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Tomorrow: Episodes 15-16 (Final)

It wasn’t enough that we took a journey into the past last week and learned about our reapers and their connection. In our final week, that past comes full circle to the present, and it’s a finale full of connections, closure, and some more tears for good measure.

 
EPISODES 15-16 WEECAP

Perhaps it’s because we have met so many characters along the way, and cried with them and over them, that this drama seems so much longer than its actual run. If you told me we’d just made it through a 24-episoder, I would believe you.

After the tragic Joseon romance between Ryeon and Joong-gil that we learned about last week, we’re left with the same question as Jun-woong, who luckily asks it for us: but does Joong-gil remember?! The answer is no. His memories of Ryeon were sealed up, and though it usually only takes one reincarnation for a soul to get over past pain, Joong-gil’s burden is so great that we’re told he brought his pain with him (a theme we’ve heard a lot of, and that fits beautifully here).

But all that tragic backstory doesn’t signify much unless it comes full circle, and indeed, it all does, and it’s a busy finale week. First, we meet our Risk Management team as they embark on their final (for us anyway) case, and we take a dive into idol hell with them.

Our singer-actress is RYU CHOI-HUI (Kim Shi-eun, long time no Love Alarm!), and we see her struggles to put on a happy face and fight for her success while the netizens and press brutally attack her at every turn. She’s known for speaking the truth and not playing along with the fakery — so satisfying when we see her doing this — but while it’s right, it makes her life a living hell. Eventually, all the pressure from the outside world to kill herself for wrongs she didn’t do starts to get to her.

Hilariously, Jun-woong knows this idol well — since she “got him through” his military service lol — but really, it’s Ryeon that’s having the major menboong. This idol is a person deeply beloved from her past: the faithful friend and servant that died protecting her during that horrible stoning scene.

Ryeon, at this point, has reached the place we’ve seen both Jun-woong and Ryong-koo get to: where all rules and regulations go out the window, because they’re determined to save the person who was so precious to them in the past.

It’s here that Ryeon butts heads with Joong-gil, whose rancor against these suicidal humans reaches an all-time high: he’s found out that Ryeon also committed suicide in her past life, but no more than that — yet — because the Jade Emperor warns him she promised someone she would never tell him about his past. Who is that person? His past self. Chills!

Remember the reaper guarantee that Ryeon signed so many episodes ago? Joong-gil puts it to use while Ryeon is trying to save Choi-hui, and the girl winds up getting hit by a car while Ryeon was in the very act of saving her. Joong-gil is at peak anger/cruelty here, but he’s about to get his own menboong moment later on.

Ryeon is furious over not being able to stop Choi-hui’s suicide attempt, and though she survives, Ryeon goes rogue — and her rogue actions make Ryong-koo’s seem tame. Though it’s somewhat gratifying to watch her punish terrible people, it gets dangerous quite quickly, and soon all of Jumadeung knows about Ryeon going off the wall, and there’s an order for her arrest.

A sudden villain appears from hell — DIRECTOR HA (whoa I didn’t even recognize Park Hoon for a second) — a Mephistopheles-type character that feels like he flew out of Faust with his glamor and trickery. He’s determined to bring Ryeon back to hell. The drama kicks into full gear here, with the soundtrack and the speed of the plot kicking up, and the tension at an all-time high.

The Jade Emperor is (seemingly) furious over Ryeon’s behavior, and transfers Ryong-koo back to Sales, and Jun-woong back to the dreaded Editing team. Will they take this sitting down, behind a desk? Nope. The boys act like they’re going along with it, but there’s a plan in place to saved Ryeon.

Here, Jun-woong’s knowledge of Ryeon and Joong-gil’s past is what brings everything full circle, and to the climax of our entire drama. He confronts Joong-gil, saying he’s the only one who can help Ryeon, and challenges him with The Question that changes everything: do you even know why you hate those who commit suicide so much?

That question sends our very smart Joong-gil back into his own past, for he knows there’s a lot buried there, and he has to uncover it. So he goes rogue on his own, and uses the Sales Team’s dream device to visit his own past (which, since repressed, comes out via dreams and nightmares — or at least that’s how it made sense to me). Regardless, poor Joong-gil gets the 10-second replay of the story we just witnessed in Episode 14, and just like that, he knows everything worth knowing. *Sob*

There’s a bunch of action next, as both the Ryeon and Choi-hui storylines escalate. Joong-gil steps (or is that snaps) in to buy time for Ryeon as Director Ha approaches her to take her back to hell. Joong-gil takes all the punches like the hero that he is (squeeeeee), while Ryeon is able to have her moment with her beloved friend.

Much like all the other healing moments we’ve seen in the drama thus far, Ryeon is able to give Choi-hui hope, and, more importantly, is able to protect her with her own life — thus repaying what Choi-hui did for her a lifetime ago.

While our reaper team cheers on Choi-hui (and Ryeon continues to intuit a future love connection between Choi-hui and Jun-woong, which is cute but a bit rando), her mess is dealt with, everyone is taught a lesson that needs one, and our adorable idol enters the green zone.

Later, Ryeon muses if Choi-hui was the person she was destined to save. But of course it becomes clear to her — and to us — that the person that needed saving was Ryeon herself. And, much like the wider message of the drama, we see Ryeon had to come to peace with her own past, pains, and choices, like all of the survivors we have learned about thus far.

One of the peak sequences of the finale episode is the strange Jumadeung power struggle that quickly plays out. The Jade Emperor — sniffing out a takeover — is able to outsmart the treachery of Director Ha by using all these little pieces of the puzzle, and having them come together perfectly. It takes a deity indeed to have all that prescience.

The way the plot played out here was quite fun (and I secretly wish, again, that we spent more time in Jumadeung and less with the case of the week), but the end result is that Joong-gil takes on the “punishment” that was intended for Ryeon. The Jade Emperor skews it so that it looked like he was trying to destroy the RM Team, but really, we all know that evil is currently being outsmarted, and in its place we have redemption for Ryeon and Joong-gil.

Joong-gil is imprisoned and demoted for a month, and during that time, Ryeon goes to see him. Sure the thread of fate between them is long broken — and they both know it now — but there’s still a connection between them.

Joong-gil now understands not only Ryeon’s actions in the past, but understands why the RM team is so important, and why it’s Ryeon’s heart to save people from her very own fate. No one can argue with that, especially Joong-gil, who’s experienced the agony first hand, for lifetimes. When he called her “Ryeon-ah” my heart almost burst. This scene between them is so sad and wonderful. No words.

Thankfully, we close on a slightly lighter note. The RM team is saved, as is the Jade Emperor’s dominion in Jumadeung, and Ryeon has some requests: make their team permanent, upgrade their office, make Ryong-koo a manager, and give her more team members. Because she’s losing one…

Everyone recognizes the extraordinary effort Jun-woong has put in, so the Jade Emperor releases him back to the Land of the Living — all without any pomp and circumstance.

Jun-woong wakes from his coma, returns to his life, gets the corporate job he once dreamed of, and we even have hints that his fate just might be connected to Choi-hui after all (he keeps winning tickets to her concerts).

Jun-woong doesn’t remember a thing, which is a little sad, but certainly as it ought to be. However, old habits die hard — and Jun-woong’s loving heart is ever the same. As the drama ends, we see him reaching out to a miserable and lonely coworker, befriending him, and essentially saving his life. Ryeon, Ryong-koo — and Joong-gil! — look on proudly. Jun-woong might have no clue who they are, but they’re looking forward to working with him again in 50 years after he’s lived out his natural life.

And that’s it, folks! I found it a satisfying ending that hit all the points I wanted, based on what the drama was willing to give us. Of course, if I had my druthers, I would have switched up the drama to maybe only 40% cases and the rest all the potential in the Jumadeung and past storylines, but viewers can’t be writers, and instead I’ll happily take the heartfelt moments of this drama and smile back on it fondly.

 
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*sigh*

A week ago I was thinking about writing a very long ranty essay covering everything wrong, bad and/or frustrating with this show, especially that which I didn't cover in my Episode 7+8 weecap comment, which half of you on here would've appreciated, and the other half of you very much would not have appreciated.

Except I think I'm getting sick again and my energy levels are at 0 so I no longer feel like doing that.
In fact, I didn't even watch the finale episode because I didn't feel like being mad at this show all day. Which would've happened. Investment in the reason I was continuing this dropped to zero overnight.
A sort of blessing in disguise because I should've dropped this show 13 episodes ago and just watched a (hopefully inevitably coming soon) YT compilation of Joon Gil and Ryeon's full scenes and story when it was all over.

Er, fellow Crackshippees let me know if ANY part of the last EP was worth it, I guess. I doubt it, at least to my standards, but yaknow.

Oh well. I'm glad it's over.

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The last two episodes were so good which is the reason people were wishing the story had focused more on Jumadeung. The visit by Director of Hell took the excitement up a notch and the background score when Jade Emperor owned the Director of Hell was crackling, not to mention Lee Soo Hyuk scenes which were impeccable! The fashion designer for this drama is going places, especially for putting Joong Gil in a vest and making him look cool when he was being punished😂😂😂

So yeah, just watch the scenes with LSH, so you won't miss out on the heaven we had witnessed.

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I didn't enjoy 15 at all so uh... can't quite connect with the sentiment of the first paragraph.

I have got the notion that I should just watch it for LSH, like every other episode, but I can't quite bring myself to do even that- I have difficulty turning off the part of my brain that analyses storytelling, despite LSH in a vest.

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Then this drama is a lost cause for you. Better not see the finale because the acknowledgement of the past connection with Koo Ryeon by Joong Gil was pretty lame.

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Yeah that's what I thought hehehehe thx 😅

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Truthfully like someone said, with everything we are annoyed ar the one thing we can say is "thank you for LHS in the vest"

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@sicarius You summed up that feeling of acceptance that a choice has to be made because you know the drama is not going to redeem itself and become the drama it would have been if you were writing it.

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I can’t believe I watched all 16 episodes for that lame ending between the leads

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It was ok until koo ryeon and joong gil talk (?) ( that scene where joong gil sexily on his knees XD) and then it went downhill and pick up a bit at the end. I was expecting more (too much?) of joongryeon arc but it didnt happened so....

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While I did enjoy this episode there were some things that I didn't like. I would've liked to have seen Joong-gil's reactions as he relieved his memories and not the rapid flashbacks we were given from a previous episode. Also, his interactions with Ryeon were a little underwhelming, especially given his realization of who she had been to him in his previous life. Also, what was his life like after Ryeon's passing? Did he every remarry? Did he have children? I just wish that the writers would've given us a bit more. I am happy that Jun-woong finally landed a good job and that he is thriving. He is still caring and continues to look out for others. It makes me wonder if he will become a reaper and join the Risk Management Team once again.

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Anticlimatic is the word I would use for KR and PJG's confrontation. At least they are on better terms at the end.

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Finally the journey is over. I'm quite satisfying with this finale although I need more episodes with grim reapers trio. Yess, we need more Jumadeung backstory because I found the company is fun with their ability and their job desc, but I'm not complaining because all the cast worked so good include the cameos every week.

Joong Gil - Ryeon love story still tragic for me but their fate cannot be fixed. At least Go Ryeon finally can hear the words that she want to hear from 'her husband'. Hopefully she truly healed from her regrets, and of course she can works happily with Ryung Gu and Joong Gil.

Junwoong! Like you said Missvictrix, he can't remember anything related to Jumadeung but the old habits and his warm heart still there. He still used his usual way when he interviewed and thank god the Jade Emperor promised him he will get a job no matter what. I'm happy at least he will be with Cho Hui someday and I'm not expecting that either before.

Tomorrow maybe not perfect drama but his story and some famous line will be linger in my heart for a long time, although I'm not ready to rewatch in near future because I'm tired of cry every week *sobss

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Lee Soo Hyuk in a vest.

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Yes exactly.

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I thought I was the only one this nearly killed ^^

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with that lighting too, chefs kiss

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🥰

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The show would’ve been a hundred times better if it were mostly about Jumadeung politics/world-building and Ryeon and Joong-gil’s past, but as @missvictrix puts it so well, viewers are not writers. More woe for that as this viewer would’ve added many more hours of Lee Soo-hyuk. Such a shame he was so relegated when he was basically my number one draw to this show. Overall, this was a very mixed bag. Too many procedural, case-of-the-week stuff that were often not handled with the care and nuance it needed; not enough of the good stuff (i.e. the fantasy elements, past live angst). I’ll remember this for the beautiful angst of Ryeon and Joong-gil that was criminally underused and not much less.

The drip was immaculate though. Giving credit where credit is due.

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Now, there *is* one way I would forgive Tomorrow for its wasted potential. If a casting director watches this mess and sees how Lee Soo-hyuk was clearly the best part. Then channels that understanding into giving him the leading man role he so deserves. Please, drama gods, give me this one thing. I want nothing else.

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Lets manifest a leading role for Lee Soohyuk into existence.

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Well, we differ on the best part. The closeups of Ryeon carried the drama for me. :)
But, seriously, you are exactly right that the world building could have made this a much better show, especially with the concept of the afterworld as a corporation. Only at the end was anything done with that at all, and even then the whole issue of cold bureaucracy vs. compassionate care was kind of glossed over.

Another aspect of the fantasy world that was promised and not delivered (and is relevant to the Joong-Gil issue) One of the unique aspects of this fantasy was representing Grim Reapers as extraordinarily stylish, fashion-forward, and stunningly attractive, yet with the exception of Ryeon, this visual aspect of the show, featured in the opening of every episode, too often went by the wayside.

From the perspective of this heterosexual male, Rowoon is as good looking as Lee Soo-hyuk, but his handsomeness was seriously neglected throughout the series, since most of the time the show wanted to portray him as a good hearted doofus, and therefore put him in sweatshirts.
I would not normally focus on this issue, except that it again was a great concept that just wasn't realized very often in the show.

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@hacja "One of the unique aspects of this fantasy was representing Grim Reapers as extraordinarily stylish"
One of my coworkers who also watched the show brought up the same point.

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No, you’re absolutely correct about Ryeon’s close-ups carrying the drama. Kim Hee-sun is a seriously good-looking woman, it’s unreal.

The afterworld as a corporation angle was not explored well at all. I think a major problem of Tomorrow is consistently introducing fascinating concepts in the world-building and then ignoring it to focus on mundane issues. Better writing could’ve incorporated both aspects equally or made the mundane stuff, well, less mundane. But this ain’t that drama. Jumadeung started out and ended as a cold bureaucracy IMO.

As for Rowoon, this bisexual woman agrees he’s just as much of a looker as Lee Soo-hyuk or Kim Hee-sun. I mean, he’s an idol irl for god’s sake and just look at how freaking tall he is. I get that he’s the audience surrogate into this fantastical setting, but come on, there’s no toning down how hot he (and the entire cast) is, even if you keep putting him in unflattering sweatshirts. So yeah, totally agreed that they should’ve gone all out with the styling for Rowoon as well. Once again, Tomorrow wastes its great potential in yet another way.

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They say when two are gathered...

So let me join you in prayers 🙏🙏

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Well. This viewer also happens to be a writer.
But. Hmmmm. lol

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If being a fanfiction writer counts, then this viewer is also a writer. Hmmm, maybe there’s room for a fix-it fic in the future?

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Tomorrow is the best example of wasted potential for me. You had an incredible, good looking cast with good rapport. You had KSH and LSH serving us sexy tragic goth looks with angsty backstory spanning over centuries and you fail to utilise it. I am glad that SKorea is trying to show suicide in a more compassionate light but the shows handling was very questionable. While some of the episodes were very heart-touching, the overall heaviness of the show made it difficult to watch. Koo Ryeon and Park Joongil's story was the best part of the show and its a shame that we only had two episodes devoted to them.

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Yes, you summed it up perfectly.

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Thought the ending was great, with Jun-woong getting a job and reaching out to this suicidal coworker before the RM team even got there and knowing that in 50 years, the team would be reunited.

Ryeon's rampage was reminiscent of Joong-gil rampage. It was satisfying to see her take down the cyberbullies.

Before this week's episodes, I had wanted Ryeon and Joong-gil to reunite romantically, but I was okay that they didn't and that they were both healed by a mutual understanding. And they're both different people now. Joong-gil's current incarnation seems to be more inflexible and less empathetic. By the way, the whole going into his dream to get a cliff notes version of what happened in his past life was sort of weird since it took all of a minute and had little impact.

Overall, the drama was rollercoaster ride. There were some really bad episodes/cases and the writing and messaging were sometimes too clunky and even problematic. And there was too little Lee Soo Hyuk. However, it had a strong cast and guest stars. The last couple weeks' episodes were well done, and I like how they were all linked.

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I definitely wanted more from this series although I knew I wouldn't get it, the conclusion of Ryeon and Joong-gil's story was barely a line like seriously.
But I'm glad to have watch it, it reintroduced me to Lee Soo Hyuk (I watched Lucky Romance but no recollection of seeing him).

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Due to the short sightedness of the director and the writer, even with a good source material in the hand, the drama failed reach its full potential. It is only due to the acting of the main cast, including the supporting actors for case-of-the-week, this drama worked because after the initial setup the narration and execution sucked. Rather than emotionally manipulating the viewers sympathy, the drama should have focused on incorporating the viewers feedback and fleshed the characters of the grim reapers a little earlier than the rushed last episode ending. Overall I would still recommend this drama (anyone who is not currently undergoing a traumatic experience) and give it a 7/10 for sending across the message that words have the power to both destory and heal.

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Ahhh that's so true about it feeling like it was longer because of the emotional weight and all the different storylines! I think ultimately this show is going to end up in the bittersweet pile for me - it had so much potential that just wasn't fully explored. The cast was great (though I wish Rowoon and LSH had more screen time) and it had a solid premise with the OST and cinematography to match. The let down for me was the balance between the ‘case of the week’ plot and the overarching reaper/Jumadeung plot line. Specifically, the way that RY and JG’s story was wrapped up - whilst I can appreciate the decision to not have them get together again in line with the severed threads theme, I just wish we’d been given more time to see JG regain his memories of the past and see the two of them properly get closure from one another. After the emotional punch of episode 14, it felt like that was just a footnote in the finale and that had me in a little bit of a tailspin.

BUT as you so aptly put it @missvictrix we’re viewers not writers so my personal gripes aside, it was an enjoyable ride still and I appreciate the themes and topics it did bring to light. Even if the way it did so sometimes left a lot to be desired, it prompted a lot of discussions and opened up spaces for people to learn, relate and find comfort. Plus it was fun to watch with everyone and read your funny & insightful commentary along the way ❤️

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"The let down for me was the balance between the ‘case of the week’ plot and the overarching reaper/Jumadeung plot line... "

Same same, you echo my thoughts here. It would have made a huge difference if they had found the perfect balance

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Thank you for the recaps @missvictrix

I guess this is as happy an ending as we'll get.

My thoughts have mostly been echoed in the comments and recap so I'll just be sitting in the corner and waiting for news of Lee Soo-Hyuk being cast as an ACTUAL male lead in a drama.

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Lee Soo-hyuk really gave a terrific performance and at this stage of his career if he needed to ‘audition’ well he aced it here.
Before this I had seen three of his dramas (in order of viewing):
WHITE CHRISTMAS, NEIGHBORHOOD HERO and TREE WITH DEEP ROOTS. He was very good in all of them. Why he has not really attained ML status by now is a mystery. Show biz is strange.

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This was only the second drama of his I watched after Doom at your service. Everyone has been talking about White Christmas so I'll try to watch that too

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I really loved this drama. It wasn't the usual drama, the leads were not the focus but the message it adressed. This drama focused more how the people ended in this position than the healing part too. I found interesting because we could see how every person can play a role : pure villainism, indifference, forgetting, judgment, selfishness, etc.

I liked the After World, how it reflects the World of the livings, its rules, their different possibilities (visit dreams, get back in the past,etc.), how it looks, the staff uniform. The Emperor of Jade was a great character, they gave her a good balance between the prescience and the heart (the one in Doom was so weird). I liked how the past lifes can still influence the new one, it's why it's important to stop suicide too.

If the characters weren't the main story, they had their arc too. Everyone was connected to suicide and its consequences in their life. Koo Ryeon and Joong-Gil are definitely separated but at least, they could find peace and will be able to be reincarnated in a future and get a good life, without their past wounds haunting them. I liked the fact they didn't reunited them, they had to pay the consequences of their act, but it doesn't mean misfortune anymore. Their story was beautiful and very tragic but meaningful with them using it to help people.

Ryung-Gu could apologize to his mother and doesn't have to search her anymore. His situation made him able to help Ryeong.

Jun-Woong was the heart of the team. He gave love (and big hugs) to everybody who needed without any restriction. I'm sad they made him forgetting everything. Because it was important for him to remember like for the comfort women victims, the veteran... They could at least give him a more meaningful job. He dreamt to get in a big compagny but it was before everything.

I have pretty much cried at every episode, but the 6th was cleary the most touching for me. I think I will rewatch it (after being well hydrated).

I liked the actors. It was a good ensemble when every of them could play a role. I woud like Kim Hee-Sun to keep this haircut, it was weird to see her with brown and long hair, I was so used to see her with her short and pink hair, it looked very natural on her. I wouldn't mind a full episode of Lee Soo-Hyuk in his special event uniform. The actors for each episode were great too, they really brought a lot to their story.

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Nice analysis @kurama.
Episode 6 (the veteran) and 10 (the twins) were probably the most emotionally draining of the story if the week.
Yoon Ji-on’s episodes (Ryeon-koo’s back story) we’re excellent. Like many I wish we had spent more time in Joseon.
It is unfortunate that the ratings were so poor in South Korea but given the subject matter TOMORROW away always going to be a tough sell.
So if and when Jun-woong meets Choi-hui (and they become a couple) will Choi-hui still know his Jumadeung experience and never reveal that to him?

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Maybe she got her memories wiped off too?

Tomorrow is doing better on Netflix. I think it's easier to watch when you get ready for it.

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She's not going to know it's him, he looked differently to her when he was a reaper.

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Maybe I have forgotten already but wasn’t his looks changed for only those who knew him?

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Nope,it was for general humans,when he went to report that guy who provided assisted death the policeman saw him as the old man...Now,don't know if they reveal their real faces to the people directly involved saving or after their presence is totally errased,don't think it was ever mentioned...

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This show could have been so much more if it gave equal attention to weekly cases and grim reapers. While final episode wrapped up every plot, it felt very underwhelming, especially KR-PJG's story. If I am being honest their story line was what kept me coming back because the case-of-the-week were difficult to watch. I would get excited, thinking we will get more of their scene, but instead had to go through 55 mins of heart-breaking traumatic stuff for mere 3-5 mins of scenes. So for me, the confrontation between KR and PJG during his punishment felt unfinished after the whole build up. I wasn't expecting them to reincarnate together but I wished we got a more detailed scene about their new dynamic at Jumadeung. It feels like the show runners failed to make use of such amazing chemistry between KSH and LSH. I came to know at halfway point of the show that KSH doesn't do much skinship since she got married. Do you guys think it may be one of the reasons why their love line wasn't the focus?

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This show is not a romance and their relationship was never the focus on the story. Koo Ryeon needed to save herself. Both characters are not big talkers, so I think the final confrontation corresponded to both of them who knew that it was the conclusion. In the manhwa, they don't share a commun story. It was added for the drama.

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I know it was not a romance but I wish it was. Well, I guess different strokes for different people.

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And that's a wrap!

Reason I picked the show was because for once it was available on Netflix in my region with a single week delay, so not too bad; also it looked pretty cool and different from the start.
I loved the cast, the music, the premise and world building were quite interesting.

Sometimes there was an imbalance between case of the week and the overarching stories of the main characters, so that's something that could have been improved.

As it's been said by many before, they didn't always do the best of jobs dealing with many sensitive topics, but overall it was fine for me.

I liked some episodes more than others, preferring ones where the RM team had a more personal involvement in the case of the week story.

And this is a very unpopular opinion, but I personally found the way they dealt with Ryeon and Joong-gil story to be just fine, I didn't feel the need to see more of them, but I get why people would be disappointed in that aspect.
I never really expected much from the show in the first place, so that might be why I'm ok with what we got.

In the end I had a good time, I do not regret watching it!

P.S. now, the actual thing that's been bugging me for a while:
- Did Kim Hee-sun wear a pink wig, or used a black wig? Or did she film every scene were she had long black hair in advance, then cut her hair and dyed them pink?!
I really really want to know lol!! xD

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She really dyed her hair every 4 days to keep her pink hair

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Ha, I see!! They indeed looked real!!
Thanks for sharing! ^^

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I am wondering @missvictrix if you might expand farther what you mean by "Viewers Can't Be Writers."
🤔🤔🤔

For me anyway at least, (aware not everyone is like this), literally all I do is analyse kdramas from the perspective of Writing.
In fact, the predominant lense through which I view them at all, is that of Writing and Storytelling.
In large part because I am a writer myself.

So I'm just curious about your point here.
I feel I may be missing it, 😅 but I am not sure.

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It was a pun on "beggars can't be choosers" -- basically, that in dramaland we are often at the mercy of writing choices we wouldn't make ourselves, if we were writing and not merely viewing

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I waited till the end hoping for a good closure for Ryeon and Jung-gil coz been shipping them starting from the beginning of the show. Seeing Jung-gil shows up before the ending is confusing too; so he's okay knowing his history with Ryeon? Now are they friends, or just colleagues, or on the path to lovers again? Confusing but thank you for "LSH in a vest." 😂

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I think they're just friends/colleagues now. My thought is that Jung-gil had been reincarnated twice since meeting Ryeon. When he entered the Jumadeung, he was different person even thought he had the same face. Ryeon was shaken at first, but for hundreds of years, she was able to be his employee and later, his adversary without feeling like he was her love, Joong-gil. I guess I think of them as one of those divorced couples that are still friends and still care about each other, but aren't in love anymore and don't want to be married to each other anymore. I thought I would be upset that they're not a couple at the end, but I liked how it ended with them resolving their past hurt and him not being an obstacle to the RM team.

I also don't think he got all his feelings and memories back when he went into the dream so much as he got a really immersive movie experience. I wish they had gone into detail with that instead of that buildup to having him lie down to go into his dream....only to flash those past scenes for a minute.

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Thank you, I like it when you describe them like a friendly divorced couple bcoz its easier to understand.

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@ryunami I feel the same. I really wanted them to become lovers once more. But I also realize that they are no longer the same individuals. I am happy that Joong-gil is no longer actively trying to sabotage Ryeon and her team :)

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They had good closure.

We knew since the beginning they won't be a couple anymore, she cut their red string by commiting suicide. Even the Emperor of Jade can't change this fact.

When Joon-Gil reincarnated he wasn't happy because the wound was too painful for him, now he will be able to reincarnate and be happy. He finally accepted that the role of the Risk Management Team is important too and won't stop them anymore. He won't be so angry everytime too. He was pretty cruel with the mother who hoped to see her son.

It's the same for Ryeon.

They're colleague, it was clearly the first time they saw each other since he was released from his punishment.

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I have a lot to complain and I have to add, they did not even try to address mental health aspect to a person taking their lives and till the last episode I have been disappointed by that. That aside, it was a good drama, some incredible epidodes here and there addressing Korean war, comfort women, loss of child etc. I understand the ending but I am not 100 percent satisfied. I wanted a good and more packed with intensity reunion between Joon Gil and Koo Ryeon. I understand Joon Gil having two more lifetimes as a human and Koo Ryeon having spent years around him dampened the blow but I really, really wish writers had done these two characters justice there. Its a wasted opportunity to not recognize the strength of chemistry the actors bring and fleshing it out here once its evident. Jumadang power struggle would have been interesting too but they didn't even try. The Director Ha made a grand entry and I wanted to know more. Anyway not a bad overall experience. Yes, I agree this show felt like it went on and on, due to its theme being so heavy handed. I hope to see Lee Soo Hyuk get his due by getting a good lead role next in a well written drama. I hope he can reunite with Kim Hee Sun, I'd love to see this pair as a proper couple in a drama again.

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Agree with the majority here - strong idea that needed to be executed differently. I was far more invested in Ryeon and Joong-gil than most of the individual stories, and found the wait to get to the bottom of their story excruciating.

Wanted to give a shout out to LSH for his acting when he emerged from the dream - extraordinary. So understated and completely in character; so profound - no shred of doubt that he was shattered by it. Going up there as one of the best examples of facial acting - maybe we should make facial acting the topic of one of our Drama Chats...

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At the start, judging by the Netflix photo, I had no idea what 'Tomorrow' was about. Horror...fantasy? But when I realized it would be a procedural (my least favourite genre) of 'suicide preventions' I was going to drop it, but not so easy by then, because I was being pulled into those finely layered stories of why ordinary people are pushed & pulled towards ending their life. Very compelling. Yes, I liked the "Afterlife Corporation" and the Rescue Team formed to save them, and of course who wouldn't like a romance, but I didn't stay for that because I was taken in by the people and how they slowly lose their grip tin society enough to want to let go. And their problems mirrored ours too, but then the writers also showed how their korean history way back then, reflects ones we still have now and are working to heal in our generation. The first episodes seem to tell the personal stories of suicide, how an individual can come to their knees because of a loss, whether it's a parent, a wife, and her child...or the loss of dignity and self-respect when bullied, scammed, or even forgotten about, like the War Veteran who gave his all for his country, but never got much thanks. Then there's stories about youth, when psyches are more vulnerable to being crushed because they were bullied hashly for being poor or different...or they were teased by peers for being too fat or too skinny. And those very intinmate stories of guilt in the loss of a baby or wife...and horrifically we are shown even more loss and violence in a personal story of rape, where the victim is victimized by society.
Finally, after our skillful writers enlarged the lens and made the personal story of rape even larger and more tragic by showing us how women in two generations of Korean history were raped in groups first by the Barbarians of the Joseon Era who stole them for disposable slaves, and finally we see this travesty repeated again during World War, when the Japanese occupied Korea and sent 'Comfort Women" to the front to serve as sex-slaves for Japanese soldiers.
I can see where many commenters would bristle because our Rescue team only seemed equipped to stop them from suicide and writers didn't follow their healing, but I do think that the writers had a lot of ground to cover in digging into the many many causes leading to suicide. Healing is such a long journey as we've seen in the long saga of Korea's "Comfort Women" who finally received an apology from the Japanese Prime Minister. But @two years ago, koreans discussing it in the media felt it wasn't heartfelt or enough. To study the healing side of this type of trauma would have taken another series. I was just simply awed by how many tragic events and wounded people they actually managed to dig into because there was a lot of information in this drama that could maybe help some people understand and empathize with those who do try to commit suicide. I thought the script was well-done,...

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I find a lot of comments very superficial. The writers were trying to bring real social commentary to the fore through a fantasy genre. This wasn't about the politics of Jumadeung. It wasn't about a love story. It was about the alarmingly high suicide rate and the societal causes behind that rate and the fact that some societal causes that continue to exist today existed centuries ago. We may consider ourselves to be 'more advanced,' but the same issues that drove people to take their own lives over the centuries are still there. The lack of tolerance, the bullying, the blaming the victim mentality, the people who have nothing better to do than criticize those in the public eye, the lack of acceptance of people who are different, the dehumanization of the poor, the hurt, the weak and, to some degree, women, by those with power, money, connections and anonymity. It has been made worse by these things sitting, to some degree, in the hands of everyone.
Television is not just about entertainment. If used thoughtfully and carefully it can be a reflection of the world in which we live. These conversations remind me of comments in a similar vein around "Jealousy Incarnate" known as "Don't Dare to Dream" on Netflix which I personally think is a much better title. The fluff in that series was a love triangle, only after Hwa-shin realizes he has feelings for Na-ri when Jung-won takes an interest in her. That was the fluff, and it was fun fluff. The series was about the prejudiced attitudes that exist in society, particularly in the workplace around certain illnesses. The writers took the path of male breast cancer to point out, not only men how are treated but primarily how women are treated. When everyone thought it was Na-ri that hold breast cancer, there was talk about not extending her contract. This is something women face regularly and is totally considered acceptable (NOT). So the writers made the cancer patient a man so that it would hopefully make people think about societal and workplace attitudes. BUT NO, all anyone wanted to talk about was the fluff.
I feel sorry for the writers who spend their lives trying to bring viewers' attention to important issues only to have the entire commentary and focus be on the fluff that the stories hang on. Another example is in "Business Proposal" when the two lead women find out they have been secretly filmed by a hidden camera and when they go to the police they are told "He'll probably just get fined... But that is what the law currently says." I remember reading articles about digital sex crimes in South Korea, so I was pleased to see this little side story and the fact that the second lead woman was now terrified to use public toilets. The biggest disappointment was it got 'dealt' with so quickly.
Yes, I am having a rant here. I really enjoy watching many K-dramas; I like the fluff. But what makes fluff more interesting than an old fashion Mills and Boon's novel is the stories...

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