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Jinxed at First: Episodes 3-4

Our heroine starts acclimating to the real world, reveling in her newfound freedom. And as she does, our hero finds his bad luck beginning to work in reverse.

 
EPISODES 3-4 WEECAP

We pick back up in the alleyway where a gang of thugs have cornered Su-kwang and Seul-bi. Seul-bi isn’t worried, though. Instructing Su-kwang to throw a brick on her signal, she reaches for each thug’s hand in turn to catch a glimpse of their immediate futures.

As we saw with her mother during the big escape, Seul-bi’s powers seem to extend beyond just seeing the future, allowing her suggestions to sway their thoughts. For example, the simple phrase “gas fire” makes the gang’s leader whip out his phone and call his mother in fear, seemingly already knowing he’s about to learn their house is fire.

While they’re all distracted, Seul-bi signals Su-kwang. He hurls the brick, which smashes onto the window of an unmarked police car that happens to be passing by. And, as luck would have it, the cops recognize the thugs and arrest them.

Seul-bi and Su-kwang accompany the police to the station to give their statements, but of course the police can’t find anything on Seul-bi in their system (she claims she was living abroad this whole time and lost all her memories prior to showing up at Su-kwang’s fish shop).

With the only places for her to stay being a homeless shelter or Su-kwang’s apartment, back to the apartment they go, for now. But Su-kwang has one more thread to pull on to try and find her family: Chairman Sun’s hotel.

He has the bright idea to walk right up to the front desk and ask if any young, female guests have gone missing, which of course gets him pointed out to the security team who are searching for any sign of Seul-bi. As they chase him through the hotel, he runs smack into Min-joon, who lets him out a back exit and directs the guards elsewhere.

It’s pretty clear at this point that Seul-bi isn’t telling him everything, and Su-kwang finally wheedles out of her that she ran away. He figures she must be a spoiled chaebol who’s been waited on hand and foot her whole life, but something about the way she tearfully pleads with him not to send her back gives him pause.

Agreeing to let her stay with him for the time being, he sets about teaching her how to do basic cooking and cleaning tasks. Except, he really just gives her a crash course on all the appliances in the apartment, and then wakes up to literally everything turned on, food burning, and a flooded laundry room.

Despite her general ineptitude, though, Seul-bi wants to help him out, promising to turn his bad luck into good. And though it takes a bit of time to set in motion, she appears to do just that.

First, she keeps her promise to the loan shark by giving him the information he’ll need to “coincidentally” meet a specialist who can treat his son’s eye cancer. In return, he agrees to write off Su-kwang’s overdue interest.

Then, when the shouty ahjumma who owns another nearby fish shop picks a fight, Seul-bi earns her friendship by helping her stop her husband from dragging a whole group of shop owners into a crypto scam.

Suddenly, Su-kwang is the center of positive attentive from all the other shop owners. And somewhere along the way, everyone – including Su-kwang, on occasion – has taken to referring to Seul-bi as his girlfriend.

Meanwhile, Seul-bi’s mother is either putting on a desperate act, or she’s severely declining mentally and emotionally. At times she acts just as childlike as Seul-bi herself; at other times, she breaks down in tears, begging Chairman Sun not to look for Seul-bi.

We also learn who Seul-bi’s father is, and thank goodness it’s not Chairman Sun. Rather, it’s a man who once helped Seul-bi’s mother escape, during which time Seul-bi was conceived. Presumably, they were caught, and he’s spent the last 20 years in prison.

Perhaps Chairman Sun once loved Seul-bi’s mother, or perhaps he just always saw her as belonging to him, but either way, he’s now haunted by nightmares about her. As he should be.

And that brings me to Min-joon, who remains easily the most interesting character. After the encounter at the hotel, he seeks Su-kwang out again. Su-kwang, understandably, has no desire to talk to him, believing Min-joon had deliberately refused to help when he lost everything. Min-joon tries to explain that he was locked in his room, but Su-kwang isn’t interested in hearing him out.

Neither Min-joon nor Seul-bi lets on to Su-kwang that they know each other, but they do speak privately long enough for Min-joon to assure her he’ll do his best to keep his father from finding and hurting Su-kwang, asking in return that she “come home” soon. I’m still worried he’ll turn possessive eventually, but at least for now, he seems to want her to return of her own volition instead of being forced.

Still, Seul-bi doesn’t actually make any promises to him, and when Su-kwang later asks her to go back to his apartment instead of hanging around the market, she brightly but firmly says she’ll go where she pleases, thank you very much.

Another thing we learn this week is that Min-joon is engaged. But his fiancée has been studying abroad, and as soon as she’s back, he calls it off. He doesn’t think it would be fair to lie to her about Seul-bi, and he’s definitely not going to just keep Seul-bi secret and locked away the whole rest of her life. He doesn’t explicitly say it, but it’s not hard to guess that what he really wants is to marry Seul-bi.

The fiancée doesn’t seem too surprised at his request to break up, saying breezily that this frees up more time for her to focus on writing. She lays out two conditions: they keep the breakup a secret for now, and she gets to interview him as character inspiration for her novel. By the look on her face, though, I’m guessing she was hoping that would be too steep a demand and he’d go through with the wedding after all.

As she leaves, she spots Su-kwang on a delivery. And yikes – the way the news that he’s alive immediately spreads through their chaebol friend group makes me wonder how Chairman Sun’s men haven’t managed to find him or Seul-bi yet.

Blissfully unaware that Su-kwang’s cover is all but compromised, Su-kwang and Seul-bi are in the early stages of a quickly blooming romance, replete with bike rides, piggyback shenanigans, and a drunken kiss that Seul-bi may or may not remember planting on Su-kwang – but that Su-kwang cannot stop thinking about with a giddy grin.

The kiss triggers a vision that involves going to Busan, so when the opportunity arises to deliver a puppy to her owner there, Su-kwang parrots what Seul-bi said during her vision, volunteering to make the delivery almost before he realizes what he’s saying. Time for a road trip!

 
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I can't quite make up my mind about this show. Seul-bi's bright but clueless behavior is on a fine line between cute and annoying. Su-kwang has mostly been shown as kind and upright, but helpless. I'd like to see him grow a bit and take charge, not just enjoy his newfound good luck. Min-joon really is the most interesting character. It makes me wonder who his mother was, that he turned out so differently from his father and isn't afraid to stand up to him. But every time the father is on screen or the secret apartment where the mom is imprisoned or the cruel attendant -- then I want to either fast forward or turn it off.

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I have been so traumatised by kdramas that I genuinely had my heart in my throat anticipating a Truck of Doom to materialise when they were all smiles and sunshine on the road to Busan 😮‍💨

YAY for Rich Dude Jr turning out to not be evil, looks like the apple can fall further away than you think from the tree (so far). As for the cousin taking up the spot of resident 'Young, Entitled, Evil Chaebol Son' - that I didn’t see coming but going back it makes sense given his characterisation from the start. It’s actually quite interesting introducing the uncle+cousin duo into this mess because now Evil Dad is fighting a war on two fronts and there’s more reason for Rich Dude Jr to stay a nice guy (or is there? he’s got a soft spot for family clearly). So far though he (Rich Dude Jr) has honestly been pretty respectable, until I remember that his idea of leniency was just promising Seulbi that she can one day experience freedom.That said he’s been sticking up for her to not be viewed as an object still and pointing out that Evil Dad was straight up committing a crime so there’s that (the bar is low folks). Objectively though it is also nice to have a character who doesn’t fall neatly into the good or bad category and instead keeps you guessing - literally every time he’s on screen, I’m split between thinking he’s going to do the ‘right’ thing and thinking he’s going to suddenly fall to the dark side.

As for our leads, I know Seulbi’s childlikeness can be weird/off putting to some and though it took me a while to acclimatise initially, I get the vibe that while she is naive about the ways of the world mostly, she also uses her bright eyed and hyper persona as a front to hide her actual feelings and thoughts sometimes too - which you can see glimpses of when she’s thinking deep about something, or even when she chooses to lie and keep certain information hidden from others. Sukwang is so adorkable, I’m glad we didn’t get like 10 episodes where he’s in denial about his feelings and continually thinks of SB as a pest - his protesting about her latching on to him or repeatedly telling him she like him didn’t even last past a day or something 😂

My only gripe is with the audio - every time someone got a bit loud/yells/screams, the audio sounded really screechy and blown out. Not sure if this is a me problem but I had the same issue on my phone as well though.

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I like the Shopping King Louis vibe when they’re running around together, and Na In Woo is pretty cute when he says things unintentionally and then kind of gives up (the Su Kwang name mixup, the Busan repetition).

I don’t even know where to go with the idea that Chairman was friends with Mom (seemingly) when she was imprisoned by his father. Or that she managed to escape long enough to get pregnant. Or that he imprisoned Seul Bi’s father and locked them both up again. That pattern looks like it’ll repeat, and I am not a fan.

I don’t know what’s up with Nurse Ratched, but mom is locked up with a woman who tortures her. By a man who imprisoned her lover so he could have exclusive use of her. And he is grooming her daughter for his son. This show is hard to watch, in part, and I really wish about half of the show wasn’t in it.

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@mistyisles Thanks for the wee cap.

I found these two episodes really hard to watch as it was confusing trying to make sense of the different elements of the chairman’s character and contrasting this with his brother and nephew’s increasing evil side just raised too many questions.

What’s with Ms Kim and her one woman crusade to have the upper hand like she has been personally effected by Misoo?

The introduction and ending of the engagement felt like it was just to get us wondering if Minjoon actually loves Seulbi and will become a bitter second lead in his disappointment if he is unable to show her he wants her back as an equal rather than an object of fortune.

Seeing Seulbi’s mum also being bright and bubbly when she was in the world and her explanation that the misfortunes are taken on by them every time they touch someone made sense as the behaviour can be seen as their natural brightness rather than child like.

The lack of common sense that no one can learn how to use multiple appliances with just one discussion was just silly and it was too obvious this would lead to a problem. So it wasn’t funny and did not add anything to the story when it all went wrong.

Finally, towards the end of episode four we saw the rom com elements coming out. This was more what I had expected from the show and will keep me watching one more week but if it continues to be a mishmash of genres I will be walking away.

Great to see the cameo of the dog from Let’s eat 2

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This show continues to be a hot mess... but I kinda like it 🤷‍♀️
I hope Min-joon doesn't cross over to the dark side, at least not now when we already have the bad cousin.
The problematic elements are still problematic, Na In-woo is still a cutie pie, and I guess I'm still watching.

You win this time, show.

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I find Min-joon's interest in Suel-bi whole lot of off-putting and creepy. Dude, wake up. She was imprisoned her whole life by your father and she was regularly drugged as well. You are guilty by association. I don't think there would be single person on this earth who would be able to look past that. It's not a single thing, it's whole twenty years worth of torture. Your lifestyle is built on pain of Suel-bi and her mother. If you really want her happiness, just provide her with enough money and watch her from afar, (I don't believe I am sating this) be a standard second male lead .

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‘Be a standard male lead’ - the quote of the day for me☺️

It’s true how can she return? What is he offering her? Does he even know her? He can’t control his dad so even if he wanted to be with her living as a free agent he couldn’t. What kind of a dream world is he living in where their relationship is her giving him tips for world dominance and he gives her love and some freedom? What is his love based on what he gains or the unhappy childlike woman he saw in his brief encounters?

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I really want to say positive things about this drama, but both of our leads' acting is really bothering me. Na In Woo was great in Mr Queen so I don't understand what happened.

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Even though I liked the first two episodes and for now I'll continue watching it albeit with generous use of the FF button, the acting is just too shouty for me (especially Na In Woo, who I liked in Mr.Queen) and cutsy (mainly the supporting cast).

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