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Sisyphus: Episode 14

Only a few days remain before the end of the world, and our genius engineer makes a choice that might alter the course of history. However, his decision comes at a cost, but if it means saving the love of his life, then he is willing to pay the price even if it means making her cry in the process.

 
EPISODE 14 RECAP

Tae-sool pleads with Seo-hae to drop her gun, but she pushes him away and shoots present Sigma. This, in turn, causes Mr. Park to shoot her, and present Sigma uses the distraction to run out of the room. Meanwhile, Sigma and his partners wonder what happened since their feed was cut.

Bleeding from his shoulder, present Sigma dashes onto the street, and Seo-hae chases after him. She aims her dad’s gun at him, but he jumps in front of a taxi and escapes. Tae-sool follows after them as well, but by the time he arrives, both of them have disappeared.

Mr. Park wonders why Tae-sool came back alone and asks if he can find Seo-hae. He tells her that they turned off their GPS and calls her number to no avail. As the brokers leave disappointed, Tae-sool receives a call, but it’s from Sigma.

He thanks Tae-sool for saving him, but Tae-sool growls at him for causing this mess. Sigma points out that he did nothing today, and everything that happened right now is a result of their choices. Regardless, he considers Tae-sool his savior, so he promises to watch over Tae-san.

Tae-sool vows to catch him, but Sigma pays no heed to his threat. Instead, he warns Tae-sool to stop digging into his past because if he continues, then he will kill everyone special to them. With a smile, Sigma reminds Tae-sool that he will find him, not the other way around.

Tae-sool chucks his phone to the ground, but something catches his eye. He discovers the hidden camera inside the studio, and it slowly dawns on him that Sigma must have been watching him this entire time.

Sigma joins the table after his call and tells Officer Hwang to carry on with their plans. He proposes a toast to their futures, and they raise their glasses. After the party, Seung-bok brings snacks to his research team and thinks back to his conversation with Sigma.

During their private chat, Sigma told Seung-bok that history-makers do not always know how special they are in the beginning. He used Edison as the classic example, and explained how he lost to Tesla constantly yet everyone only remembers Edison now. Like the famed inventor, Sigma believed Seung-bok could be the same.

Remembering Tae-sool’s warnings, Seung-bok pointed out that building the uploader meant starting a war, but Sigma denied it. He claimed that the uploader saved lives like Seo-jin’s mom, and turned his icy stare towards her. To Seung-bok’s disbelief, Seo-jin pleaded with him to build the uploader, and Sigma smiled, knowing that he won.

While Sigma tries to get ahold of Tae-sool’s coding, Seung-bok meets with his researchers and informs them of their change in plans. He needs them to build the machine first and hands them a blueprint for the new uploader.

Tae-sool drives around the city looking for Seo-hae and leaves her a message. He tells her to stay put and promises to find her no matter what.

Wandering the streets alone, Seo-hae hugs her dad’s gun and stares at the photo of them. During their bunker days, Dad used to take pictures of her and record her height on the wall. Though she complained about his picture-taking then, the memory of her dad brings Seo-hae to tears.

With only a few days left until the war, Sun packs up his bags to leave the country and calls Seo-hae to tell her about his departure. When he hears her crying, he changes plans and jumps in his car to find her. While the others look for Seo-hae, she rides the train, lost in thought.

Tae-sool’s fruitless search leads him to a bridge, and he steps out of his car to clear his mind. He stares at the container Bong-sun gave him and finds a white powder inside. When he touches it, he winces in pain and sees a memory of his and Seo-hae’s wedding.

He remembers what she told him about having dreams of her future and realizes that he experienced the same phenomenon. As Tae-sool deduced, Bong-sun found his grave, which means the powder is his ashes. Despite the risks, Tae-sool forges ahead and starts to flicker as more memories flood his mind.

Returning home, Tae-sool hooks the camera from Sigma’s studio to his computer and discovers that the footage was sent to the headquarters of Quantum and Time.

Mr. Park monitors his old house and pulls out a gun when he sees himself beating his wife again. Before he gets out, Bingbing arrives to stop him. While they bicker, the wife comes out, and Mr. Park is too distracted by her to notice his present self walking towards the van.

His present self hits the windshield and accuses Mr. Park of having an affair with his wife. While Bingbing cries at her boss to do something, he drives away from his present self and bumps into a parked car. With nowhere else to run, Mr. Park starts to vanish as his present self draws closer to him.

As his present self prepares for his final swing, his wife jumps in and grabs her husband. Enraged by her meddling, he raises his hand to hit her, but Bingbing shoots the ground first. She screams at him to leave the woman alone, and the wife drags present Mr. Park away.

Seo-hae ends up at the bunker and walks inside its familiar walls. She pictures her younger self drawing and is propelled back to the past when she first made this place her home.

Dad taught her how to shoot, and over the years, little Seo-hae grew into a capable teenage who could even best her dad in combat. Though much of her youth was filled with training, Seo-hae also remembers the time they celebrated the holidays and decorated the bunker with lights.

As Seo-hae looks around the place, she notices that something is wrong and takes out her gun. She hears someone approaching from behind and whips around, only to find Tae-sool standing there. She asks how he knew about the bunker, and he tells her that he built it

Tae-sool returns her old gun to her and asks for a few minutes to talk. He shows her the storage room and reveals the refrigerators filled with antibiotics. He also got them weapons, but more importantly, he stocked the bunker with plenty of food, particularly all her favorites.

The last stop on their tour is the levers, and Tae-sools explains how the bunker doors will close and open even if the buttons break. Seo-hae asks if he really made all this, and Tae-sool tells her that it was the least he could do for her.

Since his time is up, Tae-sool leaves, but Seo-hae runs up to him and hugs him. They lie on the bed together and stare into each other’s eyes until Tae-sool gets up. He has Seo-hae teach him how to shoot, and she gives him a quick lesson from how to hold a gun to basic maintenance.

He asks how long she stayed inside the bunker, and she tells him that it was for nine years. In the beginning, she wondered about her friends and the outside world, but after a while, time became a blur. She smiles, hiding the pain behind her words, but Tae-sool holds her back and hugs her.

Tae-sool asks if she wants to live in here with him and explains how the world would be safe as well. Seo-hae pulls away from his arms and faces him to explain why she cannot stay here: living in the bunker was like a nightmare that never ended.

She tells Tae-sool that she came to the past in hopes of changing that future and believed he could do it. He wonders what happens if they fail, and Seo-hae assures him that they will try again. She says that as long as they do not give up, they will eventually win.

Seo-hae caresses Tae-sool’s face, telling him not to run away, and he agrees to keep fighting. As he smiles at her, he suddenly flickers, and Seo-hae demands to know what he did. He pushes her behind him and breaks the control panel to close the doors.

Locked inside the bunker, Seo-hae watches Tae-sool flicker again, and he tells her that he saw the future. He knows that he cannot run, but in order to win, he needs her to stay behind. She begs him to open the door, but he apologizes to her and walks out.

The Control Bureau locates Tae-sool in his car, but no matter where they look, they cannot find Seo-hae. Officer Hwang informs Sigma of the unprecedented situation, and for once, he seems slightly flustered. Right then, he receives a call from Tae-sool who tells him that he is in charge now, and Sigma chuckles to himself, wondering how he will win again this time.

Still searching for Seo-hae, Sun drops by his old workplace and checks the alley where they first met. He only finds garbage there, but things turn from bad to worse when the Control Bureau shows up. Though Sun tries to flee, Officer Hwang threatens to bring his family back to Korea, so Sun turns himself over.

They drag Sun to Sigma, and as soon as the younger man learns his name, he drops to his knees. Sigma tells him that he will not hurt him and explains to Sun that he is just trying to make some money. When his nice guy tactic fails, Sigma takes a different route and mentions Seo-hae.

He knows that Sun stayed in the country because of her and says that he likes her, too. However, if things continue, then she will die in the end, but Sigma offers an alternative. He hands Sun two plane tickets and claims that all he has to do is find Seo-hae.

Sun does not fall for his ploy, so Sigma shows his true colors and threatens to kill him and his family if he refuses. He gives him one more chance to reconsider, and Sun accepts his deal as long as he promises to let Seo-hae live.

Sigma instructs Officer Hwang to make Seo-hae come to them instead of chasing her. As for Tae-sool, he will catch him personally since he knows where he will be.

With only a day left until the war, the time traveling politicians all leave the country under the pretenses of work, and Seung-bok prepares a bunker for Seo-jin and her mom. He offers to help her in any way he can and begs her to let him stay by her side. She refuses his advances, but Seung-bok takes out the ring and tells her that he can wait forever.

The brokers also prepare for the end of the world when Tae-sool walks into their store. Meanwhile, Mr. Park is still recovering from his last visit to his present self and tries to step out despite his condition. Bingbing holds him back, having figured out that he kills himself today, and Mr. Park asks who she really is.

As their fight gets heated, the other brokers interrupt them since they have a guest. Tae-sool enters the room and tosses a bag at Mr. Park’s feet in exchange for a gun to kill Sigma. Mr. Park laughs at his offer since money is useless, but when they open the bag, they find fifty years’ worth of antibiotics.

It is enough to get him a gun, and his earlier lesson pays off as he checks the weapon for any defects. He ignores Mr. Park’s mocking advice and repeats the quote about the future already being here. He whispers something in his ear, and Mr. Park’s face turns grim.

Tae-sool arrives at his old company building and tells all the workers to go home. They give him strange looks, not budging from their spots, so Tae-sool pulls out his gun and shoots. That gets everyone’s attention, and they all evacuate immediately.

Sigma finally answers Tae-sool’s call and welcomes him. Tae-sool asks where he is, and Sigma smiles at the question since Tae-sool should know already if he is really in charge. Tae-sool says that he is fine with that answer and marches forward with the gun in his hand.

 
COMMENTS

The short scenes of Seo-hae and her dad in the future were bittersweet, capturing the harsh reality of a post-apocalyptic world in quieter, more character-driven moments. Dad is split between his two desires—to teach Seo-hae how to survive and to shield her from suffering—and we see his attempts to create a semblance of normalcy for his daughter whether that be Christmas parties or recording her height on the wall. I wished the show spent more time on their relationship and Seo-hae’s childhood in the bunker because it sheds so much light on her character as well as her dad. It explains the dichotomy that exists in Seo-hae and meshes the two sides of her so well. She can be both the fangirl who loves plushies and the badass warrior who never misses a shot because of her dad’s parenting. He teaches her how to fight, but at the same time, he tries his best to preserve her youth so she grows up to be a caring person rather than a heartless killing machine.

We learn in the episode that Tae-sool built the bunker, and in a way, it also served as a metaphor for his relationship with Seo-hae. He created a state-of-the-art facility filled with all the amenities her family will need, and his choice of food and goods reflects what he knows about Seo-hae. While it is a sweet gesture, there is something ironic about the whole scene because, in the end, Seo-hae tells him that living in the bunker was a nightmare. No matter how well Tae-sool builds the place with her needs in mind, he does not understand what life was like for Seo-hae growing up. He fails to recognize the emotional toil she went through trapped in that bunker with no hope for a better future, and thus, he traps her in there again with his own two hands because he thinks this will save her. He claims that his actions are for her sake, but Tae-sool strips Seo-hae of her agency and makes her feel helpless as a result. Tae-sool believes he is doing the right thing for her—and maybe he is—but Seo-hae does not see it that way because, to her, Tae-sool is her hope and future. Just as he does not want her to sacrifice her life for him, she does not want him to die for her sake.

Though the war is only a day away, I’m not that excited about the upcoming battle between Tae-sool and Sigma. I’m assuming Tae-sool has some plan up his sleeve, especially now that he knows the future, but since the show revealed so little of his thoughts, I don’t understand why he is so confident all of a sudden. The main problem Tae-sool has is not technically defeating Sigma, but defeating him while also protecting Seo-hae. Keeping her inside the bunker might save her from a physical death, but it does not answer the question of the time paradox. If Tae-sool was not able to shoot present Sigma because of his fear of losing Seo-hae, what makes this time different? Hopefully, the final week will provide some much-needed answers, but as I’ve said multiple times before (and as many of you have pointed out as well), the show should have answered a lot more questions by now.

Whenever the show focused on the secondary and tertiary characters this episode, my interest dropped considerably which is a shame since the actors are great and I love a well-developed supporting role. The brokers have become one-note, and their motivations are either paper-thin or nonexistent. If Bingbing really is Mr. Park’s daughter or somehow related to his backstory, I wish they revealed it sooner because it would have made his character more complex and possibly explained why he wants his family with him again after abusing them for years. Besides the brokers, Seo-jin and Seung-bok’s storyline has dissolved into mediocrity, and I couldn’t care less about what happens to either of them. The show turned Seung-bok into a sniveling ex-boyfriend who is fueled by jealousy, and his declaration of “love” to Seo-jin was puzzling and problematic. All in all, everything that has to do with Sigma tends to fall flat, and his manipulation of Seung-bok and Sun was banal at best. The use of red to show his evilness is cool in certain scenes, but as with many things with the show, the creators overdo it, and consequently, the impact lessens. With only two more episodes left, I don’t expect a spectacular ending that will resolve all the show’s problems, but hopefully, the creators will at least be able to pull off a decent closure for its characters and answer some of the time paradox questions in a meaningful way.

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Aww you deleted your comment! IA, that CSW is undeniably a charismatic and talented actor! However, not all actors can save duds at the end of the day. Also, him and PSH's romantic chemistry was awkward esp. for them being married in the future lol. But the behind the scenes clips though are such a hoot to watch!! And CSW+PSH seem to get along very well too.

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It's the same comment as below. I just left out a word. I just started watching 15 and stopped after a few minutes. I will go back to it, but even now, it's not grabbing me. I agree about the underwhelming chemistry. Sigh. At the risk of incurring the wrath of her fans, she just does not bring it home. I'll take your recommendation and look at the BTS clips.

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Looks around. *Insert eyes moving back/forth

Uhm, PSH looks scared/grossed out whenever she has romance scenes. She actually is quite good here, for me she clicked as Seo-hae in Ep 9. I feel like some of the flirting/kissing scenes aren't her strong suit. It's not even age either, since both are mature. For a supposed married couple, I'm not feeling it. The BTS clips tho are super cute!!

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I've always wondered if she doesn't like doing romance/kiss scenes, but she keeps doing dramas with romance (although has been going more action-oriented lately) so I think either she can't get roles without romance or she actually doesn't mind them and for some reason thinks the way she acts during romantic scenes is what viewers want to see...

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Romance is a popular genre, esp. internationally. It sells well. But for women, even established ones, the roles one gets are Melos/romance Melos. Action is a way to expand their reach/range so they don't stagnant as they get older. But yes, while she has been doing more action fare. In dramas, she's been shoe horned into doing romance. CSW said he read Ep 1-6, and signed on, so PSH is aware there was going to be romance. The romance is subtle, so that's even the problem. It's how we're supposed to have this amazing/transcendent love and what we get is awkward/failed flirting lol :3

I think its maybe both actors aren't a match together/writing and/or maybe PSH is being conservative here w/ her skin-ship/kissing? Of course, that shouldn't define an actor's skills, but when she's shown in several romance based shows her romantic scenes...well...YIKES!! She looks petrified, unless that's what she's going for which yikes lmao :3

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Always shocked in a pseudo-innocent freeze. It plays to an audience that values a form of modesty that dictates the frozen response to the unexpected moment we've all been waiting for. It's worn thin for me, at least. I think it's become a knee-jerk response for her: an acting habit. I also find women in "action scenes" a bit of a yawn. I loved it when she outwitted the brokers. Those are the moves that I think are really sexy.

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I heard PSH's really religious which speaking of, this show not so subtle inserts a lot of religious motifs. She seems conservative in regards to kiss/skin-ship. It reminds me of Kim Hee Sun who said she really didn't want to kiss Lee Min Ho in Faith, and was disappointed to do so, for her she was married but yeah. Honestly, if romance isn't their strong suit, don't do it just saying :3

I love seeing women in action scenes tbh. Ex. Lee Si Young in Sweet Home. I will say at least in Sisyphus, PSH is wearing appropriate clothing/gear/shoes for combat. It really irks me to no end, when they've women in high heels/tight dresses/outfits fighting like really?! Altho ngl, Tae-sul seems to be given a lot of the brains/solutions. I feel like her role was non de-script for the first half, just consisted of her fighting awful henchmen lol, and saying that she needed to protect Tae-sul.

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Yes to everything you've said @lovepark
Jo Seung-woo, I still have faith in your choices. Bring it on. Fighting!!!

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I agree, CSW is the only reason I have stuck with StM. It's fun watching him in a role like this. Hopefully the last 2 eps can redeem the story!

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I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that for all its many flaws, this show has been a lot of fun. Besides the action, acting, chemistry, etc, it's had more surprises and been less predictable than for example, River/Moon, which has been a bit of a disappointment so far. A few weeks ago, were any of us expecting Sun to show up in the fancy car and save the day? Did anyone expect Seo-hae to find her own corpse? Tae-sool's trick to summon help from the future? Magic guided Coke bottles? Tae-sool to have built the bunker? Tae-sool to have built the bunker with better doors just-in-case for the 2nd time around? As a bonus, except for the flying sodas, those things were pretty logical in context. Surprises that make sense are not as common as I wish they were in Kdramaland, so I'm willing to forgive some thing that didn't make sense.

But was anyone NOT expecting the leads in River/Moon to do almost everything they have done?? Does anyone not think they have a good idea how it will end?

And I've enjoyed some little touches like the girly decorations on Seo-hae's favorite Beretta 92.

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I’ve really enjoyed Sisyphus too. But I think if it were anyone other than Cho Seung Woo, I would have dropped it. Okay, maybe Gong Yoo too. Lol. Hoping his Netflix show with Bae Doona is better!!! I’d crawl into a hole if it isn’t.

Anywho, I have yet to see the final episodes. I hope it ties things up at least, because if they all still die, I might throw an ottoman.

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It's been a train wreck of a show, so thank you @lovepark for continuing to recap the episodes in spite of everything.

I'm just watching for the sake of closure. And some curiosity about 1) how did everything start in the first timeline a.k.a how did Signal go from a directionless artist to this architect of disaster? and 2) how did the brokers end up leading these lives?

I'm not sure when this happened, but at some point I stopped caring for the main leads. Not just out of logic (if Tae-sool dies, isn't that a foolproof way of making sure the apocalypse doesn't happen?) but also because I wasn't intrigued by their stories anymore.

But the brokers somehow still fascinate me. They can be pretty ruthless, and they're definitely jaded, but they're also one another's surrogate family and those nuances really show up. Mr Park was genuinely concerned for the kid that got shot; even though Bingbing and the guys seemed cynical about Mr Park's background, she was still concerned for him.

@lovepark I'm not sure what made you think Bingbing might be his daughter, so could you explain that a bit though?

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Just speculation on my part about Bingbing being his daughter. Unlike the brothers, Bingbing seems to care more about Mr. Park and his personal issues. The show repeatedly has her appear in scenes where Mr. Park is thinking about his past (the bank, the car, etc). Her age also works since she comes across as younger than Seo-hae, and in the old family photos, Mr. Park's daughter looks to be about a young elementary school student. Then in this episode, she shoots at present Mr. Park and tells him to leave the woman alone. The creators had her deliberately stand up for the mom instead of a more generic threat aimed at Mr. Park to get away from their van, which made me think that she could be related to his backstory. Granted, the show has disproved multiple theories I had, and in the end, Bingbing might just be a nosy broker.

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I've also been wondering if Bingbing is his daughter, too. There have been a few incidents that have made me suspicious; either that, or she essentially views Mr. Park as her de-facto father now.

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That's a lot of details you noticed! I thought her nosing around in Park's business was out of mutual concern between the brokers, but I didn't register that she actually told present Park to leave the woman alone. Nice work!

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I'm still wondering if they are in a timeloop....it's already ep 14 and I'm still confused about the basics.

The bunker made no sense. We saw Soohae's bunker in the future it was nowhere as fancy as the one Taesoo made. It's as if this is something new for a new loop to happen.

And Taesoo has locked future Soohae in the bunker. So what will happen to kid soohae and dad? How can they enter the bunker now? So...will future Soohae cease to exist soon because the war and time travel machine didn't happen in this new(?) timeline? 😖

Why am I questioning stuff in this drama 🥲

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The timeloop is always the same: the war begins and then in the future little SeoHae grows up in the apocalyptic future and discovers her grave, and then goes back to the past and tries to stop the war, and fails, then the war begins and little SeoHae grows up in the apocalyptic future...

And yes, the bunker made no sense. Are you telling me TaeSul built it in a couple of months? When he learned about SeoHae and what she means to him? It would be almost impossible! And yes, she's locked but when mum and dad and little SeoHae show up in the bunker (in the event that she doesn't escape before or they can enter because he's broken up the door's commands...) adult SeoHae will disappear.

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EDGE OF TOMORROW, a 2-hr movie, has a better visual and logical explanation of a time-loop than.... Whatever this drama is. The absolute ghetto. I am so annoyed.

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Once again, thanks for the recap and comments.

"The creators will at least be able to pull off a decent closure for its characters and answer some of the time paradox questions in a meaningful way". If only. Let me doubt it.

At this point I'm watching because there are only two episodes left and I don't expect the ending to make much sense or to tie up all the loose ends. I know TaeSul will solve the time paradox, save the world and the girl. I'll just FF through it. I don't have any theory, tbh.

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Again, hat's off to @lovepark for sticking with the last bitter dregs of this drama.
It strikes me that StM reeks of , which typically results in "a Frankenstein-esque product; a loosely stitched together mashup of various ideas and opinions.". Critics say the process rarely produces anything but drek, be it designing a car, an ad campaign, an operating system or writing a sci fi drama.
Without the guiding hand of a single strong manager, the sheer number of voices at the table, each with self-serving opinions and sub-optimal solutions produces something resembling a crazy quilt with big names attached.
Even for a non-professional it's easy to observe in StM when the action team got their way, when the blow-stuff-up CG team won, when the we-need-more-guns group was given the nod (and it was very often) and when the relationship builders finally got a word in edgewise. Hopefully the time travel premise will become stale and derivative soon and writers will follow their strengths.
Well written supporting characters are what appealed to me most when I first started watching Kdramas. I was amazed at the Dickensian level of minor character development, with fully fleshed out personalities, backstories and growth arcs for each one that served to support the main plot. Initially the Asia Mart crew seemed to fill the bill in StM, but they have since been reduced to a paint-by-numbers contraband cartel. Oh well, they may yet be redeemed.

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reeks of "Design by Committee". I'll get this bracket thing down some day.

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Well said! This feels like a gathering of many heads cooking up something, to appease everyone. The action folks, romance lovers, melodrama fans, sci-fi fanatics, and etc. I'm and will continue to say this, but very befuddled on this being JTBC's big budgeted 10 year anniversary project. I'm perplexed on SBS (2016) fighting for this show, and thus going to court for it. Perhaps, it was way better on paper? There are elements/storylines I like, but its a bummer that something feels a bit off despite the fact that I still do like this show. Bummed that the ratings have been lackluster. Ah, the things I do for an amazing actorly cast. Seriously, it's nice to see just actors in this show, must be nice for the underrated ones to get a role here.

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At first, I was annoyed with Park Shin-hye getting sidelined and locked in the bunker. She was sidelined in MotA, and I felt the same flash of annoyance. BUT, Sigma is freaking out that he can't find her. He needs her out and acting, because she has always done that and he can predict her moves and win. He's even willing to drag out Sun to get her back into the action. Her absence is freaking him out! THIS and only this, makes me think that Tae-sool is making the right call to lock her up. It's the unforeseen variable. Who locks up the sharp-shooting, martial arts expert when it's D-1 to nuclear war? I'm looking forward to seeing how this bananas show wraps it all up. I have firmly locked my logic and thinking abilities in an underground bunker, and am ready for a wild ride!

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For all it's flaws - and there are plenty I have frothed about - for me, the OTP is actually a strength. CSW is just in general engaging to watch, and I think he's doing pretty well with what he's been given. I'd say the same for PSH, though I did take a bit of time to warm up to her character - but hers was probably meant to be more enigmatic anyway.

When it comes to the development of their relationship, for me it's logical that it isn't super touchy-feeling, and also that Seo-hae would be a bit more standoffish. She's essentially lived a massive chunk of her life with only her father for company and socialization. She's grown up in a post-apocalyptic world where every day is a struggle to survive and you can't trust anyone. She's a grown woman swooning like a tween over BTS. In short: she's weird when it comes to people, and so it makes sense to me that she's weird with Tae-sul, especially if she's feeling these feelings for the first time - she never experienced school crushes and puppy love before. I like that they don't make this hard-ass, tough-as-nails, rifle-toting heroine with crazy strong sang-froid immediately melt into a swooning, helpless Puddle 'O Love with Tae-sul. And I also like that she's awkward and prickly with him, and he basically takes that all in stride and loves all of her. (And I note that he also choked when given the chance to make his move when they are lying on the bed together in the bunker.) This very, very long paragraph to say that I appreciate they show their love/affection/whatever for each other in subtle, consistent ways - taking care of each other, finding each other, protecting each other, risking and sacrificing for each other. Making sure there are a sh*t-ton of bananas for each other. You get what I mean.

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This drama is a big yawn!

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I didn't want to give up on the show so close to the finish line but... idk I just couldn't find the motivation to watch so I ended up just reading this recap. It's so sad bc I really liked the show originally but it's just run out of steam and the plot is making less and less sense as it goes on. 😒

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Finished the finale today. Nobody would bat an eye, @lovepark, if you rolled 15 & 16 into one recap - and a brief one at that. One bean and done.

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Han Tae Sul 😳🤔😔

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No substance to this comment, and all can ignore - but I hate that they’ve turned Sun’s character into a useless puppy for Seo-hae….out of everyone else’s characters that could’ve made an impact or had potential, Sun’s was just useless ever since he was given the chance to leave the country with his mom and sister but didn’t.

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