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Kiss Sixth Sense: Episodes 11-12 (Final)

Our drama concludes this week, with predictable reveals, a gamut of tropes, and one too many nice, neat bows. Mysteries are solved and memories are retained, but can our couple slide into happiness? While we finally get an extended rehash of the past, the future is suddenly a lot less certain.

 
EPISODES 11-12 WEECAP

Is this the same show we’ve been watching for the past five weeks? Sure, we all knew the story was about take a cliff dive into the valley of cliches but I can’t imagine a less satisfying way to tie up all the threads. Rather than the waves of future happiness we were waiting for, we get a tsunami of tonal shifts, random storylines, and nonsensical filler — while simultaneously being robbed of seeing how Seung-taek and Ho-woo actually get back together. I’m glad it was only a twelve-episode run, but I would have been elated if it ended with Episode 10.

We finished last week with our happy couple finally acting out Ye-sool’s vision in Min-hu’s bed. This week we get the morning after where the tension is gone and “I love you” is in the air. But the good vibes are cut short when they kiss and Ye-sool sees a violent version of the future, where Min-hu is stabbed while trying to protect her. She keeps it a secret from Min-hu, while wondering if she can stop it from happening.

Meanwhile, Ye-sool’s mother’s new husband is hit by a car and seriously injured. The hit-and-run driver is KIM HAE-JIN (Um Hyo-sup) — Ye-sool’s favorite bartender (also, the man who intended to kidnap her two weeks ago). It seems that Hae-jin has been obsessed with Ye-sool’s mom since they were in college together, and he murdered Ye-sool’s dad in order to try to take his place (ya know, just your classic crazy). Both Min-hu and Ye-sool’s mother know about this but are surprised that Hae-jin has reappeared, since they thought he was dead. The two collude to keep the story a secret from Ye-sool.

By this point, Ye-sool is crazy in love with Min-hu and can’t bear the thought of her violent vision coming true. She tells Min-hu about it so he can be prepared (though Min-hu does not do the same for her, continuing to keep Hae-jin’s identity a secret). In an effort to change the future, Ye-sool decides to go to the US. She believes that if she is not with Min-hu, then he will not get hurt while trying to protect her.

Ye-sool doesn’t make it far before Hae-jin catches up to her. Not knowing he’s dangerous (because she’s been infantilized and kept in the dark), Ye-sool goes to Hae-jin’s bar where she feels safe. Of course, being the quintessential criminal that he is, he drugs her unconscious and takes her to the house where she grew up (which evidently has been sitting empty since her dad’s death). There, Hae-jin lights candles all around for extra creepiness and we see family photos with his face pasted over Ye-sool’s father’s.

Ye-sool escapes the house but, being chased, she runs onto a nearby frozen reservoir. It’s the location of her latest vision and she realizes this is where Min-hu will be stabbed. Ye-sool falls through the ice and into the water just as Min-hu arrives to dive in and bring her back to the surface. Under a blood moon, he gives her mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and we see flashbacks of the same event happening when they were kids. This is how they got their powers.

As predicted, Hae-jin stabs Min-hu and injures him severely. Ye-sool, now conscious, holds a bleeding Min-hu in her arms on the ice. Not long after, the police arrive and arrest Hae-jin, and that’s the last we hear of him.

At the hospital, Min-hu is in a coma and Ye-sool gets her long-lost memories back as she waits for him to wake up. We learn that the two were close friends as kids. They met when Ye-sool was lost and Min-hu stumbled on her crying outside the orphanage where he grew up. After he helped her find her way home, Ye-sool’s parents were thankful and Min-hu became like one of their family (Min-hu even went into advertising because of Ye-sool’s dad).

The day Ye-sool’s father was murdered, Min-hu and Ye-sool came into the house while the killer was still there. Trying to escape, Ye-sool fell into the nearby reservoir and Min-hu saved her (with mouth-to-mouth under a blood moon). Both kids went into a coma and when Ye-sool woke up she’d forgotten not only the events of that night, but the whole summer (and thus forgotten Min-hu’s existence). (Is it just me or are there more cracks in this timeline than the ice they fell through? Before young Ye-sool leaves for the US with her mother, she sees Min-hu in a coma and tells him to wait for her. Didn’t she lose her memory of him before that? If not, how did she forget about him? Ugh, I’m done asking questions.)

While both the killer plot line and the childhood backstory are predictable and fairly boring, they at least make sense with the story. What comes after, however, seems to negate the themes of the show. When Min-hu wakes up from his coma, both he and Ye-sool have lost their powers (apparently what the blood moon gives it also takes away). Afterward (in a drastic change of tone), we see a series of comedic events making Min-hu and Ye-sool seem somewhat incompetent without their abilities. At the same time, losing their powers appears to make them lose their fated connection.

The two go public with their dating, but it’s a little too public. They fight all over the place, breaking up and making up constantly. We see their colleagues react to their fighting — but, unfortunately, we don’t see their reactions to the fact that they’re dating at all (after so much nosiness and speculation, I wanted to see the relationship reveal at the office). The string of fight scenes appears to be included to show that Min-hu and Ye-sool are not having the happiness they thought they would, but the scenes seem like filler in a story that should have ended earlier.

Until these last episodes, I thought the drama was about fate and the emotional growth that Ye-sool and Min-hu show as they make their way toward their destiny. I was wrong. The final idea is that they may not really be destined for each other, and so, they just need to take it one day at a time because they don’t know what will happen in the future. (Can someone please tell me then why we sat through all that childhood connection angst?!)

Here’s my issue: Ye-sool didn’t really know what was going to happen in the future even when she had premonitions. Having her abilities, and learning to react differently to what she sees, was a thread throughout most of the show. Losing her powers feels a little like stunting her growth (actually, with the current ending, it seems that neither Ye-sool or Min-hu has learned anything, or they’ve already forgotten what they learned from each other). Also, it makes the Pil-yo/Ye-sool storyline seem irrelevant in retrospect.

For me, one of two possible endings would have made more sense. In the first, we end the show last week, where Ye-sool and Min-hu keep their powers and continue to help each other deal with living with them — growing both as individuals and as a couple. In the second, they lose their powers, but the freedom enables them to live more happily together. As it stands, the ending makes me feel a little like Ye-sool when she has a premonition: confused, anxious, and seriously looking for ways to change it.

 
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que sera sera? whomp whomp

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TL;DR: Not enough kissing.

I wasn’t exactly disappointed by the final episodes since I no longer hoped this show could stick the landing. The good:
- The childhood backstory was surprisingly well-handled, and the friendship between the kids was nicely developed and touching. These two are good actors (we’ve seen the boy in a bunch of dramas and I was tickled to spot the girl again in Link, with its own cast of grown-up child actors).
- That scene with young YS crying at the orphanage gate and young MH assuming she’d been abandoned there - ow, my heart. I think that’s the only hint we get of MH’s own history.
- MH faking amnesia was hilarious and awesome. Yoon Kye-sang played it so perfectly deadpan that I believed for a moment that the show had really gone there.
- The suggestion in the last moment that YS once again has a premonition when kissing MH. This show doesn’t need a second season, but MH and YS definitely need another spark - working, bickering, breaking up, and reuniting ad infinitum sounds exhausting.

The not-so-good:
- Extended scenes should have been shorter and punchier. Everything including the childhood flashback needed tighter editing. They’re running through the dark forest! They’re still running! It’s dark, and it’s a forest, and they’re running! We get it.
- Secret-keeping from a grown-ass woman who deserves to know about her own life and dangers that affect HER.
- The eye-rolling panegyric to the noble business of advertising. Gack!
- People weeping over their wounded lovers and mauling them about and probably exacerbating the bleeding instead of just calling 119.
- YS resisting MH unbuttoning her sweater - and this from the woman who whispers to him about her underwear. Did she suddenly get a Maidenly Modesty implant? She does know the premise of the show, right?
- The dragged-out, cringey on-air confession (yeah, my anti-PY bias is showing).
- Many, many minutes spent on arguments. Conflict is probably a realistic path for their relationship, but if I wanted realism, I wouldn’t have come to this joint.
- Nobody ever learns anything. Of course, if they did, all dramas would be done in 4 episodes.

MH and YS don’t just lose their connection once their superpowers disappear - they seem to become different people. It would have been interesting to see that play out with them getting to know (in ALL senses of the word) each other again instead of arguing. Or they could just hit the hay. 😈 I agree with @dramaddictally that it should have stopped after ep. 10, or at least after the first couple of minutes of ep. 11. Oh well, this show introduced me to Yoon Kye-sang and confirmed my love of Seo Ji-hye and provided plenty of sparky moments, so I don’t regret the watch.

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Just to be absolutely clear, the TL;DR was mocking my own lengthy screed, which expended more energy than this show mertited, and not @dramaddictally 's recaps, which I really appreciated and enjoyed!

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If you see the future and someone you love gets stabbed and you are also in the vision, LEARN BASIC FIRST AID. Tell him to wear a knife-deflecting vest! WHO ARE YOU MORONS.

Sometimes I feel only stupid people get superpowers.

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It’s because whatever preparation/warning she does to avoid such situations she can’t change the future just like when she told her colleague to be careful because he might fall but then he still ended up falling because it is bound to happen and there’s nothing she can do about it.

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I'm distracting myself with CHOCOLATE at the moment. It's super dramatic in parts, but somehow it fits.

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"The childhood backstory was surprisingly well-handled, and the friendship between the kids was nicely developed and touching. . . .That scene with young YS crying at the orphanage gate and young MH assuming she’d been abandoned there - ow, my heart."

Last week I commented that I came for the intriguing premise, continued to watch for the romance and comedy but after Ep. 8, the only reason I was staying was to see the children together and their story. So, I got my ½ hour payoff and I had tears in my eyes.

But s**t, they were terrific friends as kids and couldn’t even manage that as adults? This show could have been much better if the last ½ hour had simply maintained the wit/comedy AND shown more of how Dr. Oh and Ho-woo found their way back to each other.

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I enjoyed the final to episodes, but I would have preferred if they had left out the fighting and breaking up cycle. That was just annoying and was out of character.

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Well well well. I think we all knew this had the potential to go STRAIGHT off the rails in 11&12, but were hoping it would not, and yet - here we are.

Item 1: this is now a 10-episode series for me.

Item 2: I will never again watch the prologue, which is apparently a cautionary tale about how comas are actually INCREDIBLY dangerous and can result in mood and personality changes if not debilitation and abbreviated lifespan, and also that if you suddenly remember being chased through the woods by your father’s murderer and drowning in a lake you absolutely need intensive therapy or you may also have incredibly negative after-effects.

That. Was. TERRIBLE. I’ll continue to like the first 10 episodes (even more if someone supercuts it to snip out the stalker plot) but episode 12 was a horribly unhealthy relationship of two highly professional people who apparently lost their damn minds. I can only imagine the actors’ reaction when they saw this script. Ouch.

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…epilogue. You know what I mean. Also the last two episodes made no damn sense so why should I?

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Show confirms that we all desperately need the 6th (7th? 8th??) sense that lets us know the future of the show when we watch episode 1.

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😂 😂 😂

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Min-hu seems to have more superpowers than expected. Apparently he can beam himself out of ice holes without any problems and his self-healing powers are also enormous. (My father had to learn to sit and walk properly again after 1.5 weeks in an artificial coma).

Having seen the previews for the last two episodes in the last few days, I had already expected that it wouldn't continue as fluffy as episode 10. But I'm at least glad that there was a "logical" explanation for the two's superpowers, and even better that they can now live a normal life.

In a way, Min-hu has created his own monster with the self-confident Ye-sool. At work, she acts like him. In private life, too, she does not hold back. Two temperamental stubborn people who now clash frequently. I have the impression that Ye-sool in particular provokes the quarrels. Perhaps to show that she is no longer willing to back down and wants to get her own way in a relationship. Min-hu was and will always be a handful with his quick-temper (his first conversation as a young Min-hu with little Ye-sool was so typical adult Min-hu, tough as nails, telling the truth to her face). But in all the arguments (when Ye-sool wanted to take the picture away, I did have to laugh) you notice that they never really mean it (the other is always waiting for the other to come back). So I am convinced that their relationship will last in the long run. Still, I would have liked it to be a bit more balanced at the end and we would have seen a bit less fighting. Thus, for me, the series will always end mentally with episode 10.

I can also understand why Ye-sool doesn't want to hear any more about her and Min-hu being destined for each other. Too often she was at the mercy of fate, eventually realising that she couldn't escape her visions. So it is understandable that one wants to take one's life into one's own hands.

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My friend was in a coma for six weeks. Four years later, she is not okay.

I yell at medical dramas a lot.

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Former lifeguard here. You yell at medical dramas, I yell at water rescues - especially in very cold water. That scene made me laugh like a loon, which is probably not what the show intended.

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I was a lifeguard too! How the HELL did he get both of them out of an ice hole, never mind the logistics of the ice edge, none of your muscles work when you’ve been submerged in frigid water that long! Why did no one lie flat on the ice when it was cracking? That is not how you do rescue breathing!!

“Romantic” rescue breathing always makes me cackle, especially when everyone’s mouth is barely open. As does romantic CPR - nothing says “I love you” like needlessly starting chest compressions and snapping three or your beloved’s ribs.

First responder training: makes you all dark.

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I agree that Minhu created his own monster with Yesul behaving just like him at work - It was hinted at the beginning of the drama too when she treated Minhee the same way as Minhu did to her. What I think was bad writing is how they act in public while they were very professional at work.
The writer could have done so much better with office hijinks once they lose their super senses (and yes, how their colleagues react to their dating). But maybe these writers are always looking for random nonsensical comedy anyway (everything except the lead couple up to ep 10 was pretty nonsensical comedy - even the lead couple with those imagination was also over the top crazy).
Overall disappointed last 20-30 mins, but I enjoyed the couple's relationship until then.

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Thank you. I thought I was the only one who found their imagination scenes uncalled for and just thought I was being a stick in the mud. But those things were JARRING, when I thought the show was trying to be more "adult" than that.

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omg re: the ice hole bit, I legit found it so perplexing that he decided to jump in with a thick trench coat on and then even more so how on earth he managed to swim UP with said heavy coat in freezing water and carrying someone 💀

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Oh also am I the only one who flinched at “Where’s Minhee”? GUYS. You had a whole resignation storyline set up. Alternately, you could’ve said she was with the client. I have no idea why you’d deal with the actress’s death in the last episode with “where’s Minhee”. Maybe there’s a cultural nuance here I’m missing where that would be viewed as a more respectful acknowledgement, but YIKES.

Also I do sort of have to note that the death of a close colleague could impact the interpretation of those last two eps. If the script is hopelessly silly, maybe you go the extra mile to infuse it with gravitas. But if it’s hopelessly silly AND one of your cast members died during shooting, and you’re stuck on a strict filming schedule, there would be some impulse to stop fighting the stupid. Don’t battle the script and the massive character change. Just get through it because nothing makes sense right now.

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…well that’s an odd autocorrect of my name.

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Agree, it would have been better to have Min-hee simply not mentioned in the final episodes rather than that super-awkward “where is she?” moment, but maybe it didn't land the way it was intended. Was her resignation letter spliced into the scene in ep. 10 (?) to make her disappearance seem planned? I can't be bothered to go back and find out. I've been thinking about how hard it must have been for the cast to deal with that, and with exhausting days and nights shooting in winter weather on top of it.

The writer has no such excuse.

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I had understood that Min-hee had quit (I knew, of course, that the actress had died in the meantime).

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Minhee had somewhat reconciled with YS in the darts scene, and she was being lured to the dark side by creepy CD, so I figure as originally scripted she likely was part of the leak showdown. Which then was re-written as a one-man show.

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Naaaaaaah. I had my fill of laughter watching ep 12. Min-hu and Ye-sool...What a pair of misfits who are heads over heels in love with each other. They complement themselves so well so much that they uncomplement each other in a cohesive loving way. Naaaaaaah, it was so much fun seeing them this disjointed. Whether it is disagree to agree, or agree to disagree, I lolled at the banters.

Yoon Kye-sang really dipped himself in this role. I really don't know how to put it in words so I'll just dump it as it comes. He became the character especially during those moments that could tend to become shifty, inconvenient, uncomfortable, or pushy, to the point that risked him being portrayed as entitled to Ye-sool or it looking like she is going to lose her agency due to the imbalance, he was ready to act ridiculous and natural at the same time that that vibe was never passed across. That sold it perfectly for me.

Howoo-Seungtaek - Was I pissed at the way Kiss Sixth Sense handled this two? Yes. But immediately they reestablished a talking zone, all became forgotten.

Sidenote. Im Ji Kyu is nailing the bad guy role quite perfectly in a row.

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I forgot to add.

I've seen child actors fight in several modern kdramas. But this is the first I'll register as actually fighting dirty. Young Ye-sool really stood up to the occasion and checked all the boxes. Dust your body after fighting dirty✅. Bruised face✅. Dirty and messy hair with great empahsis✅. Dirty clothing✅. Very realistic portrayal of kids fight.
Oh! And she was a real mama bear for Min-hu. Those kids would definitely leave Min-hu alone from then on.

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This drama was pretty disapointing.

I was expecting something sexy and fun and I got a boring, full of clichés drama instead.

The childhood connection was too strong. Their powers are connected and they atone each other powers ; Min-Hu always loved her, never forgot her and did everything for her. I couldn't see them fall for each other genuinely, it was all about their past connection. At the end, they acted like kids.

She didn't learn anything from her relationship with Pil-Yo. He waited for 3 years to come back to prove her wrong but she reacted with her last vision like she did in the past, she ran away.

Kim Ji-Suk deserved so better! His character didn't deserve to be the spare wheel for a bad actress (in the drama and in the reality).

I think I will stop watching Seo Ji-Hye's dramas. I don't like them either it's the story, either her character.

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At some point I had to reconcile with the fact that while Cha Minhu and Ye-sool deserved themselves in all the positive sense, Pil-yo deserved something that's not Ye-sool. Not necessarily better than her, but different from her but still retaining the quality and value he fell in love with in Ye-sool, and that which he deserves. And on that end, I didn't fully enjoy his being paired with Ji-young cause I know he deserves better than Ji-young. But then this Ji-young has matured out of her Minhu obsession so I give her credit for that and overlook that arc.
And yes, Kim Ji Suk deserved better than what he got in Kiss Sixth Sense.

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I don't know anything about the writer for this show, but my sense is s/he was talented enough to come up with an interesting scenario and interesting characters, and lucky enough to get some good actors on board -- but not able to take all that potential and turn it into a compelling drama. It was fluffy, inconsistent, and overall, a letdown. I would give it a C.

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The script was based on a webtoon (which I never read) - so, I'm not sure if the scriptwriter can take credit for the intriguing scenario.

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The drama characters were way, way better than the webtoon. The webtoon’s not finished yet (I think, or at least I didn’t see an end) and I think the writer made the most of what was available from the source material, but I very much wish they’d left out the murder mystery bit. Not sure if the writer was stuck executing on that.

The webtoon is a daft Candy and her very webtoony male lead boss. I vastly preferred two competent people at work in their 30s.

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I actually really like the webtoon. It's uber-fluffy though - probably more akin to the Why Secretary Kim drama than the drama adaptation of Kiss Sixth Sense - and I know that isn't everyone's taste. I think the webtoon has better psychological reasoning and is definitely more consistent in the storytelling. The webtoon is more focused on the OTP, who are 10 years younger than in the drama, and on them being neighbors, while the drama has a lot of workplace stuff, which is sort of needed to fill the episodes. The webtoon only has enough content so far for drama special. The FL in the webtoon is the cheerful and bubbly type, but she can hold a steady job and aside from the childhood trauma, has a pretty stable life and the ML isn't out of her socio-economic league.

The drama's strength is definitely the two lead actors, who were able to bring on the sizzle and then some before the more recent webtoon chapters were available.

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I dnf-ed this after the sixth episode - I guess I had a sixth sense it would turn into a dumpster fire. Guess I was right 🤷‍♀️

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The last two episodes were disappointing to say the least. In fact there were quite a few disappointing episodes overall but the last 20 mins of forcefully drawn out ending ruined the whole finale week for me. The fact that they waited until literally the last minute to explain the whole backstory was annoying and ruined my memory of all the cute. Still YKS and SJH delivered the chemistry in the initial episodes and I'll walk away with that.

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Hated Ep.11, liked Ep.12 at first, but shook my head later…
The childhood connection was well done and made sense. But later everyone made a pact not to tell her about it, WHY? The obsessive stalker showing up and all the nonsense that followed, especially the candle-lit house?!? And don’t even start about the scenes on the lake… The ice was cracking all over, but later it’s just a single hole where she fell in and he somehow got her out, and then 10 people are moving around on the ice? The police taking their time to arrest the criminal and only afterwards helping the injured person on the ice? And in the second half of Ep.12: The couple are finally together and are fighting ALL THE TIME. Why are they not even enjoying their time together (in between fights if they must) after all that build-up? And I hate the drama for using my favorite aria and showing someone picking their nose ☹. I suppose all of that was meant to be funny and different from regular happy endings… Instead it ended with a really lame kiss ☹

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The show sparkled because of its two leads. Their chemistry was spectacular but the biggest flaw of the show was the story and it became apparent in last two episodes. It couldn't be helped because it was based on existing IP which made me think why such generic story with dash of supernatural power was chosen? I am erasing 4 episodes from memory and will remember that it as 8 episode drama.

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Fully agree that the show would have been better if stopped after ep 10.
Just leave the flufiness and chemistry. The rest is a mess.
It's original to have the main couple fight after beeing pushed together by fate. But their fighting was too much. I understand that tuning almost everything to 10 is a stapple of kdrama, but is some case it does not works.
The second couple story was concluded quikly as an afterthough. As much as I did not care for them at the beginning, I would have preferred more time on them than on the childhood connexion or the creepy stalker.
With less story and more smooching the drama would have been better. At least some ep were good.

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Yes, I agree that the fighting was original for the end of a drama. I would like to see it in another story—it just didn’t fit here.

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I would have been completely fine if this drama had ended at the 47 minutes mark because for me the last 25 minutes have to be one of the most useless I've ever watched in a drama. Where did all that pettiness and bickering come from 🙄?

Anyway, the chemistry between the leads was truly everything.

I hope kdrama parents stop hiding the truth behind childhood traumas from their children

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