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Seo In-gook fans his way into Oh Yeon-seo’s heart in KBS’s Cafe Minamdang

Counting down to the premiere next week, KBS’s Cafe Minamdang has been laying out their last round of promos including colorful new posters (with some beautiful fans!) and a video teaser.

The comedy-mystery assembles an odd bunch of justice fighters, ranging from the “mystical” shaman Nam Han-joon – played by Seo In-gook (Doom at Your Service) – to the more conventional law enforcer, Detective Han Jae-hee – who is played by Oh Yeon-seo (Mad for Each Other).

Kwak Shi-yang (IDOL: The Coup)’s Gong Su-cheol joins the team as a detective with a side job as a barista at Shaman Nam’s cafe. What would the team be without a good hacker, though? That’s where Kang Mina (Moonshine) comes in. She plays Nam Hye-joon, who is also our Shaman’s younger sister.

The teaser begins with an introduction to our larger-than-life Shaman Nam, who announces his decision to open a cafe. Detective Han is skeptical about Nam’s new-found abilities, but we see business is booming and Nam is aided by his hacker sister as well as Detective/Barista Gong.

Although Detective Han vows to take our shaman down, Nam confidently asserts that it’s a win-win situation; he can help people and make money. He tries to put an end to their seeing each other ever again, but we hit our cue for a quintessential drama moment and the teaser comes to a close.

Written by Park Hye-jin (Ruler – Master of the Mask) with PD Go Jae-hyun (Will You Have Dinner With Me) at the helm, KBS’s Cafe Minamdang premieres June 27 in the Monday-Tuesday slot and will be available internationally on Netflix.

Via KBS (1), (2), Newsen (1), (2), (3)

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Kwak Shi-yang in a bowl haircut! LOL!

I'm looking forward to this! And "I'm going to run a cafe" must be a common aspiration in Seoul, considering there are so many cafes in Seoul.

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In the UK bespoke tea rooms is often about selling quaint afternoon tea and cakes but cafes in Korea seem to be on a next level with some unique concepts all over Instagram. You could tour the country visiting coffee houses and boutique guest houses.

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@bowl haircuts! Does anyone know if there is a cultural dimension to this abominable hairstyle? It can make the most stunning person turn into a boob😂.

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🤣 i completely missed that part of the previous comment scrolled back up and yes that really is a bad cut! What kind of a role calls for that visual?!

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@dncingemma: I’m from a country where these abominations against mankind are also very common, but I can’t for the life of me tell you why these are so damn popular. Culture or not (leaning on the not, personally), it should constitute as a felony, let me tell you. Ruins many a perfectly handsome face around here.

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@ladynightshade: It should be a global indictable offense (without the prison-industrial complex benefitting from the incarceration). Just incarcerated in a purple haze!

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Haha, I had this same thought (about the hair)! When I was watching IOTNBO, my partner kept looking over and saying, "Ooph, his hair is terrible" at Kim Soo-hyun. I showed him a picture of him just as his normal actor-self and he finally admitted that he looked a lot better! Is it just a cultural phenomenon? I do not get the appeal.

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I literally cannot wait to see SIG on my screen again!! Looks like it'll be a killer combination of fantasy, comedy and scooby-doo-esque hijinks.

And YAY for Netflix release, I'll make do with the subpar subtitling if it means I don't have to wait long for episodes to drop!

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Do you find Netflix subtitles subpar? In what ways? I honestly don't have anything to compare it to, but while I do notice differences the more Korean I learn, the parts that I've been able to figure out seem reasonable at least. Korean is so contextual, and I think they sometimes insert more information into the phrases so as not to confuse English-speaking audiences. I'd love to hear your perspective!

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I find their subs adequate, but I cut my teeth on fansubs which almost always kept in words like oppa, noona, etc. It's still kinda off-putting to hear "oppa" and then read the person's name, or worse, use the word "brother" when it's definitely NOT a sibling type of relationship :D

That being said, I learned years ago (thanks to Javabeans and Girlfriday's wonderful explanations) that oppa is a many-layered word and can have complex implications, so I kinda understand why Netflix sticks to a standard of using names. But I still have the urge to edit the subtitles LOL.

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NOTHING will EVER top the sheer wealth of knowledge of Korean language and culture nuances JB and GF taught us through the years.

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Oh that's totally fair. I got into learning bits of Korean in the first place because I could tell they weren't calling each other what it said in the subtitles and I wanted to know what it actually was. Addressing people is such a nuanced thing in Korean and I find it so interesting! I'm just now realizing that it's become so automatic for me to replace the actual words they're using (instead of their names) in my mind that I don't even notice it anymore!

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Yes, that practice of changing to the person's name is truly obnoxious and even inexcusable because it destroys the flavor of the statement

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I get that, and I feel pretty much the same way, but I also understand that if you are encountering a Kdrama for the first time and don't have any idea what all those words mean, it can be quite the learning curve. It's not a perfect system (or even a very good one), but I do understand why Netflix has made that decision. Plenty of English speakers are even watching with dubs, which I find totally weird and completely unappealing. I wish there was a way to select different "levels" of subtitles! There could be one for beginners (maybe the default), and another for folks who are more used to Korean terms/addressing norms that you could select in the menu. I'm better at recognizing banmal now, but at the beginning I would always wish they would color-code it or something so I could tell when someone was being familiar/rude to someone else.

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I do at times, especially compared to Viki. I find with Netflix, that there's a lot of missed nuance because of mistranslations, over simplifications (for lack of a better word) of what's being said, or like the beanies have said below, instances where things like honorifics have been taken out.

Also things like jokes involving wordplay or specific Korean are sometimes missed in the Netflix subs, whereas Viki tends to go above and beyond most times to give extra explanations to sayings/jokes involving word play/idioms etc - like they'll literally include explanations in brackets in the subs themselves.

So maybe I'm being a little bit too harsh by saying Netflix subs are 'subpar', because they still obviously get the story/mood of the drama largely across but they do seem pale a little in comparison to sites like Viki which are fan subbed - which is also kind of interesting, considering Netflix translators are paid (I'm assuming) where as Viki translators for example aren't (they get site 'perks' etc but it falls under volunteering as far as I know).

Having 'levels' of translation honestly would be so cool - I do agree that for first timers' it can be a lot to get used to (and I do find dubs weird sometimes too).

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*specific Korean idioms/phrases

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That’s very cool that Viki includes all that information. I would probably have to pause to read it all! I always assumed that Netflix had some standard practices that all their subtitlers followed, because using the given name instead of something more nuanced seems pretty universal for them. But really I have no idea. Someday I’ll get Viki and compare for myself, but until then, I hope I can rely on other beanies to fill me in on anything my poor English-speaking self missed!

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Jumping in here. I totally agree with @lapislazulii analysis concerning Viki/Netflix subtitling. Imo the volunteer subbers at Viki provide superior subtitles to the (presumably) paid Netflix subbers.
I did not understand one word of korean when I entered the world of kdramas in 2016. Because the Viki style was not to translate certain commonly used words such as hyung, oppa, noona etc I would look them up and began to quickly build up a vocabulary of words I understand. They flow naturally.
One of the elements of the Viki style that I have always liked was not to directly translate profanity but to use asterisks to make the point. Netflix on the other hand I think thrives on going the vulgar route. I have never seen to many f-bombs as in Netflix subtitles.
I was concerned that Viki was starting to go the vulgar route and I thought I detected a certain sloppiness creeping in (like doesn’t anyone proofread anymore?) but recently for example watching INSIDER where naturally there is a lot of profanity among prison inmates the profanity it not being directly translated but even with asterisks you know what is said. Overall is see an improvement in Viki back to the quality of subtitling I remember in the past.
Apologies for the rant.

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Yesss to this. Bo go ship po is one such word. Sometimes it means I miss you and sometimes it means I want to see you. Netflix subbers get that mixed up a lot. I end up translating it in my head based on context.

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They are subpar and even more when u understand what you hear and read along with their constant need to americanize(is that even a word) everything,for ex. the simple thing to type the correct name(like many might already realized they same the family name first and after their surname)...It irks me at no end this simple thing that...It is after all about SK and not America...How would people learn new stuff if they are left in their ignorance or pampered because it's easy...

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Netflix subtitles are block white lettering- which essentially disappears when laid over a white background making them unreadable at that moment.

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why does this feel as if Yang Jeong-Do is back

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I just read a book "Investigative notebooks of a necromantic handsome" by Jung Jae-Han and I am confused about the source material for the drama.
In this book the Beau Gosse is Nam Hanjun, pseudo-shaman. With a hacker sister HyeJun, and an ex-cop partner Sucheol.
But the police inspector is Ye-eun a martial expert called the ghost by her colleagues.
Is the book inspired buy the webtoon or the webtoon derived from the book ? Will the drama-shaman be as cocky and passionnated about italian clothing, the cases as ghastly as in the book ?

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The drama is based on the webtoon "Minamdang Sagun Soochub" (Minamdang- Case Note) by Jung Jae-Han and the writer keeps posting about the new updates of the drama on Insta... Maybe the writer also turned the webtoon into a book n that's what you read.

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I do not know what was first between the webtoon and the book, but the names and some characteristics are the same. So one is clearly a first try and the other the refined work.
I have good hopes for this drama, in the book it's a fun trio.

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SEO IN GOOK!!!!

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I have been waiting for this drama for so long and the teasers till now are hilarious!

I love how the character description of Seo In Guk's character matches with two of his previous roles- "Nam Han-Joon is a former criminal profiler, who now works as a fraudster." He was a profiler in I Remember You/ Hello Monster (of the heady days of that drama) and he was a con- artist in 38 Task Force. Plus Han-Joon even has a mole near his eye in the webtoon just like Seo In Guk does!!- It almost seems like the character was based on him LMAO!

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Great observation. I loved both IRY/HELLO MONSTER and SQUAD 38.
You may find it interesting, on my fan wall I have acknowledgements to both dramas.

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Aww I am a big time Seo In Guk fan as most of his dramas are really good!

I'll check out your fan wall, thanks!

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I AM READY TO BE MESMERIZED....LET'S GO!!!! 😍😍😍😍

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I’m here for pretty fans and pretty Seo In-guk. Thank god for easy Netflix access - even if it means sacrificing subtitle quality.

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You’re here for me? I’m a pretty fan! Hahaha ^^

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Jance have you be hanging around @lordcobol recently lol?

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I'm so happy this is on Netflix! I feel like lately it has been harder for me to access dramas I want to see--or Netflix is carrying some that I'm not particularly interested in--so with this and "Alchemy of Souls" I should be set for a while.

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Really wish this will be fun as Seo In Guk really rocks this type of characters...
Not even his ugly hairstyle can keep me away from this one!

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We are really looking forward to this one.

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