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Sell Your Haunted House: Episode 14

In this episode, our team takes some time to piece themselves back together in the wake of recent events, and begin to understand each other and themselves a little bit better. Reunited at last, they face down their biggest foe with aid from an unlikely ally, but just when things seem to be looking up for our heroes, a tragic twist of fate puts one member in serious peril.

 
EPISODE 14 RECAP

Ji-ah realises that Baek Hyun-joo is preventing her son’s spirit from moving on and tells her that she needs to let Chang-hwa go, but Hyun-joo blames herself for driving him away. 12 years ago, she and Chang-hwa had gotten into an argument about his unemployment and he’d walked out mid-meal and never came back.

Ji-ah insists that Chang-hwa’s death wasn’t her fault but Hyun-joo can’t accept that and wails, mourning her son, while his ghost watches on and cries. Ji-ah and In-bum leave unsuccessful, and Ji-ah refuses to explain why.

Ji-ah rushes back to her apartment and tries to summon Mi-jin’s ghost, desperate to know if she was actually the one that prevented her mother’s spirit from moving on. Her attempts fail and Ji-ah hurls the incense burner to the ground and sinks to the floor sobbing with guilt and frustration.

Below, In-bum hears the crash and goes to investigate, overhearing Ji-ah mutter to herself that she’ll disappear soon and it’ll all be over.

Meanwhile, Tae-jin is weighing the pros and cons of giving Sung-shik’s memorandum to Director Do and risking death for a greater reward, or dealing with In-bum instead and getting a smaller but safer payout. His lackey arrives and asks why they should settle for just one when they could have both.

Ji-ah is awoken by loud noises the next morning and goes downstairs to find In-bum and Ji-chul moving in, having been kicked out of their lodgings because the restaurant has closed down. Ji-ah is unimpressed, but In-bum manages to negotiate a week’s respite for them to find somewhere else to stay.

In-bum spends the day constantly knocking on Ji-ah’s door and asking her inane questions, and tags along when she goes on a walk that evening. She tells him that she wants to be alone, but he says that he can’t let her go by herself when she looks so upset.

Sat side-by-side with Ji-ah on the swings, In-bum explains that his grandmother always told him when he was a child that his birth had brought misfortune to their family, blaming him for the deaths of his grandfather, parents and uncle. He hated her for it then, but realises now that she needed to blame someone as a way to cope with her grief.

In-bum warns Ji-ah not to make the same mistake as his grandmother by pinning the blame on someone who doesn’t deserve it, particularly if that person is herself. He tells Ji-ah that what happened wasn’t her fault and that she doesn’t need to punish herself or atone for it by disappearing.

Ji-ah and In-bum attempt to exorcise Chang-hwa’s spirit again, and Hyun-joo prepares a table full of home-cooked food to see her son off. After confirming with Ji-ah that Chang-hwa’s eating it (although he’s actually not), Hyun-joo apologises for the harsh words she said to him, and tells her son to enjoy the last meal she’ll ever make for him and then move on to a good place.

Ji-ah’s spirit awl, which had been holding her hair up in a bun, dissolves untouched as Chang-hwa’s spirit disappears, and back at Daebak Ji-ah explains to In-bum over a beer that Hyun-joo was able to let go after giving Chang-hwa a last meal, to make up for the one he walked out on.

In-bum says that it seems to him as though mother and son were both holding onto each other, out of concern rather than regret. He tells Ji-ah to give herself more time, and when she goes upstairs Ji-ah retrieves a picture of herself and her mother from a moving box and puts it back on the shelf.

Tae-jin contacts Ji-chul to arrange a deal for the memorandum and Ji-chul shows up at the meeting place with a box full of cash, which is promptly stolen by Tae-jin’s henchman. In-bum appears and Ji-chul confirms that they took the bait, having planted a tracker in the box in anticipation of a double-cross.

Meanwhile, Tae-jin picks up his lackey and they briefly gloat about how gullible Ji-chul is before realising that the money in the box is actually fake. Tae-jin immediately switches to complaining about Ji-chul’s dishonesty — with no apparent recognition of the hypocrisy in that statement — before reminding himself that they still have Director Do.

After meeting with Detective Kang, Hwa-jung lights up with relief when she gets a call from Ji-ah asking to meet. They go to the park, and Hwa-jung struggles to keep the smile off her face as Ji-ah explains that CEO Yum told her she’d be no different from a ghost if she kept pushing people away.

Ji-ah says that Hwa-jung came running unprompted 10 years ago when she decided to re-open Daebak Realty, and thanks her for staying by her side ever since, preventing her from living like a vengeful ghost.

Hwa-jung tells Ji-ah about her baby daughter, Bom. She didn’t choose to have her but Bom was her only family and she loved her fiercely, working multiple jobs and caring for her while still a teenager. One day Hwa-jung left Bom sleeping on the bed in a motel room while she went out to work, and when she returned she found Bom dead — she still doesn’t know why.

The police thought that Hwa-jung had killed her baby, and she encouraged that belief out of guilt for not taking care of Bom properly. She was sent to a juvenile detention center and had decided to follow Bom, when Mi-jin appeared and told Hwa-jung that she knew she hadn’t killed her daughter. Together, they’d exorcised Bom’s ghost and enabled her spirit to move on.

When Mi-jin asked her 20 years ago to take care of her daughter, Hwa-jung decided to protect Ji-ah in Bom’s place. Ji-ah says that it’s because of Hwa-jung’s protection and support that she was able to endure her work until now, but Hwa-jung doesn’t need to keep making sacrifices for her any longer.

Hwa-jung asks if she’s being fired and Ji-ah replies that she’d never be able to find someone else who could handle her temper, taking her hand as Hwa-jung teases her.

Tae-jin is on his way to deliver the memorandum to Director Do, having come to a lucrative deal for it. Unfortunately the director has no intention of letting Tae-jin leave with knowledge that could destroy him, and has his goons ambush them in the parking lot.

Bruised and beaten, Tae-jin manages to break free and runs out into the street, where he finds In-bum and Ji-chul waiting, having tailed him using the tracker they planted. He hops into their van and they manage to lose Do’s thugs.

In-bum pulls over and demands Tae-jin hand over the memorandum, but he says it was in the jacket that he lost at Dohak Construction, distraught at losing his golden ticket. In-bum is devastated to realise that the only piece of evidence against Director Do has been lost, and furious at Tae-jin’s greed.

Tae-jin fires back at In-bum for trying to take the moral high ground when he’s just as much a con man as Tae-jin or Director Do himself, pointing out that In-bum was the one who scammed him first. In-bum stares at him in disgust before getting back in the van and driving off without a word, leaving Tae-jin standing alone in the street.

Ji-ah notices that things are suspiciously silent downstairs at Daebak the next day and goes to investigate. Ji-chul tells her that the memorandum is gone and she heads to the park where In-bum’s brooding alone to ask him if he’s really going to give up that easily.

Ji-ah tells In-bum to pull himself together, because Director Do needs to be stopped before he creates more vengeful ghosts. She offers him her hand, and he uses it to pull himself up.

The Daebak team is complete again with Hwa-jung’s return, and she fills them in on the progress the police have made while investigating Dohak Construction’s finances, uncovering a paper company involved in a money-laundering operation that they suspect Do’s been using to bribe officials.

Ji-chul laments that many people wouldn’t have had to suffer if the police had investigated more thoroughly 20 years ago, and Ji-ah tasks him with looking into Secretary Choi’s background.

Hyun-joo comes home to find Tae-jin asleep in her spare room, having nowhere else to go. He’s surprised that they’re closing the restaurant but assumes it’s because Chang-hwa came back, taking credit for passing on their phone number.

Shocked to learn that Tae-jin actually met Chang-hwa, Hyun-joo tearfully asks how he was and whether he missed his parents and intended to come home. Tae-jin is dumbfounded to hear that he died in an accident at the construction site, and tears up when Hyun-joo thanks him for giving Chang-hwa that number so the police could contact them, enabling them to give their son a proper funeral.

Hyun-joo gives Tae-jin a hot meal and one of Chang-hwa’s old shirts, telling him off for going around in rags. She says that she knows he’s a good boy really so he should start acting like it and settle down, because all people really need in life is a safe place to go home to and a good meal at the end of the day.

Tae-jin drinks alone that evening and has a moral crisis, eventually heading over to Daebak to throw his shoe at In-bum. He tells In-bum that he wants to live a simple life too, and orders him to use the memorandum hidden in that shoe to take Director Do down.

Team Leader Jung holds a press conference to announce that Director Do is being investigated for ordering an arson attack in 2001 that led to the deaths of 7 people. Sung-shik’s case has been re-opened following the discovery of irregularities in his suicide/confession letter that seem to point to foul play, and the police will carry out a search and seizure at Dohak Construction’s headquarters as a result of the ongoing investigation into their money laundering.

Director Do seems unperturbed by these developments, warning Detective Kang that it’ll take more than that to catch him before making a call to the Director General. He’s told that he’ll need to be interrogated at the police station at least once to keep up appearances, since the media have latched on to his case.

The Daebak team are joined by Tae-jin for a celebratory dinner, and Ji-ah gives her customary toast to not becoming vengeful ghosts after they die. She watches everyone bicker and laugh together and smiles to herself, and In-bum watches her fondly.

On the way back from buying supplies, Ji-ah warns In-bum not to get too ahead of himself because Director Do has a lot of friends in high places and it’ll be an uphill battle to make him pay for what he’s done. She says that now they’ve begun they’ll have to see it through, and In-bum is relieved to hear it but doesn’t let on, hoping that that declaration means that Ji-ah’s changed her mind about disappearing.

At the station, Director Do admits to his part in the arson but insists he had nothing to do with either Sung-shik’s death or embezzling funds, pinning the blame on Secretary Choi. Meanwhile, Ji-ah meets with Secretary Choi to ask why she’s willing to take the fall for her boss.

Choi explains that she owes a lot to Director Do, who was the only one to help her when she was abandoned by her parents. He may have taken advantage of her hardship to earn her loyalty and devotion, but she believes that he’d never abandon her. Ji-ah warns her not to throw her life away for a man like him.

Do’s lawyer sees Choi take Ji-ah’s business card and reports back to him, and although the director doubts she’d betray him he realises that she knows too much and could potentially become a liability. Do tells his lawyer to take care of her, and he gets her out on bail and sends her home in a cab.

In-bum is revealed to be driving the car, and he plays Secretary Choi excerpts from Director Do’s interrogation in which he pinned all the blame on her, offering her a plea deal in exchange for testifying against Do. Choi keeps insisting she really was the one responsible for Sung-shik’s death, not Director Do, but In-bum doesn’t buy it and drops her off at home to mull their offer over.

As Secretary Choi waits for the elevator, In-bum and Ji-ah’s words run around her head and she starts to doubt Director Do. She calls Ji-ah to agree to testify, and as she steps onto the elevator a man in a helmet steps off.

Outside, the man removes the helmet and In-bum, recognising him as the guy who lured him and Ji-ah into the freezer where they were almost killed, realises that Secretary Choi is in danger and runs after her. Meanwhile, Choi’s apartment has been filling with gas and explodes as soon as she opens the front door, killing her instantly.

Ji-ah sees the explosion on the news and realising that In-bum was near the building, rushes to the scene to find him. The plaza is full of injured people and emergency workers, and Ji-ah searches for In-bum desperately, eventually noticing his necklace lying on the floor.

Ji-ah sees In-bum standing in the middle of the plaza with his back to her, and when he turns round she sees that he has no face — he’s been possessed by an egg ghost once again.

 
COMMENTS

Oh great, another egg ghost. That would have been a cruel cliffhanger if it wasn’t for the preemption that shifted the broadcast schedule. For a moment there I thought In-bum might actually have died in the explosion and become a vengeful ghost, so I was actually quite relieved to see that grotesque facelessness. I suppose it’s fitting that things have come full circle with the egg ghost, allowing Ji-ah and In-bum to break the cycle and start again without bloodshed this time — I don’t buy that either of them is actually going to be sacrificed, although I expect that they’ll both try to die for one another. My guess is that In-bum’s special medium powers will save Ji-ah somehow, but possibly he’ll lose them in the process and become a normal person — or maybe Ji-ah will no longer be an exorcist.

Is that the end of Director Do? It definitely felt a little anticlimactic, to be resolved so neatly by the police without the direct involvement of the supernatural or the Daebak team. I do like the way Do’s selfishness and underhandedness came back to bite him, creating a seed of doubt in the minds of both Tae-jin and Secretary Choi that In-bum was able to use to turn them against him: if you’re not loyal to others, they won’t be loyal to you. The fracturing of Do’s side contrasted well with the Daebak team coming together again, and emphasised that people are stronger united than divided.

Jang Na-ra did an excellent job as always portraying the pain that Ji-ah felt when she realised that she was the one holding her mother’s spirit back. It’s been a tumultuous few episodes for Ji-ah, but after so long bottling her emotions up I think it was necessary for her to get all that pain and anger and grief out of her system before she could start to move on. I think her focus has begun to shift away from the past and what she lost, and towards the people who love and care about her in the present.

This was an episode of conversations, reconciliations and resolutions, but despite that it didn’t feel that slow to me. I think every interaction served a purpose, allowing the characters to understand each other and themselves a little better. Both In-bum and Hwa-jung opened themselves up to Ji-ah and confided their pasts in her, deepening their relationships, and I very much enjoyed how aggressively supportive In-bum was when he realised Ji-ah was struggling — I laughed at the montage of her opening the door to find him standing there in different poses. In-bum’s remarks about a mother and child mutually clinging to each other rather than one holding the other back, the difference between concern and obsession, and using misdirected blame as a coping mechanism helped Ji-ah look at her relationship with Mi-jin’s ghost from a different perspective, and I particularly liked the emphasis he put on being kinder and more patient with yourself and others, and giving yourself time to heal, during both this episode and the last one. And of course Ji-ah returned the favor when In-bum was in need of some words of wisdom himself.

A single teenage mother and cot death — Hwa-jung’s backstory was even more tragic than I anticipated. I’m glad that her intentions were good, even if she went a little too hard on the overprotectiveness, and it was lovely to see the bond between her and Ji-ah re-established. The hand-holding could easily have come across as overly saccharine and out of character for Ji-ah, but somehow they managed to hit exactly the right note of sentimentality.

I’m never sure how I feel about Tae-jin. He actually wasn’t wrong when he said that In-bum and Ji-chul conned him first, and although we know that they’ve changed — and possibly that their intentions weren’t all that bad to begin with — I think Tae-jin really does consider them no different from himself or Director Do at heart. Yes he double-crossed them, but in his world you either play or you get played, and he’d expect them to do the same to him if their positions were reversed. I don’t think they could ever have changed his mind. It was Hyun-joo’s belief in him that made him want to do the right thing, and there are some interesting parallels between Ji-ah telling In-bum he’s a good person and Hyun-joo telling Tae-jin that she knows he’s a good boy. I think those words were something they’d both secretly always wanted to believe in but never quite could, until they heard it from the mouth of someone upright and unflinching that they respected and trusted to tell them the truth.

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I guess this was a much needed episode to clarify any misunderstandings and come to a reconsiliation within the Daebak group members.
That being said, there were a lot of things that I didn't like:

➡️A lot of focus on Tae Jin. I don't know if the show is trying to make me like him or if it's trying to say he's just human like everyone else. Either way, the amount of screen time he's getting is laughable.
➡️Hwa jung's back story and the death of her child and how it was an 'accident' in some way. What mother would leave her newborn by (himself/herself?) and go to work/school? No matter how desperate you are, there are some things that are just plain stupid. Leaving a baby on its own for god knows how long is something no sane person would do. So this scene didn't really feel real to me.
➡️The fact that Director Do can only be caught if his secretary spills all his secrets! I mean, the secretary who for 13 episodes has stood by his side come rain or storm. Is this the best that the writers could do? If she had shown some shred of disgust at Director Do's antics, then I would have believed her to be capable of change. Her death feels meaningless to me.

I'm glad that the next episode not only picked up speed, but nicely tied the egg ghost mystery together. Won't go to much detail about that here but eagerly waiting the next two recaps!

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Regarding Hwa jung's backstory, I think it can really happen tho. I came across this article about a poc mom who got arrested and jailed for leaving her children by themselves in motel while she works, thankfully the charges were dismissed by the judge and also, the mom has now additional funds from gofundme. Life is that hard sometimes.

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*shudders* Those poor children!
I know parents can have a hard time raising their kids, especially if their income doesn't allow for them to take a day off or provide additional support (child care, nanny etc.)...but it's just that this kid looked like a new born! I just cannot believe that someone who definitely cares for their child would just lock up the house and leave? If they found the child to be a burden or they decide to leave the kid at an orphanage...that's different isn't it?

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If a baby usually goes to sleep after being fed, she might be left alone for a few hours and nothing much would happen. Sorry, I'm not saying this is ok, but I can imagine Hwa-jung having no choice but to take a calculated risk like that. Also, I think babies have been left on their own for far longer periods in some orphanages...

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It's not about anything happening to the baby. It's more than that. the children at the orphanages are a different story because they were left by their parents to fend for themselves (in some cases unwillingly even). But in this case Hwa Jung clearly loved her child. It's not that she didn't have a choice. I think she could have found an alternative way to care for the baby.

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I think she loved her child, but given the circumstance that she was alone during the time with no one else by her side, the baby was her first-born, and that perhaps she was only 16 at the time in a very traditional society, it might be hard for her to ask for help and instead took an uneducated risk of leaving her first-born alone for a couple of hours.

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I would never advocate leaving a child unattended, but sadly this kind of situation is also not as uncommon as one may think. There are plenty of parents (often poor, single mothers without access to familial or community support), who have to make some pretty agonizing choices every day in their attempts to provide for their children.

Suggesting that she leave her child at an orphanage if she finds her to be a burden smacks a bit of, "Have they no prisons? Have they no workhouses?". It's clear that Hwa-jung doesn't find her child to be a burden - she loves her, and is trying to do her best by her in a society that has ostracized them and offers no safety net or support to either her or her child. Hwa-jung did the best she could with what she had - which was precious little. I can't imagine the loneliness, despair, guilt and grief that she and parents similar to her must feel in situations like these. I'm not saying it was right, but I primarily felt sadness and compassion for her.

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Hwajung worked several part time jobs, so it may have only been a few hours. It looked like she may have done this many times before without issue, and the baby had no health issues to monitor. Guessing the baby died from SIDS, which could happen even with the parents at home and even now with all this wearable technology to monitor breathing.

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Also, nobody seems to have commented on the fact that she was in a school uniform. She has no friends or family, was a child herself and was (probably) raped and forced to give birth to a child because she wasn't given proper access to necessary health care. Then she was forced to raise the child herself without any income support... I really don't know what else she could have done. And the fact that she blamed herself to the point that she went to jail for murder over it speaks volumes to the self-hatred she has internalised.

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Re: Do's secretary. Looked more like self-preservation than a change of heart. I think she just didn't want to be the scapegoat for possibly far more crimes than she'd been led to expect.

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Yeah, fair enough. Self-preservation seems more fitting for her anyway. I just don't agree with the fact that Director Do can only go down if his secretary spills. I would have prefered if the team had threatened the secretary instead of merely 'talking' to her and hoping she just hands them all the evidence.

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They didn't have to threaten her, cos the recording of Do talking to his lawyer did the job for them. I doubt she would have folded if In-bum hadn't let her hear it.

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I don't agree for Hwa Jung. The sudden infant death can arrive any time even if the parents are sleeping next to the baby. She was already trying her best but the Korean system didn't help her.

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A friend of mine who watches the show with me actually told me that the baby could have been possessed. Maybe that's why Ji ah's mum approached Hwa Jung in the first place? Maybe she could sense the ghost of the baby and came to help her pass on?

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I was also expecting a storyline with the baby ending up a spirit that needed to pass on. Then again, I'm glad we didn't have a see the baby as a spirit since the ones we've seen are all gray and distressed.

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I think the baby died normaly but couldn't leave because of Hwa-Jung's guilt.

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i agree. and the scene where hwa-jung holds the baby spirit in her arms as she finally is released really hit me in the feels. esp. with mi jin sitting nearby to offer comfort and aid. it really made me believe that hwa jung would do anything to protect mi jin's daughter (ji ah) from that moment forward

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I made a mistake...started to watch this while waiting for the last few episodes of another drama I've been watching...except now I have to wait for this one to finish too!!! ><
I binged the already available episodes in a couple of days, faster than expected and I'm clearly loving it more than I expected! XD
Now I can't wait for the finale!! Only a few days left luckily! 😍

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Sell Your Haunted House’s characters largely exist on the periphery of society, but even so I’m constantly surprised at the writer’s willingness to make them darker than expected. Earlier we had Sung-shik, Mi-jin and In-bum’s grandmother, and now, after several episodes of nice In-bum, we’re reminded that Tae-jin has a pretty legitimate grievance against him. As for Hwa-jung, her flashback left quite a lot of worrying things to the imagination, like how she got pregnant so young, and how desperate and alone she must have been to leave her baby unattended for several hours.

For me, Tae-jin is part of this landscape, and I agree with @branwen that he is similar to In-bum. Each is parentless, became petty criminals and got into serious trouble. In-bum managed to get out; glad it’s Tae-jin’s turn now. I love his scene with Hyun-joo in this episode: excited about Chang-hwa’s return, eager for HJ’s approval, then having her thank him profusely even though he has failed her and betrayed her trust. That, and Ji-ah and Hwa-jung’s reconciliation, really made this episode for me.

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I've been loving Tae-jin's character all along, and I thought he was awesome in this episode! He's a person who has been completely self-serving his whole life, because that's the way everyone he knows behaves, and it's gotten him nothing but violence and humiliation, but he doesn't know any other way to exist. The most positive outcome he can imagine is to be reinstated in Do Director's good graces and get his nightclub back—and he is prepared to live in fear and grovelling for the privilege. Then he is treated like a good person by Hwa-jung, and, just like for In-bum, that's a powerful thing. He makes a really nice foil for In-bum. I love how all the stories come together and reinforce the themes.

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I mean Hyun-joo, not Hwa-jung!

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I LOVE Tae-jin character and the actor! He is funny, but I kinda feel like deep down he has a kind heart. The problem is that he's been only exposed to that kind of life, so it delighted me so much when he cooperated with In-Bum in bringing down President Do. The scene when they tried to look cool eating that PPL snack made me laugh. They looked so great together as a team. I paid particular attention to Tae-jin's face and it was quite a crack.

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*attention to Tae-jin's face while he was eating the snack

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so astute! i really dislike dramas about spoiled chaebols and their problems so this may be why i love SYHH so much. it's about regular people who have fallen on hard times and who have real-life day to day things to worry about. as well as egg ghosts and unrested spirits of course ; )

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I love this drama! They give their characters the time to grieve or settle their emotions. I think it's important for their growth. Im-Bum's words about the concern were great. I love how they help each other.

We finally know what happened to Hwa-Jung! I'm happy to know she didn't kill her child. It's sad she was all alone to raise a child.

Another Egg Ghost created by Director Do. The loop will come full circle : they exorcize it without dying (please), they stop Director Do, the mum can leave!

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I was so sad for Hwa-jung. It occurs to me that she's also probably led a fairly lonely life, and I can't imagine the pain she would have gone through after losing her baby like that. I'm glad she was found by Mi-jin and brought into a new family.

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also the fact that we don't know exactly how she got pregnant except that she didn't voluntarily have a baby is so dark but so subtle. it says so much about societal conditions at the time and how vulnerable young women are. and after mi jin helps her baby transition you really believe that she'll take a bullet for mi jin and her future daughter

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And that explains well why she has been over-protecting Ji-ah for all these years.

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Not just 'at the time'. Pretty sure in Korea now, women still don't have access to adequate health care, rape and sexual assault are largely unpunished (especially intimate partner violence), and there's almost no social support for single mothers. This is not a 20 years ago problem, it's a today problem.

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Unlike a lot of other exorcism dramas, this show knows that ghosts exist in people's minds as much because of guilt, fear and loss then any other reason. I think 13 and 14 were a beautiful set of episodes because they were about letting go of the past and learning to live after a senseless loss. We had three ghosts stuck here only because the people who loved them wouldn't let them go.

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Director Do is the living egg ghost.. How many people have died because of him? The people who died in the fire accident 20 years ago, the Sky Building's victims, and many many more (who are unrecorded)....

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Ji-ah's cracking open the last few episodes has been all the more powerful when compared with her impenetrable stoicism in early episodes. I really appreciate that no one rushed her as she grappled with her emotions - they just gave her the space, support and love that she needed from afar. I continue to maintain that Jang Na-ra is the reason this drama is punching above its weight, but Yong-hwa as In-beom has grown steadily throughout the drama, and I'm also quite attached to Hwa-jung now.

I appreciate @knewbie 's comment below that this is a story about people at the fringes of society - it's so obvious and yet I hadn't considered that before, so I appreciate even more how pragmatic and clear-eyed especially Ji-ah is about, well, life. And how, while she has steeled herself because of it, she does care and she does what she can to balance out some justice in the world.

I know a lot of dramas are best watched via a weekly episodic pair, but I feel like SYHH truly is best like this, so I'm frustrated that the airing schedule got so thrown off. It would have been better to have just skipped an entire week vs throwing off the couplets, but alas this is probably more my own fault for not having enough self-control to wait!

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ITA about pairs. that cliffhanger where in-beom turns into another egg ghost is totally a second-show-of-the-week-tune-in-next-week cliffhanger

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Thank you @branwen for the recap!
I really enjoy reading your comments.
So nice to have our team working together under one roof again. I like how In Bum and Ji Ah take turns supporting and lifting the other person up. I'm also glad that Hwajung and Ji Ah made up, Daebak Realty wouldn't be the same without them together. All the lovely moments when our characters are together in this episode brought a smile to my face.

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My previous guess that Mi-Jin exorcised Hwa-jung's baby was correct, but the circumstances were much different than expected. That is what is good about this show, the foreshadowing is present but there are deeper meanings in the truth.

There will be several untold truths by the end of this story. Hwa-jung was a single mother. Was Mi-jin also a single mother? Who was JiAh's father? Did JiAh stay at the Blue Salt with Mrs. Yeom for ten years after her mother's death to learn to become an exorcist? Is the Blue Salt her grandparents' home? I can see why the writer and director may not fill in these background pieces to keep JiAh a cold and mysterious character. I personally would like to know so we can fully see JiAh's character development and growth at the end of the show.

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i also want to know what happened to ji-ah during that ten-year gap. and how exactly in-beom became a swindler and partnered with +1. maybe the prequel will fill us in: sell your haunted school? daebak school? exorcist 2005?

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i loved the little montage with in-beom and ji-ah interacting at her bedroom door, as well as the preceding scene where they negotiated how long in beom and ji chul would get to stay at her place. it was a little bit of fun to break up all the moodiness and gave both nara and yonghwa a chance to show off their comedic timing. happy to see ji-ah's eye-rolls and annoyed sighing make a comeback, as well as yonghwa little smirks.

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*yonghwa's* little smirks

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I think I'd combust without these moments of levity. This combination of sadness, humor and compassion—all in one sequence—is just one of the many elements that make SYHH one of the best k-dramas of the year.

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Totally agree. This show is exceptionally good at the tonal shifts/combinations. I don't know how many times I've burst into a surprised guffaw in the middle of a deadly serious sequence.

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I have to agree that this episode is not boring at all though clearly the actions are less shown here compared to the previous ones. But these facts proved to make this drama even more firm; it doesn’t need to be in raw actions always because it’s already a serve just as it is. This drama doesn’t need to try so hard just to get me on the edge of my seat. Can’t wait for your recap on episode 15🙌🏻 Apparently I’m a newbie and SYHH (and Law School) brought me here. Sadly, both are approaching their denouement just in time, later🥺

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