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[Fix That Ending] HEA for Na Hee-do and Baek Yi-jin


By @kathystrobos (Kathykat)

What I didn’t like about Twenty Five Twenty One’s conclusion: the present-day storyline, 2009 interview, and breakup. In my rewrite I would take out the present-day storyline altogether, and also the 2009 interview. I would keep the story lines of Yoo-rim and the others, but revise certain scenes with Hee-do and Yi-jin. Here’s how I’d fix the ending.
 
Episode 15

First, I would start by revising Hee-do’s conversation with her mother about Yi-jin and the friction with his career. Here’s how the scene would go:

MOM: I’m asking if that’s okay.
HEE-DO: Yes, because it’s different. You never said you were sorry. You didn’t even explain. I had to figure out on my own, as a child, that a newsflash meant you wouldn’t be at my father’s funeral. And when you “reported” on my gold medal, you didn’t come home and say “I’m sorry.” You yelled at me. I’ll take Yi-jin’s sorry, because Yi-jin believes in me even when he’s not there. And when he is with me, he shows me so much love. And because Yi-jin tries to find the truth, not the slant that will create more news. So, I’m going to have to live with him missing important events. I don’t need him physically by my side at all times. I can stand on my own two feet, because his love and belief in me is by my side.
MOM: I had to put my career first to have a career.
HEE-DO: But you didn’t have to put me last.
MOM: I’m sorry.
 
Next, I would keep the rest of Episode 15, but revise the final scenes. Yi-jin stays in New York for another month, and Hee-do watches him on TV. When it’s just his voiceover, he calls her because he knows that she will miss his face. Yi-jin is depressed and has the conversation with his senior about hope.

Then, I would move up these two scenes from Episode 16: Yi-jin reads the letter from the woman he interviewed, who thanks him for his reporting despite her colleague not surviving. He talks to the firefighter, who tells him that life goes on through people doing their jobs despite the circumstances.

The late-night conversation with Hee-do starts the same, until the point where Yi-jin says that his senior says there is no hope in this world.

HEE-DO: Where are you finding hope?
YI-JIN: In telling the stories of the people who died. In making them live on in words. And in sharing their last heroic acts. In finding the heroes.
HEE-DO: So, don’t get too sad. There is hope and you’re finding it. You’re doing important work. I’ll come visit you.
YI-JIN: Don’t come. I don’t want you to experience this. You can’t ask me to make you share this.
HEE-DO: I’ll come visit. I told you I was going to share this with you.
YI-JIN: Don’t come. I promise I’ll be back by New Year’s Eve.

Then the last scene of Episode 15 would be New Year’s Eve, when Hee-do returns to where they spent last New Year’s Eve, alone. She tries calling him, but he doesn’t pick up.
 

 
Episode 16

First Scene: Yi-jin shows up to join her for New Year’s Eve, with the red suitcase in hand, having just flown in from New York. They hug and have their usual fun together that night.

(Side note: I lived through 9/11 in NYC and I don’t understand why he was still there four months later. There was no new news about it by that point. The realization that there were no survivors happened within that first month. And then it became about telling their stories. It was deeply traumatic, so the trauma he felt was realistic. Also, there was survivor’s guilt, but the other lesson was to hold your loved ones close and appreciate them all the more because life is precious.)

Next scene: Yi-jin wakes up with a nightmare, unable to sleep. Hee-do comforts him.

Next scene: Yi-jin has vacation because he’s just returned from New York; they go on a short trip with red suitcases. He cooks at home for her while she trains. They meet up with the gang.

Next scene: To me, Yi-jin should have character growth. Yi-jin feels very deeply, and his line that resonated with me is when he’s upset about the crane incident – he says, “this shouldn’t be happening anymore.” So, Yi-jin becomes a local investigative reporter, uncovering corruption and working on longer, more in-depth stories, having learned in New York that he couldn’t realize those goals in his current position.

The next few scenes would show Yi-jin reporting on corruption and making a name for himself as a reporter who cares. Because these stories are in-depth, his schedule is more his own than if he is reporting on immediate crises.

After a time jump of a few years, we see Hee-do and Yi-jin each make their own plans for proposing to each other in the tunnel.

Hee-do wins more gold medals and is interviewed and says the toughest match was with Yoo-rim. Hee-do retires, as in the existing scene with Yoo-rim and the press except Yi-jin is there too. Yi-jin’s brother meets Seung-wan. Yi-jin brings his family back together.

Final scenes: Hee-do and Yoo-rim run the fencing training center together. Together, they train new athletes and have fun, with the coach stopping by periodically. They celebrate their athletes winning medals by ordering from the bakery of the fencer who quit.

To be faithful to the fleeting nature of youth theme, the gang, in the present day, tries to get together, but it’s difficult to plan with everyone’s family and work commitments. That spontaneity of youth is gone.

Hee-do suggests a date for a dinner with the gang. Seung-wan says she has a shoot that night. Hee-do suggests another date, after looking at a calendar filled with her schedule, her children’s school events, and Yi-jin’s schedule. They arrange a date at the restaurant. And finally, they all arrive, one after the other. The three couples hug each other and eat, chatting and laughing.

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Ah....an ending finally made sense. This is much more consistent with the internal world of the show.

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This is nice. I like your point about holding on to those we love. Why was he still there?

I was also separated from my nearest and dearest at that time and for the next five years because of work, travelling across continents from where I was working to my home at six monthly intervals. It's a hard thing to do, but not enough to break up relationships. In fact, it gave me a different perspective on myself and a renewed appreciation of my family.

Realistically our leads had already overcome so much that it's not believable that they would have ended it at this point. The only way I could understand their decision was in the context of her never having her mother there when she was growing up, and the pattern being replicated with him was too much. And that was the point she made. But their love was so strong and the bonds they forged were not going be dissolved so easily, if at all.

Your version of the conversation with the mother is perfect because it shifts Hee-do out of that pattern. She resolves her issues with her mother and then has the freedom to move into a mature acceptance of Ye-jin's profession. She is freed from the past, as a mature adult.

I did like the granddaughter's coming-of-age realisation from reading her mother's journals, but yes, I can see how it could be dropped. Your rewritten ending is more realistic. Well done.

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One of the things that made me sad about the finale was that it seemed the writer forgot how deep their connection was, and how that connection didn't care about time or physical presence. How they understanding was so deep...

One of the most shocking things for me is that Yi Jin came back from NY and Hee Do didn't comfort him. Even if she was going to break up with him, asking how was he doing or what could she do for him would be something more appropriate for their relationship. Another one is the tunnel fight. They said some weird stuff for the kind of relationship and communication they had.

I also liked the difference between her mom as a reporter and YJ as a reporter.
YJ never forgot he was HD's boyfriend because of his job. Her mom kept forgetting her role tho. They both disappointed Hee Do at times, but YJ definitely tried, her mom not so much; she just asked for understanding without giving it in return. I think that little effort YJ made would change that pattern and help HD understand YJ's profession.

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I agree. The ending forgot the strength of their love for each other. This wasn't simply a first love. It went deeper than that.

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I didn't like the tunnel confrontation it was out of character. It feels like the Hee-do and Yi-jin on that scene were 2 different people.

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LOL Are all the Fix That Endings going to be Twenty-Five Twenty-One and Business Proposal?

The present-day storyline ruined this show. Thank goodness Kim So-hyun doesn't do dramas because I am never watching her in another drama again.

I'd rather not give our boy more depression, so I would take out 9/11. As a matter of fact, I don't want Yi-jin to be a reporter at all.

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Perhaps there ought to be a "Rotten Kimchi" award for terrible endings. Twenty-Five Twenty-One should give Monthly Magazine Home and Do Do Sol Sol a run for their money.

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"Rotten Kimchi award"...I LOVE THIS IDEA!!!!!!

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What’s the relation to Kim So Hyun?

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Kim So-hyun played adult Na Hee-do.

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Musical actress KSH not our beloved former child actress KSH. I agree though on never wanting to see adult NHD on screen again. Never thought musical actors could be bad drama actors but clearly exceptions exist.

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Oh ok!

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Oh well done!
During the 9/11 aftermath part I kept thinking, is that how it was? I don’t remember it like that. I remember the search for survivors ending quickly. There were several things that didn’t really compute in the 9/11 part, like how he even got there when (as I recall) all North American flights were stopped for about a week (he said he “ came over the border “).

Nice inclusion of the fencer who left to become a patissier 🍰

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wow. the conversation between hee-do and her mother should've gone the way you wrote it, rather than how it was in the drama. there was a clear difference between how yijin treated heedo as a reporter compared to how her mother did (which the drama itself showed) so i hated how that distinction wasn't mentioned by heedo to her mother, i'm still mad/disappointed at how they fell apart :(

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😭😭😭 Thank you 😭😭😭

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I think changing the end of this drama means changing the message of the drama. It's not same than changing the end of Business Proposal by adding two marriages for example.

I love the messages about first love, a great but painful one, about youth versus adulthood, about past days and present days.

If I needed to change something, it would be about their dating days. It was vey short and not very well explored because they put it in a time jump. We entered in the separating phase too fast after the very long period of friendship.

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The idea that the drama is trying to say first love doesn’t always work out is false. At no point is the message of the drama that first love and friendships don’t work out. The phase of separation is just a part of life but bonds formed never end. Baek Yi Jin and Na Hee Do weren’t the only main leads or couple. Go Yurim and Moon Jiwoong also exist and they proved that distance, separation or lack of communication and opposite personalities never means the end of a relationship or friendship. They got overcame everything to keep both love and friendship. The break up for our other leads was forced and there was no rations build up to it. That is a fact. Until Hee Do has that conversation with her mother the thought had never crossed her mind. The drama used that conversation as a fulcrum to the snowballing of emotions that led to the breakup. I completely agree the future storyline was pointless because there was no cohesion between and adult Na Hee Do. The kind of person Ana Hee Do was she would never have chosen the break up path and gotten married and had a child even before she retired. The later storyline did not add up with her underlying personality.

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I don't know anybody around me who married their first love. I don't say it's impossible. I like the idea too and I have no issue with dramas with childhood connection (when it's well written and not added without any meaning).

The break-up was not forced at all. Hee-Do was very clear about it. Their love was bringing sorrow and pain to them and not support, encouragement, happiness anymore. Some people can love at distance and other can't. Go Yurim and Moon Jiwoong could do it, even if as second lead couple, we don't really know how they managed it. But Hee-Do and Beak Yi-Jin were different. It's all. They tried it but at the end, they realized it wasn't working, it wasn't making them happy, they always felt sorry for themselve and for the other. It's all. The mother didn't push this idea in Hee-Do's head. She knew her daughter and could see her disapointment. She knew her daughter doesn't do anything halfway but always at 200%. So she asked her daughter to be sure that Hee-Doo knew what she was doing.

For the present scenes, I don't think Hee-Do completely changed but the actress wasn't good enough to make an old version of Kim Tae-Ri.

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My best friend broke up with her LDRS boyfriend, who was childhood friend of hers before they turned this into relationship.
So I understand what you mean.

She can't go to him ( He is working in Australia) cause she loves her job here & for him, he also can't come back.
They were communicating all the time before breakup ( messages, video calls), but some relationship just didn't work .

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Problem is we don't want a realistic ending in dramaland , we want a happy ending for them because it is an escape from our crazy real life.

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For me, it's not the case. I want an ending that is realistic, that matches the drama and the characters.

I understand why people are disapointed and share some part of that. But I don't think it's a bad ending.

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I also think it isn't a bad ending, and I really wonder if I'd be that happy if their relationship was a happy ending one. The reason is because we all know not every one wins gold in every aspect of their life. If she ended up as a happily married couple with BYJ, she would be NHD the Gold Medalists who married BYJ the Youngest UBS News Anchor who as also Ko Yurim's Best Friend. If it ended up like that, the show would have to be billed as a fantasy; Unlike A Business Proposal that was an adaptation of a webtoon which I could enjoy its craziness simply because it was a webtoon, I hope there is be some reality that will enable me to be genuinely happy for the characters because I can actually relate to them as they look, act, and experience so many ups and downs like other people in real life.

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I know most people around me who have married their first love. However this isn’t about my reality or your reality. This is about the reality of the relationship they built between the two characters and the hurt and unhappiness that entered and ended their relationship was contrived. Till the end they both still had very strong feelings for each other but neither wanted to work through the bits that were straining their relationship and that was not in line with their original characters.

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I guess we will have to disagree about that. You seem to think they could work on that when I think Hee-Do was very clear about why she didn't want to. It was 100% in her character. She prefered no relationship to an half one.

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I do agree with @kurama that I'd like to disagree with being ok with working to overcome a relationship with BYJ at that point is in line with her character. I really couldn't understand those who said her decision to end the relationship wasn't in line with her character and his character and their strong bond. No one questioned their strong bond at that point, but BYJ didn't choose NHD as his priority when he chose to stay in NYC. His priority had become a different one at that point. He loved NHD a lot, but his love for his family was so much more than that. It didn't help that he had to choose one then and we all witnessed what he chose and later learnt about how far he had become since then.

My opinion is also that the decision to end the romantic relationship was in line with NHD's character; her insecurity was about her nearest and dearest left her in the cold. She might have decided to keep the relationship if it wasn't that BYJ chose the NYC position, broke their promises without better explanation, and left her out on many things that had been going on with him. It wasn't what NHD asked of him as her partner. I think it was very clear from so many dialogues between them before that point.

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She was young, was considerate but also relentless. If she had known better than that (aka if that wasn't her first love), they might have come to a compromise and the relationship might have worked. But the fact was different, and I also thought that was the intention of the show from the beginning: to show how first love can fall apart even with the strongest and best kind of bonds when it happens at the wrong timing.

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Dear @Owl, I keep reading your posts and cant help but say you have made some valid points. A lot of situations in the latter part turned contrived with some character assassination done because they were needed to fit the author's narrative of their breakup. Those were the things I see that bothered majority of viewers.

I'm thankful to the author of this article for giving frustrated viewers some comfort from those flaws and inconsistencies. Obviously, we're still hurting and trying to make sense of it all.

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I would have to disagree with some points not because I want them to end up together, but because I agree that it was rushed to the point everything was just squished to fit the break-up trope. Why did I say that? One is because thinking about breaking up with someone is not what Hee-do can just think about in 6 months and just ask Yi-jin to accept. Yes, they have issues, but before actually asking for that there was not an "effort" to actually "talk" about it in a calm manner. They've been on this situation with Yi-jin being mistaken as Injeolmi, and her avoiding him instead of confronting the issue head-on. Yi-jin being persistent didn't really let her get away with it, and so they had an honest conversation. And for Hee-do who's just so brutally honest and forward how can you not really want to talk this over? It's not aligning with the foundation of what their relationship is all about. They've been through so much together, and have seen each other's heartbreaks. How can they of all people not talk about this? And Hee-do the same person who actually told Yi-jin not to give up on happiness would just let go that easily is absurd. If we're gonna go the route of them not ending up together that means not abandoning the core of their personalities. She can choose to break up with him by saying what she truly feels instead of questioning him "Do you even love me?" which is so damning given the problem is their lack of communication and not whether Yi-jin loves her or not. Hee-do can forgive Yu-rim after what she had put her through from start and even before the Madrid match, but can't spare a chance to hear out Yi-jin without lashing out.

People can say that we the ones who weren't happy were just up for the fairytale ending. But the thing is the writer hasn't given enough justification for us to believe that the only route was just to break up. Like what I've read before the cracks in their relationship should've been shown early on and not on half of episode 15 where others can't even make sense of it. That's how that should've been, you build your case so that the viewers can actually accept that them breaking up was for the best.

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Well said!!

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You dont know anyone who married their first loves (i do actually) but i bet you also don't know any couple who loved each other like Yijin and Haedo! (meeting after 6 months yet love is tsronger, running to save each other overruling boss s orders etc) This is a drama, not real life. "Realistic" ending has to serve the reality of set up by the world of the drama. Which in this case it didnt

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My parents :)

Not as dramatic than 25-21 but still very strong after 47 years of marriage and 3 + 2 kids.

It did serve the reality of the drama, it's just you didn't take in consideration the present parts when clearly the daughter didn't know anything about BYJ.

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I agree about the dating - I think the ending felt so sad because they got together and immediately the show was pushing toward their breakup.

Don’t you think it needed a bit more of everyone’s story post breakup?

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I think it would have been nice to have a little bit of everything after their break-up, in the past and in the present.

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There needed to be more PRE-breakup that focused on the cracks in H &Y's relationship to lead viewers toward the "real-life" ending. Also, more scenes on the friends noticing signs of things falling apart with H&Y--his lack of prioritizing his love for her (his disrespect by focusing on her toe after she kissed him, etc.) and his withdrawal from their friendshp--would have supported it.

Otherwise, have Yijin waiting at the tunnel. They hug & kiss because Hee-do (or her mom) had called him when she received the diary. Yijin, still single, realized what he lost, knew HeeDo was available again since he worked with her mother, and they were falling love all over again. Hee-do gave her daughter the diaries not only to inspire her daughter but to introduce her to Yijin as her new step-dad.

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I’d have enjoyed that ending!
I think if I were to change the ending (and keep it in line with the writer’s idea), I’d cut out present day, move through the ages faster, have the 9/11 crisis earlier, then show how Hee do and Yi Jin grow after their break up, how everyone remembers that summer, the Madrid match, the interview minus wedding comment, Hee Do’s retirement and a reunion of the gang on the beach reminiscing about the past. Open ended but not totally shattering.

What was that funeral reunion?!

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The 2009 interview was really in bad taste with the scene of Heedo fixing her left side. And so was that funeral scene with the divorce comment. I wish I could unsee and delete the bad parts.

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The thing about this drama that I just realized is that the supporting characters who are supposed to be a catalyst of actually knocking some sense on the leads weren't even really present on this. Hee-do's mom might not be that person but hell what about Yu-rim does Yi-jin not mean anything to you? I don't like how no one in their circle actually budges on that break-up. And you know what's silly is that I also remember this line from Yi-jin's mom about finding someone that inspires you to improve by being together, and that's what a truly successful life is. Imagine the weight of those words on Yi-jin, and how it didn't make sense for them not to fight for each other at all.

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Chingu! You read my mind. >_<

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And also the repeated patterns of issues which they didn't resolve was a big miss. No closure for Chanmi and Jae-kyung these two women who both shaped Hee-do as a woman and a fencer. Hee-do fully understanding her mother's way of coping after her father's death and her sacrifices in raising her. As well as finding out the connection of her mom and coach. Also I hate it when others were blaming Yi-jin because he chose his career over Hee-do. When in reality Hee-do was the one who told him that his job as a reporter makes the world they're living in a better place. Which ties back to the same sentiment about Hee-do leading Yi-jin to do what's right and to a good place. That's the reason why it's just so hard to accept how it all went down.

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Yeah, I wish there had been a different take on lots of those things. Hee do was brave and self-confident - and I could more imagine her releasing Yi jin to do what he loves than blaming him for breaking them apart…

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And also true about other storylines. I wish they’d given (suddenly can’t remember her name!) a more thoughtful job than a variety show runner … :( I thought she was awesome fighting for justice!

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Thank you for giving an alternate view on an ending that makes much more sense. Their conversations sound so in line with their characterization, it feels like what young Heedo and Yijin, the one that we came to know, would say and do. A happy ending can also be a realistic ending.

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I agree that Yi Jin had no character growth, thrice he ran away or hid when he went through a difficult time. His stay in New York should've taught him to share his burdens with Hee Do. It wasn't going to solve any of their problems, but it meant being together, and that would've made a world of difference in their relationship. Hee Do wasn't afraid of hard times even in her relationship with her mom, in fact she wanted the two of them to share their sadness about her dad. What she couldn't live with was being shut out.

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EXCELENTE... Fixing... I LOVE HAPPY ENDING... The real life meets hope in the romantic series. We rest from the real life Just watching romantic series. The viewers needs are importante too. In order to help viewers I propose to include a New category of romance series: NO HAPPY ENDING.

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Although I appreciate this ending, it changes the theme of the show of the daughter finding the desire to dance again through the mother’s diaries and her vigor for fencing. The first love story, although super compelling, was never meant to be the end game. And the ending never explains how the daughter got to be there and why she has a different surname. The dialogue is great though and I picked how you used current scenes to make sense of new scenes you’ve made. And now should I write my own ending???

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As much as I'd like the two walking off into the sunset also, this is a completely different story, and with this ending a rewrite from episode 1 would have been needed too to tie up the plot starting with MinChae having a different surname, and not recognizing pictures of his BYJ. From the get go, this was not a romance only genre, had always been a slice of life coming of age story, and thus a bit of realism is expected. True, the show could have paced this better by showing us more episodes of them coming to terms with the fact that love is not always the answer to happiness and fulfillment. So my disappointment lies with the fact that the show lost its identity for a bit by the 10th episode or so by dangling the romance further than they should have (which ultimately backfired). If the show is rewritten and reproduced entirely to be a love story of MinChae's parents and the people around them, then this ending is perfect.

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I think from its promotional teasers and synopses implying their ages and the stages at which they'd meet and fall in love that the production team promoted this as a romance drama with a hint of nostalgia. It didn't help that they squeezed the romance mystery storyline to the very end too. I'd say they shot themselves in the foot with that. I'm not surprised it backfired on them.

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Thank you, thank you @kathystrobos!!
I never cared for the present day storyline. Maybe because present day Hee-do seemed nothing like 19 year old Hee-do. And I don’t think all the blame can be placed on the actor portraying her. While it’s true that life does change us, it doesn’t change us 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 much. At our core, we are still the same.
I think your rewrite of Hee-do’s conversation with her mom is more realistic. If Hee-do and Yi-Jin had not spent years building a foundation of friendship and then love, I could more readily believe they would not fight harder for the relationship. But it wasn’t just a simple crush. These two had so much more. And if the show taught us anything, it taught us that Hee-do was not a quitter. Wasn’t that the point of her chastising her daughter for giving up so easily?!
FYI: I know many first loves who married and are now grandparents. It’s not out of the realm of possibility.
Yes, some dramas call for happy endings and others do not. Personally, I’d prefer to see more.

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Same thoughts! We may age but that doesn't mean our core changes that's what I keep saying so many times. The thing is how come 19 and 23 Heedo and Yi-jin can be mature enough to talk about defining their relationship, while the 25 and 21 ages can't even have an honest conversation. That's what truly bugged me, how on earth did that happen. Are they growing backwards?

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I did imagine a HEA like that but since the writer obviously had wanted a different ending for them so your version is appreciated.

Though to be honest, I felt that they were better off as friends really.

Especially BYJ, despite being years older made her his only friend and he was always there for her. Cheered and helped build her confidence.

But when he officially became her boyfriend, he started being late on dates, later on could not even make it all. All due to work of course. And as he said he wanted to be a boyfriend she could be proud of.

NHD despite being years younger, still tried to accommodate his schedules and did not react the way she did with her mom in the past. She has matured or has already begin to be more understanding of his job.

During that time I could already see the cracks in their relationship. Nothing good happens when the other party just keeps apologizing due to his absence. That alone actually would be enough to drive them apart in the long run.

But my discontent with the writer was with the 911 event and used it to separate them. I could understand the horror and emotional trauma so why didn't he get help. Why did he bottled it up and emotionally detached himself from her. Someone mentioned that after 911 we should cherrish our loved ones more.

And another is wouldn't it have been better to show both are living happily with their own family?

I mean her husband was even a no show not even a single phone call, a tweet, a message, or even a wedding photo. It's like she doesn't even want to see him at all.

In short I didn't mind that the main couple didn't end up together but how they split up because of 911 was totally not expected.

I know they needed to use 911 so as to make him a foreign correspondent so her mom could recommend him in taking her place. So I guess his happy ending is to be news anchor and get a bigger paycheck to be able to buy a house to get his family back under one roof. The end.

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Your comment is exactly what i feel too! I now feel peaceful finding a comment that resonates with what I felt while watching the last two episodes.

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I agree - I'm gutted that they weren't going to make it as a couple, but I think it still would have kept with the writer's plan to at least show them living happy separate lives after. I felt that the inclusion of 9/11 and their subsequent depression / breakup was quite a dark way to end the drama.

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The use of 9/11 and the trauma surrounding that was a cheap shot at triggering the most emotional response. The way it was presented and used for their eventual breakup wasn't done well. It was dark. It was cruel and unnecessary.

It seemed the writer wrote herself into a corner by creating 14 or 15 episodes that built up her characters but didn't know how to give it a proper conclusion.

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I didnt understand why UBS would send a city reporter as a foreign correspondent for a crisis as severe as 9/11. Nobody does that. Also the show's treatment of 9/11 is so wonky. On one hand haedo is unaffected by it, upet only that Yijinis gone (??) and on the other hand, they treat Yijin going to NYC like he has gone off to war or something? I mean it was bad but not so bad that you cant say hello to the love of your life and are mean to her huffy when she tries to comfort you.

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This made me smile.
Thank you for such a warm ending.

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You can't hear it but I'm clapping my ghostly hands together for you. I would have loved to see your ending unfold.

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Thank- you. That was healing!💗

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You are a genius. This version is balm for my soul. And you are completely consistent with the show's tone and theme. THANK YOU for fixing it so beautifully.

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Thanks everyone for such supportive comments. It was healing for me to write this.

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This is brilliant! I love how you turned that conversation with Na Heedo's mother because what happened in the drama was such a forceful writing. That's what would she say, though, I would try to toned it down a little bit, but the fact is out of all people, it is Na Heedo who knows that Yijin is not similar to her mother.

I would also add more depth on Heedo's character by making her more concerned and feel deeply with the 9/11 event, because I didn't appreciate how the writers only used that part as a way to break-up, it is just bad writing and such a disrespect over the event. It was also like a mockery to Na Heedo's character by making her only excited and disappointed that she's not seeing Yijin reporting the news.

I would also made sure that Yijin would consult that New York City position to Heedo, he would slowly break down in the conversation and he would come back to Korea to get his therapy.

I would also add Yijin's family especially his father while he's in New York to give him some advice and to affirm him that he doesn't need to save all people and that what he's already doing is already enough and that he also needs to save himself too if he wanted to save others. It's just fitting and would remove Yijin from that martyr trope.

I also love the other lesson you pointed out because in episode 15 he said to Heedo that they should love with no regrets, so instead of just feeling guilty and killing himself more, he would learn to value life especially the precious ones around him, especially Heedo.

After he completes his therapy, he will not go back to New York after realizing that he's already contented here but there are many things he can do for others in Korea as well and will probably go with your chosen career for him because it's such a good one!

He will propose to her with the nudging of his parents and family and she would accept it. Of course it is not smooth sailing always, but the fact is they would persevere together.

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YES YES YES.

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