Dan-ah and Young-hwa, but actually, that’s how I feel about the drama overall. Even though it has many familiar elements, there’s both newness and depth to this story that I can’t seem to get enough of. The drama also has a great balance of comedy with deeper, character-driven moments, and though I rarely say these words: every character here interests me.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , ,

52

Required fields are marked *

SK & Mom’s convo was so fresh and adorable. That “Nope” kills me every time. Though I didn’t like how disconnected mom was as a mother at least she’s not there to ruin SK’s life unlike dad.

You’re totally right @beanjuice, our OTP’s way of communicating is different and it’s interesting to see them navigate around this. I can’t help but compare it to the typical troupes we’ve seen in the past years, if an OTP is opposite from each other, we get shouting, noble idiocy, and all the usual candy-chaebol shenanigans. But Run On adds a certain vibe (the writing & acting totally contributes to this) that it totally works.

Dan-Hwa OTP has an interesting dynamics too and I hope that it continues to be. They both can take each other’s “rudeness” or “cocky ness”. We need more scenes of them together.

18
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Nope.. Nope!!! his face!! (I might have broken the rewind button there!)

I was glad that his mother acknowledged her role and credited him for growing up fine. In many ways, I am also glad she is not feeling 'guilty' about not being there because its always the woman who have to feel guilty while men get away with the same thing. I am glad she will be supportive of him and MJ, if he chooses to make that decision.

11
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Totally love the nooope, esp the 2nd one *heart eyes*

Mom chose career and she did acknowledge it. Dad chose career while using his kids to move forward.

6
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like that she's not a hypocrite about it. And that she's wants her kids to have that freedom to choose what works best for them. The dad didn't do much to raise the kids and still wants a really large say in their lives and activities even when they're in their 30s.

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, she admits she's not a good mother where the father still insists he "love" his son. Excuse me, Mr. Hypocrite, you want no one's happiness but your own!

2

Yes, totally refreshing!!

This episode was lovely! I loved how Young Il called Wooshik. These three friends are such a mismatched group, and I love how much they care for each other (Young Il, a little reluctantly, lol).

I also really like Mijoo's fight. I agree that the fight went on for a little too long, but near the end, I think it was more about Mijoo being embarrassed for fighting. She dragged it a little too long, and then didn't know how to end it,...so just pretended to stay mad. Totally relatable, though a little immature, hah.

May is seriously one of my favorite characters! I love how all of the characters have unique and specific lines that just flow naturally! Heejin is also lovely!

14
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Young-il is a cutie! Thought Sun-kyum would be the typical tsundere male in the show, but apparently it's Young-il ^^

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

It seems like it's Mi-joo's thing to pretend to stay mad since May was like "she still pretending to be mad?" I love May too! Without having dedicated scenes, you still feel like she's a fully-realized person in the story.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yess, every character, no matter how minor, feels like a completely whole person!

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Drama, you’re my happy pill.

I love as I have said many times in my comment how drama leads with the different forms of loneliness and (mis)communication and how every character seems to be learning about it it the way:

- MiJoo and SeonGyeom try so hard to understand each other and want - don’t want to show how deep their feelings for each other are: SG trying to join MJ and YH conversation looking for information on internet just to “translate” what they were saying, MJ relieved when she learned where SG had spent the night, happy to receive a text from him, thinking about him in the first place as a driver, SG leading with the ahjummas at the hospital and telling MJ to call his name when she’s in pain. The minute these two lower down they walls...
- DA changing from businesswoman to woman when interacting with SG and HY, but still not totally opening to his little brother. How heartbreaking was listening to TaeWoong he would do anything she asks because hate is a form of interest? And then him saying he wants to die. I’m now worried about him, and I want DA to reconsider her attitude with the kid just as he’s doing with HY.
- Mum explaining SG that she loves his father (and obviously he loves her back). The whole situation with SG’s parents is particularly sad to me: they’ve never been able to connect with their children and I believe now that they love them and their family, but not in the best way. I do hope they too learn how to communicate.

11
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

The treatment of HY is probably my only quibble with DA. I would really like to see her soften towards him. I feel like she and HY could find some warmth and family in each other, if she would be willing. I understand that she hardens herself because of her own hurt, and appreciate her caution with Dad and "oppa," but I feel like this is one relationship wall that may be hurting more than protecting her.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

From businesswoman to woman around Sun-kyum and Young-hwa, aw, like the phrase! She needs more people where she can lower her armour, aside from Secretary Jung and the bartender ajusshi...

Am also hoping there could be some sort of reconciliation between Dan-ah and Tae-woong. Why are chaebol families so full of lonely souls? How heartbreaking it is that he prefers hatred to indifference? Dan-ah's family is such a mess and surely the blame is largely on the father. He must have had both her brothers via affairs because she called them both bastards. Ugh, so messy.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Dan-ah's dad appears less bulldozer-y than many kdrama chaebol patriarchs, but he is more frustrating in his cluelessness about the hurt around him. I think he's genuinely happy to see his children, including Tae-woong, but doesn't see that Tae-woong is ostracized by his siblings. He think being a lesbian is something that can be fixed by a marriage. It seems like he thinks Dan-ah kicking her mean brother is just her wild streak and doesn't realize that there is a lifelong struggle going on. He even has his 2nd wife do his 1st wife's memorial. He gave his youngest son the art gallery even though it's Dan-ah who seem more interested in art. Maybe he did it out of affection for Tae-woong. But everything he is doing is hurting his kids and he walks around blissfully having zero clue.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes every character is interesting. And this episode especially highlighted that. SK was like a puppy looking at mijoo with those sad eyes. Though it felt a bit slow on the first watch I enjoyed it more on rewatching. And Young hwa has a comeback for everything dan ah says and stumps her that she has to tease with the ball to get an upperhand. Love it!! And really liked how they showed what happens in the film set.
And the ending is so swoony. Im Shi wan and his eyes. Lol at mijoo for saying that his name is hard to pronounce.

11
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I liked how they inserted that joke in the last scene to lessen the candy turn that it was otherwise taking.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I've thought his name hard to pronounce too. Just thought it was because I don't speak korean. Then I LOLed when Mi-joo mentioned it.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Are you good at English? | Of course. It's my major. | That doesn't always mean you're good at it. | I wouldn't know. I was always good. | The same goes for me.
Yeap, Mi-joo and Yeong-hwa sure speak the same language ><

Loved the comparison @beanjuice draw on the communication between Mi-joo + Sun-kyum and Mi-joo + Young-hwa. How our two OTPs "interpret" their communication differences is really an enjoyable journey to watch so far.

On the other hand, the conversation between Dan-ah and Director Dong pretty much highlighted that Dan-ah considers emotion as weak and has no place in business, so whatever it is that she does, she refused to let emotion has a say in. Yeah, well, am sure Young-hwa will have something to say about that.

Watching the ending scene from the floor as the puddle that I was! So endearing how Sun-kyum wholeheartedly held her hand, like, he totally covered it with both of his...

12
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

The SK-MJ-YH drinking scene is really done well! How two can click right away while our OTP forever struggles to get their message across.

If anything, this drama excels in drawing out how class difference and family background play a big part in shaping people. Here we have those in the upper echelons like SK and DA, MJ and YH in the middle, and Woo-Sik in another class. Does wealth bring happiness? Not necessarily. While YH is not materially rich, he’s one happy free-spirit guy obviously with abundant live and care from his beehive family. Even WS is contented in being able to stay and look after his grandma.

This is indeed a very refreshing “youth” drama and you can’t help but root for all our protagonists.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think E.T. is the most perfectly appropriate motif for this drama, which is about people from different universes colliding, wanting (but struggling) to understand what the other is trying to say. The finger touch is the middle ground they must find, so as to communicate their feelings to each other. 👉🏽👈🏽

Oh, and did I mention how much I'm enjoying this show?

16
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Aw, what a lovely way to interpret the fingertouch!
So far it has happened between those accepting of two-way communication; maybe this has to be forced upon her, but would love to have 👉🏽👈🏽 between Dan-ah & Young-hwa ><

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

There's actually so much depth to Dan-ah's story that I feel hasn't been talked about enough, probably because the writer hasn't actually brought it centre stage yet.

The reason why Dan-ah always seems to be running around so furiously, forever short on time with days filled to the brim with activities, getting snappy and frustrated whenever people "waste (her) time" and is so cruel with her words to Tae-woong or anyone who seeks her affection is because she knows she's racing against time. With her heart condition, she knows she only has so much time to prove her worth and make a name for herself, having had to fight incessantly against her own father's prejudices against her as a female and her validity as a leader. Can you imagine having to call your younger half brother "oppa" just because your father wanted a male heir...urgh. Marriage and love mean nothing to her at this point, just a waste of time in her endless pursuit for recognition. She can't even afford to reveal any hint of her anxiety in her own home.

But I can see that she's aware of the way she acts and how scathing her words can be from how she asked TW why he keeps forcing her to be so cruel. She feels guilty about it but she just can't help it. She's desperate and the clock is ticking. She tries to maintain her health as much as possible by running anytime she can between schedules but she leads such a lonely, pressurising life of her own making that I want to see her feel the same sense of peace she experiences whenever she looks at Yong-hwa's paintings in her daily life as well. After all, what is life if you don't love and live a little? I know Yong-hwa's grounded optimism will bring much light into Dan-ah's life, once she opens up to him and is willing to be vulnerable about her fears.

9
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really hope whatever she has isn't terminal, but I get that when you have a serious health issue, you're more vulnerable and there could be complications down the road. She's just trying to get as much accomplished while she's at peak health. I found it sad that she can't even keep a self-help book at home since she's trying to hide any weakness that her brother may use against her.

Dan-ah is mean to Tae-woong, but I sort of get it. Tae-woong is just another reminder of her messed up family and he can be annoying in his naive belief that just because you're blood, you're family. But ultimately winning in business and sticking it to her dad and usurper brother is her life's goal. It may not be noble, but it's what drives her and keeps her from being forced to do her family's bidding. I agree that she's aware, but desperate.

She liked Young-hwa's painting because she did see something dark in it behind the light foreground that resonates with her. I wonder what lies behind Young-hwa's optimism.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Am also wondering about his background, so far we have nothing except his folks made honey. For all we know, his family might own hectares of land in Gangwon Province ><

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Dan-ah’s character is fleshed out very well NDC Sooyoung is doing justice to it. Under her confident, mean and competitive streak is a deeply hurt soul that I look forward to YH breaking it down.

I’d say Son Ye-Jin’s character in CLOY is a fairy floss version of Dan-Ah here.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I’m just going to list some of the things I loved in this episode:

Seon-gyeom telling Mi-joo to call his name when she was sick or struggling. More romantic than any kiss scene.

Mi-joo and Young-hwa chatting away while Seon-gyeom gazed at Mi-joo, tried to whistle and made lame attempts at joining in the conversation. Mi-joo and Young-hwa really do speak the same language while Seon-gyeom has trouble translating.

Mi-joo and Seo-gyeom refusing to give Dan-ah’s number to Young-hwa without her consent.

Seon-gyeom trying to do the ET touch with Mi-joo lol.

Seon-gyeom’s mom playing a vegan killer who slices people up. That whole scene cracked me up and their talk made me sad/happy because his mom is at least more self-aware than his dad, she knows she was a neglectful parent and is being supportive of him because he always did everything asked of him.

Showing the unglamorous life of the crew on a movie set and Seon-gyeom's horrified reaction to the room.

Seon-gyeom taking care of the old ladies in the bed next to Mi-joo’s by eating tangerines and chatting quietly so as not to wake Mi-joo.

16
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Am cracking up at how the room was so bad that even stoic Sun-kyum had a very open reaction to it! And at his reaction on the leopard print blanket, LOL.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Soo many cute scenes!

Seon-kyum telling Mi-joo to call out Ki Seon-kyum instead of someone who can't be there for her was swoony. He's usually so un-assertive!

Mi-joo pointing out that Young-hwa should stop acting creepy (trying to get her number through Seon-gyeom) and just ask Dan-ah for her number was hilarious and also relatable. When you're with friends chatting, inevitably, someone will say or suggest something that could be creepy or inadvisable and the rest of us would be like "yeah. don't do that."

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Tae woong is clearly starved for affection. I think he uses his fans' adoration as a substitute from the lack of love/warmth in his family. When Dan-ah drove away and left him standing there and he started receiving notifications from his fans, it was clear that none of it mattered because it wasn't coming from the people he wanted.

It didn't really click for me until this episode, which, now that I think about it it should have been totally obvious, but Tae woong acts so extra because he wants attention from his family, specifically Dan-ah. He doesn't even care what kind of attention, as long as she's acknowledging me in some way. The realization broke my heart. I really hope their relationship can improve significantly, because there is no reason they can't be close. The fact that they have different mothers is neither's fault, so I don't see why it should continue to keep them from becoming closer.

I'm pretty worried for Tae woong because he seems so fragile. When he asked 'What's the point of living?' after Dan-ah drove away warning bells immediately went off inside my head. I fear that he may turn to suicide as a cry for attention.

8
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel its more than that...

For example when DA said maybe he didn't know anything because he spent most of his time in America locked up in a hospital, and his friend in the car asking him if he had his medications with him and now telling him to crawl back to the hospital...

I feel he either has heart or mental health issues...

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Now that you mention it, yeah, I do think he might have mental health issues. In which case he's even more vulnerable. Mental health issues seem more likely than heart issues because of his volatile behaviour. One minute he's needy, the next he's lashing out and throwing a temper tantrum, then he's sweet and thoughtful.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I get why Dan-ah rejects him. Just because they're blood-related doesn't mean they have to act like family, especially with someone who comes from the same family that has forged a birth certificate so that she is now legally considered the second child and her other younger brother is always out to get her. And does she even know how to be family?

Tae-woong's situation is so sad. It seems like his life in America was starved of love and affection too if he's trying to turn the tiniest drop of hate into a drop of affection. He was genuinely happy that the older bro talked to him even if it's just a curt "how much did you hear?"

I'm hoping he can be friends with Young-hwa!

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It would be great if he could become friends with Young-hwa. Being around someone warm and affectionate would do him a world of good.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really like how ordinary MJ is. She isn't noble, she isn't above pettiness. She feels like an actual person. It's been a while since I've watched a drama where a female lead felt like someone who could exist in the real world rather than only on a screen. She isn't described as stunningly beautiful, she isn't happy all the time for no reason. She gets grumpy, she has a job we actually see her doing, she doesn't have some goal she's working towards, just like a lot of us don't have stuff figured out for the long term. I really love the character.

It was great seeing MJ in action, translating on set. It's been great actually seeing her work in general.

The James actor at the place MJ and her roomie went to was so gosh darn good looking. Anyone know who he is and where I can see more of him? 👀

Also, did anyone else think of Kill Bill when they saw what the actor was doing to the wooden thingy with his hand? Repeatedly placing his fingertips against it then punching it. The movie reminds me of Kill Bill, from what I've seen of the scenes so far.

12
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What an episode!
I especially loved the ending and glad that they did not go for the usual ep 8 kiss (not that I don't want a kiss!). Somehow, SK asking her to call his name and not mom, was so much more heartwarming and touching. This is huge coming from him and I am sure Mi Joo understands that. This is the big step he is taking towards her.

I like how you are talking about 'communication' here beanjuice. And I like what @Pickle said about the E.T motif (Now I want to go back and watch the movie for the nth time).
Though communication is key in all relationships, it's much more exaggerated here because the leads are such quirky personalities. They are all warm and lovely people, but don't confirm to the 'standard'. Especially SK and DanOh. So its nice to see these issues are cropping up now rather than coming up later (as 'angst')once they start dating.

Also, how adorable was SK in that couple+one date? Nodding his head, actively listening, trying to whistle and getting into the conversation. Oh, he is so smitten and I love it!

10
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I initially found Dan Ah's baby bro incredibly annoying because I wasn't sure about his relationship with her, now that I understand I genuinely feel bad for him. He is still annoying, but I understand it now.

Also Sun Kyum is the VVVIP for quieting those halmonis.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah. Same. He just wants to talk/communicate to his family. And somehow he feels DanOh is the one who might warm up to him.
He gets a lot of love from his fans but all he wants is some love from his own family. May be he will meet YH and form a bond with him :)

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Great, great point @beanjuice about difficult communication not being a barrier to a relationship! I think this is one of my favourite things about this drama - the idea that relationships don't have to be effortless, or even easy, for them to work. Rather than being frustrated at SK and MJ constantly talking past each other, I'm finding myself constantly intrigued by their efforts - and they really are effortful! - to try and grasp the other. I love how MJ is so utterly straightforward, as if she's trying to help SK, step by step, to get into her mind. Yet she still manages to fail as he just responds in such a bafflingly unpredictable way that she's left wondering what he even means. I love the way SK stares to intently at her as if he's trying to understand a foreign text, time and time again refusing to give up trying even though he's seemingly making little progress. Watching this should be eye-rollingly frustrating - but it's not. It's just fascinating. Great work from all involved!

12
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you @beanjuice for the recap!
I agree with you; the density in the storyline is amazing, and all without psycho mothers, mother-in-laws's, amnesia, murder, TOD's, etc. that writers sometimes use to pad scripts

I find myself rewatching scenes where not much happens, a smile in the eyes, a softening of a look,.......sigh

11
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Initially I thought my deep connection to this drama was due to a need for some Kdrama comfort as an antidote to the daily news. After this ep I realized the writer has so much to say about communication and what hard work it can be. Any couple who come from such different backgrounds understands that. Even though we've been married for many years, I still have to invoke two cue questions in response to hubby's random statements. "Antecedent" for a sentence that begins with an unascribed pronoun and "context" for verbalized mental musings because I don't have a window into his brain. No wonder our OTPs are having issues de-coding each other; they're just at the baby-step phase. It takes a concerted effort to understand the other, mutual respect and a liberal sprinkling of love to avoid misunderstanding. Can we have that, please writer-nim??

13
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Is it terrible that I'm so happy they included a scene of her being sick and him taking care of her? I've gotten a bit weary of the leper mentality we've had towards sick people for the last year or so... it did my heart good to see someone sick with a fever and instead of saying "I'll keep my distance" instead taking them home and nursing them at their bedside.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for mentioning this -- it did my heart good as well. Like this entire drama, actually.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh my gosh, SK keeping the ahjumma company and focusing their attention on him instead of MJ was just the most thoughtful and kind gesture I've seen in a long time. He's just too sweet to handle sometimes.

8
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the recap beanjuice. I liked how you described how natural and easy was the conversation was between Young-hwa and Mi-joo, while Mi-joo and Sung-kyom are often stumbling over each other. Most people would assume that this means that Mi-joo and Sung-kyom might not be that good for each other- but they would be wrong. These conflicts- and their resolution- are actually a deeper and more important form of communication: It is only through these small fights that a couple can truly learn what things are important to their partner. I think that the reason SK's mom was smiling at the beginning of this episodes is that she senses that this relationship is very real- and going somewhere- with her son having very fortunately found a young lady who is both smart and gutsy.

Do you know who understands the importance of conflict in building a deeper understanding between a man and a woman? Our young art student Young-wha. That is why he seeks out confrontation with Dan-ah. The fascinating dance between Young-wha and Dan-ah adds so much depth to this show precisely because it is so different from our OTP. And it is clear that this relationship is going somewhere, even if the destination is murky. In the early part of this episode Dan-ah proposed to Sung-kyom. Please understand that she was quite serious about this- yes it would be a marriage of convenience, not love, but both his father and her father would like this to happen and Dan-ah would then be free to continue building her business, which is her real priority. By the end of this episode I am not so sure that she would still be willing to do this, because Young-wha is starting to get under her skin.

17
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I can see where Seon-kyum gets his cuteness from. It's sort of hilarious that his mom does slasher/horror movies and I love how she loves her job. Actually, I love how much passion and pride everyone has for their work. I can see why Seon-kyum feels lonely on so many levels. In addition to his natural awkwardness that keeps people at a distance, he's probably wondering if he could find that sort of passion that everyone around him seems to have.

Mi-joo standing up for herself and asking for a few more seconds to translate is something you don't see in kdramas. A character would usually just step away dejectedly or fly off the handle. I love seeing Mi-joo work.

12
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

In my work I frequently have to use interpreters- both when just talking to foreign born clients and actual hearings. A good professional interpreter will always do this- and in the courtroom the judge will always back them up.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love how professional Mi Joo is. It’s not often dramas show women being professional at work. Even when he came to stay with her, she kept her work schedule and didn’t let his presence affect her work.
She speaks up for what is right and has had conflicts but that doesn’t mean she takes her work lightly.

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

Mi-joo and Young-hwa have comfortable chemistry. They're both extroverts who get along well with others, have a love for movies in common, and are well-versed in slang like 뒤풀이 and 자만추. It was both funny and sad that on top of Sun-kyum being unable to join their conversation, he couldn't even drink soju because no one poured him any.

I cried when Tae-woong asked, "What did I ever do that was so wrong?" I'm most invested in their sibling relationship. If only Dan-ah can return even half of his love.

If Sun-kyum has never liked Dan-ah, was she just projecting? I wondered how she knew he liked her. Did he confess and she rejected him? But how could she mistake his monotone, emotionless expressions as a crush?

I love how Sun-kyum came to be a driver, and his rich self ended up paying for hotel rooms for all the staff. I felt so sorry for Mi-joo when she started crying from being sick and the ajummas wouldn't stop bothering her. "Ki Sun-kyum" is a tongue twister. Many thanks for the recap, @beanjuice!

5
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I just LOVE this drama. Everything about it, even the obnoxious fathers.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I too agree that the most poignant moment in the episode was when KSG asked Min-joo to say his name instead of calling out for mom. While it is definitely romantic, I think I felt KSG's very controlled anger too in his facial expressions (or lack thereof?). You could feel like he was holding himself back from being angry and frustrated at a world that had caused Min-joo to make herself look so pitiful "to fit in", when he is used to seeing her so strong and independent. I think he felt similar emotions to when he saw Woo-Shik being beaten up (in that case, poor Woo-shik was getting a literal thrashing from others who thought he was different from them, just like orphan Min-joo among other kids). In some ways, when he's asking MIn-Joo to call his name, it's more important to him that she would be calling out to someone who can depend upon (which of course, he wants to be that person). All of these emotions and nuances were well-packaged in that scene with just a few words and almost no emotions on his face! Amazing scripting and directing for that scene.

And several people have made comments on how it's hard for KSG to communicate with "regular" people, but I noticed that when he was coaching the young athletes at that school, it was like there was a light shining from inside him. He explained all of their issues in such a cute and easy way - words were just gushing out of him. Because of this, I think he would be better suited to be a COACH than an agent to athletes. That also goes with the ability to motivate people - especially if they have to change their habits in how they have been running all their lives. And because of this, I am super excited that Min-joo has agreed to start running with him. I think that is where their communication barriers will be easiest to surmout.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Don't get me wrong, I love this drama so far! I love the chemistry between SK and MJ, and I start to understand and appreciate the role of YH in all of it. I had to laugh so much at the E.T. sceene! And I relate so much to MJ - I also ate cornflakes as a quick meal and my Korean friends would always worry and say I should have a proper meal...they were right. So I hope MJ will also get to understand how important nutrition is for your health, especially when working so much. Also, the cheap hotel brought back memories as I slept in similar places in Korea...yikes.
BUT right now I don't see were the drama is heading to, despite all the communication themes. Initially, I had high hopes it would be a track and field drama (my hobby as a teenager) so I was exited. Now that I know it was used as a metaphor for SK to "run away" from abusive family, I'm not sure about this part anymore. We go more into the movie/art direction atm where SK seems a rather lost still (hence the commucation theme). I do hope there will be something to justify the title "run on", something that SK is going for because he wants to, instead of "run away". And also something that works for both SK and MJ as they both are from different worlds they don't understand well.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

does anyone know the book Seo Dan Ah was reading and the books that are the shelf??

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

looking for the same

0
reply

Required fields are marked *