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Why Her?: Episodes 1-2 (First Impressions)

Yet another legal drama has dropped in dramaland, but this one focuses on a powerful female lawyer who has clawed her way to the top of a prestigious law firm. Her cutthroat approach hasn’t earned her many friends, so when an incident tarnishes her polished reputation, a lot of people are happy to see her demoted to an adjunct law professor while she repairs her public image.

EPISODES 1-2 FIRST IMPRESSIONS

I’ve watched my fair share of legal dramas recently, and even though I feel a bit burned out on the genre, I decided to watch this one for one reason, and one reason only: Hwang In-yub. Ever since he rocketed into fame following his screen-stealing role as the second lead in True Beauty, he has been on my radar as someone to watch — and crush on. While he may be the leading man in this drama, there’s nary a sign of In-yub until the last fifteen minutes of Episode 1.

Instead, the story first takes its time introducing our leading lady OH SOO-JAE (Seo Hyun-jin). She’s cutthroat, but despite being the highest-earning lawyer at the prestigious TK Law Firm, she has more enemies than allies. A lot (well, most) of the animosity stems from good ol’ fashioned sexism — because women with ambition who don’t smile on command are “bitches.” She’s up for a promotion as managing partner of the law firm, and as a group of (all) men weigh the candidates’ qualifications, Soo-jae’s gender is seen as a negative. It would be far too progressive of them to have a female managing partner.

Soo-jae also “came from nothing” and was merely a high school graduate — someone who passed the Korean bar exam without attending law school. (Note: this practice was eliminated in 2017, and now all future South Korean lawyers must attend law school.) And sure enough, in a flashback to her early days at TK Law Firm, we see a meeker version of Soo-jae handing out papers at a meeting and then being told to leave the conference room because she wasn’t qualified to sit at the big boy table.

Soo-jae’s biggest competitor for the managing partner position is MIN YOUNG-BAE (Kim Sun-hyuk). His ineptitude is palpable, but his Y-chromosome makes him 99.999% more likely to get the position. And yet, that .001% worries him, so he tries to bribe Soo-jae’s right-hand woman, associate lawyer SONG MI-RIM (Lee Joo-woo), into putting in a good word for him when she’s called in to give her opinion on Soo-jae’s qualifications for the position. Soo-jae, however, plays dirtier and eliminates Young-bae as a contender entirely.

One of their firm’s biggest clients is Chairman HAN SUNG-BEOM (Lee Kyung-young playing another corrupt rich guy). His company, Hansu Group, is selling off its subsidiary Hansu Bio Chemical, which is run by Sung-beom’s nephew HAN GI-TAK (Jeon Jae-hong). Soo-jae and Young-bae were placed in charge of handling Hansu Bio’s acquisition, but Young-bae took bribes from two of the three potential buyers and tried to sway Gi-tak away from selling Hansu Bio to SP Partners, despite them being the strongest buyer.

Soo-jae has their boss CHOI TAE-KOOK (Heo Jun-ho) on the phone when she exposes Young-bae’s backdoor dealings, and he’s promptly dropped from the acquisition case. But she doesn’t fully secure the managing director position for herself until she has her team swoop in and raid Gi-tak’s office for the files that he’s dodgily avoided handing over — a sure sign that he and Sung-beom are up to something illegal. Now that she’s in possession of these documents, Tae-kook has no other option but to promote her and try to keep her on a short leash.

Soo-jae’s next client is actor-turned-assemblyman AHN KANG-WON (Lee Tae-sung), who has been accused of raping PARK SO-YOUNG (Hong Ji-yoon), a bar hostess. Soo-jae meets with So-young and her lawyer, and at first So-young appears to be a possible spurned gold-digging ex-lover.

Not only does her “cheap attitude” seem atypical for a rape victim, but she’s also wearing a pair of shoes that match the exact pair that Kang-won gave to Soo-jae when he was pursuing her. This suggests there might have been — at least at some point — a reciprocated romance between the assemblyman and the bar hostess, who claims they never met prior to the night of the incident.

It’s been well established that Soo-jae fights dirty in order to win on behalf of her clients, but this particular exchange between Soo-jae and So-young was uncomfortable to watch. So-young’s lawyer is useless, and unable to counter-attack Soo-jae’s ability to discredit So-young’s version of events. Soo-jae even low-key blackmails So-young — threatening to tell her younger sister about her profession — in order to get So-young to back down. The longer the exchange goes on, the more apparent it is that So-young is a victim, but — as Soo-jae reminds Mi-rim later — So-young is not their client.

Later that night, So-young falls from the law firm’s rooftop — a scene that jump-scared five years off my life. The police rule her death a suicide, but the public’s opinion is fueled by misinformation and rumors stemming from Soo-jae and So-young’s public dispute in the law firm’s hallway. The media reports that Soo-jae is responsible for So-young’s suicide, and the negative publicity concerns the firm’s other lawyers, who ask Tae-kook to delay her promotion.

At first, Tae-kook seems mostly unswayed by their opinions, but he doesn’t take kindly to Soo-jae interrupting the meeting and asserting that she is the backbone of TK Law Firm. Ultimately, it’s her hubris that prompts Tae-kook to send her on a forced “vacation” and remind her that he is the boss.

She’s demoted (no managing partnership) and sent to work at Seojung University Law School, where she can rebuild her image. In the meantime, Tae-kook appoints his own son, CHOI JOO-WAN (Ji Seung-hyun), as the next managing partner.

On Soo-jae’s first day as an instructor, she leaves her students waiting for almost a full hour before showing up to class. She writes, “I will never send my client to jail” on the board, and then promptly walks out of the classroom — which is unnecessarily dramatic in real life but great for television.
GONG CHAN (Hwang In-yub), one of the students, follows her outside, and when she walks past him, he’s relieved that she doesn’t recognize him. But is he referring to their recent random encounter, where she slapped him out of misdirected anger, or something else?

A series of flashbacks to a case early in Soo-jae’s career — like waaaaay early, when she was still meek — suggests that she and Chan have a shared history. However, the client that Soo-jae defended against rape and murder charges was named KIM DONG-GOO (Lee Yoo-jin), not Gong Chan…

Chan’s interest in Soo-jae causes him to be one of only two students who did not transfer out of her class. While Soo-jae worries the course will be canceled, the other remaining student, CHOI YOON-SANG (Bae In-hyuk) — Tae-kook’s youngest son who received tutoring from Soo-jae — cryptically assures Chan that Soo-jae is not the type to allow the class to be canceled. Sure enough, she sends out a mass text announcing that the number one student in her class will receive an internship at TK Law Firm and tuition money, which sends everyone rushing back to her classroom.

Although she lost the position as a managing partner, Soo-jae refuses to let Tae-kook quietly cut ties with her. So later, at the Seojung University Law School Night where Tae-kook is a guest speaker, she uses the files she acquired (and hid) from the raid of Gi-tak’s offices to leverage a deal and retain the Hansu Bio case. The contents of those files must be seriously juicy.

Her success, however, is tainted when a former chief prosecutor and current professor at Seojung University SEO JOON-MYUNG (Kim Young-pil) sexually harasses her. Chan shows up to be her white knight, but Chan, who has a strong desire to seek out justice for all, is baffled that she’s not inclined to demand an apology from Joon-myung. Instead, she apologizes to Chan when she recognizes him as the man she slapped in misdirected rage after Tae-kook sent her on “vacation.”

Joon-myung can’t keep his hands to himself, and the next day NA SE-RYUN (Sohn Ji-hyun), one of Soo-jae’s students, publicizes that Joon-myung sexually harassed her at the after-party. Unfortunately, her only witness recants his statement, and the situation becomes a classic case of he-said-she-said, with everyone assuming the upstanding professor is telling the truth. Poor naive Se-ryun, they all think, she must have misunderstood the situation and is making a big deal out of nothing.

To make matters worse, all the professors — even the female ones — want Se-ryun to drop out so they can avoid a scandal. Soo-jae remarks that the school is dirtier and more corrupt than TK Law Firm, but her opinion does not translate to sympathy when Se-ryun comes to her for help. Instead, she advises Se-ryun to keep her head down and focus on obtaining her goal.

This is the second time Soo-jae has advised a victim of sexual harassment to just ignore the atrocities inflicted upon her in favor of using her anger as fuel for her pursuit of a “dream,” which makes me wonder: what is Soo-jae’s dream? And is her current coldness when faced with victimized women the result of her own trauma that she’s used to fuel her own personal agenda? Given that she turned down both Sung-beom and Assemblyman LEE IN-SOO’s (Jo Young-jin) offer of her own law practice in exchange for the files she’s holding hostage, it makes me wonder if her own dream — and possible motivation — has something specific to do with Tae-kook and/or his law firm.

Chan overhears her exchange with Se-ryun and lets slip that he’s disappointed that she has “changed,” but he dodges her curiosity by pointing out that her inactivity is only going to cause more victims. She has more power than Se-ryun, and Soo-jae should be using her anger to help defend her student. Soo-jae assumes Chan is passionately defending Se-ryun because he has a crush on Se-ryun, so she advises him to find his own evidence.

…And so he does, with a little help from the rest of Group 8, which is composed of Chan, Yoon-sang, and the other students with the lowest test scores in the class. They band together and acquire additional evidence, including incriminating CCTV footage, but when they present it at Se-ryun’s disciplinary hearing, the professors — and Joon-myung’s wife — dismiss it as inadmissible because it was obtained illegally.

But then Soo-jae shows up with her own flash drive. She advises that all the people not personally involved with the case should leave the room — which we know is her code for “I’m about to drop a bomb” — but Joon-myung’s wife insists the student hearing remain public.

With a shrug and a “I warned you,” Soo-jae plays the CCTV footage of Joon-myung sexually harassing her. She assures them that, as the victim, she was able to obtain the footage legally.

Even when he’s confronted with the evidence, Joon-myung doesn’t believe he’s done anything wrong (classic “she was asking for it” mentality). His wife is equally absurd, choosing to direct her anger at Soo-jae, the victim.

She accuses Soo-jae of enacting revenge against her husband because he bested her when she was a public defender. Given her poor performance in that particular case, people were surprised TK Law Firm hired her, and Joon-myung’s wife sneers that everyone assumed Soo-jae slept with Tae-kook to get the job. Soo-jae remains unaffected by the accusations and whips out a set of blackmail photos. Looks like she was cheating on Joon-myung. Man, they are quite the pair.

Chan joins Soo-jae on the elevator, where he explains that he didn’t defend Se-ryun because he likes her. Instead, he confesses Soo-jae is the one he likes, and he boldly grabs her hand. Given all of the lack of consent that has occurred this episode, it’s a gutsy move that I don’t find particularly squee-worthy, but Soo-jae appears somewhat curious, especially when he once again hints at their shared past and says that he kept his promise.

Through more flashbacks we learn that Joon-myung was the prosecutor in Dong-goo’s case, and when Soo-jae lost the trial, Dong-goo was sentenced to ten years in prison. Following the sentencing, Soo-jae held his hand and made him promise to become someone powerful.

After a grueling year in prison, the real killer was caught, and Dong-goo was released. Despite his proven innocence, his step-mother still blamed him for his step-sister’s death. So with no family to return to, Dong-goo and two of his cellmates, GU JO-GAB (Jo Dal-hwan) and SO HYUNG-CHIL (Lee Kyu-sung), became a found family and built their fish market restaurant from the ground up.

Most importantly, Dong-goo changed his name to Gong Chan (there’s no mention of plastic surgery, so I guess we’re chalking the new face up to puberty), and began studying for law school. When asked during his application interview why he aspired to be a lawyer, he said he “wanted to find someone.”

Well, it looks like he found her, but I’m not sure how I feel about this romance subplot. Even when you take away the teacher-student relationship, Soo-jae feels… unattainable. She’s a ballbuster, and we’ve seen that she’s capable of using and disposing of men infinitely more powerful than Chan. I’m not saying I won’t eventually begin rooting for a romance between these two (I like both characters separately), but for now the professional and emotional gap between them is too wide for me to begin shipping them as a couple.

Instead of the romance, I feel compelled to continue this drama in order to find out more about Soo-jae’s backstory. She’s such an interesting and morally ambiguous character. As a woman, I applaud her strength when faced with rampant sexism, but she also has an agenda — a personal vendetta, perhaps? — that causes her to act in ways that even she finds regrettable.

Her past is a mystery, and I really want this drama to show us her evolution from a naive and incompetent public defense attorney to the powerful woman she is today. Dear drama gods, please don’t drop the ball on this character.

 
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My brain was distracted in episode 1 by how TOO PERFECTLY AIMED AND TIMED that death fall was.
To land precisely and directly on top the law firm's meter-sqaure blue glowing logo cube? And right as Soo Jae is walking past? I mean it's also deliciously horrific and poetic but what excellent aim. (Must be staged LOL)

Totally the kind of dramatic plot catalyst death I would write though, lmfao.

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Agreed, timing and landing spot were too perfect but the frequent replays were over the top even if they paid a lot for the execution of the scene and wanted to get their monies worth by etching it into the audiences brains.

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So, a nice beginning…how should it end? I’d hate it if she ends up a soft and squish do good-er lawyer at the end. What we know, this being a kdrama, is that:
1. She has an agenda.
2. She will accomplish her agenda.

Anything else?

And, what *should* happen to someone who has sold pieces of her soul to she achieve her objective - after the whatever it is?

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How do we put this hmmm...
I would've tolerated the romance angle only with very thoughtful execution, but unfortunately, I think I'm going to have to drop this, as it seems they are already sailing the ship in eps 3-4 which I have no desire to watch since I find that highly unbelievable, and not thoughtful, and very ooc, and would find it very unlikable in fact in the long run.

As for how it SHOULD end, and #3... that depends, narratively, on what kind of story you're trying to write... ;)
Which... whilst I could justify going either direction (towards just deserts and tragedy or towards redemption), and come up with a minimum of three distinct dramas from this point alone, ... I find it highly unlikely the drama will do anything it should or even could do. So...
:( :(

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OOC, exactly. I thought they had built a potentially interesting lead character - and then the romance? Sigh.

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I really really liked the first episode and loved Seo Hyun Jin's portrayal of a ruthless lawyer, but the transition in the 2nd episode was not smooth. We did not get to see the group dynamics nor their bonding, but suddenly Chan, Yoon Sang, Gang Ja all team up together to get justice for Se Ryun. I couldn't help but compare this to "Law school" kdrama (That was a good drama) where the group had great bonding and followed the law strictly and did not have cop out scenes like "The evidence is not legal, but you are a school so you should be different from the court."

Also, I have questions regarding the age of the ML. It was mentioned that the step sister was in middle school, but the ML went and enquired about her in a convenience store, presumably where she was working part time (Are middle school students allowed to work in SK?), so was he a middle school student as well? However, the way he threatened to hit the guy made him look like a senior student who is soon to graduate. He lost a year in prison and Soo Jae was a novice when she took his case and failed. So assuming he was 19/20 when he got released and Soo Jae to reach a powerful position, there must have been 4-5 years gap. So there is no age limit to attend law school or become lawyers?

P.S: I have never seen Seo Hyun Jin dressed this stylishly because in most of her dramas she dresses very modestly like a girl next door character.

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Then you should watch her in Beauty Inside.

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When the first couple of news about this drama come out, I expect a typical SHJ romcom with noona flavour and a law background plus a bit of mystery as side story, then the posters come and it was quite dark - i'm a bit intrigued.

After watching the first couple of episodes, I feel like this is a weird mix of I Can Hear Your Voice + Law School + Vincenzo.
Vincenzo because I felt the TK Law Firm is a bit like Wusang with all the corrupt lawyers, corporations and glamorous office interiors that I would like to peek inside. The set decor is top notch here. And, SHJ here looks a bit like Hong Cha Young - both her looks and attitude.
Law School because the setup is similar as both are mystery series with law school setting. I assume we will get each of Group 8's personal stories for the upcoming episodes.
I Can Hear Your Voice because ... the premise is also similar to that one - it will definitely contain noona romance with older lawyer and student with a hint to their past. I'm not a fan of noona romance so I hope they sidelined it on this one in favor of the mystery/thriller aspect, not to mention the student-teacher relationship which i'm icky with.

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Actually, I'm not a particularly big fan of legal dramas and even here I had to sit through the first 15 minutes, but Oh Soo-jae is such an interesting character that I kept watching and look forward to the next episodes.

As the clues thickened that Gong Chan is Soo-jae's former client, I blamed it on my difficulty recognizing faces that I couldn't see any similarities. Later I thought about whether he had a facial surgery, too, after all, a person at that age does not change so extremely.

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I'm glad I'm not the only one with difficulty over the former/current Gong Chan!

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Exactly, the actor has played school age students in previous dramas so would have been fine to play that part and I didn’t think his younger self looked enough like him for him to be the grown up version with a hair cut. I was so confused and then saw it was another actor playing that part so I could relax as I know I am rubbish with facial recognition but they were just too different.

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I agree with you! I was confused too! The younger version seems more matured to me.

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🤣 exactly

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Soo-jae is a ruthless badass, I loved her. I can't see how she will fall for Chan as she needs someone equally badass as her. But as we saw in the flashbacks, she was soft before becoming hardened by her cutthroat world.

Soo-jae is not at fault for So-young's death. It is not her job to believe So-young; it is So-young's lawyer's job to prove his case. Soo-jae did not kill her; she committed suicide, which is questionable at that. She was most likely pushed to set Soo-jae up, but I doubt it was Assemblyman Ahn as Soo-jae's ex-boyfriend is a coward, so the culprit could be Chairman Choi.

I was totally with Soo-jae until she slapped Chan. Twice. Which would've been a third time if he hadn't stopped her. I think she knows who he is after he held her hand. Will Stepmom please watch the news and see that Dong-goo didn't kill Na-jung? I'm glad he at least has his prison hyungs.

I'm most interested in Yoon-sang's character. As long as he doesn't develop a crush on his noona. When the TA said their seats were assigned based on grades, I thought Yoon-sang was first. I wonder if Joo-wan is his half-brother.

Many thanks for your first impressions, @DaebakGrits!

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Didn’t really go into this one with expectations, besides knowing the cast can handle whatever is thrown at them. Our FL does not disappoint. She’s ruthless, but with some of that hidden heart helping out behind the scenes.

Random aside…why exactly is the step mother still blaming the ML? Literally proven that he didn’t do it, and sat in jail for a crime he didn’t commit and she shows up throwing things at him? It takes work to be that awful, kudos *golf clap*

I’d very much like to see less Lee Kyoung-Young on my screen. Besides the fact that he seemingly plays the exact same character in every show (and now like 2-3 shows at the same time…great…) seems weird for the whole industry to just look past his scandals and start giving him so many roles again.

Probably my favourite of the new shows this week (though I haven’t gotten around to Eve yet) and I’m looking forward to the next batch of episodes.

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I'm chalking the step-mother's behavior up to illogical victim/survivor blaming brought on by grief. She's upset that he lived while her biological daughter died. It would definitely make more sense for her to transfer her hatred to her daughter's real killer now that he's been identified, but she's probably hated Chan for so long that it's easier to find a new reason to hate him that transfer her rage to the real killer. Or maybe the real killer is dead, which isn't a tangible enough outlet for her rage.

Whatever the reason, I hope they explore her phycological state more while we learn more about the past case.

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Viki comments seems to be sick of how much they're seeing Lee Kyung Young as well, honestly me as well and this is technically the first drama I've seen him in this year.

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The first episode dragged for me, but things picked up in episode two. I think I needed a wider focus than just Soo Jae. I would also like to see more development of the group 8 dynamic, as mentioned, suddenly they are a team for no other reason than they are all in the same group?
I also thought it was strange, and a bit tone deaf, in regard to GC holding SJs hand, without consent, directly after a disciplinary hearing on sexual harassment.
Having said all that, I'm a fan of the two leads and Bae In Hyuk and there was enough in episode two to have me coming back next week. Hopefully we'll see a little more of BIH next week!

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@daebakgrits great recap thank you.

I thought the first two episodes showed enough of the main settings and characters for me to want to know the backstory.

It is always disappointing when women climb the ladder and then seem prepared to do whatever it takes to save themselves. It might as well have been a group of men talking the way they did. The two levels of power from the professors ‘chatting’ with the students before they went to the board room for the panel discussion showed that wherever Soo jae is the game playing will be an issue and she will need to address it alongside the actual job she is paid to do.

I know she didn’t want to teach but the students pay a lot of money to attend university so they deserve committed professors and we can already see the attitudes of those they have to learn from. So her strolling in and out was disrespectful to them and a second example of her striking out at the innocent and the least powerful.

I also wonder if the youngest son is not interested in the family business hence struggles to engage in studies but has another area of interest which he excels in.

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I wonder if her cavalier attitude about teaching also partially stems from the fact that she didn't go to law school. She may not see a formal classroom setting as a requirement to becoming a good lawyer. Not saying I agree with the results, but it may not be wholly a disinterest in teaching or act of rebellion. Either way, I think we're going to see unorthodox -- but effective -- teaching methods from her going forward.

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Her class is going to be the class to be in for sure☺️

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There are a lot of questions.

Is it really a suicide? Or a murder? I found weird she chose this building to commit suicide. If she was a bar hostess, she had to know a lot of things too.

The murder of Chan's step-sister was weird too. He found her and then he was unconscious with a knife in the hand, alone with only her clothes...

I'm not convinced by any character for now. But Seo Hyun-Jin looks great.

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Oh my god, I didn't recognize Lee Eugene who was a kid in Sky Castle. He got so tall.

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NO WAY THAT'S HIM?????????

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Yeah. 😅

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Ep 1 - Why is this character the lead instead of the villain? She's terrible. Why should anyone care if she gets a redemption or a romance with a student? I'm trying to remember if there was any worse character from episode one. Maybe SIG's in Thousand Stars? He did let an innocent man go to jail. She had fun humiliating, blackmailing and being cruel to a potential rape victim. Even after what happened she did not seem to question her own reasons or morals, probably because she doesn't have any. Then she got furious for being fired and slapped the waiter. Twice. Meanwhile drama is trying to pretend she is, as some have said, merely ambiguous, or even, kickass. No, she is just plain mean and while monsters can be quite great as leads, no drama should pretend they are lost puppies in need of redemption.

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Yes, valid points because these traits are portrayed as being cool by the media, but in reality this is a cause of concern. However, there are not many such female characters in kdrama who are written as ruthless, powerful and smart that even the slightest portrayal is getting cheered on. Her slapping Chan is wrong, but the way she threatened the victim is nothing new and every male lawyer in kdrama has used such tatics to win the case.

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What traits. I don't recall being immoral portrayed as cool. Villains can be charismatic but the problem is she is not the antagonist. The recapper wrote she behaved in a similar way to yet another victim in the second episode. That is starting to seem like an example of the misogyny in this drama and in korean society. If she is a career woman capable to deal with powerful, immoral men, she must be a devil. She must be even worse than they in order to beat them. What a terrible idea. Her troubled past and personal issues will also probably be used as excuses for her bad choices and behavior. This is a bad representation and we don't need this kind of thing that only leads to prejudice and wrong ideas such as mistaking this kind of person as someone powerful or smart. She is not acting in her own best interest and is causing pain to others. Where is the power and smartness in that?
I don't like legal kdramas very much but I don't recall any male lead ever doing something evil like she did unless he was the villain. Isn't this perhaps to say women can be so easily changed? She was once kind, idealistic and timid but bullying and harsh work environment turned her into a villain, maybe because she is "only" a woman? This is the kind of idea that might be behind such characters when they come disguised as morally gray characters.

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I hesitated whether or not to comment on this drama, because it hits close to home. Could I be objective when I've been in Oh Soo-jae's shoes? I've experienced being a young associate who is faced with blatant sexism and sexual harassment. It's real. But when I was starting out, it wasn't talked about or acknowledged like it is today. You just lived with it, or you were asked to find employment elsewhere.

So, I can identify with what Soo-jae must have felt when she was just starting out. I can identify with her need to prove herself and never be in a position of vulnerability again. But while I admire how she proved herself to the Good Old Boys Club and rose higher than them, I don't admire the person she became. She became calloused and too big for her britches.

My guess is the reason Soo-jae wanted to be a lawyer in the first place was to fight injustice. To never leave her client in jail. In her rise to the top, she acquired the skills and the power to do that, but she lost herself in the process. Like @daebakgrits, I want to learn more about Soo-jae's backstory. And I'm hoping that Soo-jae reuniting with Gong-chan, will be the beginning of her path to redemption.

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Strong premiere. Really enjoyed it. The story moved quickly to get the main plot. Seo Hyun Jin was excellent. Excited to see more of her story and her clever moves. The bad guys were plenty from small fries to the big boss, ugh.

I'm not minding the romance at all. I like that Chan was direct with his simple confession, but not cocky. I like that she was curious about him. The hand hold was a nice reference to the time when she held his hand to comfort him.

The only thing that bugged me was that I wish they had In Yub playing his younger role with a disguise to make him look different enough from his present self or choose an actor that looked similar to him. I kept staring at the other guy's cheekbones. Almost thought Chan had a face transplant, but that didn't make sense. XD

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Ngl, I laughed out loud when I realized Dong-goo was supposed to be Gong Chan. The state of plastic surgery has come so far. I refuse to chalk this up to puberty. No human being’s face has ever changed this drastically without artificial means. Some real makjang stuff in the middle of a seemingly-serious law drama.

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I'm hoping that they reveal he had plastic surgery because it really is ridiculous. lol Like, maybe after being wrongfully accused, the government gave him some sort of compensation for his pain and suffering, and he used it to pay for the surgery.

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I'm hoping it was surgery too. Like since his parents still hate him he decided to create a new life by changing his face

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I'm fine if they're trying to do teenage ver of the role or smth but that supposed to be teenage actor looks like full grown adult and suddenly he morphed into the current gongchan??? lol

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I think what threw people off is that Hwang Inyeop actually looks younger than his childhood counterpart 😂
He could've easily played his own teenage parts but I guess the context is that he's supposed to be younger and thus slightly unrecognizable (for Soojae to remember) once he grew up so they needed someone else. But Inyeop has such a baby face so anyone would've looked older than him hahaha. They could get an even younger actor but I guess they needed a teenager to play the part. It's probably hard to find a teenage actor who not only has to look somewhat similar to him but also need to look physically younger than him.

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God... I can't believe I have been waiting for Seo Hyunjin for THIS................. I don't know the premiere was compelling but ep 2 got more and more questionable. As a character Soojae is definitely intriguing and will be a very fun one to watch develop, Taekook is equally as interesting but when you have two interesting characters surrounded by so many one-dimensional characters... it's not exactly exciting. Not to mention I still couldn't grasp Gong Chan and his blind attraction to Soojae.

Directing wise.... sometimes I can't even follow the emotion im supposed to be feeling lol Some scenes even i don't know why was it necessary even lol. Story wise............. there are too many dramatic twist but it does sometimes work with legal dramas (this one gave kind of Law School vibe, and it worked in Law School!) but with this one, instead of a story I feel like we're actually watching a play where the writer lazily just bunch these characters together with no background whatsoever just to make them do something.

But it's seo hyunjin so i'm staying until 4 episodes ig *sigh*
Bright side is, I used to be quite disappointed with You Are My Spring premiere week, but it turned to be one of my fave drama ever so... I don't expect it to be like that but... please just be decent enough to watch I wanna watch Seo Hyunjin so bad

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I started this and I like it so far. I really hope we get to see what made our FL who she is now.

I definitely think Chan got plastic surgery and that would make total sense after being publicly accused and his face being all over the country. Otherwise, they would have just let HIY play his younger self

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