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Good Job: Episodes 7-8

This week on Undercover Boss — I mean, Good Job — our chaebol and his keen-eyed sidekick disguise themselves as members of his company’s janitorial crew, and toilets aren’t the only thing they’re cleaning. There’s some corrupt management that needs to be trashed, but tossing out the riff-raff upsets the status quo and paints a target on our hero’s back.

 
EPISODES 7-8 WEECAP

Good Job: Episodes 7-8 Good Job: Episodes 7-8

We pick up this week where we last left Sera and Sun-woo: surprised that they’ve woken up in bed together — fully clothed, of course, because they are on that slow-burn romance track that we love oh-so-much. Once Sera gets her bearings, she leaps out of bed, concerned that she was the one who pounced on him last night. Not only did I get a good snicker out of her thinking she was the more likely aggressor, but it warmed my heart that she trusts him not to have not taken advantage of her. Dawww!

Sun-woo assures her that she didn’t take advantage of him while she was drunk. Instead, she fell asleep, he carried her to the bedroom, and like a proper gentleman, he crashed on the sofa. At some point in the night, though, he went to the bathroom, and out of habit he climbed into the bed instead of returning to the sofa.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

After sorting out what happened the night before, Sera and Sun-woo use his secret tunnel to take a shortcut to work. Sera sets out for Tae-joon’s office unaware that Tae-joon now knows she’s been spying on him. Plus, after pondering her identity a little longer, he finally recognizes Sera as the woman in the pink dress who so elegantly compared him to a monkey’s scrotum.

Sun-woo realizes — either telepathically or via Tae-joon’s cloned phone, not sure which — that Tae-joon is onto Sera’s real identity, so he tells her to abort the mission. He will help her find a way out of the building undetected. The plan: hide her in a trashcan and smuggle her past Tae-joon, who is on the hunt and out for blood.

While he does manage to throw Tae-joon off Sera’s scent with a strategically placed durian, Sun-woo’s chosen disguise complicates matters. He and Sera are mistaken for real members of the janitorial staff, and they are put to work! Coincidentally, their first task is to clean the office of Manager KIM HONG-SOO (Kim Joon-won), who has seemingly disappeared after logging into the company forum and posting a tell-all exposé publicizing Tae-joon’s slush fund.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8 Good Job: Episodes 7-8

After searching Hong-soo’s office, Sera and Sun-woo come to three conclusions. One, Hong-soo was not liked, especially among the female staff. Two, someone left-handed drugged his coffee, so he’s probably not hiding of his own volition. And finally, whoever drugged the unlikable sexual-harrassment-lawsuit-on-legs was probably not Tae-joon, because Jae-ha is also searching for Hong-soo.

From that point on, our hero’s investigation is repeatedly stalled by a series of tasks handed down by the manager of the janitorial staff, which yields a bunch of comedic hijinks as they try to solve their latest mystery and avoid detection. The poor lofty chairman roughs it for the day and has to clean the toilets of his own company.

Not only does he have the misfortune of seeing and smelling some things that he’d rather forget, but he also learns that the members of his cleaning staff are under-appreciated and mistreated. Company policies put in place by — you guessed it — Tae-joon have made them second-class citizens, pariahs that should remain unseen and un-smelled by the rest of the company staff.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8 Good Job: Episodes 7-8

Sun-woo’s stint as a janitor also makes him privy to a lot of company gossip, and eventually he puts all the clues together to figure out that a former employee drugged Hong-soo and posted the message on the forums under his username. She wanted to expose not only Tae-joon’s slush fund, but the toxic and sexist work environment that she and her female coworkers had experienced. Ashamed by his ignorance and failure to protect his employees, Sun-woo encourages her to file a lawsuit and share her evidence of the slush fund with the police. He has her back.

And as another act of benevolence, he remodels the janitors’ break room and revokes all the rules Tae-joon established to segregate the cleaning staff from the rest of the work population. It’s unclear if the cleaning staff eventually recognize Sun-woo from his cardboard cutout in the lobby, but either way, he’s earned their loyalty. And I loved this wholesome undercover boss resolution. Sure, it may have taken us on another detour away from the whole murdered mother plot line, but I honestly don’t care if the revered Queen’s Tears necklace ever gets mentioned again.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

Oh right, the necklace! Now that Tae-joon’s slush fund and Sera’s alliance with Sun-woo have been exposed, Sun-woo drops all pretenses and goes for a more direct approach. He straight up asks Tae-joon how he came into possession of the necklace. Tae-joon’s confusion over the matter indicates that he didn’t kill Sun-woo’s mother, which was pretty obvious from the beginning, but his round-about way of skirting the truth points to the more likely (and age appropriate) culprit: Wan-soo.

After a celebratory dinner with Sera, Sun-woo walks her home — omo, they’re so close to holding hands! — and reveals that he believes Wan-soo is the villain that they are going up against. That’s when Sun-woo notices the gangsters lurking in the shadows. Trying not to alert Sera, he abruptly cuts their conversation short and urges her to head home. Sera, who definitely wants to linger, reluctantly follows his orders, but she only gets so far before turning back and witnessing the gangsters attack Sun-woo.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

When Sun-woo unexpectedly puts up a fight, one of the gangsters stabs him, which was not part of their original plan. Unsure of how to proceed without their boss’s orders, they abduct him, but Sera — and a no-questions-asked taxi driver — pursue their getaway van.

Sera uses her super-sight to tell the driver which turns to make, and in between instructions she calls Jin-mo, who is trying — in a roundabout way — to define his relationship with Na-hee. When they hear that Sun-woo has been kidnapped, they hop in the batvan, and while Na-hee drives and weaves through traffic, Jin-mo clings to the “Oh, shit!” handle and uses his laptop to track Sun-woo’s cell phone.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8 Good Job: Episodes 7-8

Our trio regroups at the gangsters’ hideout, where their leader PRESIDENT BYEON (Ryu Sung-hyun) calls Tae-joon and updates him on the current situation. Yeah, they were only supposed to rough up Sun-woo a little bit, but one of his guys got a little stabby-stabby, so what should they do with Sun-woo now?

Tae-joon panics at the messy turn of events, so Wan-soo takes the phone away and tells President Byeon to take care of Sun-woo — permanently. After hanging up with Wan-soo, President Byeon puts Sun-woo inside an oversized fish tank with a lid, and it’s clear his murder method of choice is drowning. But it’s a slow process — what with filling the tank and stuffing Sun-woo inside it — so Sun-woo tries to stay his execution by explaining to President Byeon that he’s worth more alive than he is dead. As President Byeon considers the offer, Sera and the rest of the rescue team suit up and arm themselves.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

Entering the warehouse to what sounds like a bootleg version of the Ghostbusters theme song, our battle-ready heroes come charging in with a forklift, lead pipes, glacial acetic acid, and a slingshot as their primary weapons of choice. The skirmish is just as chaotic as it sounds, but like all of Jin-mo’s backup plans, it works, and Sera and Sun-woo escape into the woods.

Unfortunately, the gangsters follow them. Sun-woo’s protective instincts outweigh his injuries, and he tells Sera to run while he holds the men off and herds them in another direction — a direction that leads to him falling off a cliff. When the police arrive on the scene and comb the woods, they are unable to locate Sun-woo, and Sera fears the worst. To make matters worse, Wan-soo and Tae-joon moved quickly and flipped the narrative, causing the media to report that the missing Sun-woo is a corrupt chairman involved with gangs and drugs.

Sera is not able to idly sit around and wait, so she goes back to the scene of the crime in search of him. She’s not the only one searching the woods, though, and she inadvertently stumbles across President Byeon’s men, who have been ordered to finish the job they started. But before they see her, she’s grabbed from behind and pulled out of sight — by none other than Sun-woo!

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

Our favorite chaebol didn’t survive a stabbing and an attempted drowning just so he could let a little fall off of a cliff kill him! He’s gone into hiding, biding his time until he can put the next phase of his plans into motion. If Sera had stuck around the batcave a few minutes longer, she would have seen the coded message that Sun-woo sent to Jin-mo.

But if she hadn’t gone looking for Sun-woo, then he wouldn’t have whisked her away to his secret hideout (his childhood family home). And that’s waaaaaaay more enjoyable for us to watch — especially since their alone time together allows them to lower their barriers and open the door to more intimate conversations — and skinship!

Sun-woo’s wounds need dressing, and Sera innocently assists him, wrapping the bandage around his bare abdomen. For a woman who so recently feared that she’d drunkenly pounced on Sun-woo and ended up in bed with him, I cannot fathom how she didn’t jump him in that extremely charged moment. I guess her concern for his wounds outweighed her attraction, but if the look Sun-woo was giving her is any indication, he wouldn’t have said no to a little… pouncing.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8 Good Job: Episodes 7-8

But before anything happens, Sera notices a photograph of his mother. It was taken at the very orphanage where she grew up, and it confirms that Sun-woo’s mother is the “Angel Ajumma” that was so nice to her as a child. Unlike the other kids and adults at the orphanage, Sun-woo’s mom believed Sera when she said she could see things that other people couldn’t.

Being able to talk openly about his mother with someone who also has memories of her softens Sun-woo even more, and during their time together, they naturally grow closer. He holds her hand and falls asleep with her head in his lap when she wakes up from a terrible nightmare, and he indulges her every whim when she drags him into the nearby town to shop and eat street food. Then, they both take a bicycle built for two — but peddled by one because Sera doesn’t want the injured Sun-woo exerting himself — to a spot by a lake where both of them once (separately) visited with his mother.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

I know it’s overly cliché that they have a childhood connection, but in this case I don’t mind it because — even though Sera’s nightmares lead me to believe they might have crossed paths the night his mother was murdered — it doesn’t appear that they otherwise met as children. Instead, there is a degree of separation through Sun-woo’s deceased mother, and by making her their common ground, the two are able to bond over their shared memories and have their relationship evolve organically.

Sadly, their private getaway must come to an end because Wan-soo and Tae-joon have already moved to fill the vacant chairman’s seat with — no surprise here — Wan-soo. They’ve called a board meeting, but just when everyone present is about to make the official vote, the boardroom doors open dramatically.

Enter Sun-woo, looking like an absolute snack in his white suit, and at his side are Sera and Director Hong — who accidentally stumbled upon Sun-woo’s batcave and is now a fully initiated member of Sun-woo’s secret team. Oooowee! I really do love a good, “Surprise, bitches! I’m not dead!” cliffhanger.

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

It’s very rare that I can look back on an episode of a show and think, “Wow, hardly anything happened in the last hour to progress the plot, and I’m totally okay with it.” But that’s exactly what happened to me this week after watching Episode 7, and it made me realize that a large part of this drama’s charm is that it doesn’t try to complicate its overarching plot (viz., who killed Sun-woo’s mom) with a ton of twists and misdirections. Instead, it spoon feeds us the (fairly obvious) clues one-by-one and fills the gaps between each new lead with mini capers, situational comedy, and romance.

And speaking of romance, this week’s episodes had me squeeing out loud, which is a pretty dangerous thing to do while watching dramas on my lunch break. Thankfully, no one heard my squawking happy noises and mistook them for cries of pain because if someone had come to check in on me, it would have been a bit awkward if they’d caught me watching the shirtless Sun-woo scene. Seriously, I can’t be the only one who watched that quasi-backhug and thought, “Oh my,” in George Takei’s voice, right?

Good Job: Episodes 7-8

 
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I’m totally on board with this show; nothing really happened in the overall plot and I don’t care. Sun Woo got stabbed and then was totally fine except for when he needed some romantic first aid and I don’t care. I basically watched episode 8 saying to myself “this time, they MUST kiss!” 🙈 And they DIDN’T so now I have to wait till next week 😅😅😅

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Other thoughts:
- I liked that they found out the childhood connection and bonded over it; it doesn’t feel forced or shoehorned in to me the way that these things often do
- was the falling over cliff and faking his own death a deliberate Sherlock Holmes reference?
- his company needs to work on its security protocols if two janitorial staff that no one recognises can walk around for that long without producing any evidence that they are who they say they are. Three if you add in the ex-manager who wanted to expose Manager Kim.

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Ep. 9 was great silly fun and at one point I was laughing so long and hard my husband took off his headphones and asked me to shush, but now I cannot remember a single moment. I really appreciate these terrific recaps, @daebakgrits, because apparently the plot’s total lack of seaworthiness is affecting my brain and every detail leaks out as soon as the episode is over. When Sun-woo brandished a picture of the necklace, I had trouble remembering why it was significant.

I did have some trouble suspending my disbelief enough to fully enjoy ep. 10. The hero can fight off multiple thugs multiple times, run away (into a forest instead of the car, WHY) and survive a fall from a mini-Cliff of Non-Doom after being stabbed, beaten, and nearly drowned? I have no idea why I balked at this when I'm totally on board with every other absurdity. I guess miraculous recovery from massive blood loss is a tougher sell than super-acute vision. And the hero’s friends don’t call the cops but do stop to put on warpaint before rescuing him? The whole abduction-and-rescue plot was dragged out too long. However, playing house/footsie in the countryside was just delicious and the matching hippie tourist costumes were exactly what drew me to this in the first place. How can they look so silly and so hot at the same time?

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This is hilarious (to me, at least) - the show deactivates my brain so thoroughly that I can't even keep the episode count straight!

@beffels, good catch on the Sherlock Holmes reference!

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Lol don’t worry, I saw you said episode 9/10 and I was like omg did I get the number wrong 😄

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Yes on the warpaint!

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Are we supposed to take this show seriously? I don't think so - it's wacky (disguises, bat cave), silly (Ghostbusters Korea style; Hawaiian shirts) and has a murder plot that was telegraphed from the very first couple of episodes. It's not serious.

But I adore this couple - I adore the fact that after Ep. 2, they moved into Team Mystery Solver mode and then recently into solid friendship mode. I thought we would have a fake kiss by now (like the fake wife and fake girlfriend roles), but it didn't matter because I really prefer that it be real when it happens.

Meanwhile, I'm not one to use the word "squee" but I came close in Ep. 8 during their many talks, when they cleaned house together and of course, when Sun-woo clasped Se-ra's hand so she could fall asleep - and lightly brushed her hair back. My heart melted several times during Ep. 8 - this is MY kind of romance (team/friendship/love) and they've done that perfectly.

As for how Se-ra traveled back to the woods (bus? pink scooter? taxi?) or Sun-woo survived and managed to get a new disguise AND return to the woods in the nick of time or any number of other missing parts - I don't care. I will re-watch this episode several times before next week. 🥰🥰🥰

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I really appreciated and liked Director Hong's reaction to things haha
It was just like "well, this explains so much" haha and then disbelief that the sidekick could be lollygagging while Sunwoo is missing haha

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Same 😂

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I’m so looking forward to Director Hong being part of the team. He flipping deserves it after all the crap he gets from Sun woo. I was worried he was about to go and do a deal with the VP half-way through…

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And it wasn't just Director Hong who noticed! Kwang-ki OPPA (too bad, Sun-woo, he'll forever be Se-ra's oppa) also wondered why Jin-mo was canoodling with Na-hee when his boss had gone missing.

I also loved Director H's acid "That man has never contemplated a day in his life" re: the Contemplation Room.

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This show is just so much fun! I LOVE that the show isn’t shoving the murder mystery in our face and instead is focusing on the hijinks, adventure and romances of the characters. I think it is pacing the drama nicely. We’re at the halfway mark and I see where we’ll end up, but am totally looking forward to watching what further hijinks, adventures and romance get us there.

Also, I die every time Na-Hee and Jin-Mo have scenes together and I, too, was hardcore squeeing and couch-slapping at the development of Sun-Woo and Se-Ra’s romantic progress.

Law Cafe really should’ve taken a page from Good Job’s book (er, script)—metaphorically speaking, of course.

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There is a lot to enjoy in the show. I love the mystery mobile that apparently expands like Dr WHO’s Tardis and the way they all move from building to home to work to hotel via some sort of miraculous tube or transporter since everything seems connected! Oh, and the emergency janitorial cart, equipped with durians no less, handily parked somewhere just in case one of the team needs a rescue…that was just ridiculous.

I loved the Bossam moment when Eun Soo tossed the sheet over Sera and said, be careful, I might Bossam you. That was great.

I loved the bonding moments about Sunwoo’s mom, and the cute Kimbap picnic bicycle ride, and the shopping trip - I love Jung Ilwoos happy “yum” sound when he’s eating. I love how Sera found really ugly clothes and Sunwoo wore them without too much complaining. I love Jin mo, Na-hee and Sera’s ridiculous Ghostbuster style rescue using cleaning supplies and a fork lift. I love that the stint as a janitor helped the chairman see the plight of the workers and try to fix things. I loved when the evil assistant chairman and Tae-Joon walk down the steps and the janitors are all sort of hiding behind, hugging, and gently moving the Sun Woo cardboard cutout…that was funny and sweet.

I am happy every moment Jung Ilwoo (gorgeous in this, and generally an underrated actor in my opinion) is wearing his messy BaWoo hair and having adventures while trying to uncover his moms murderer. Yuri is doing well, in KYR opinion, at avoiding the “too sweet/candy” caricature that her role could be with a different actress. She is a great foil for Ilwoo - I’d love to see them together in other types of dramas. They just seem to feed off each other well. Plus, they look great together, so I am very happy the romance is finally moving along. And please, yes, kiss for goodness sake. The characters and actors are in their 30’s - what’s with shy glances and widened eyes…ugh.

Re: Beffels: I think the falling off the cliff/ faking his own death was both Sherlock Holmes reference and Bossam reference from when BaWoo tells Princess Hwa In “I’m a dead man” or something like that.

Tun your brain off and enjoy the ride.

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Thanks! I miss all the Bossam references because I haven’t seen it, I am seriously contemplating watching it next despite being not very patient with historical dramas.

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Bossam is beautiful. It’s filmed beautifully and it’s well done. There are moments that will irritate (for me, when the drama hits around episode 15 or 16 and we see less of Ilwoo, Yuri and their little group together), but it is, IMO, a very romantic story. Although lots of crying…

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I think I’ll have to wait till Good Job is over at least, i don’t think watching both at the same time will work. I’ve heard lots of people saying it tails off but what drama doesn’t, really 😅

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I don't think Jung Il-Woo is underrated, but I can see how newer kdrama audiences aren't familiar with him yet. He was definitely part of the hallyu wave in the late 2000s/early 2010s. He's phenomenal in every role he plays, even when the script isn't. *ahem Cinderella and the Four Knights cough*

But people who started watching dramas in the past couple years may not have known him because of his military service and the dramas he's chosen after. Also because he's 35 (international age), new viewers tend to watch trendy idol shows before branching out.

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Oh I love the *cough cough* re: Cinderella and 4 Knights! Sigh. He definitely was the best part of that, with those smiley eyes and adorable smile…

I agree military service then later script selection definitely has affected his visibility. I’m hoping the movie he just filmed will land him some good parts going forward. I want him to shed the chaebol/good guy role and do something nuanced next…Kim Nam Gil’s role in Through the Darkness! Lee Minki’s role in “My Liberation Notes” or Ju Ji-hoon in “Hyenas!” I think the roles in the 35-40 year old range will suit him well!

Until then, I’ll enjoy Good Job.

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I loved it in the first half or so (cheesy, candy romances are my fave), but then it got too far off the rails by the end.

He's so good at the chaebol role, though! But I also love him in sageuks, and I can see him doing lots of those, too. I'd also like to see how he'd fit in an ensemble cast drama now that he can play more mature roles. Crossing fingers for good scripts!

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Yes good scripts for Ilwoo! I’m looking forward to him in more mature roles. I loved the beginning of Cinderella and liked the idea of these missions…but it did seem to change into something else later. I wouldn’t mind a season 2 of good job. Maybe 8 episodes where the mystery mobile takes our intrepid detectives on another adventure - with lots of romance.

I love Ilwoo and Yuri together. Bossam was better but this one promises that long awaited kiss!

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Fascinating that Seon-woo manages to fight so well with a bleeding stomach wound. His healing powers must really be enormous.

Unfortunately, there were no fake dates this time, but there were some wonderful dress-up scenes again. How fortunate that the right clothes are always at hand, such as the uniforms of the cleaning staff 😂

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The couple is nice.
The story is ridiculous.
I still think the childhood connection wasn't needed.
I'm very happy to know there are only 12 episodes!

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No wonder the pacing seems fast!!

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These days, I’ve been looking for a light-hearted, wholesome romance with strong chemistry between the leads, and this is exactly it!! So much love for Jung Ilwoo and Yuri, and their CHEMISTRY! Sad this drama is coming to an end so soon - I could watch them for days on end.

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The way Sun-woo was collapsed on the floor bleeding one moment, and kicking down gangsters in the woods the next moment, fell off a cliff and showed up the next day fresh as a daisy -- that was a little much. In most shows, he would have needed emergency surgery, but whatever.... The respite at the childhood house was the best part, so no complaints.

The way Sun-woo got all grumpy whenever she mentioned her oppa, and spent the night all snuggled up, holding her hand, just to outdo oppa, was hilarious and adorable at the same time.

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Yet more random laughs in these 2 eps, like Sun-woo dying of disgust in the toilets, Jin-mo's appreciation of vegan bread, Na-hee's way with acetic acid and the world's most useless warehouse fight.

Assistant Kim, the gorilla in sheep's clothing, is giving both me and Kwang-ki oppa a bad feeling. I wonder if he has superpowers too, or if he is in fact the scary kid in Se-ra's nightmares.

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There's so much I really like about this show. But above all, I'm SO ON BOARD with our main leads' ship. I love how comfortable Sun-woo and Seri are around each other (and I think it's because Jung Il-woo and Yuri appear like good friends IRL), and there mini getaway was so cuuuteeee ~ WE NEED MORE!

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The show now has assembled the full TV version of Batman: Batman, Batgirl, Alfred (Director Hong), Robin who has a girlfriend! At this point it is really is a parody of super hero show, but I am OK with that since it is not taking itself too seriously.

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My reaction is 😍😍😍😍😍

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just so sexy funny! That bat cave is sure easy to find!!!!

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Since every building in Seoul seems to have a Willy Wonka elevator that connects to it, it's amazing more people haven't found it yet!

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Ha! An elevator that goes sideways just like in Willy Wonka!!! Perhaps they should at least change the book that opens the door??? Or, better yet, just put out a neon open for business sign!! Just part of the fun, I don't mind!

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This is show is so much fun that it's like the suspension of disbelief is not a conscious choice, it just happens as I'm carried along the merry pace set by the drama. As others mentioned, it's hard to remember the details after I'm done watching, but I'm enjoying it anyway.

Btw, how sweet was the cleaning staff trying to show their loyalty by hanging out by the cardboard cutout of Eun Sun Woo then reluctantly dragging it away when evil cousin & uncle came down the stairs.

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What brilliant fun episodes. I spent every scene where the main leads were together yelling at them to kiss already. 😁
Super fun.

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I have a soft spot for Jung Il-Woo bc of Cinderella and the four knights and he is as appealing in this silly but super entertaining show! I also saw Kwon Yuri in Gogh, the Starry Night, and I really liked her in that one too. In any event, I loved the going back to sleep scene. Sun-Woo's instinct to hold her hand and stroke her head seemed so natural and their comfort level and ease with each other was definitely laid out well. The scene came off as romantic, but also, just like warm hug kind of scene between close friends leaning on each other.

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Did anyone else catch the Bossam easter egg in ep 8?!? I seriously squeed! This show is light on plot and is really just the Jung Il Woo / Yuri chemistry hour and I am okay with that. They honestly have some of the greatest chemistry of any on screen pairing I have ever seen. They had it in Bossam and they have it here. I just adore them and am okay with just watching their crackling chemistry for an hour. I wouldn't say that about just any Kdrama couple.

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