47

The Devil Judge: Episode 16 (Final)

Things are looking dire for our judge duo as they fall prey to the chairwoman’s elaborate scheme. Determined to deal the SRF a major blow, our young judge embarks on a dangerous mission in an attempt to set things right. The finale is action-packed and overall satisfying. There’s destruction to be sure, but it ends on a more hopeful note than expected. So strap in for the final trial as our avenging judges go head-to-head one last time with the corrupt elite.

 
EPISODE 16 RECAP

After Yo-han is arrested, Ga-on goes upstairs to the distraught Elijah whose first thought is that Yo-han is being taken away because he might’ve truly caused the church fire. Ga-on assures her he didn’t and
straightforwardly admits that he was tricked into reporting Yo-han for killing Soo-hyun.

He promises to bring Yo-han back, even if it costs him his life. Elijah bursts into tears, asking why Ga-on did it. Ga-on can only hang his head and apologize while listening to her cries.

Ga-on asks the housekeeper to stay by Elijah’s side and heads to the police station to sort things out. The detective clearly doesn’t believe his story and says they can do nothing without evidence. Even Ga-on’s attempt to have himself arrested for falsely accusing Yo-han is brushed off.

Desperate, Ga-on threatens to report the police’s inaction to the media, arguing the detective must be following orders. The detective is unconcerned because there’s no way the Blue House will let any media outlet report on this. As Yo-han is taken to his cell, Jukchang sees him pass and yells that he’ll kill him.

While Jin-joo watches the news report on Yo-han’s arrest in shock, Justice Min tells Chief Justice Ji he’d better take responsibility for making Yo-han the presiding judge (although it wasn’t even his idea). Ga-on is waiting in Justice Min’s office when he returns.

Ga-on wonders what happened to the whole resigning thing. When Justice Min says he has to clean up the mess, Ga-on calls him shameless. Did he really have Soo-hyun killed just to entrap Yo-han?! Justice Min insists he didn’t know Sun-ah would kill Soo-hyun.

We flash back to when Sun-ah told Justice Min of her plan to put him on the Supreme Court. It wasn’t hard to convince him given his hatred for political figures like President Heo and Yo-han, as well as his fears regarding the upcoming The People’s Live Court. Sun-ah told him the first step is to place someone beside Yo-han who can monitor him.

Now, Justice Min justifies his actions by saying he only wanted to stop Yo-han from destroying the world. His determination grew after the attack on him and his family, which he attributed to Yo-han, and he vowed to do whatever it took to bring Yo-han down.

Even though Justice Min was horrified by Soo-hyun’s death, Sun-ah enticed him to stay the course with her talk of him becoming the chief justice who will go down in history for stemming the chaos. Justice Min tells Ga-on he chose to become a monster to stop Yo-han. History will judge his choice.

Livid, Ga-on calls him a disgusting hypocrite and grabs him by the lapels. Justice Min calls in security right before Ga-on pushes him into the chair and begins screaming at him for killing Soo-hyun. Ga-on is pulled off Justice Min and tossed out of his office.

He runs into Jin-joo in the hall who asks if it’s true Yo-han committed murder. Ga-on tells her it’s a trap by the SRF, so Jin-joo offers to help save Yo-han however she can.

At the prison, Yo-han runs into the warden he threatened into going public over the Young-choon incident, and the man is thrilled to have the chance to pay Yo-han back for his misery. Elsewhere, the chairmen are in awe of Sun-ah’s skills in even turning Justice Min to their side.

President Heo is subdued for once and nervously praises Sun-ah for turning Ga-on into Judas to catch Yo-han. President Heo, unsurprisingly, thinks they should just kill Yo-han in prison rather than deal with a trial. Sun-ah chides him for thinking too much, and he immediately backs down.

Sun-ah finds President’s Heo’s acquiescence suspicious and has noticed the chairmen being careful around him. Wondering if she’s underestimated him, Sun-ah has Jae-hee look into his activities involving the Dream Village project.

President Heo’s wife thanks the chairmen’s wives for convincing their husbands to support President Heo’s latest venture, the “weekend farm.” She promises to set up a time for them to visit their investment.

Meanwhile, Ga-on tries to convince Attorney Go to help him save Yo-han. Attorney Go is reluctant to trust him again, but Ga-on argues they need to act before the SRF tries to hurt Yo-han. Ga-on’s plan is to ferret out what the SRF is hiding at their Dream Village by infiltrating the Medical Center.

Attorney Go points out they have military guards and it’ll be hard for Ga-on to escape once he’s inside.
Even if Ga-on managed to get footage for an exposé, what media outlet would air it? The government has even shut social media down. Ga-on has an idea but needs Attorney Go’s help.

When Elijah wakes, she sees a tray of food and a note from Ga-on on her bedside table. He writes that he spoke to someone who worked at the church and learned the fire was the result of faulty wiring – a simple accident. Yo-han intentionally made her suspect him, hoping her hate would fuel her to live.

Ga-on emphasizes that nothing is her fault since her hating him was what Yo-han wanted. From now on, she should treat Yo-han well. Ga-on encourages her to eat and stay healthy so as not to worry Yo-han once he returns.

In the prison yard, Yo-han fights off Jukchang and his cronies. Yo-han subdues them without breaking a sweat, proving he’s undoubtably the bigger badass.

Meanwhile, Ga-on initiates his plan to take down the SRF by stowing away in a shipping box and sneaking into the Dream Village Medical Center. He dons some scrubs and a mask and makes his way into the clinical trials area.

He surreptitiously films the poor test subjects – including children – as they writhe in pain on their beds. One of those test subjects is So-yoon who looks unwell but not too damaged. She’s relieved to see Ga-on who promises to come back for her in a minute.

President Heo arrives at the facility, so Ga-on slips out to listen while the center gives him a report. 182 of the over 3,000 test subjects have died due to side effects of the vaccine. President Heo is happy with that “low” number and instructs them to expand the “farm” for their new clients which include Russia and Japan.

The chairman and their wives laugh that they might need to expand their operation beyond Seoul. President Heo says people are the most important resource; just look how much money they’re worth! They can even harvest their organs when they die. Ga-on seethes as he watches them laugh and treat human lives like commodities.

President Heo and the chairmen discuss whether to bring Sun-ah into this operation. They’re a little nervous to leave her out, but they’re greedy enough to take the risk. They harp on “aggressive” women like Sun-ah and Minister Cha and diss Sun-ah for being a former maid. The men decide it’s the right time to cut Sun-ah off and get rid of Yo-han.

Ga-on makes it into the elevator with So-yoon, but he’s stopped by another doctor. She recognizes Ga-on but luckily is on their side. She’s not the only medical personnel who’s been waiting for help to arrive. She and a few others help sneak Ga-on and So-yoon out, hoping he’ll expose the situation to the world.

Once they’re out, Ga-on calls to update Attorney Go who is worried about their next step. He reluctantly agrees to proceed when Ga-on says there’s no other option.

Sun-ah makes a trip to the Medical Center and is horrified to see the teenage girl she took a liking to is one of the test subjects. She recalls the girl’s smiling face during her lecture and shakily strokes the girl’s hair. Sun-ah falls to the floor and cries, “What have I done?” She holds the girl’s hand and sobs that she’s sorry.

While Ga-on brings Jin-joo into his plans involving Justice Min’s inauguration, the warden passively watches as an inmate rushes Yo-han with a knife. At the courthouse, Ga-on and Jin-joo are stunned to see the news report that Yo-han was killed in prison. (There’s no way he went out that easily.)

Sun-ah, fighting tears, tells herself it’s fine since she was going to kill Yo-han anyway. The SRF men, on the other hand, are relieved to finally be rid of Yo-han. Chairman Min, looking a little shifty, suggests holding an event in Yo-han’s courtroom to celebrate their victory.

President Heo naturally likes that idea and says Sun-ah needs be there. He thinks it’d be a fitting ending for her too, so Chairman Park calls up Sun-ah to invite her. Sun-ah is many things, but stupid isn’t one of them. When she hangs up, she tells Jae-hee to get her a pistol. “I think I might be the next president,” she muses. It’s time for her to protect herself.

Newly minted Chief Justice Min gives a press conference in lieu of an official inaugural event, vowing to bring justice back. Jin-joo catches up with him afterward and tells him Sun-ah is waiting to meet him in his old office.

Jin-joo reports to Ga-on that Chief Justice Min is on his way. She’s surprised when Ga-on tells her to leave the building. He promises to explain later. This can’t be good.

In Yo-han’s courtroom, the SRF gang holds their own little soirée. The women fawn over Sun-ah while Chairman Min is strangely quiet.

When Chief Justice Min enters his office, Ga-on ambushes him. After binding his hands and gagging him, Ga-on says, “Let’s go together.” He unzips his jacket to reveal a bomb strapped to his chest. Well, that escalated.

Media outlets won’t miss the chance to report how the new chief justice blew himself and his student up on inauguration day. When the bomb explodes, an email about the Dream Village project will be sent to all major media outlets. “Think of this as atonement for Soo-hyun if you have a conscience left,” Ga-on remarks.

Ga-on squeezes his eyes shut with 10 seconds on the timer. He waits … and with less than five seconds to go, Yo-han swoops in to shut it off. He apologizes for being late, saying it took a while to get here from hell.

Ga-on stares in shock at the very alive Yo-han and pushes him in frustration before grabbing him in a bear hug. When Ga-on asks what happened, Yo-han gives him a “c’mon, don’t you know me?” kind of smile.

We flash back to the warden thinking he’s the big man on campus only to have Yo-han reveal that he knows about his illegal funds in an account in the Bahamas. Yo-han promises to return the money if he switches him out for another prisoner for 24 hours, which he already knows he’s good at.

After Yo-han killed the man who attempted to murder him, he instructed the warden to use that dead body as his replacement. Ga-on can’t believe Yo-han managed this all on his own. Attorney Go arrives and apologizes for not telling Ga-on about the plan; he wasn’t sure he could trust him.

While the warden is cursing Yo-han for “returning” his money by donating it to various charities, Yo-han leaves Ga-on to handle Justice Min. In the courtroom, the SRF crew gets one hell of a surprise when Yo-han starts live streaming to the room. They might have blocked all media outlets, but they forgot about the DIKE voting app.

With the help of our trusty PD, Yo-han begins the final trial. The “cast” of the trial is not only our main SRF gang but also the wives. Yo-han admits he’s a criminal, but so are all of them. He plays the video Ga-on took at the Dream Village Medical Center, which is not a good look.

Yo-han tells the public that a fake virus is being used as an excuse to kidnap people and sell them as test subjects. President Heo desperately yells that this video is faked, but his protestations are undercut by the portion of the video where President Heo stands among the test subject and callously discusses their monetary worth.

Next, Yo-han puts up photos of his lackey and Soo-hyun, identifying them as victims of Sun-ah’s. Ga-on holds the phone so Justice Min can see while Yo-han tells the world how Justice Min worked with Sun-ah who killed Soo-hyun in cold blood.

Ga-on frees Justice Min and tells him to go live the rest of his life in hell. “Your name will go down in history just like you wanted.” Through his tears, Justice Min takes one final look at Ga-on before trudging out.

In the trial, 99% of the public vote guilty, so Yo-han announces the punishment. He shows photos of live bombs planted in the building. If any of the convicted attempt to flee the room, the bombs will go off. The SRF crew panics when Chairman Park finds a bomb in the room.

Yo-han declares that when 10 million people – the same number of votes President Heo received – press the button, the bombs will explode. As the number reaches 5 million, Yo-han leaves the broadcasting room and heads to the stage.

In the courtroom, Chairman Min sneaks over to a specific door and curses Yo-han when it doesn’t open. Looks like we’ve got a double agent. Yo-han waltzes into the room with a detonator, continuing his broadcast trial from the courtroom.

Yo-han announces that Ga-on risked his life to take that video exposing the Dream Village and promises Ga-on will later reveal the whole truth. When Yo-han says he’ll go with these villains to hell, Ga-on goes flying out the door toward the courtroom.

Chairman Min begs Yo-han to let him live – he gathered the SRF crew just like he asked. We see that Yo-han had blackmailed him into it by threatening to expose how he embezzled SRF funds. Now, Yo-han offers to give him a chance.

Yo-han opens one of the doors. “Doesn’t this remind you of something?” Just like in the church that day, they’ll have to make a break for it. The first person out the door lives.

Only Yo-han and Sun-ah remain in place. Watching the melee, Yo-han flashes back to the church fire where these same people clawed their way out. He thinks of his last moments with his brother and smiles as he says, “Hyung.”

Sun-ah quietly walks out from behind the judge’s seat and pulls the pistol out of her purse. The others are too busy fighting to notice. President Heo yells for silence and tries to convince Yo-han to cut a deal with him.

President Heo’s obnoxious screams that he’s the king are silenced for good when Sun-ah puts a bullet through his head. She next levels her gun at Yo-han while the others yell for her to shoot.

Yo-han raises the detonator. “Let’s go together, Sun-ah.” Sun-ah smiles with tears in her eyes. “Goodbye, Young Master.” She turns the gun on herself and pulls the trigger.

In her final moments, Sun-ah thinks back to one day when she’d broken a decorative plate in the mansion and Yo-han had told her it was okay with a smile.

“Do you know? I truly liked you,” she thinks to Yo-han who watches her take her last breath. He lets out a long sigh.

The moment Ga-on arrives, everyone starts begging him to save them. Ga-on ignores them and pleads with Yo-han to reconsider. Is he going to leave Elijah alone and die with this trash? Yo-han says it has to be this way. “The actor has to leave once the performance is over.”

“I’ll go with you,” Ga-on offers. Yo-han stares at him for a long moment. “You be the hero,” he says. “I’m enough as the devil.”

Yo-han grabs Ga-on and tosses him out into the hall, slamming the door shut behind him. He stares at the door sorrowfully as Ga-on screams for him on the other side, fighting against the bomb squad trying to drag him to safety.

The number reaches 10 million. With a smirk, Yo-han presses the detonator, and the room explodes. Ga-on and the team are thrown back from the blast. Ga-on stares in horror and screams Yo-han’s name.

That night, Ga-on goes to the mansion to see Elijah. Her chair is in her room, but she’s not. He checks Yo-han’s room where he notices a tower of cards on the table and a set of courtroom blueprints in the chair.

Yo-han made notes on a secret emergency exit and how the magician should disappear from the scene. The final note reads, “My part is done. Now you have work to do.”

The housekeeper enters the room and tells Ga-on that Yo-han already came and went. So he faked his death twice in 24 hours? Earlier, he’d shocked her by running in and telling her she’s fired. She should live her life now since no one will be in this house anymore.

Yo-han grabbed her in a hug and then went to fetch Elijah. He’d promised things were okay now and told her they’d be going to a rehab in Switzerland that will try to help her walk again. They’d held each other and cried.

Ga-on is delighted to hear Yo-han is alive and well. The housekeeper isn’t sure how to take Yo-han’s “severance” pay: a health food shopping mall where she can sell all the “healthy and tasteless” things she wants. Heh.

A month later, Ga-on says goodbye to Jin-joo who is headed back to her hometown to work with youth. He then heads to the hearing on the “Kang Yo-han incident.” Ga-on is lauded as a national hero and an assemblyman asks his opinion on how to avoid another such disgraceful incident.

It’s clear they only invited Ga-on as a publicity stunt because no one truly listens when he remarks that Yo-han wasn’t the real problem; people were already angry. Public officials should be focusing on getting justice for the citizens who are hurting. “If we don’t do our jobs, someone will suffer. That suffering is what creates a monster.”

The assemblyman praises Ga-on’s sentiment but ignores it entirely, preferring surface “solutions” that court public favor. Ga-on listens to their chatter in disappointment, noting to himself nothing has changed. He contemplates how to go about creating a world that doesn’t need Yo-han.

A hand rests on the back of Ga-on’s chair and Yo-han’s voice says, “Do well or I’ll come back.” Ga-on looks up and glimpses Yo-han walking out the door. He runs to the lobby and spots Yo-han on a walkway the floor above. Yo-han salutes him and walks off.

Ga-on chases after him, calling his name. Yo-han stops and turns to face him. They stare across the space at each other with tears in their eyes but neither steps closer. They share a smile, and then Ga-on watches Yo-han walk away.


 
COMMENTS

That’s a wrap, folks. I’m not sure how I feel about the death fake-out. While I’m glad that Yo-han survived and is finally free, the happy ending felt a little dissonant with the tone of the drama. Honestly, I expected at least one of our leads to die. After the explosion, I thought we were going full circle but this time Ga-on (the Isaac stand-in) would have to survive alone. I did think it was kind of mean that Yo-han traumatized Ga-on like that, even if it was temporary. Of course, if he’d told him the plan ahead of time, it wouldn’t have been nearly as dramatic. Although it was a happy ending overall – the bad guys were vanquished and the good guys lived to fight another day – it was also bittersweet. Our little family was separated with Ga-on and Yo-han going their own ways. In my mind, the three of them are reunited in the future under much better circumstances. Maybe they holiday together on occasion or something.

I actually liked that Yo-han was out of commission for a while this episode because it gave Ga-on a chance to be more than a sidekick. Although I was annoyed with him last episode, he redeemed himself for me by taking full responsibility and doing whatever he could to correct his mistake. He took initiative and got things done. The whole incident led to greater character growth which was nice to see. Whereas he was previously naïve and indecisive to a sometimes problematic degree, he came into his own with a newfound surety of who he is and what he believes by the end of this journey. Despite sometimes being irritated with him, I didn’t dislike Ga-on’s character. I largely credit that to Jinyoung’s strong performance. He did a great job with Ga-on’s emotionality which could have easily strayed into overacting territory. Instead, he gave a nuanced performance that made Ga-on more interesting than he might’ve been on paper. Also, he had great chemistry with Ji Sung, which was essential for making this drama effective.

Unsurprisingly, Ji Sung gave a wonderful performance as Yo-han who could’ve come off very differently in the hands of a less skilled actor. Yo-han wasn’t cartoonish in his scheming or overly stoic in demeanor. Ji Sung made Yo-han a sympathetic antihero who felt human despite his uniqueness. His loneliness and pain were always present under the surface of the charismatic outer appearance he cultivated. Aside from Ji Sung’s portrayal, Yo-han’s relationship with Elijah helped to humanize him as well. I really enjoyed watching them figure out how to connect with each other and grow into a real family with Ga-on’s encouragement.

Then, we have Sun-ah. I personally loved the over-the-top way Kim Min-jung played her. Sun-ah’s exaggerated persona embodied the extravagance of the world she sought to own and fit well with the drama’s theme of corruption beneath a veneer of opulence. She was a truly tragic character who could never escape her traumatic childhood. Her loneliness and greed consumed her, bringing destruction wherever she went. Her rare moments of empathy and vulnerability, like when she sobbed by that teenage girl’s bedside, made her pitiable if not sympathetic. Sun-ah choosing to end her own life felt in line with her character. She knew there was no way out at that point and that she’d never have what she craved. Sun-ah always refused to live on others’ terms, so it’s not surprising she’d also refuse to die on them.

Although Sun-ah was arguably the main villain, I liked that this fight wasn’t against a single person but a system. Yes, the SRF and all the people in power needed to go, but they weren’t even the main problem. Until strictures are put in place to curb the power of money over the system, similar corrupt leaders will replace those ousted. Yo-han knew he needed to blow up (heh) the current system but that wouldn’t be enough. Lasting change would require someone who cares to take the reins and rebuild from the rubble. Was it always Yo-han’s plan to pass the torch to Ga-on? If so, it makes sense why he wanted to recruit Ga-on so badly. He needed someone who had intimate knowledge of the problem and a personal stake in fixing it. Someone who wouldn’t give up on an exhausting fight or become corrupted themselves in the process. It’s a tall order, but Ga-on has matured enough to give it a go. There’s no guarantee he’ll be able to successfully implement change, but there’s hope that things can improve so long as people are willing to fight for it.

Despite the dystopian nature of it all, The Devil Judge was a fun watch. I do wish we’d gone a little deeper into the dystopian future element; it was more of a backdrop than the focus. I was interested in learning what brought everything to that point in more detail and seeing what other aspects of life were affected, but alas. At its core, this was a revenge/underdog drama about the dangers of consolidating power into the hands of the wealthy elite. Our leads’ backstories and the development of their bond provided an emotional center, and I appreciated the character development for both of them. I’ve already talked about Ga-on, but Yo-han grew a lot as well. By the end, Yo-han had started letting people in and expressing himself to those he cared about more openly. He, Ga-on, and Elijah finally let go of their anger and together began healing from their trauma. The future may be uncertain, but I’m confident these three will truly live, no longer hiding in the dark.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

47

Required fields are marked *

One fake-out of Yo-han's death was enough; the second was just anticlimactic. Especially when the public was on his side "Kang Yo-han for President!" Isn't ten million votes to blow up President Heo the same as one million votes to electrocute Jukchang because Yo-han is still turning the citizens into murderers? Sun-ah should have shot and killed all the foundation members before committing suicide if she wanted to save her beloved master.

I'm seriously disappointed Ga-on didn't die after his foreshadowing yesterday "That was the moment I decided to die." He sounded so resigned when he told Yo-han he'll go with him. Ga-on's plan was a disappointment. Why did he not hijack Justice Min's inaugural press conference to expose the Dream Home Medical Center? Or if he were gung ho about murder-suicide, at least take Justice Min hostage and detonate the bomb in front of the cameras. When Ga-on told Jin-joo to leave the building, I presumed he had planted bombs behind the paintings like the explosion in Yo-han's office.

I cried when Elijah cried and hugged Yo-han who had come back from the dead, but I really wish she had called him "samchon" as an ode to Ga-on's letter to treat Yo-han well when she sees him again. Elijah was my favorite character, and I loved her relationship with Ga-on because like housekeeper ajumma said, she was the most cheerful around him. Elijah and Yo-han fighting like cats and dogs was so much fun. Sigh of relief she never learned the truth about the fire, and I pray she can walk again.

I wish we had seen how Sun-ah got all her power. I know Show had alluded to Sun-ah being sexually assaulted by Chairman Seo as a girl, which she used to blackmail him to head the Social Responsibility Foundation, but how did Chairman Min and Chairman Park follow her? I also would've like Jae-hee's backstory and how she started working for Sun-ah like Yo-han's lackey K.

Thanks lots for recapping the entire drama, @quirkycase!

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Even if Ga-on did it in front of the cameras, the SRF would've found a way to stop the broadcast. The only way to make the news channels pay attention was by doing something sensational enough to warant going against the government.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@panshel I feel the same way about the two fake outs. I wish that they would've stuck with one and then reveal that Yo-han had survived at the end; it would've been more impactful. I also wish that we would've learned more about Sun-ah's rise to power.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was sad to see our little family going their separate ways cause now
Ga-on is all alone. I'm so glad Yo-han and Elijah found their way back to each other because you could tell they adored each other when she was younger. He protected her with a fierceness like no other. But man, was that courtroom scene dramatic and Ji Sung's acting was superb. (I cracked up when Chairman Min's own wife kicked him in the face for his betrayal.) It's true what Ga-on said, nothing had really changed. But Yo-han telling him to do well or he would come back would be the perfect opening for a second season with our trio fighting crime. How amazing would that be. But even if that never happens, I'm just glad Yo-han, Ga-on and Elijah made it out alive.

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I took the ending as a warning to the judiciary to do their job or someone like the Devil Judge would appear (or in the case of the drama, reappear) with all of the dire consequences. Corrupt Justice breeds justifiable anger that finds its own outlet in vigilantism and mob violence, in short in the Devil Judge, the abyss. So in the end, Yo-han is an cautionary allegory.

9
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

a cautionary allegory - lol

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hello! Prob. ep 16 is best to discuss this finale. While I'm not as articulate as the other commenters here, this has sparked some interesting discussion. In my view, it was basically Yo-han's origin story of how he came to be, and his revenge tactics. Once the people he sought to revenge were gone, his duty/place to go was done. In terms of the overall broad picture, it did highlight how governments act/will power that goes beyond their control can turn a society upside down. But also the power to conduct extreme issues, and letting the people decide can also be deadly, b/c most act on empathy and first reaction.

Even with Yo-han gone, the system is still broken. Ga-on was aware of that, & there is a slight glimmer of hope that it could change. But he would've to be a monster in order to inflict that change. So its not as golly of an ending, but I think it proposed a lot of discussions and questions about absolute power, justice, and law at the hands of people (both good or bad).

Ngl, Yo-han's bomb scene low-key gave me Ju-Dante Penthouse bomb scene vibes (of course one is an actual Devil spawn lol). But the whole bomb scene while bombastic, in the hands of Sun-ah, it would've been in the writers eyes a villain like thing to do. But for Yo-han, a martyr for the people. Low-key got some red thread vibes in the end, that Ga-on's mindset is in the just side, that there's always might be a case where he'll need to tap into the devil side of his shoulder. Either way, solid wrap up for the show.

I'll say, Kim Min Jung was excellent as Sun-ah. Even though she was evil till the end, she was resilient & knowing her story, she went out with a bang literally. When all the hooligans were off yapping/screeching, she stayed stagnant. She accepted her demise. Glad that she did off the loud mouth president first.

1
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

LOL. I haven't seen Penthouse so I'm missing that. At the end, Yo-han became an allegorical figure (hope that doesn't sound too inflated). Whether he existed as a rl person or not didn't figure. He will never die. His potential to unlesh mob rule is always there, lurking, ready to be unleashed when people take justice into their own hands. His presence is triggered when the judiciary fails, especially when corruption and a failed justice system let the people down. That's why Ga-on has to do a good job in the face of the entrenched, partial, status quo. Yo-han is what he says he is, the abyss, a spiral down into chaos. The court of the people, a vehicle for his vengeance, becomes chaos. For me, what happens in social media, when people are cancelled, vilified, and their lives are ruined, is where we are at, now. So we do already have a court of the people in a society not very far removed from this dystopian society. The President was someone we all recognised. In SK the justice system has been going through deeply politicised upheavals, and the current candidates for the new President frighten me, and I don't live there. It was a warning.

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well Penthouse is CRAZY!! LOL. But man, Ju-dante was one crazy motherfker. Ironically, the bomb scene in Penthouse S3 happened the day before Devil Judge finished. So I bet viewers watching both or one of the shows were taken a back to say the least :3 But diff p.o.v.s/roles taken by each character, but the same result of terror in the end.

Yo-han felt so Batman like to me. As the whole symbol of even if he leaves, a future Yo-han is always there lurking. What stood out to me in the show were topics of nationalism/pure blood & seeing how many conservative SK politicians boast about that, & foreigners issue going on too. It was def. taken from this time, also very Trumpian vibes w/ the actor president. (This actor is a theatre actor, but my god he was a bit loud sometimes lol). But he cowered towards the end.

Cancel culture seems like a lot of noise, but not much result/action in the end? A lot of people who committed heinous acts get off scoff free :// And then those whose lives are ruined by fake rumors just like that. Social media has def. made these issues more prevalent. I admire what this show was trying to get at, & even addressing some controversial topics/tactics. I think over time, it might age better? It also helps when said actor playing the role is Ji Sung, so even w/ the acts he's committed, I can sense why his character might do so. As for SK Justice system, whether is the West/East/etc, its a broken system fixed by the rich, and the poor are always victims. Ex. Ga-on's father. That fire scene of money vs family was spot on. Also low key gave me Squid Game vibes there, plus the rich people trying to claw out vibes too. Basically, The Devil's Judge should've gotten the Netflix treatment.

I'll say that many of the people in TDJ view Yo-han as a hero to save us from ruins. But his tactics in getting there are def. radical. I'm just speechless, esp. the bomb scene. Didn't expect that at all!! I would love a S2, but I doubt it. It would be nice to see Ga-on take on the Judge position and how he'll fares, and if Yo-han would return back?

Overall, did you like the series? And did the finale wrap it up well for you? Thanks!

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

On a scale of 1-10, I'd give it a 7. I didn't like the women as characters. They were unconvincing imo. I didn't see Yo-han as a hero to save us from the ruins. He's something we should avoid at all costs. The topics you mention do stand out - all those appeals to populism that Trump gave impetus to, but that work so well to whip up hatred everywhere. A single season is enough for me. It was too close to home and too OTT at the same time. Ji Sung is of course brilliant. For me it all came to a focus in the final minutes.

1

@jorobertson The criticism I've read was the female characters (expect for the Veronica Park) all died. So yeah, not great. I'll say at least Sun-ah was able to go out in her own way, but considering the male characters died in the bomb as well. However, I've been noticing in many K-dramas lately in this action/thriller genre that the female characters that came out as strong in the beginning later got diminished or forgotten about.

I found this really interesting statement from the writer: https://twitter.com/g7uwu/status/1437296844636409859

"when asked about #TheDevilJudge ending MYS writer said that some people misunderstood it as being gaon’s fantasy but it was real, yohan went back to korea to check up on him, and that KYH & KGO will meet again soon “because the world doesn’t change easily” Red thread, yes?!

I'll give this show an A-. Solid, better 2nd half, & interesting themes that were well supported by great actors, set design, and budget. I feel like the writer wrote him in a favorable light, giving us a sympathetic backstory as well. Anti-hero is more the term for Yo-han. Side note; part of me wishes this was on Netflix just so Ji Sung can finally get the international recognition he deserves. (Sorry lol, Squid Game's recent success!). He's brilliant, & toned down his acting to match his role. I really hope he can get an acting nom or award (don't know if he'll much competition), but I always feel like despite his talents/charm, he's feels under appreciated even in Korea.

The last moments were brilliant. Just a simple glance/look, was perfect. Their bond was forged. Something about characters just looking over w/ a simple glance, stopping for a moment, and then going on their way is classic. For all its worth, I applaud this show for taking some risks (whether it worked or not is up for debate), but I do feel b/c of Taxi Driver/Vincenzo (anti-hero shows), Devil's Judge (it got good SNS buzz!! esp. Ji Sung who got #1 for Actor's Ranking *Yay!!. I do feel it got a bit sandwiched between that, I think it deserved a 10% for its finale, but it did pretty good. Jin-young did well here, I see potential. I hope to see Ji Sung back very soon!!

1

That's really interesting about what the writer said. I agree with you about Ji Sung. He's so compelling. He was an early discovery for me and I've enjoyed him in everything I've seen. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

1

He unzips his jacket to reveal a bomb strapped to his chest. Well, that escalated.

When they're done reforming the judiciary perhaps they can pay attention to the quality of the security guards who let someone with with a suicide vest.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree! 😂

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The first person out the door lives.

Alternate endings game:
1: Sun-ah is not very repentant and after shooting the president she just walks out the door and high-tails it to the airport.
2: She is completely repentant, walks up to Yo-han, takes the detonator and tells him to be the first one out the door, thus unintentionally but totally ruining his 2nd faked death.

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Two death fakeouts in the same episode was a little much.

I liked how the SRF members fighting during the final trial was reminiscent of the church fire plus the classroom warfare Yo-han instigated as a kid.

Sun-ah shooting loudmouth President Heo was pretty satisfying.

I wish Sun-ah could have lived, but she was a tragic character. I didn’t mind that her last memory was of young Yo-han since it better explains her obsession with him and why she kept asking him to be nice to her.

Yo-han blew people up. Yes, they were bad people but still, he blew them up. I have some feelings about that.

I think it would have been fitting for Yo-han to die in the blast, but for Elijah’s sake, I’ll suspend my disbelief and accept that his plan somehow worked. I have an easier time accepting Yo-han survived the blast than I do that the most recognizable face in South Korea, someone who blew people up, was strolling around the building in the end.

The lawmakers ignoring Ga-on’s testimony to argue about PR band-aids was frustratingly realistic.

This drama certainly had its flaws, but it kept me entertained, nonetheless. Ji Sung and Kim Min-jung were both great in their roles.

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

When I watch this type of shows, I tend to expect a certain underlying message from the story. Devil Judge is one of those that I can't seem to grasp what is it all about until the very last scene with Ga-on & those assemblymen in the room. The key word here is 'Nothing Changes'. Just when you think that the problem is solved, another same problem will surface only with a different face....sigh

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm not saying that Sun-Ah's ending didn't make sense for her character, but the fact that all five of our main female characters fall nicely into the venn diagram of "little-to-no agency and/or character development" + "agency via suicide" is a little eek

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

everything wrapped up neatly and conveniently. Too many fake deaths in one episode :)
Nevertheless, I am happy with the ending. It was a feel good happy ending. I was expecting someone to die.
Overall, this was a very enjoyable and entertaining drama. And Ji Sung was the reason I started the drama and boy did he deliver!! It is such a joy to watch him in this role.
I also liked the relationship between Ga On and Yo Han, all their ups and downs. They were my OTP :)

9
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yo-han and Su-nah would make one powerful couple. Too bad that plot could wished for, better still dreamt of. She went down, quite powerfully, and it was tragically classy that she died facing Yohan upfront, kind of like sent him one final message. Great performance by Kim MinJung cause I for a minute blamed Yohan for Sunah's turnout, if only....., if only.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

They would've made for a very interesting/powerful couple. We rarely see those type of power dynamic presented in K-dramas, I find that don't end in tragedy. I for one thought Ji Sung/Kim Min Jung had some steamy chemistry. Ah, what could've been if the situation wasn't as grim/deadly...Fantastic performance from KMJ full stop. Would love to see her in more of these type of roles, she plays the verge of wanting to hate her role, but you just can't b/c she's smart/sassy/mischievous.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Overall, I enjoyed watching this drama. Kim Min Jung and Ji Sung's performances were magnetic (as usual), but I was most impressed by how far Jinyoung has come (remember Dream High 2 anyone?). Among cartoonish villains and anti-heroes, I thought Jinyoung really grounded the show, and his nuanced portrayal of Ga-on and his idealism towards justice, expression of grief, anger, guilt and despair really won me over. And to think I wondered at the beginning whether Jinyoung was doing his same character from When My Love Blooms back-to-back..
Re: Devil Judge, I appreciated that the show tried to do new things. There were times the execution was a bit wanting, like the climax of an episode felt dragged out a little too long sometimes, especially when it seemed like the director wanted to say something grandiose about people. Like other beanies, two fake-outs were one too many. I tried racking my brain for my preferred ending, but ultimately because of Elijah, I don't think I would have wanted Yo-han to die, which meant Ga-on couldn't die either. Sun-ah felt like she receded in favor of Heo Joong-se, but I think maybe because her character is so destructive (competent?), everyone would have died by ep 16 if she were featured as the main antagonist. Thanks for your recaps and analysis quirkycase!

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's what happens, when veterans lead the show/cast!!

Side note, now that Netflix is the launch pad for shows to get a global hit. Would've loved if this was on Netflix, but alas I digress.

I do wonder if this will get noticed by the Baeksang's come next year?! Or is it a bit too radical to get noticed there?

Jin-young was so good here! He's def. shown potential as a leading man. He's a handsome lad, and his voice annotation was clear and precise. Even though he was wishy washy at times, I do feel he had a clear conscience and good heart. I feel for his character b/c he's lost his loved/close ones, but he does persevere for the sake of justice. In that remark, I really think Ga-on was a sympathetic character for him to portray. His dinner table scenes were one of my favs, he was the light & helped bridge Yo-han/Elijah/the family maid together.

I think b/c this was on Cable that they were able to go a bit more radical w/ some of their ideas like cutting off one's anatomy/death row, and such esp. in a country that is quite conservative w/ these topics. Perhaps they wanted to push the envelope a bit more, but couldn't b/c of certain TV constraints/restrictions? Also I got Batman : Dark Knight Rises type of ending lol. With Yo-han hanging up his gown, & taking a break and finally putting his own interests first. By giving Ga-on the opportunity to take on his mantle next as the final step. It's that glimmer of hope, that a new Yo-han could arrive maybe b/c they were inspired by his ordeals? That whole legacy thing if we're talking from the p.o.v of the character.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This show started with a sizzle, then ended with a fizzle, unfortunately. I dont regret watching it , for the memorable acting, and OTT villains which are hilariously funny. But the show’s intended message was lost to me, and the emotions it might have wanted the audience to feel about justice, corruption and the futility of fighting a systemic problem, got sidelined by disappointing backstories (or lack of it). Unfortunately D.P came along, and clearly delivered the same message and brought the emotions in 6 episodes, which Devil Judge failed to do in 16.

2
14
reply

Required fields are marked *

The difference between DP and Devil Judge is that DP left us with a message of complicity in bullying, but the Devil Judge was a message to the judiciary - do your job in administering justice or the Devil Judge will unleash all manner of chaos and we'll all fall into the abyss.

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes it is.. i am drawing a parallel on DP depicting systemic bullying and DJ depicting systemic corruption… and the emotion elicited was supposedly unsettling, but at least can make viewers self reflect. And in the end,DP also showed that this unjust system created a monster(like Yohan) but that monster died, tragically. DP ended with a keening and a wailing from the lead, signalling that change is still a long way to go, but there is at least a chance that people will find the right answer. DJ on the otherhand glorified the monster, ignoring the fact that this monster made 10Million people guilty of a mass murder, a horrifying thought. And the monster got away with it and even hints that he may come back because change is also still a long way to go.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

The monster in the Devil Judge is the outrage of the people that is unleashed when justice is not served. Was it glorified? For sure, there are many, even having seen this, who subscribe to "an eye for an eye" and who cannot see anything wrong with taking justice into their own hands. The monster hasn't gone anywhere but just lurks beneath the surface waiting to erupt yet again, unless the justice system does its job, and even then. In the end Yo-han was much more than a real person. The bullying and injustice in DP has not ended either.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Unfortunately D.P came along, and clearly delivered the same message and brought the emotions in 6 episodes, which Devil Judge failed to do in 16."

I applaud your comment, @jingbee, this is exactly what I am thinking (although I didn't watch D.P.yet, which I will sometimes later). No doubt The Devil Judge is talking about do your job in administering justice, it is even spelt out by Yohan in the end (whispering on Gaon's ear?); but for me, it is more like if the world spin into chaos, we should pray god to send a greater evil like Yohan to destroy the world ... It is, in fact, a direct insult to that exact message Yohan uttered.

At one time when I comment the show, I said "I still have high hope on the screenwriter, and the show, too. (Ep.13)" My hope fades when Sunah cry of regret before the girl who as an audience member of her teaching ... No, not the "Dream Village" is actually a Nazi-like Dead Camp crossover to an human lab of new vaccine. This was something we are not too difficult to predict, following a Dr. Evil-like evil project maybe just cliché, but it is not too hard to watch. However, I do wonder when Adolf Hitler rise up to power, why there is not a Yohan to stop him?

To be honest, we don't need a messianic figure to fend off evil like President Heo. In Law School, the evil is as well potent (and shallow and comic, somehow sometimes), but Yangcrates and his students use the law and their smart mind to beat him; there is no Yohan there (The show even shows us the law is imperfect, but we can always work on it). I think this is a more powerful message, way more powerful then "scaring" us with someone like Yohan, because Yohan doesn't exist whatever President Heo real or not, and I don't need an evil just as evil as President Heo to beat him (Maybe Vincenzo do, because it is a sarcasm).

Screenwriter Moon, you are a Harvard graduated former judge. I can forgive you because you are just a second time screenwriter, but I cannot forgive you for giving me this show, because you are writing a show going against you legal background, because you are giving your audience a very bad lesson about law and order. This is simply unforgivable.

3
10
reply

Required fields are marked *

But Yo-han does exist, in the rage of the people who judge and cancel people online and in those who raged in the streets when Trump was in his ascendance. Some is justifiable (#ican'tbreath) but if we erode the law, we have nothing, only the law of the jungle and "the justice" of the vigilante. The writer is warning the judges to do their job because what comes next, if they fail and lose the faith of the people, is too terrible to contemplate, and it's not in the far off future, but in our already dystopian world.

1
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

@jorobertson, Yohan maybe exist in some people's mind. At least it exist in some of my hometown folks' mind.

Sorry for my bias. For me, The Devil Judge is a failure, and a huge one. I am a Canadian from an Asian city (you know where it is, although I don't want to mention it out loud) immigrate during my youth. That city is now cracking down those who voice different opinions to the government in the name of "national security", and the diaspora of that city was begging that American President (the last one, not this one who just pull out from Afghanistan) to "fight a war for them". For me, that president is that "Yohan". My question is, however, even that president suppressed those with different opinion with him by police force (in Portland and Seattle), or claiming those saying the truth as "fake news", or using his lackey news outlets to spread fake news—Do you think this kind of "Yohans" can help (I even didn't mention that guy even doing business with the country that suppress my city)?

For me, hoping for an evil like Yohan to beat the evil is a message so offensive, I can't believe a former judge of 22 years who graduate in Harvard can write this kind of garbbage. I guess if I am the screenwriter, I would put Gaon's insatisfaction of law and government, and put him into a revolutionary leader and raise a revolution against the government (and afterall, Mr. Sunshine is the first drama re-introduce me back to K-drama, and I watched it 9 times). I think a revolution is a more powerful message to such situation then a "scary" evil judge, which is for me, not that scary, even cute and kind sometimes ...

5
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

The Devil Judge is not what we should want at all. The Devil Judge in the form of Yo-han is a frightening warning of what happens when justice fails. He is a very bad person and symbolically, the abyss. I don't think we are meant to think of him as a solution but as a terrible calamity, exactly as you have experienced. The beginnings of Yo-han that you describe were in the failure of the judges in your country and their links to those in political power. That enabled the President to become exactly as you have described. It's no coincidence that the president in the drama is like the one you saw in action. The writer is pointing to that dystopian world and saying that's what happens when the judiciary fails. Yo-han will rise again out of the rage of the people. Do your job so it doesn't happen again. Yoo-han is not a rescuer, but the abyss.

7

I dropped the show after 14 because I was so ragingly angry (and I'm so glad I did after this episode's anti-vax nonsense) but I did read the final two recaps. All I can say is that I completely agree with you. This show failed in too many ways.

2

It's a pity @leetennant that you cut at 14 because the point of it all is made right at the end. I found the women intolerable and the big bads way too cartoonish, but the mob rule, Lord of the Flies style, through social media, was uncomfortably on point for all of us. In the context of the SK judiciary, in all seemed disturbingly pertinent.

1

I think @jorobertson we're going to have to agree to disagree on this one.

I have read the recaps so I do know what happened in the last two.

I'm not arguing that was what the show promised it would be about. But in execution it got extremely confused and I don't believe that was its ultimate message.

Just look at some of the comments here about Gaon carrying on Yahon's legacy or the show having Yahon wander off into the sunset. Yahon got exactly what he wanted - revenge by using the worst of humanity to do it. And he got rewarded with a happy ending because of it.

Instead of saying that things like the Live Court are a possible outcome of our own dystopia, the show instead portrayed it as a tool for overthrowing Trumpesque tyrants.

So I'm afraid we see different things when we watch this particular text.

1

I can't argue against it confusing viewers, and I'm not prepared to judge if with was a success or failure, but I found the ideas interesting.

The way I see it, we already have a live court which is two edged. It's a forum for judging people online (and cancelling them). It's also a forum for buying tickets to a rally and not turning up (thanks BTS Army). But ultimately, justice simply cannot be left to the people, otherwise we get a lynch mob. It made me think about the limits of democracy.

1

First of all, @jorobertson, I love quite a lot of your arguments, but I am sorry I can't agree with you on this one. In terms of this drama, I don't find Yohan is the abyss, as you mentioned. If he is such an abyss, it is not scary, and I even think we should pity him, help him, even love him; and if he don't mind, I would wish to have him in such desperate time (take a look at those Trump-lovers in the US, this is exactly what they want)--this is probably the message Screenwriter Moon doesn't want to give us, but have given us anyway with this ending.

NO, we should not look for such a "messiah" to do the job for us, let along this "messiah" is an evil one. Screenwriter Moon first wrong is to write the only person who can speak for the true law, Justice Min, as another President lackey; and second, if a dystopia is so bad it became lawless, isn't a revolution another answer? Nelson Mandela didn't go the violent way in the very beginning of his struggle against South Africa's apartheid government, he tried to be peaceful first, until the government go violent (i.e., the Sharpeville massacre in 1960). If the law becomes the tool of a dictatorship instead of upholding justice and protecting the weak, then we should revolt (certainly when or how is up to the people, because not all times and places suit this solution). The show, on the other hand, gives us a space to sympathize Yohan, making us think what he has done is reasonable, and even spoiled the public trust to do execution for him, so he can let go of the blame, and at the same time, as the plot goes, we the audience may have think what he has done is tolerable, even should be encouraged: it is not a suitable way to talk about law!

If President Heo's dictatorship can be fixed liked what happened at the end of this episode, we really don't need someone like Yohan; if it can't, this ending doesn't make sense at all. What worry me most is: after Yohan, now we have Gaon as the new hero? Now give me a break! A mature democratic society doesn't rely on heroes, but the law and the system. Certainly they are not perfect, but it is us to take the responsibility to fix it together, not rely on some kinds of heroes!

The story's message is so wrong it is out of my imagination.

1

The above message is also my answer to @leetennant. Yes, you are right, the show's unforgivable sin is trying to warn us and make us fear to someone like Yohan, but turn out making him a pitiful, even an adorable character, thus encourage us to love someone like him, even wishing for someone to come when things go south. If our society doesn't look like the South Korea of President Heo, this story is spreading a very wrong message.

I guess Law School's message is way more helpful then what we have here. My only small complaint for that drama: replace the antagonist into someone like Sunah, that would be more realistic ...

2

To ask for "Yohan" fight for justice, is like asking for US to fight a war for my city. It is offensively unrealistic.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Man, it's so cathartic to see Ga-on beating up Justice Min like that before trying to blow them up together. I understand Ga-on's line of thinking, by blowing them together secretly like that, the public might think it's Justice Min's so called idea to clean up the chaos, becoming martyrs and uncovering the dirty deeds done by the government as their dying act. It's just something so Yo-Han that I knew Ga-on truly took his true teacher's lessons to heart. Well, maybe too much to heart. Then again, Justice Min deserves it for being hypocrites about his own principles. At least Ga-on takes his principle of righteous justice to heart, Justice Min advocates one and does another. It's just so disgusting.

And Yo-Han, wow, I am pretty sure dude has a thing for faking his own death, and fits so well with his personality. Say whatever you want, but Yo-Han has always had a thing for theatrics, even when it's just him, Ga-on, and Elijah (see Jenga moment). Faking his own death twice is like his own way to tease Ga-on. Is it kinda evil? Of course, but it's like those playing death prank. At the end you can't help but laugh about it. Besides, Yo-Han, Ga-on, and Elijah surviving and possibly reuniting or living happily together is a very big plus. (Thank the gods Elijah don't know anything about the truth about church fire, good job Ga-on and Sun-ah)

And yeah, Sun-ah. I legit thought Sun-ah gonna spill the beans about the truth to Elijah in this episode if not in the previous one, and she surprised me by just taking Yo-han away. That and her crying over her "protege" this episode convince me that at heart Sun-ah only craves wealth and power as a way for her to be on the same level of Yo-han and to feel that she is in control of her own life, that she still has a certain amount of sympathy to specific category of people. If only she didn't eat up President Heo's taunts or if only Yo-han is a bit nicer to her, maybe Sun-ah wouldn't kill K and she would get her happy ending. Oh well, what ifs and what nots.

All in all, I really enjoy the show and its portrayal about what justice truly is. It's not kind, it's not evil, it delivers everyone to the ending they all deserve, and more often than not, that is death. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth, life for a life, evil for evil.

6
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I always thought of Ga on as another Justice Min, but your highlight on their differences is spot on. However, I do wonder had he not seen the prisoner switch, would he be a righteous person, still doing everything by the law.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

And isn't that what differs people like Ga-on and Justice Min? Whether or not they realise what justice means when confronted by the darkest side of human nature? Ga-on saw the abyss, and decided to walk alongside it, neither truly embracing or rejecting it. Justice Min saw the abyss, and rejected it while ignoring every existing common sense.

Human nature is neither evil or good, but just as it is, always a mixture of light and darkness. If one can't grasp that, the meaning of justice will always elude them.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you @quirkycase for the recap. I don't mind the double death fakeout because it was obvious the jail death was to catch the baddies by surprise. I am glad that they kept Gaon consistent and not suddenly turn him into a mastermind like Yohan, by showing him that he was fooled twice by Yohan's fake death.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is a different POV and I don't care if everyone disagrees with me.

Yohan found a perfect way to exact his personal revenge, and that was to find scheming (but very effective) ways to bring the system down. It just happened that the corrupt elite wronged him in a personal way, and he would use everyone--the public included, to bring about his revenge. If you remember, he said his was not justice, and he was the abyss.

Sunah also found a very scheming way to get to the top and use the elite for a personal agenda--and that is to make Yohan notice or remember her somehow.

The two characters were able to pull of big schemes for something personal to them.

While many of the netizens (including those who think they understand people and situation by deconstruction) always think about social justice this and social justice that, the way I see it is how there are extremely clever people who can use the emotions of people to let them think this or that way, or use certain issues to sway people to certain ideas. This is a drama, and it is only great that we get to see Yohan's angry revenge in attaining justice. But in the real world, it is not like that. What if people like Yohan are actually like the president and his allies? Or the real Yohan is actually like Sunah? Even without mainstream media, there are those who can spin tales in social media. That is why there are those who always say to take what you read with a grain of salt. Look at what happened to Tablo before. People witch-hunted him. Ergo, there are many times when public opinion make the people the devil judges.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

As much as I hate saying this, I feel like Yo Han should have died at the courtroom, along with all the other villains and Ga On should have lived on to carry Yo Han's legacy. It would have been horrible for Elijah though. It was a bit of a cop out and it definitely reminded me of The Dark Knight Rises. Perhaps Writer-nim was going for that kinda ending?

I thoroughly enjoyed this drama and even though the FLs weren't thoroughly fleshed out, I still think this is top drama of the year :O

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It was one of better TVN's dramas, well enough for me to finish it, Ji Sung was good, others just ok, to me nothing beats Beyond Evil and chemistry the male leads had their

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just wanted to say that all your recaps of this show were absolutely terrific, thoughtful and thought provoking, @quirkycase! I was happy we got a happyish ending because I’m a softie, and I loved the acting, the chemistry and all the drama in this drama.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Did this show really just say that governments are using pandemic health measures as an excuse to round up the poor and sell them for vaccine research that kills them?

Did that really happen?

In 2021?

I'm so glad I dropped this show as having to watch this on screen might have given me a stroke.

Lucky we have our Devil Judge and his homicidal sidekick here to crowdsource an explosive solution to tyranny!

Except.. that wasn't what he was about, wasn't who he was and wasn't what he cared about at all. He wanted revenge and he wanted the humanity he hated to bring it about for him so he could destroy them too.

In the end, this drama was at best confused and at worst libertarian propaganda. Glad I dropped.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *