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Why Her?: Episodes 11-12

You might want to grab a pair of rain boots to help you slog through all the waterworks, because now that the truth is out, emotions are running high and the tears are free flowing. But along with all the relationship drama, comes new revelations about what went down ten years ago.

 
EPISODES 11-12 WEECAP

You know how I said that our leading couple could possibly use some angst to offset the yawnfest that is their romance? Yeah, well, I take it back. This week’s episodes definitely delivered on the anticipated pity party, but if I thought this couple was uncomfortable to watch when they were happy, then watching them being all mopey is downright painful. On the bright side, we also learn the full extent of everything that happened ten years ago, so… yay?

We begin on a somber note as Soo-jae grapples with the realization that Chan is Dong-goo. She tearfully asks aloud, “How could I not recognize you?” And considering there are back-to-back flashbacks highlighting Chan’s two very different faces right before Soo-jae asks herself this question, I have a hard time understanding why she can’t figure it out herself. (Seriously, the lengths this drama goes to in order to completely ignore this glaringly obvious detail is ridiculous, and I keep hoping that Chan will admit to having John-Travolta-in-Face/Off-level plastic surgery at some point.)

While Soo-jae tries to sort out her thoughts, Chan focuses on identifying the body found at the construction site, which he suspects is his step-sister JEON NA-JUNG (Hwang Ji-ah). Chan visits his father, hoping he will meet with Na-jung’s mother JI SOON-OK (Bae Hae-sun) and convince her to provide a DNA sample for the police so they can compare with the body. Chan’s dad, however, selfishly wishes to keep the past buried, and a disgusted Chan vows to cut ties with his father — this time for good.

Both Chan and Soo-jae get drunk (separately), but Chan hits the soju a little harder and instigates a fight with a group of random men on his way home. It is at this moment, as he’s laying on the ground and crying in frustration, that I found myself feeling the full impact of his wrongful incarceration. Not only did he spend a year in prison for a crime he didn’t commit, but when he was released, the remaining pieces of his family couldn’t be picked up and put back together. Unlike his father, who is so quick to put the past behind him, Chan cannot forget the brief happiness he felt being Soon-ok’s son and Na-jung’s brother.

After getting the anger and frustration beat out of him, Chan mopes outside in the rain until Soo-jae holds an umbrella over his head. But it’s not the happy, romantic kind of umbrella sharing so prominently featured in K-dramas. Instead, even though Soo-jae says she’s not ready to talk about the past, it’s clearly a I’m-returning-your-umbrella-because-we’re-done kind of moment. As Chan watches her walk away, he drops the symbolic umbrella, preferring to stand dramatically in the rain while a moody OST ballad emphasizes the melancholy moment.

Our leading couple’s gloominess continues to permeate just about every second of this week’s episodes, even when they aren’t on screen together. On the surface, Soo-jae wears her cold work facade as she wraps up the construction incident and assures Sung-beom that the best way to quiet the protesting victims and their grieving families is to offer them a very generous settlement. When she’s alone, though, Soo-jae lets her mask slip. Suspiciously, she acts more guilty than upset that Chan lied about his identity. Hmmmmm…

Chan continues his hunt for the truth and visits NO BYUNG-CHUL (Kim Han-joon), the man who confessed to killing Na-jung, in prison. Chan always doubted that Byung-chul was the actual killer, but he never had any proof. Byung-chul, who is up for parole soon, sticks to his story — including the part where he claims he dumped her body in the ocean where no one could find it. But her body was uncovered at the construction site, which means Byung-chul lied. He’s not Na-jung’s killer.

It’s this knowledge that gives Chan the courage to speak with Soon-ok when she returns to the law school clinic to apologize for her previous outburst. Chan reveals that she wasn’t mistaken — he actually is Dong-goo — and with his identity out in the open, he tries to convince her to speak with the police. He believes the uncovered body belongs to Na-jung, but Soon-ok, who is still in denial that her daughter is dead, causes another dramatic scene.

Since Soon-ok won’t go to the police herself, Chan goes digging through her trash to find something containing her DNA, and with a ziplock baggie of Soon-ok’s hair in hand, Chan tries to convince the police detective to compare it to the body. Because Chan is being dodgy about his own identity, the detective refuses to take Chan seriously. He assumes Chan is one of those pesky Gen Z YouTubers — you know, the ones always showing up with bags of hair and asking for DNA tests.

Chan reaches peak frustration right as Mi-rim and Yoon-sang walk into the room, and they overhear him when he blurts out that he believes the body belongs to his sister. The detective seems to be taking Chan more seriously now that he claims he’s a family member, but Chan panics and runs away when he sees Mi-rim and Yoon-sang.

Having hit a dead end in every direction he’s turned, Chan is understandably down on himself, so when Soo-jae calls him, he goes running to her like an eager little puppy, hoping for good news. Unfortunately, with a literal divide between them, she officially asks him to keep his distance. She explains her previous feelings for him were a mistake; she never would have fallen for him if she’d know his true identity. She wants to forget what happened ten years ago, and she can’t put the past behind her if he’s around as a reminder. Oof!

After she’s properly crushed his heart and sent him on his way, we learn the truth: she feels guilty because she intentionally lost his case. Her mother and brothers were arrested around the time of the trial, and Jin-ki advised her to make a deal with Tae-kook in exchange for their release.

Yoon-sang goes digging into Chan’s case files, and he figures out that Soo-jae threw the trial. And what does he do with this information? Well, he starts by inviting perverted professor Joon-myung to be a guest speaker during Soo-jae’s class — without Soo-jae’s permission and with his other victim Se-ryung seated in the audience. Bad form, Yoon-sang.

Reunited, the former prosecutor and public defender hash out the details of the case in front of the class, and even though Joon-myung is disgustingly cocky over his past win — despite Byung-chul’s later confession proving his case against Dong-goo was wrong — it becomes apparent that Soo-jae should have leveraged the unidentified finger print found on murder weapon to provide reasonable doubt.

This little impromptu classroom dramatization was all part of Yoon-sang’s plan to get Chan to realize that Soo-jae betrayed him ten years ago, and… wow. Just wow. I honestly don’t know what to make of this level of pettiness. Like, why would Yoon-sang publicly embarrass Soo-jae — the object of his affection — in the process of trying to end Chan’s crush on her? A part of me wonders — hopes — this is some backwards plan to protect them by keeping them apart. Because if this was all done because he was jealous… ugh.

Want to know what’s even more messed up? Not only did Jin-ki advise Soo-jae to lose Chan’s case, but he did so even though he knew Chan was innocent and strongly suspected Tae-kook covered up his daughter’s rape. Yeah, you read that correctly, and if you’re anything like me, you’re wearing a WTF expression similar to the one Soo-jae gave Tae-kook when he told her to marry Joo-wan.

Ten years ago, Eun-seo was at a club with friends and her drink was drugged by Joo-wan, Sung-beom’s son HAN DANG-OH (Park Shin-woo), and In-soo’s son LEE SHI-HYUK (Won Hyung-hoon). After she was abducted and raped, she escaped and ran into Na-jung outside the nearby convenience store.

Na-jung gave Eun-seo her work jacket to cover up, but before she could give Eun-seo her cell phone so she could call for help, the second generation Terrible Trio found her. Eun-seo panicked and ran out in front of a car, and because Na-jung saw everything, Joo-wan and his despicable pals made her their next victim.

To protect his son, Tae-kook framed Chan for Na-jung’s murder. Chan was released a year later because a television documentary was about to shine a light on Chan’s possible innocence, and Tae-kook couldn’t have people looking for the truth. So he had Joon-myung coerce Byung-chul into giving a false confession.

Jin-ki and Se-pil justified their ten years of silence by working under the belief that revenge was best served cold — after they had gathered enough power and evidence to overthrow Tae-kook and his co-conspirators. While there is logic to their silence and passive compliance, I’m right there with Soo-jae in feeling disgusted by them.

Tae-kook is still unaware that Se-pil and Jin-ki are plotting against him, but after eliminating Byung-chul (prison murder disguised as suicide), he learns that Chan has been visiting Byung-chul. Tae-kook is surprised that Chan is Dong-goo, but he seems even more shocked that he’s still alive. Reason being: at some point in the past, Tae-kook had Il-goo run Dong-goo over with a Truck of Doom.

Wait, what? When did this supposedly happen? Now, correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t remember Chan ever mentioning that he got hit by a truck and was hospitalized for an extensive period of time. This all feels a bit unexpected and random. But maybe he was hit so hard he had to get reconstructive surgery, and that’s how he got the new face?

Unfortunately, Tae-kook’s attempted murder of Dong-goo will remain a mystery for now because we jump to Yoon-sang cornering Chan and trying yet again to drive a wedge between the eternally faithful Chan, and Soo-jae, the noona everyone wants to date. Yoon-sang doesn’t pull any punches, and — in case Chan missed the point Yoon-sang was trying to make during show and tell — he reveals that Soo-jae bartered Chan’s freedom and struck a deal with Tae-kook.

She intentionally lost his trial in order to help bail her family out of jail, and as Yoon-sang continues to point out all the ways a relationship between Chan and Soo-jae wouldn’t work, the camera pans down to his hand where he’s holding his phone. Soo-jae is listening to every word, and it’s pretty obvious that she believes Yoon-sang is correct. She and Chan cannot be together because she abandoned him.

Except… that’s not Chan’s take on the situation, and he claims that he would have done the exact same thing in her shoes. It doesn’t matter that she betrayed him because she still believed he was innocent. That’s all he cares about, and he doesn’t care if that makes him a foolish gullible idiot.

And so we end on a positive, hopeful message. As cheesy and as unrealistic as it is for Chan to be totally copacetic with the fact that his legal council made an unethical deal and did not honorably represent him in the court of law, I welcome Chan and Soo-jae’s potential reconciliation. They are more tolerable together than they are apart.

In general, I’m feeling emotionally fatigued after this week’s episodes. I’m not pleased with some of the character development and reveals, particularly the fact that Soo-jae lost Chan’s trial because she made a deal with Tae-kook. I would have preferred it if she lost due to incompetence. The loss and subsequent feeling that she failed an innocent person due to her own shortcomings should have been enough to initially motivate her to become a better lawyer, and the (supposed) stillbirth and Joo-wan’s betrayal would have been the catalyst that turned her into a cutthroat lawyer bent on revenge.

Se-pil and Jin-ki were also disappointing this week. I can’t imagine what they could or should have done differently because Tae-kook is, indeed, a formidable foe who would have completely destroyed them ten years ago. So I understand why they have been biding their time, but you mean to tell me that Se-pil amassed a crap ton of money and the only thing he and Jin-ki did to atone for their silence was put law school pamphlets in Chan’s mailbox? Rude.

 
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I haven't much liked recent episodes and after reading this recap I understand the show better and like it less.

If this show were a big-budget computer game it would be the one that doesn't send out review copies in advance so potential purchasers won't hear what a lemon it is before they line up to buy it on launch day.

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I agree this was sold as one thing and really has been a disappointment and keeps getting worse.

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@daebakgrits I was beginning to miss some of your humour from "The Ghost Doctor" and "Business Proposal" recaps that I was overjoyed when you began this recap with such an epic statement🤣🤣🤣.

I was shocked while watching TOD's appearence, but I LOL'd on reading your line about reconstructive surgery😂😂😂 How did he even survive that crash?

This drama is one of those series that go from wow, okay, why, to whatever. Can't believe Seo Hyun Jin lost weight for this mess of a drama🙄🙄🙄

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Love the transition phases of the drama you summed it up perfectly.

I am shocked that the actress lost weight for this role maybe I missed the images where she was overweight but even if she was why would this role need a model figure it’s not relevant for the plot line even bearing in mind the expectations placed on the leads that sounds extreme.

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There were articles that mentioned that Seo Hyun Jin lost weight for this role after taking director's suggestion because she has to wear chic tight fitted clothes. I only knew about these articles, when I went on a google search to confirm my suspicion of her weight after watching her in the white dress that showed her collarbones more prominently (In case, if you are wondering what that dress is, it is the one in which she confronts the girl who falls head first from the TK Law firm's building terrace).

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Haha! My comedic side comes out more when I really like a drama or when a drama has gotten so bad that I can no longer reign in my snarky side. I have finally unleashed the snark.

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Episode 12 finally managed to make me follow the plot attentively again. Lately I had been playing more with my smartphone.
In fact, I found it quite exciting to find out what actually happened on the night Chan's sister was murdered.
I almost felt like I did at the beginning of the series, when it looked very promising and I was looking forward to the rest of the episodes.

But then that was it.

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@daebakgrits thank you for sharing your thoughts on this ridiculous set of episodes. It felt like we were watching together and both saying so glad its not just me querying how bad is this really going to get?

I have stuck with this drama as I really want to know how all the pieces fit together and there is so much that happens each episode that no recap would be able to cover it all. However, the writers seem to be getting way too complacent and are assuming the audience will stick with them no matter how ridiculous the storyline.

Frequently we see the Soojae is way ahead of everyone else when it comes to having counter measures in place to address the issues that everyone else has yet to consider let alone problem solve for. However, it is ridiculous that she only seems capable of showing her true self when drinking with her friend. When she is sober she becomes stupid when she is with Gong Chan or deals with anything connected to him. How come she has started crying due to the remorse and guilt about his case when way worse things have happened to her and she presents as cold and detached?

So glad we finally have an explanation for the significant change in appearance for Chan as it looks like plastic surgery was needed rather than done as a deliberate attempt to create a new identity.

I completely missed the whole context setting to why Soojae was on the phone listening in to Yoonsang and Gong Chan having that conversation. Yoonsang seems like he is a fast learner and has started to apply the things he learnt in the law clinic to check on his dad, brother and the Gong Chan case but then he ruins it by saying or doing something stupid. That’s when I just start to hear the chorus of this song playing in my head. It should be his song on the OST 🤣

https://youtu.be/hjAvXipZ2Kw

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How come she has started crying due to the remorse and guilt about his case when way worse things have happened to her and she presents as cold and detached?

Ikr! She did not care about that girl who fell from the building top, but she is still regretful about her first case🙄🙄 It is as if the writers needed a reason for a breakup, but then that is like entire kdramaland😂😂😂

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You're welcome, and I'm happy to assure you that are not alone!

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By the way, during the scene in the sauna (last screenshot), my only thought was that the men were hopefully wearing pants under their bathrobes.

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I was thinking how is the tablet still working in the heat it would shut down steam up etc. and the poor man in the suit must have been seriously overheating.
I get the men are living a pampered lifestyle with his soft as a baby’s feet and meeting up socially during work hours but I don't really want to see old men in the bath, sauna etc. lets just stick to the golf club, posh restaurants etc.
On a side note a lot of dramas use the traditional style building restaurants for confidential meetings where you can hear through the paper doors and walls I don't get it.

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I'm happy that the truth about the past is out.

I understand why the professor and Se-Pil didn't try to help Gong Chan in the past, it was a lost battle and would have made him their next target sooner. I wonder who was behind the TV show about his innocence for the villains to find a new murderer. But they could help Gong-Chan in the past and said him the truth.

I'm tired by Gong-Chan. He acts so reckless, screams everywhere, etc. He could use his brain and be discreet. He's right to be angry against the professor, but he should be angry against Soo-Jae too, not a long time, but his unconditional love for her is more tiring than lovely in my eyes. He's like he was still the teenager she defended.

I really don't care about the change of actor in the past and the present. I mean it's pretty usual in Kdrama. But for the truck of doom, I guess it happened when he got out from the prison but it's weird it doesn't appear on his investigation board.

Yoon-Sang continues to be completely useless to the story... What a wast for Baek In-Hyuk.

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Thanks for the weecap @daebakgrits, I think I'll skip these episodes and read the recaps until such time as the show gets back on track (hopefully).

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Accept that you are only going to be reading weecaps from now on as I can’t see it picking up any time soon.😒 So disappointing, it’s like watching Sherlock Holmes and Moriarty battle it out with Watson bumbling along behind them as a plot device so the complex plot can be explained for the reader’s benefit.

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I have episodes 8-12 downloaded on my phone with no real intention of watching them. I figured if they were on my phone then maybe i'd be motivated to catch up on what i've been missing. But reading these recaps makes me just want to delete them off my phone lol... Oh well... I'll just be rewatching some of my favorite kdramas and sticking to a few ongoing shows till this one is completely over and decide whether I want to finish it or not... I truely hope the FL's next project is something worth finishing. I really loved her in The Beauty inside and You are my spring..

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Just when I thought this would finally gain some needed substance, they go for an all time low point - all of the connecting characters in fact. I can understand the main cast in the good and evil domain but Director Baek? Why? Just why? Sepil's time bidding had better be extremely worth it. If anything unnecessary or stupid harm comes to he or Director Baek, then Why Her? will have done the best of its worst, cause it has done its worst with thier characters already.

And for the first time, I actually like Gong and Yoon Sang on screen – with their own plots. Gong with his backstory and Yoon Sang with taking up his role of douchebag.
As TK's son, is Yoon Sang allowed to bring in a guest professor to teach. If the ploy to make me dislike him for good they've succeeded.
I do hope Chan finds definite closure as in individual from the incident of 10years ago by the time this concludes.

Why Her? better have something worthwhile coming for the trio baddies and their sons. It better not serve a moment of despair adrenaline rush arc where it all comes crashing down in episode 15&16. It's has to crash down episode by episode, tendon by tendon, skin by skin, bone by bone.

@daebakgrits, how you manage to recap this and last weeks episode with annoying dignity takes a whole lot of selfcontrol. You lace your discontent with sweet words I must say. I couldn't be that nice.

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A delightful read. Thank you @daebakgrits

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….I see I made the right choice in dropping the show last week. Thank god for my foresight because the development here looks unbearable. What a waste of Oh Soo-jae’s character. This should’ve been a career-defining drama for Seo Hyun-jin, but the show is dumping its own potential down the drain in order to subject viewers to the mediocrity that is this unethical (and extremely boring) student-professor romance.

I’m sure Hwang In-yeop thought playing the male lead here - with an established actress like SHJ to boot - would be a leap forward for his career, but I’m convinced it’s instead done severe damage to his career. I remember not even that long ago when people were talking about how he was a scene-stealer in 18 Again and True Beauty. Look how the narrative changed almost overnight. He’s now being lambasted online for being a terrible actor and the worst part of the show. I don’t even think it’s entirely his own fault - not even a seasoned veteran can make a nothing character like Chan interesting, but he’s not exactly an acting prodigy and it shows. This failure of a character is a combination of weak acting and abysmal writing.

As for Bae In-hyuk, *sigh*. I have no idea why he took on this role. His character is basically useless except for when the plot needs someone to be unnecessarily petty. He deserves better than to be saddled with this mess. All the actors do. What a waste.

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You should watch the confrontation scene between Gong Chan and Yoon Sang Bae in episode 7 or something. Bae In-hyuk isn't any better than Hwang In-yeop. None of them shine, even a supporting actor like Kim Jae Hwa who has a lot of dramas in her resume come across as lacking, which confirms that the writer isn't doing much for any of the characters except for the protagonist and the antagonist.

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Just to clarify, I made the BIH and HIY comparison because they have similar work experience and to point out that writer is doing injustice to everyone.

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Oh absolutely. I’m not implying that one actor is better or worse than the other. These are both rising stars with passable acting skills and a writer who seems determined to drag everyone in the show down with them.

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Sounds like the director probably sucks too- as it's their job to direct the actors in the scene, tell them how they want them to act etc (adlibs are the exception).
I dropped this at episode 2 tho, so win for me.

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It’s just incompetence all the way around. I regret even giving this a chance when I was so disgusted about the romance to begin with, but I couldn’t resist when people on twitter (it’s always that hell-site) kept sharing Seo Hyun-jin girlboss moments on my timeline. You’re smart for dropping it like a hot potato. I need to stop watching garbage past first episodes just because I have a crush on the lead actress.

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I definitely agree with the Hwang In-yeob narrative that's circulating at the moment. I hope he has the mental calculation to stay away from noona romance for a very long time. For a male lead, he's a very glaring weak link.

I blame Chan's likeability more on the writers character building than HIY. They didn't build the character well. It's law school for crying out loud, people of all ages attend law school so he could have gotten an appropriate age if they wanted him as a romantic interest. It's one thing to deal with the tetchy student-professor thingy but to add a glaring age difference into it, with his hair style just accentuating the difference more and more, what exactly will HIY salvage with his experience. I still stand by the fact that had makeup and costume given him a matured hairstyle, I wouldn't excessively bother with the noona romance. His character specifications are just unfair to begin with that he just can't match it up when he's with the veteran casts.
The guys praises has been sang so much so well that I'm pissed that the first time I'm watching him, it's an unpleasant experience. I hope they abandon, if they can't remedy the romance plot so the show doesn't ruin him totally and focus on his backstory because he's really shining whenever his backstory plot is on.

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A professor-student romance is already an extremely difficult situation for most viewers to get behind (understandably so! there’s a reason it’s illegal in so many places). Add onto that an obvious age difference and glaring dissimilarities in life experience and personality, and what you have is a tedious process for anybody to root for. This entire romance has been the drama’s weakest link and the narrative doubling down on its screen-time does not bode well. What they needed to do with Chan was NOT pair him romantically with Soo-jae and simply make him a student that she once represented with a disastrous outcome. Honestly, it’s a shame they didn’t go with that approach because the previous roles Hwang In-yeop shined in were ones where he played delinquent/misunderstood students who are actually sweethearts. If Soo-jae was just his mentor and not his f*cking girlfriend, it would’ve been much better. There could’ve been a subversion of the belief that every kdrama needs a forced romance no matter the genre and there wouldn’t be endless press about how the ML is a terrible actor. HIY could’ve played to his limited strengths and viewers wouldn’t need to sit through this slog. Don’t get me wrong, the show would still be deeply flawed for a multitude of other reasons, but this would be one simple fix.

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This would have been so much better! But I would take it one step further and remove the whole side-plot where she became a teacher. There has been absolutely no point to it beyond giving her a rag-tag team of mostly useless students to occasionally do her grunt work.

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Unless there’s yet another change where the students are better integrated into the main plot (like in HTGAWM), then yes absolutely. Those parts are tedious to get through, especially when we know there’s more engaging stuff ahead.

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I apologize in advance for making you (and anyone else passing by) read my ranty fix-it fanfic, @jerrykuvira. Can you tell I’m mad about how the writer went about this show? I totally agree that the weaknesses in Chan’s characterization lies mostly with the writer and not Hwang In-yeop. The writing for him and the entire supporting cast is complete garbage.

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Don't worry because anyone going through your comments would find your fanfic more interesting than the drama 😁

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The problem I identify anyway... is that it being a noona romance, and a teacher/student one at that, was 100% deliberate, in part to target the people that do like that, from premise alone.
It is the dramas weakest link, but it was also fully intentional from conception. So you'd have to go right back to whenever they came up with this idea, and go past that to whenever they first thought of "noona/student/teacher"! and go NO! And forbid them from writing THAT concept on its own entirely, never mind the rest of the plot- because there's no way this writer could have made the noona/student/teacher thing work, in any set up.
lol.

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Fully in support of time-travelling to slap the hands of writers away from their pens/keyboards for attempting to make student/teacher ‘romance’ a thing in the first place. I’m not typically about policing art, but the only context in which I support depicting these kinds of relationships is if it also portrays the abusive dynamics commonly present in such situations. In other words, stop romanticizing it, show the reality. This isn’t cute or quirky, it’s powerful adults being creeps and younger people being exploited/not knowing better.

So the minute I figure out the formula to time-travel, @ writers of Why Her?, Melancholia, and like a hundred 2000s j-dramas: it’s on sight.

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Student/teacher = no/never for me. That's why I didn't start watching this mess in the first place. Agree with @ladynightshade that the ALWAYS abusive nature of these relationships means that has to be depicted if a show is going to have such a relationship in the first place.

I have a similar reaction to most workplace 'romances' but that's a rant for another day.

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As for Why Her? specifically, I agree that the relationship wasn’t just organically created along the writing process, but the actual premise in the first place. The writer wanted to have their weird student/professor + lawyer/client fantasy, but probably realized that that alone won’t appeal to literally anybody but them. Hence, all the terrible lawyering and last-minute thriller nonsense, with a dash of gaslight, gatekeep, girlboss flavour to spice it up for the masses. Now, it’s no longer a creepy story about a teacher exploiting her student, but the tale of a badass woman fighting back against sexist systems of oppression or something and actually, *YOU’RE* the weirdo for not liking this story about a strong female character™. I hate it so much. I hate that one of the few times we see a female protagonist actively dealing with misogyny in law and the South Korean justice system has to be in this mess.

…Can you tell I hate this show? Have I properly conveyed my hatred to unsuspecting beanies about a show I dropped through *checks notes* EIGHT comments? Someone please stop me.

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Since episode 6 i already give up on the story. Still watching it just to see chan's face 😄

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This is an appreciation post for Yoon-sang. Not because his character makes any sense, or because the role is particularly well-acted, but because his actions seem to be short-circuiting noble idiocy routines enacted by other characters.

Usually you see a third character trying to defeat noble idiocy by telling the two leads they need to be together. I appreciate that this guy runs around expressing so much idiocy solo that it’s like he’s sucking up all the oxygen in the room and there isn’t any idiocy left for others.

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Loving that image of being a magnet for noble idiocy! Laugh out loud pre lunch moment for the day 🤣

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