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Hometown Cha-Cha-Cha: Episode 15

Our handyman’s past has finally caught up to him, and we learn just how heavy a load he’s been carrying all this time. Get your tissue boxes ready for this one – there are many tears to be shed and many hidden heartaches to be laid bare.

 
EPISODE 15 RECAP

Do-ha attacks Doo-shik, screaming that it’s Doo-shik’s fault his father became paralyzed. The others have to drag him off Doo-shik, who takes in all the horrified faces around him and slowly gets up to stagger away. Hye-jin follows, despite him telling her not to. She’s sure there must have been a misunderstanding, but Doo-shik says Do-ha was right: it was his fault. And what’s more, he also destroyed the family in the photo by killing the father. Stunned, Hye-jin lets him go.

Doo-shik barely makes it home and sinks to the floor. Suddenly, he grabs his chest and gropes his way to the kitchen, where he swallows a handful of pills and sits back down on the floor to catch his breath. Hye-jin also sits in stunned silence at home until Mi-sun gets back. She asks if Hye-jin is okay, and Hye-jin bursts into tears, unsure what to think now.

The next day, Geum-chul, Nam-sook, and Chun-jae struggle to keep up with all their work without Doo-shik to help them. But they’re more worried about Doo-shik than they are upset, and they all emphatically declare their belief in his innocence. Meanwhile, Gam-ri leaves a meal just inside Doo-shik’s door, and we see Doo-shik still sitting huddled up on the kitchen floor.

Sung-hyun sees Ji-won talking to that other director and rushes over to separate them, telling her the Gongjin footage has disappeared. Ji-won runs off to check, and Sung-hyun stares the other director down before following. But, of course, nothing happened to the footage – he just wanted to get her away from the other director. He asks her not to talk work with other men, and when she asks if he minds her talking to other men about non-work stuff, his eyes bug out. But while she waits anxiously for his answer, Do-ha pokes his head in to ask Sung-hyun for a word, and Ji-won tells Sung-hyun to just go.

In private, Do-ha apologizes to Sung-hyun for his behavior at the after party. Sung-hyun knows he must have had a reason, and asks what happened, so Do-ha tells him the story: Doo-shik had convinced his father to invest in a fund he was managing at the company they both worked for. Do-ha’s father had even taken out a loan to do so, but then stock prices plummeted, along with Doo-shik’s fund. Do-ha’s father had attempted suicide in despair. Sung-hyun apologizes for working him so hard without knowing his story, but Do-ha says it gave him something to hold onto, since he could take care of his father. Then he reveals that his father wasn’t the only one affected: Doo-shik’s boss had died in a car accident that same day. Judging by Sung-hyun’s face, that’s enough for him to put two and two together.

Mi-sun does some digging, and shows Hye-jin an article about Doo-shik and Jung-woo, and Hye-jin recognizes the latter as the man Doo-shik claimed he’d killed. Sung-hyun works late into the night trying to edit his show, but he can’t stop thinking about the day Jung-woo had died and he’d rushed to the hospital to be with Sun-ah.

While Hwa-jung is cutting up kimchi, Young-guk walks in and attempts to sneak up on her. Of course, that’s a terrible idea, and she spins around, knife in hand, making him fall to the floor in alarm. They bicker over who startled whom more, and when he explains he just wanted to surprise her with a backhug, she pauses a beat and then tells him to go ahead. They both giggle as he does, and Yi-joon walks in on them right as Young-guk is making her laugh with a silly voice.

Cut to: Yi-joon staring blankly while they kneel on the floor in front of him. Hwa-jung says outright that they’ve decided to get back together, and Young-guk adds that they had been living separately due to a misunderstanding that has now been reconciled. Yi-joon asks if they’ll get married again, and they exchange surprised glances before stammering out a yes. Yi-joon just kind of nods, all, Okay, got it. Can I go play with Bora now?

Gam-ri sighs to see that Doo-shik hadn’t touched the food she left, and replaces the sweet potatoes with fresh corn. Meanwhile, Hye-jin’s friend with the job offer calls to ask about her decision, and Hye-jin says she hasn’t made up her mind yet. Her friend warns her not to wait too long. Gam-ri drops by just then with some of her corn, and they chat about her teeth. Gam-ri happily says she’s been enjoying all the squid she can eat, then gets serious and tells Hye-jin about Doo-shik not eating.

Sung-hyun decides they need a little more Gongjin scenery footage. He tells Do-ha he doesn’t have to go, but Do-ha insists he can set his personal feelings aside.

When Yi-joon hasn’t come home by nightfall, Young-guk calls Bora to ask about him. But Yi-joon left her place hours ago. Young-guk and Hwa-jung rush out with flashlights to look for him, and Bora and her parents join them. Bora finds Yi-joon first, where he’s just fallen off a pull-up bar and is crying his eyes out. She tries to cheer him up with ghost stories, and urges him to come home, but he doesn’t want to.

Before he can explain why, the parents find them, and Hwa-jung gathers him in her arms as Young-guk scolds him for scaring them. Hwa-jung asks if he’s upset with her or uncomfortable with the idea of them all living together again. But, through his tears, Yi-joon says he’s not upset – he’s so happy he can’t seem to stop crying, and he didn’t want to upset them with his tears. Awww, baby. They tell him he doesn’t need to worry about their feelings over his own, and Yi-joon cries even harder as he admits he always wanted to eat together as a family even when it wasn’t a special occasion, and to all live together again. Young-guk says they’ll go home and eat together right now. Off to the side, Bora sobs to her parents that she wants to eat with Yi-joon every day and live with him so he’ll never be lonely.

Hye-jin goes over to Doo-shik’s house. She brings Gam-ri’s food basket inside and sets it on the coffee table in front of Doo-shik (who’s now sitting on the couch). She tries to sound cheerful as she says she’ll cook him a meal and then let him have his privacy, but he finally looks up and says he’s ready to tell her his story. She sits with him as he relays the story of becoming roommates and then best friends with Jung-woo in college.

Jung-woo had convinced him to work for his company because as a fund manager, he could give people hope. While working there, he’d become close with Do-ha’s father, who had insisted on investing in the fund despite Doo-shik’s warnings about the risk – and made other reckless choices without Doo-shik knowing, leaving him in even worse debt when everything fell apart. Doo-shik had promised to help him, but had ignored his call while trying to sort out the overall mess, and that was the day Do-ha’s father attempted suicide. Distraught to the point of hysteria, all Doo-shik had been able to think of was going to him. But he’d been in no condition to drive, and Jung-woo had taken the wheel instead. While comforting Doo-shik, Jung-woo hadn’t been watching the road closely, and they were hit by a truck, killing Jung-woo.

After hearing the story, Hye-jin pulls Doo-shik into a hug and tells him it’s okay to cry. She knows he’s been holding it in all this time, but he doesn’t need to hide his pain from her. Doo-shik breaks down in her arms.

On the way to Gongjin, Sung-hyun and Do-ha reminisce about how Sung-hyun getting lost on the way to their original film site was the reason they ended up choosing Gongjin instead. Sung-hyun muses that they must have been meant to meet Doo-shik, and explains his relation to Jung-woo as Seon-ah’s cousin. He also tells Do-ha that Doo-shik had been on the way to see his (Do-ha’s) father the night of the car accident.

Cho-hee goes to see Hwa-jung for some porridge, since she’s gotten her wisdom tooth taken out. Having worked up the courage to go through the procedure, she’s also ready to confess that it was Hwa-jung she’d had a crush on, not Young-guk. But Hwa-jung has known all along, and says she sensed it from the way Cho-hee looked at her. With a gentle smile, she says that even though she couldn’t return Cho-hee’s romantic feelings, she liked – and likes – her as a person. Tearing up, Cho-hee thanks her for keeping the secret and accepting her as she was. All she wants now is for Hwa-jung and Young-guk to be happy.

While filming, Sung-hyun catches Do-ha spacing out and tells him to go take care of the “hangnail” that’s eating him up. So Do-ha goes over to Doo-shik’s. He admits he’d pictured Doo-shik living shamelessly and preying on other people, and Doo-shik sincerely apologizes. Do-ha asks if Doo-shik was the one who’d paid his father’s hospital bills and his student loan. A flashback reveals Doo-shik had sold everything he owned to do so, and borne all of Do-ha’s mother’s bitterness as she’d accused him of paying her off.

Do-ha asks if he thought money could fix it, but Doo-shik says he did it because the last time he spoke to Do-ha’s father, he’d mentioned wanting to buy Do-ha a suit to wear for job interviews. This was Doo-shik’s way of fulfilling that wish. Do-ha cries, recalling his father blaming every failed interview on his old, worn-out suit. But Doo-shik says his father was constantly bragging about him. Do-ha finally confesses he knew it wasn’t Doo-shik’s fault – he just needed someone to blame.

The next morning, Doo-shik puts on the suit Jung-woo bought him, and he and Hye-jin head out with flowers for Jung-woo. On the way, they meet Sun-ah, who smiles sadly and encourages her son to say hello to Doo-shik. The boy is confused because she calls him “uncle” but he isn’t Sung-hyun, so she reminds him how Doo-shik used to hold and dote on him. Doo-shik cries as the little boy talks about his favorite dinosaurs, and gives him a tender hug.

They leave the flowers on a rock at the beach, and while Hye-jin plays in the sand with the little boy, Doo-shik and Sun-ah sit a little ways off to talk. Sun-ah tells him that Sung-hyun told her he was here, explaining that the two of them are cousins. After a pause, she says she won’t apologize for her words back then. When Jung-woo died, her world had stopped, and she hadn’t thought she could go on. But she slowly regained her will to live. She’s also come to let go of her bitterness towards Doo-shik, and tells him he should forgive himself, too.

Doo-shik watches tearfully as she stands and walks over to join her son and Hye-jin. A vision of Jung-woo sits beside him, teasing him about crying. Doo-shik tells the imaginary Jung-woo that he missed him horribly and apologizes, but Jung-woo tells him it wasn’t his fault – the same words he’d said right before the accident. He tells Doo-shik to live on – for his own sake and not just for Jung-woo’s – and they can meet again and go fishing once Doo-shik has done everything he wants to in the whole world.

Now that filming has concluded, Gam-ri moves back into her house, and the other two grannies help her clean up.

That night, Hye-jin and Doo-shik sit by the waterfront. Hye-jin remarks that they didn’t quite make it to Jung-woo’s grave, but Doo-shik is sure he’ll understand. Hye-jin says it’s nice to see him smile again, and tells him he doesn’t need to think about whether it’s okay for him to smile and be happy – he should just let himself feel his true emotions. He looks at her with gratitude, and then slowly confesses that after Jung-woo’s death, he’d gone out to a bridge over Han River, intending to jump off. But he’d gotten a text from Gam-ri at that moment saying she was in Seoul and wanted to bring him some food. He says that Gam-ri and Gongjin had saved him: even though he locked himself in his house, the villagers kept knocking on his door and bringing him food, caring for him like a stray cat. Then they switched tactics and started asking him to help them out with various problems, and that’s how he came to be Chief Hong.

With a smile, Hye-jin says she understands now why he loves Gongjin so much. He apologizes for taking so long to tell her, but she thanks him for finding the courage to open up. Suddenly, Doo-shik remembers that she had something she wanted to tell him before all of this blew up. When she hesitates, he says she doesn’t have to tell him until she’s ready – now it’s his turn to wait for her. But Hye-jin comes straight out and says she’s been offered a job, and he guesses it must be in Seoul.

The grannies stay the night with Gam-ri, and get sentimental thinking about growing older. Gam-ri says she likes it, though, because of all the wonderful things and people she’s seen throughout her life, and all the fun things she’s done. “Look around yourself closely,” she says, eyes drooping heavier with sleep, “and you’ll realize that you’re surrounded by many precious things. Every day is full of such excitement, as if I’m going on a picnic the next day.” The other two laugh and make plans to go on a picnic tomorrow.

Later in the night, Sook-ja rolls over on top of Mat-yi. Mat-yi complains loudly, wondering how Gam-ri can sleep through this, only to realize that Gam-ri has passed. She gently covers her up with the blanket, and tells her tearfully to enjoy the picnic and wait for them to join her some other time.

 
EPILOGUE

On the night Doo-shik had been out on the bridge, Hye-jin had been driving by and spotted him (of course not knowing him at the time). She’d pulled over to call an ambulance for him, and waited in her car until it arrived and he was taken back to the hospital.

 
COMMENTS

Go ahead, show – just take all my remaining tears, if there are any.

Doo-shik’s story was gut-wrenching for a number of reasons. Neither Do-ha’s father attempting suicide nor Jung-woo’s death were his fault, but I understand how he felt that they were, especially with the two being compounded on top of each other right when he was already at his wits’ end. It also makes sense why he grabbed onto the Chief Hong role like the lifeline it was: it gave him a chance to start completely over, an excuse and a means to bury the past deep inside and not let anyone in to see it, and a whole new life to enjoy instead of wallowing in the one he’d lost. But it was always a façade, and he would never have been able to heal if he’d kept his grief and guilt locked away forever.

You know what? I think I’m going to return to my very first impression of this show, and choose to agree with Sung-hyun that – within the story – there was a bit of fate involved in all this. Something about Gongjin draws people together in such a way that they’re forced to confront, deal with, and heal from their past traumas and heartaches. But for some people, the process took longer, or needed chain reactions of sorts to work themselves out. (Think of little Yi-joon, who wasn’t really given the tools to voice his inner feelings until his parents had worked through their own issues enough to see his suffering. Or Do-ha learning Doo-shik’s name being the catalyst to finally force all of Doo-shik’s carefully buried secrets out into the open.) How else do you explain Sung-hyun getting lost and ending up in that exact place, hmm?

At the end of the day, I’ve had my share of frustrations with this show as well as moments when it hit all the right notes, and I’d rather dwell on the brighter side when I can. Of course, the ending could always undermine everything I like about it, but as of right now, I’m hopeful that won’t be the case.

Maybe I was too busy crying to focus much on anything else, but I really only had a couple of small complaints about this episode. I liked Hye-jin giving Doo-shik space but being there when he was ready to talk, and assuring him he didn’t need to put up a strong front for her. I loved the beach scene, and I couldn’t hate Sun-ah despite the awful things she said to Doo-shik at Jung-woo’s funeral. I even liked the scenes with Young-guk and Hwa-jung, now that they actually seem to like each other. I do wish Sung-hyun would just be honest with Ji-won about his feelings, though he did have other things to think about this episode, for sure. (But was it really necessary to end the episode like that, show? Right when Doo-shik is finally able to smile again, did you have to take Gam-ri from him too?)

I’m still not sure exactly what kind of conclusion we’re heading toward. Will Hye-jin learn to stop living for others’ approval? Will that entail settling down in Gongjin permanently or pursuing her own interests back in Seoul? Will Doo-shik decide he wants to return to Seoul with her now that he’s resolved some of his pain, or will he continue to embrace the life he’s built in Gongjin? Will we ever find out who won the lottery? How many more chance meetings did Hye-jin and Doo-shik have before that day she lost her shoes on the beach?

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This episode was frustrating for me, not so much because of then past flashbacks, but because the security guard’s son and Du Shik’s hyung’s wife are STILL blaming him five years later!

How did the security guard’s son even know about Du Shik? And did his father blame Du Shik, but just never mention that he’d invested in a different fund in exactly the way Du Shik told him not to? And noona is still holding a grudge against a man who was practically her brother-in-law for what, not dying in a car crash caused by what seems to have been a drunk driver and then a truck?! Oh, you don’t resent him anymore? Good for you, you’re a lunatic. How do you resent a passenger in a hideous car crash?

I get that Du Shik has massive survivor’s guilt coming at him from every direction. I was very, very disappointed that those other two morons showed up to guilt him all over again about the worst three days of his life.

…speaking of which, I guess this is the last we see of Kim Seon Ho for a while. I do not understand Korea’s vengeful ex takedown system at all. At ALL.

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Exactly! I don’t agree with what Sun-ah said. I understand back then she was distraught after her husband’s death, but now that she realises she was wrong, shouldn’t she apologise about it? To wish for someone to die is a huge statement to make!
Do-Ha at least agreed that he just needed someone to blame and that he was wrong.

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Yes yes yes!

The issue for me is how underwhelming it was for that bottled up conflict to be resolved so quickly and so easily. Chief Hong's trauma was hidden from us for like most of the show and then when it was finally revealed, heavy as it is, it was gone almost instantly by just having Ms.Dentist listen to his woes? And then the unapologetic closure from the security guard's son and the supposed "sister-in-law". Major major flaw for me right there.

I particularly like it when a strong male character breaks down in the arms of the girl and I've seen this done well in several shows like in K2Hearts and Healer. But in this case, it was ok, but again it felt "forced". I didnt feel like Du Shik actually surrendering.

I also didnt like that seafood ahjumma getting back together with her ex. Toxic relationships dont get fixed easily like that. I would have appreciated if they reconciled as friends as they are clearly better off that way.

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Agree with your point about how they closed Chief Hong's trauma so quickly it was beyond belief. I held out a tiny smatter of hope that it would be shown to be an ongoing process - as Hye-jin said, "You can cry whenever..." suggesting that this was not going to be a one-off but a process of revisiting and healing over time. However, hope disappeared... (Even a mention of still going to the counsellor in Seoul would have been enough, but alas no.) Hye-jin has actual magical powers. Sigh.

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ditto re your last sentence!!!! :(((

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I watched the last two eps after knowing about The rumors and hurry to finish it before it ruins all. This gave me major chuckles. Oh the irony! It is some drama in itself. Life imitates art.

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Props to you for continuing to recap this. I dont think I can watch/rewatch this drama after what happened.

Since I was waiting for this recap, I just write it down. I dont understand why Doha jumped on him? His dad was not investing with him and let his greed took over. I'm also not happy to that someone who he called noona wont apologized for what she said years ago. I understand that she was in shocked with what happened but she move on now, shouldnt she at least acknowledge what she said was too much? It need a spirit on a dead man to actually make him move on and stop blaming himself

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Instead of the dedicating 2 episodes to the over-the-top cuteness between the OTP, they could have cut it down to 1 episode and focused more on the trauma part instead of clubbing it all together and shoving it into our hearts in Ep.15. It was a heavy watch that I couldn't finish it in the 1 hour 20 mintues time span.

The healing could have been more elaborated because I loved how Hye Jin was by his side throughout, how Gandma Gam Ri kept placing food in his house. We viewers saw the repercussions of the trauma,we saw what caused the trauma so they should have also shown us the path to recovery. That would have made this shown even more beautiful than it had been throughout its run.

With the above being said, I'm happy how the story explained Du Shik's odd job and current lifestyle and his love for GongJin. Everything felt connected, even Yi Joon's maturity being an outcome of his parents' divorce.

I still don't buy Sung Hyun and Ji won love because either there story was underdeveloped or the romance felt forced. Even the dialogues seemed awkward rather than a conclusion to Ji won's feelings.

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I really felt that love for Gongjin. It wasn't just a place that he ran away to for comfort. It was a place that actively saved him.

I had always been praising Yi Joon for being such a perfectly-behaved, mature boy, never thinking that this was how he dealt with the trauma of divorce. I felt bad never questioning why he was always so calm and perfect.

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Ah...as suspected eun was the lottery winner (him driving big car n the super expensive collection).
Dushik got healing from his dead hyung which he reinforce not dushik fault n those sun ah n do ha blame n curse making dushik felt even more guilty for 5 years, did not even apologise. Indeed dushik need to forgive himself. Gamri giving dushik food n visiting hyejin helps to mend their relationship.
I felt really bad for Seon Ho how his private n professional life was brought out in public, like a knife to cut him off as acting is his passion beside acting he does not know what he can do. Only hear 1 side of it n may never get to hear Seon Ho side. I remember in early 2d1n episode in 2020 just before start up casting, Seon Ho is the most stress n cried n remember he said his family has gotten bigger n who is going to take care of them. I always wonder what he mean cos he is the only child. Before this, there was once he came with tears n members say forget about the girlfriend, he just say no. During start up drama at the sunset, he cry too. I was wondering why but he never disclose saying it's the sunlight. Hope Seon Ho n his ex have people to comfort n counsel them n can have good talk n get healing n move on. For me, actors are actors doing the job n not bother about personal life so long it is not a crime, i will still watch Seon Ho works. He is afterall an actor that brings out a character to life. This is my opinion n my wish for Seon Ho, hope will be respect even agree to disagree.

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I’ll admit, the episode did wring out some emotional tears from me. Though not from our main characters. I can see why our ML decided to change his life the way he did, but the events leading up to that change just…baffle me.

I get feeling bad because of what happened to both these people, but the father did the exact thing the ML told him not to do. After he repeatedly asked for advice. And his friend dying in a car accident and his wife, who was super close to him, wishing him dead is pretty messed up. Though I can understand her grief at the time, doubling down on it years later is just…awful. I’ve also got to vent about how much I hate the truck of doom trope. Just some of the laziest writing when a bit of tragedy is needed.

Like some others said, I am curious how the son of the security guard even knew about the ML. Did he leave a note? Cursing him for what…giving him advice that he ignored? The mother obviously never told him the name, or he’d have known about the money from him as well.

Just an odd pair of episodes ending the whole thing, with some great emotional moments ruined by some generic tropes and strange justifications.

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From what the security guard said his family didn't know about him investing the money, so I assume he left a note saying he had lost their money. Since he tried to call DS several times before his suicide attempt, maybe she made assumptions? I can understand her blaming DS, I suppose, but the security guard had woken up by the time Doha jumped all over DS.

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To add to this: I would have wanted that the security guard's son, after finding out Chief Hong = Du Shik, would approach him and Chief Hong panics and all, only to have the son bow to him and thank him for the financial help he has given the family. Not the enraged son that we saw. And that would propel Du Shik's healing because then it validates that it really wasnt his fault. His reaction to the events was understandble. He was in shock and under a lot of stress. So the trauma cultivated.

But if the son came to him and said that he's been looking for Du Shik to say thank you and to say it's not your fault, that would have been a better plot development for me. And would make Du Shik's healing understandably instant.

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I thought it was an interesting choice to have Jung-woo appear and tell him to move on, that they would see each other again after he had lived a full life. I'm not sure how I feel about that. It was a convenient way to get closure, but maybe too convenient. The whole tragedy felt contrived - terrible enough to explain why Doo-shik went home but clearly not his fault. The truck of doom was super contrived. (Don't trucks have brakes in Korea?) And Hye-jin being the one to call an ambulance for Doo-shik back in the day was also super contrived. Why did this have to be packaged so neatly and tied up with a ribbon?

Compared to that whole plot line, Gamri's passing was very natural. She fell asleep with her friends beside her, grateful for a good life. More about that after next recap.

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hye-jin calling the ambulance fit perfectly in my opinion. if you noticed throughout the show they crossed paths many times unknowingly, so this just fit in with the other occurrences.

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I personally liked how they showed Jungwoo. It must be Dooshik's way of forgiving himself.

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The drama seems to be very into fate and Gongjin is like some weird town where random combinations of people's lives intersect. I don't mind the ambulance part so much, as long as they don't have Hye-jin or Doo-shik find out about it. I don't mind crazy coincidences when the audience is aware of them and the workings of fate, but the leads are unaware. I was bummed when they had the leads connect each other to both the beach photo and the scene of him paying for her milk.

Gam-ri had a beautiful death. Dramas and movies always portray beautiful deaths surrounded by loved ones. But really most of us just die alone. Death doesn't wait for all your friends and family to be so close by. I'm jealous of Gam-ri!

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This episode annoyed the everloving crap pit of me. I couldn't even commiserate because the reactions were so dumb. He is literally not responsible for anything that happened to either of those men. Feeling responsibility for someone else's action is arrogant, you cannot control other people. Also for why are kdramas the only tv shows where trucks don't swerve even after honking, when literally no one else is around, and you can miss the clear barrier in front of you? This episode honestly removed a lot of the good will from previous episodes, wth

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I feel the opposite. Dusik's guilt over the truck accident that killed his closest friend, and the security guard's attempted suicide felt real. He took a job in a company where the main goal was making money, in spite of this not being the right career for him. He did it because he was swayed by his friend, and a natural desire to get ahead. He got caught up in being successful, and didn't make the time to help the security guard when he kept calling. I understand Dusik was very busy with the crisis-but I also understand that he would have felt tremendously guilty afterwards. His nature is to be caring, and he would have carried this guilt for a long time. Add to that the car accident that killed his friends. Dusik's caring nature would have caused him to struggle with guilt for year's to come.
As far as the truck of doom--I have come to accept that Korean drama writers use these accidents to represent terrible incidents of fate in characters lives. Dusik and his friend were "destined" to suffer, and so the TOD was used.

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His guilt felt real to me too. "What if's" are the worst, and I'm sure "What if I had answered the security guard's calls?" or haunted DS.

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What ifs are the worst and when you're grieving and feel even the tiniest bit guilty or regretful, it gnaws at you and your rationality.

I would say that if he answered the security guard's calls, the security guard would not have attempted suicide then because he would have been on the phone with DS. But it's still not DS's fault.

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Surprisingly, the most emotional moment for me in this episode was Yi-joon's happy cry. This stoic little man was carrying the weight of the world on his back.
I am not condemning divorce (I have one myself) but my final career was teaching 10- 12 year olds. Divorce is devastating for kids no matter how hard their parents try to make it amicable. His parents were the worst and simply stopping the bickering would be a more believable first step.

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I agree! I was sobbing watching Ijun cry. He's such a good actor!

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Yi joon for Deasang! I was seeing comments on DB on how he was a scene stealer this episode but I couldn't gather it until I saw it myself. He cried in layers. This child is so talented, who taught him that? He acted better in that one scene than all the adults in the show.

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He was considerate even when he was crying his heart out not to be seen by his parents and worry...

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So true. These are the kinds of characters I think about way more often than the leads. Happily imagining that Yi Joon can live as a happy goofy kid for a few years. Hoping this child actor gets many more roles - he was absolutely amazing.

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I just want to say how they depict this trauma thing after building up for 14 eps and then the don't even give a proper explanation, that is mind blowing. I'm sorry to say but this drama does have very problematic storytelling as well as character development. The ML is a huge Gary Stu. He never does bad, so perfect, too victimized. he is quite mean outside towards certain people (which I don't get it at all) but very wounded inside, which is a very problematic message in overall. If this were a female character, people would calling her "toxic" and "annoying" but somehow he gets a pass? As for the FL I don't get what she finds in him, I see no emotional connection. This episode (with Granny specially) was the last drop for me. I can't stand this story revolving around him.

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Not related to the story but the best part of this drama was my discovery of this man's many talents <3

https://youtu.be/xGMYLZjepvk

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Yasssss I've been thinking for the longest time where I've seen Lee Sangyi before and onlt recently realized he played Benny in the In the Heights prod in Korea!

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The more I watched, the angrier I got.

Is Do-ha seriously blaming Doo-shik for the stock market crashing and his father making an extreme decision? Stocks have risks. Did Doo-shik cause Benjamin Holdings to go bankrupt? Did he tell Do-ha’s father to take out a loan?

Then Sun-ah. It was a car accident, and Doo-shik wasn't even the one driving. "I forgive you"? Bish, I blame your husband for convincing Doo-shik to be a fund manager. What a waste of his engineering degree.

When Doo-shik told Hye-jin he killed the man in the photo, instead of stepping back like he's a murderer, she should've said, "Tell me what happened and let me decide."

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Ikr. It's understandable that DS was internalizing all that because everyone was blaming him but seriously he wasn't at fault.

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I was even more angry when Sun Ah said she still resented him...How low one can get...

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Yi-joon is such an old soul that it was a relief to see him break down and tell his parents how he felt. Then Bora started crying, and I knew was going to be put through the wringer. Those kids are so talented.

No wonder Doo-shik is dealing with trauma though as Sung-hyun said, it was a stretch of bad luck for everyone involved.

Gam-ri and Gongjin saved Doo-shik and he became Chief Hong.

I loved that Hwa-jung knew about Cho-hee’s feelings and accepted her for who she is without any judgement.

I knew Gam-ri was going to pass away as soon as she made her little speech. Mat-yi's reaction was realistic, sadness mixed with the acceptance of the elderly.

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I haven't commented on any of these so far but man alive. I felt so frustrated with the structuring of this show. They left all this heaviness to the very end, and this being my happy Romantic Sunday drama, I was super frustrated by how sad I felt through the whole thing.

And while he sort of got to heal from things by coming face to face with the family members of the people who were hurt, the fact that EVERYONE piled guilt on him, when he clearly wasn't responsible, and then didn't apologize or take it back 5 years later, really bothered me.

Do-Ha was kind of understandable in feeling like why couldn't you have reassured him one more time, or taken his call, but even if you think that, you shouldn't say it to the person who is feeling misplaced guilt already.

Sun-Ha made me angry. She isn't going to apologize for saying he should have died because she was in a bad place? You can acknowledge that you were in a bad place, and apologize for your actions when you are in a headspace to recognize them as wrong.

And then Gam Ri died. That was too much for my heart to handle, and felt like unnecessary extra pain on Du Shik.

All in all, it wasn't really enjoyable. It was WAY too heavy for near the end of a drama like this. (I just read some of the comments. Seems like y'all have similar feelings. :P Glad I am not alone.)

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Doo-Shik's guilt wasn't a surprise. After the death of his parents, his grand-father, his friend's one was the straw that broke the camel. He broke inside. Gongjin residents saved him. It's the best part this drama, this community. It's interesting how it makes the man he became, he doesn't take more money he needs, he likes simple things, wants outsiders to respect Gongjin and its residents.

It would have been better if Do-Ha and Sun-Ah showed some regrets and apologized. But they didn't and it's an issue for me. Do-Ha's father brought it to himself with the help of a greedy man. Doo-Shik wasn't responsible but still paid for his hospital bills and Do-Ha's studies. Sun-Ah said something under the pain but it was wrong. Her husband insisted on driving and it was an accident.

And because we didn't cry enough they added Yi-joon, who is so lovely, and Gam-Ri. I was sad that Doo-Shik didn't see her a last time.

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Oh, I forgot Hye-Jin. If I liked the fact she gave him time, I didn't think she needed to give space too. At the opposite, she should have stayed with him. It was kinda cold to let him to be alone and "force" him to heal.

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Same din't like how she din't check on him. She said she wanted to have a future with him, but left him alone to heal🙄

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Thanks for the recap and commentary mistyisles! Totally captured my thoughts and feelings. And wow, was that a lot of tear-jerking scenes all packed into one episode. I wish they were better spread out, but the scenes are associated with all the stories reaching their conclusions, including Gamri .

I really love how the drama show the characters as both being such pills and being so wonderful at the same time. Even though someone like Nam-sook would annoy me, their good outweigh the bad ten-fold. I love how the villagers tricked him into growing into the Chief Hong he is today.

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I liked how it explains the whole story.

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This episode really was a masterpiece. I loved how the stories were tied up.

Never thought I'd miss the granny squad, Gam ri death came out of nowhere.

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