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Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Our sisters are left grieving and confused in the wake of their Great Aunt’s death. However, there’s little time to mourn, as they must prepare for a trip to Singapore that’ll determine their fortunes one way or another.

 

EPISODES 7-8 WEECAP

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Aunt Oh’s death is tough on all of the sisters. In-joo, wracked with guilt over how her orchid-induced blackout may have somehow been responsible, receives a pep talk from the world’s worst unqualified therapist, Sang-ah. To wit: barricade all the bad feelings behind a door. Ideally, never unlock it.

Meanwhile, In-kyung receives a vast inheritance… of debt. Aunt Oh left the bulk of her assets to her financially-savvy great niece, but their value is outstripped by what she owed. In-kyung recognizes the painful effects of Jae-sang’s sabotage, and blames herself. As her other relatives hem, haw, and disavow the inheritance, she resolves to rebuild the family business from scratch. It’s only when she discovers that the supposedly unsentimental Aunt Oh kept a handmade card from In-kyung in her desk for decades that she breaks down and cries.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Later, the news is all abuzz as Aunt Oh’s murderer, her housekeeper, confesses. He’s an extremist with a homicidal grudge — but, more importantly, he’s a stooge of the Jeongran Society. Spurred into cooperation, the sisters investigate. In-kyung is especially keen to solve the mystery of a secret key card she inherited along with the rest of Aunt Oh’s possessions. A frantic sweep of her office reveals a secret door… and an empty safe. Judging by the blue orchid lurking on the scene, it’s not hard to guess which hidden society cleaned it out.

In-kyung, taking a hefty sniff of the flower — heedless inhalation of unknown substances must be a family trait — musters her resolve once more. She’s going to take down the Jeongran Society via the press. But, In-joo’s mic drop trumps hers: she owns 70 billion won. The sisters make a deal — they’ll go to Singapore, In-hye included, and withdraw the cash. Afterwards, In-kyung will be free to write the perfect exposé.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8 Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Elsewhere, Jae-sang rises to the seat of Mayor on a wave of public acclaim. His acceptance speech is revoltingly populist — and strikingly familiar. In-kyung wheels out the video of General Won’s practically identical speech to the troops in Vietnam. Talk about dog-whistle politics! Moreover, there’s a familiar face in the Vietnam video: Aunt Oh — who, as it turns out, served as a Lieutenant. The twelve founding members of the Jeonran Society met at a hospital during the Vietnam War. All but one are dead. The survivor? CHOI HEE-JAE… father of Choi Do-il.

Jae-sang’s mayoral victory has done nothing to dull his temper. He swiftly flips from sweet-talking his wife to caging her against the wall when she rejects him. Soon after, In-hye wakes to the sound of Hyo-rin hyperventilating — and to Sang-ah’s screams, as security wrestle her back into the house. In-hye proposes a distraction: why don’t they investigate the attic room? The miserable lump that is Hyo-rin beneath the duvet stirs in interest.

Our teens Nancy Drew their way through Sang-ah’s old photo albums, discovering empty cut-outs of a missing figure strewn throughout. There’s also a box — one Hyo-rin used to play with as a child. Unlatching it, they discover a perfect replica in miniature of Hwa-young’s death… right down to the red-heeled legs dangling from the closet. Sang-ah’s advice to In-joo was shockingly literal. The box was an exhibit from her days as a theater graduate, titled ‘The Closed Room’: a doll’s house with no door.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Next morning, Hyo-rin is summoned for a cheerful father-daughter breakfast… where she is serenely informed that her mother is sick. She’ll be recovering in her room for the foreseeable future — behind a locked door.

In-kyung and In-joo’s next investigative stop is to prison, where they meet with Do-il’s mother, AHN SO-YOUNG (Nam Gi-ae). She’s understandably hostile. But, In-kyung knows all about her. Long ago, So-young confessed to the murder of the Hongsin-dong Resident Compensation Committee’s chairman: a brutal killing, involving blunt force with a bloody hammer. It had all the hallmarks of a crime of passion, yet the hammer was purchased a month beforehand — and the murder only sped up the redevelopment she supposedly hated. In-kyung goes straight for the jugular: the only explanation is that So-young was acting her part in a show — at the behest of an unknown director.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

It’s when In-joo name-drops Do-il that she baulks. Her son, she informs So-young, is next on the list to be framed — probably for In-joo’s own murder. Will she help them expose the Jeongran Society now?

It’s enough. In-joo meets Do-il at their usual bar armed with information. So-young has a message for her son: an answer to a question he asked her twenty years ago. The answer is “no.” The answer is also an address on a sheet of paper, which In-joo dutifully hands over. But, no sooner does she utter the words, “I went to see your mother,” Do-il’s defenses spring back up. He’s done. Their deal is off. In-joo is on her own, and she’d better not contact him again.

In-joo presses. She knows about Jae-sang’s father, PARK IL-BOK — a tidy man, who hated suffering. So-young was a first-time killer, but the murder scene was immaculate. So, here’s her offer: once she withdraws the 70 million won, In-kyung will publish all they know. That’ll include exonerating So-young by revealing Il-bok as the real culprit.

Do-il responds by handing In-joo a pen drive: the location of Aunt Oh’s murderer’s ex-wife. He insists that he disdains revenge. Then again, when he flatly states he’s giving this information because he no longer cares that it’ll put In-joo in danger, it certainly smacks of retribution. In-joo gets the last word, though. She was in danger from the start. She still believes that her horse — Do-il — can jump the fence.

Both Do-il and In-kyung (the latter with Jong-ho, as ever, in tow) converge on the address given to him by So-young. In-kyung observes Do-il approach a forest shack to speak with the man inside (Kim Myung-soo).

Little Women: Episodes 7-8 Little Women: Episodes 7-8

The next day, she enacts a gambit worthy of the fearless reporter whose entire career can be summed up in one creed: rope yourself to a pole in the centre of a hurricane. She taunts the man’s dog into biting her, gaining admission to his cabin while he bandages her wound. Here, she addresses him by name: Choi Hee-jae. She needs his help as witness to take down the Jeongran Society. But, Hee-jae’s deadpan disdain puts even his son’s to shame. In-kyung is ordered out, but she leaves far from empty-handed; Jong-ho has been secretly filming.

Meanwhile, it’s In-joo’s birthday. Her present from In-hye? The dashcam footage she and Hyo-rin hid. It seems someone’s seen past Jae-sang’s facade. But, Jae-sang’s got surer schemes up his sleeve. Do-il is issued an ultimatum: kill In-joo, or be next on the hit list. Actually, first on the hit list is Hee-jae, whose address Do-il surrendered — but, forewarned by his son, the ex-soldier has rigged his house to hell and back with explosives.

In-joo treats herself to drugstore makeup and a swanky dinner, in the unique ensemble of a princess skirt, Bruno Zumino heels, and a baseball cap. Here, she’s interrupted by Do-il. He’s here to show her a recent photo from the International Orchid Society. It’s of a woman supposedly named Oh In-joo. Her back is turned, but her ankle displays a prominent orchid tattoo. Could it be Hwa-young?

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Elsewhere, Hyo-rin reveals that her true talents lie, not in art, but infiltration, as she tampers with the house’s CCTV to visit her mother’s room on the sly. The teens, In-joo, and Sang-ah have been collaborating on an escape scheme to Singapore. However, nothing lies in the locked room but disappointment. Sang-ah’s arm is bruised and scratched like Hyo-rin’s, but her smile is beatific as she explains she made up with Jae-sang. Hyo-rin, defeated, listens as Sang-ah gently whispers in her ear.

Meanwhile, In-joo arrives in Singapore. Do-il escorts her to a blindingly beautiful hotel, all marble and gold. Here, In-joo receives a confusing reception from the staff. They seem… deferential? Her English is spotty, but after some fumbling with her phone’s translate function, she realizes it’s because the name Oh In-joo has currency. Apparently, she regularly frequents this location… as the world’s foremost collector of rare orchids. In-joo’s eyes widen in wonder — and hunger — as she is treated like royalty, receiving a tour, a palatial suite, and an assistant on 24-hour call.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Back in the far less golden confines of Aunt Oh’s home, In-kyung descends the stairs to find an intruder. It’s Hee-jae, picking at her display board on the Jeongran Society. In-kyung, evermore fearless, simply asks if she got anything wrong. Strictly speaking, he tells her, Aunt Oh was never part of the society; she just looked after them. He recognizes the effort In-kyung put into this investigation, but, to be blunt, she’s an alcoholic — with, to be blunter, no access to the national news. If he’s going public, he needs credibility. In-kyung remains unfazed. Immediately, she calls up her ex-boss: she has a witness who can provide evidence of the orchid murders. He agrees to let her on air.

Hee-jae has a less orthodox suggestion. Or rather… he has a van full of artillery weapons. If he guns down Jae-sang, surely that’ll make the news. In-kyung stands her ground: the slush fund ledgers will kill Jae-sang’s career far faster than a bullet. He agrees to hold fire — for now.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8 Little Women: Episodes 7-8

In-joo strolls through Singapore as if in a dream. Everywhere, she is recognized as the glamorous Oh In-joo, orchid billionaire. It must be Hwa-young. What if she survived — with In-joo’s paperwork and her face? Plastic surgery makes anything possible. But, Do-il is unconvinced — it’s all too improbable. (Recalling my Episodes 1-2 recap, I feel as if he’s admonishing me personally…)

He has bigger fish to fry: namely, being the Henry Higgins to In-joo’s Eliza Doolittle and dressing her up for the International Orchid Festival. The results are stunning: In-joo emerges in a sleek blue dress and starry silver earrings, looking every inch the billionaire she’s playacting. When the first lot at the auction — an orchid appropriately named the Princess of Thieves — is announced, Do-il urges her to bid. In-joo does so: first, with hesitation, and then with increasing tenacity, even as the numbers become so huge as to sound unreal. She wins, standing to rapturous applause.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

However, the bliss of the afternoon is shattered when one of the socialites lets slip that she saw a woman who looks exactly like In-joo. In-joo races down the hall, desperate to find her friend — only to learn she just missed her. A message was left. I was always curious how much you would shine when you bloom. It’s exactly what Hwa-young told Sang-woo.

Back in Korea, Jae-sang speaks to In-hye. He heard Hyo-rin visited her mother. Was this In-hye’s scheme? She must remember, they cannot run away: he has men in Singapore. But, In-hye’s courage knows no bounds. Jae-sang, she says, once asked her if she could betray the people who loved her. She could. After all, that love brought her closer to death. But, Hyo-rin is dying, too — and, for her sake, In-hye hopes her friend becomes capable of betrayal. Alas, it appears Hyo-rin is capable of no such thing yet: at her mother’s suggestion, she surprises Jae-sang onstage during an interview. Afterwards, she receives nothing but shouted abuse — as Jae-sang realizes Sang-ah sent her daughter as a distraction, to aid her own escape.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8 Little Women: Episodes 7-8

The Singapore auction has served its purpose: In-joo now has a public profile. She and Do-il should have no problem withdrawing her funds in transportable cash. They have two hours to visit multiple banks without suspicion. But, a text from In-kyung causes In-joo to waver; In-hye informs her Jae-sang has people in Singapore. The old question emerges: can In-joo truly trust Do-il? Do-il, with masterful poise, hands her surety — in the form of a purse-sized pistol. He’d love it if In-joo trusted him, but the next best thing is if she trusts no one but her cash and her gun.

At the last bank, In-joo receives a secret note, urging her to flee from Do-il. Poker-faced, she follows its instructions to the letter. As Do-il is held up by an employee, she wheels the suitcase of cash through the side door, rushing into a waiting car. It speeds away, whilst agents drive after them in pursuit. In-joo reviews the last instruction: go to the apartment under her name. But, as the car swerves, they’re hit by — yes — the Truck of Doom, Singapore Edition.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

Bloodied and battered, In-joo drifts in and out of consciousness, determined to die. A woman approaches and urges her to wake: Hwa-young. Crawl if you like, she says — but you must keep the cash. In-joo replies that she doesn’t want it. With the last of her strength, she clutches Hwa-young’s arm. The only reason she came to Singapore was to see her friend again. Just once.

I’m dead, says Hwa-young. So, get it together. Run as far as you can. And indeed, when In-joo wakes — alone, in hospital, with her suitcase of cash — nearby are a pair of walking shoes. They’re the same ones Hwa-young once lent her.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

With every last reserve of strength, In-joo pulls the suitcase across the city. She needs to know why — why did Hwa-young choose her in the first place? After being given the money, who was she meant to become? Finally, she reaches the apartment. There’s an iced blue drink prepared for her, which she guzzles gratefully. After that, there’s nothing to do but sit and wait — as a woman in Bruno Zumino heels runs across the street.

Meanwhile, In-hye approaches Hyo-rin with a terrifying discovery. After hacking into Jae-sang’s CCTV files, she knows who killed Hwa-young. It’s —

Sang-ah. That’s who arrives at the apartment. It’s also whose fur coat Hwa-young was wearing when she died. Now, delightedly, she reminds In-joo that she’s always loved secret plays — and In-joo is her favorite character. The perfect doll. The people in Singapore who recognized In-joo? All actors. In-joo’s life at the company, as an outcast? All stage-managed by Sang-ah. Her friendship with Hwa-young? Sang-ah was pulling the strings. Hwa-young was a favorite character too — and through her meaningless death, she achieved the perfect narrative.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

At this last part, In-joo snaps: that’s not who Hwa-young was! But, Sang-ah has a perfect death choreographed for In-joo, too: suicide, after successfully conning the people of Singapore. In-joo struggles to protest, but finds her limbs are weak — the moral of the story being, never drink a suspicious blue beverage. It may contain orchids.

Stroking her cheek, Sang-ah assures In-joo this is her fault: she was born poor, and dared to aspire. Slurring, In-joo asks to see the suitcase of money one last time. Sang-ah leans down to oblige — only to find the suitcase is full of bricks. She turns. In-joo aims Do-il’s pistol at her head.

Little Women: Episodes 7-8 Little Women: Episodes 7-8

So, the unseen director is Sang-ah. From the doll’s house that fascinated In-hye, to the abundance of wide shots throughout the drama of characters in the middle of stage-like rooms, it’s been well foreshadowed. Remember the lesson from several episodes ago — that when you’re rich, you can control the very space in which you exist? Well, Sang-ah is the ultimate expression of this: she creates locked theaters wherever she moves. I deeply enjoyed the way she poured tea whilst explaining the story she’d crafted to In-joo — it was a nice reminder of the show’s Louisa May Alcott-like aesthetic, and a symbol of Sang-ah’s author-like control. If anything, Sang-ah is positioning herself as an updated Alcott: a creator who uses sets and cameras rather than pen and ink.

However, In-joo’s vision of Hwa-young was a reminder that escape is possible — as long as In-joo can run. Though Sang-ah may have stage-managed In-joo and Hwa-young’s relationship, I think it’s implied that an authentic friendship existed between the gaps. In-joo’s defense of her was touching: Hwa-young wasn’t the simple, tragic figure Sang-ah attempted to turn her into. She was smart enough to teach In-joo to distrust the wealthy. Do-il, moreover, cares at least enough to tell her to trust herself. Meanwhile, perhaps In-kyung can wrest some control from Sang-ah and Jae-sang over who gets to tell the story, but that remains to be seen…

Little Women: Episodes 7-8

 
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I wasn’t surprised it was Sang A, I knew it was her all along cause it so obvious she is the owner of the orchid tree and the one who taking care of it. Also the way she spoke in soft manner but almost childlike, like spoiled child, it feels there is something sinister and evil about it. But, the way she actually done it that left me in disbelief.

At the whole episode 8, I was continually getting headache because of those people who said they’ve seen In Joo either a day or a minutes before. I kept wondering what happened and thought the writer chose that tropey route of impersonation in the story. Even after In Hye revealed the cctv to Hyo Rin, I thought “Oh, it was Sang A who died, and the alive Sang A is Hwa Young”. I’m ready to be disappointed with this switched identity theory, and then realized it wasn’t make sense cause people were seeing In Joo, not Sang A. After they revealed it was all a real life theater directed by Sang A, oh my, girl is sicker than I could have imagine. Park Jae Sang seems like a pickpocket at the moment compared to her.

I don’t have a slightest idea what will happen next. I’m ready to be surprised and satisfied by the way this evil couple will be punished. Bring it on, writernim. It better be good.

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'Even after In Hye revealed the cctv to Hyo Rin, I thought “Oh, it was Sang A who died, and the alive Sang A is Hwa Young”.' Glad I'm not the only one feeling confused over this 😅😂.

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I have to admit this week was almost masterful in the way it set up the possibility that maybe, just maybe, Sang A was actually a victim of Jae-sang's cruelty and all the overwhelming evidence that she was our main villain were merely red herrings. She literally told us she was an actor playing a role and had a doll's version of the murder scene perfectly staged in the attic.

But there was the possibility that all this was an escape plan from her abusive husband rather than ... whatever it actually was (I'm still not sure).

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Ooooh, I was just waiting for Sang-Ah’s level of cray-cray to be revealed and it did not disappoint!! She is by far one of my favorite villains and, probably characters, of recent times. It’s hard for me to even describe her. Her character is just so…luscious? Like, to just straight up call her evil is a total disservice. Also, Um Ji-Won is just killing it! I didn’t really like her (or her character) in The Cursed but am thoroughly enjoying her here.

I am a total sucker for gothic horror/romance and Little Women gave off those vibes so I was sold on the show with episode 1; however, in recent episodes it felt like it was towing the line pretty closely into makjang territory. Also, I wasn’t sure how I felt about the whole psychedelic ghost orchid aspect either. I decided to do a little research on our production team to see if it would help restore my faith. I knew the PD had some buzz coming off of Vincenzo (which I didn’t watch) but I didn’t really know anything about the writer. Turns out, she’s a frequent collaborator with Park Chan-Wook!! (If this was mentioned here before then I definitely was not paying attention—yikes!)

Anyway, faith restored! I have no idea what’s going to happen as things wrap up but I am super excited to go along for the ride!

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I often imagine what this show would be like if Park was directing. The dynamic duo on the small screen would be something else.

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Little Women is not makjiang - but an extended “Park Chan-work-esque” movie. No word for the thrill of these two episodes, I’m virtually breathless during the second half of Ep 8.

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Apropos of nothing, this is now my favourite Director. I've loved the look and feel of everything she's done.

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Oh my god. These were the two most thrilling episodes in awhile! And watching them before bed didn’t help, I couldn’t really sleep from the adrenaline lol.

I always knew it was Sang-Ah who was the real villain but I was still surprised at how it all got revealed! I never once imagined that all these people would be real life actors in her real-life play and now everything makes sense (her artwork, hyorin’s hallucinations, HY’s death). All these actors kept confusing IJ that even I was confused myself lol. Sang-A makes Park Jae Sang’s antics look like child’s play. Pretty sure he locks her up to prevent her from doing more damage to others and to himself/his Presidency campaign.

I’m starting to really like all the 3 sisters, esp IJ and In-Hye – kudos to her for smelling the coffee and passing the memory card to her sis. I admire her guts though, takes some courage to talk to PJS like that.
Small thing, but I was a little disheartened (and I’m sure Do-il is too lol) at how IJ would trust a note sigh.. over Do-il, who though is a shady person, I think has some feelings for her and has never put her in harm’s way. Except for withholding information from her. Deep down she doesn’t trust him and I kinda feel the same sometimes, cos tbh I was kinda wondering if Do-il was in cahoots with Sang-A and just playing his part all along. I was also wondering if he was pretending not to believe IJ when she suggested HY got plastic surgery to look like her.

Also, I rarely watch dramas for eye candy these days and most actors' "visuals" aren't my thing, but phew Do-il/Wi Ha Joon in that blue denim shirt/white denim pants combo and tux? Gosh Im deadd. Why did he not call me out for a date and split the 70bil won with me whilst he was in SG damn.

I’ve said this a million times, but wow the writing is just phenomenal. I’m not sure if I’m gonna be seeing anything of this level in a K-drama again. But writer-nim got me out here, out of the woodwork fully invested in this drama, writing up my thoughts on various forums lol. Every character has multiple layered sides to them that feel so real, and the villians all make me second guess myself – what is their intention/what is it that I’m seeing about them. It feels like an Agatha Christie novel. I can’t even begin to predict what she has in store for the last 4 eps, I’m just here for the ride and am gonna be really sad when this drama ends.

Also, alathe, thank you for the wonderful weecaps. You’ve provided some additional perspective to my viewing lens for this drama. I totally did not catch the wide-shots and the foreshadowing of Sang-A’s actions. And I absolutely love that your comments always crack me up me in the middle of a serious read. Some gems in this weecap
- But, Hee-jae’s deadpan disdain puts even his son’s to shame.
- Elsewhere, Hyo-rin reveals that her true talents lie, not in art, but infiltration,
- But, as the car swerves, they’re hit by — yes — the Truck of Doom, Singapore...

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*Got cut off by the word limit I guess, oops

- But, as the car swerves, they’re hit by — yes — the Truck of Doom, Singapore Edition.
- In-joo struggles to protest, but finds her limbs are weak — the moral of the story being, never drink a suspicious blue beverage. It may contain orchids.

Thanks for the amazing recaps thus far! Enjoy them as much as I enjoy the drama.

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Yes, I especially enjoyed this week recap because of all the fictional characters (Nancy Drew, Eliza Doolittle) @alathe has used as referenced to describe another set of fictional characters. That was witty.

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Same! I loved the comparison of Sang-A and Alcott as well wow. This is why I still love coming here for recaps/weecaps, some of the analysis takes me back to theatre/literature classes when I was a student. So fun!

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The most extraordinary thing about this writer - and I almost can't believe I'm saying this - this show in all its crazed Makjang glory Is Little Women. It actually is. It's a gothic, post-Parasite Pilgrim's Progress about a poor family growing up and finding themselves in a world full of temptation. It's truly genius.

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I think for the most part you and I were thinking alike concerning episode 8. I always believed Sang-ah killed Hwa Young, knows more than she is letting on and pretends to be so 'sane' with her soft spoken nature, especially when she asked In Joo if she knew where Hwa Young lives. So with all your resources,and putting Hwa Young in charge of laundering funds for you, you wouldn't make it a point to find out where she lives??
I also thought Do-il was trying to confuse In Joo by pretending he didn't know Hwa Young was still alive. On some level though, I believed the story was headed toward confirming that she was in fact alive.
And I may have some opposition with this, but I honestly do not like In Hye, no matter that she is now trying to help here sisters, I still don't trust her.How did she know how to work Park Jae Sang's computer? And she did promise him that she can betray the person who loves her most, because she really wants to escape this life of poverty. Her sisters should just allow her to leave and go live her rich life.
As we still have 4 more episodes to go I suspect we may be in for some more suprises.

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I wasn't so surprised by Sang-Ah being behind it because there were some clues before like the orchid, the objects found by In-Hye and her daughter and her father was the general.

I was really happy to see the sisters working together. They are the strongest together. Each one of them is discovering things on this crazy family.

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I'm still on episode 5, so thanks, @alathe for the weecap. I like it that I already know what will happen, yet still excited to see it with my own eyes.

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I agree these are strong episodes, hopefully, the next ones are, too. While Sang-A being the ultimate villain is not a surprise , but oh boy, the many twists are well executed. For a minute there, I even believed Hwa Young is alive. And in the end, I was clapping for IJ! As always, the shots and the cinematography are excellent. I am now a fan of this director and starting to be a fan of the writer - fingers-crossed that they land the ending well.

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I still believe she's alive. The tattoo on Singapore In-joo's leg. Was it drawn? It couldn't right? Hwa-young should be alive somehow. I'll stop believing when the drama ends.

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I do too. In-joo's illusion when she was in hospital makes me think Hwa-young's still alive. By the way, who could have replaced all the money with bricks?

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In-joo. At least she learnt one trick from her encounter with the 2 billion won.

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well, you are right.. there is still that unexplored possibility. she may indeed be alive.

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I did say it would be interesting if Sang Ah was the villain. That entire family is wackadoo, but she has been sniffing those flowers too long. Sang Ah's mother's death left her in a bizarre state of stunted growth. At least the sisters have gotten smarter. They also seem to be working together as well.

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I watched the first two episodes and have since been lurking in the weecaps, but (despite @alathe 's phenomenal-as-ever weecaps) these episodes are the first that have made me want to return. I think I'll do better when I can watch this show straight through without having to wait and now I'm actually excited to do it!

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SEE, I KNEW THIS SHOW WOULD COME THROUGH. Yes, the sisters have frustrating elements about them but they are some of the most relatable characters in k-drama land in my opinion. I find it more enriching to abandon my expectations of characters and let drama stories unfold on their own. Then the drama ends up being a treat (or *trick*, depending on the ending).

So do ya'll think Do-Il is a bad guy? I don't think so. The tender rage in his eyes after hearing news from his mother just said it all. He also cares deeply about In-Joo. He wasn't going to kill her. He had a plan. But he was going according to the "stage play" with the expectation that she might deviate. He set her up for success by giving her a gun. I am smitten by this dude.

I am nervous for little sis cause...I'm not sure who will have her back besides her sisters. In-Joo has Do-Il, In-Kyung has her neighborhood bae, but who got In-hye's back? That little princess daughter sure can't with her fragile soul. The little sis has guts but she better be careful.

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In-hye has her wit. A wit so strong it stunned Jae-sang in his tracks, and she got the last word in. That is no easy thing to pull.

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I think the Nancy drew teen duo might turn out to be the strongest of the lot though. Hye Rin does seem to have some hidden skills and certain looks that make me think she might pull a switcheroo worthy of her parents in the last few episodes. Not that she would turn the evil route as her sires, but the girl is been underestimated by everyone around her, her parents and paid bestie included. From a throw away dialogue in one of the earliest eps when her class mates expressed wonder at HR having a friend, have been thinking this girl is the ‘outcast’ in the gilded world. Since then i have been bracing for a twist from the only seemingly sweet innocent-ish character on the show. Will see if it pans out but if not, i still think out teen duo would pull through in the end.

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Two very strong episodes. So much happened in both I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. I wasn't surprised Sang-ah was behind everything, but I was surprised by how far back it went. She'd been playing with In-joo like one of the figures in her models for years. And just because she could it seems like. Looks like Jae-sang spends a lot of time cleaning up her messes, but he won't dare leave because of his lust for power and his own evil plans. Quite the couple they are.

Just one thing though; STOP SNIFFING THE POISONOUS ORCHIDS!

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"Just one thing though; STOP SNIFFING THE POISONOUS ORCHIDS!"

This. And, how many strange drinks are you going to drink??? If you know your life is in danger from a shadowy psycho... don't eat, drink, or inhale anything! Sheesh!

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At times I began to doubt that my theory that Won Sang-a was the real string-puller was correct. But in the end I was right.

I wouldn't be surprised if Go-eun's earrings contain a tracker so that she can be found by Do-il.

But I've been wrong about this series before.

With episode 7, I noticed again how much I like the soundtrack of this series.

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I think the story is becoming weird; So everyone were actors? Hwa-young too? Even her colleagues from her previous workplace?? What the hell? It's kinda like squid game (which I hated).
And I really can't get the whole idea of orchids and Vietnam war.
In-hye is becoming better; But In-jo's still soo dumb and naive. And though I like In-kyung , I doubt she'd be able to do anything as a reporter.

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I let out a big laugh when she said everyone was a huge play with real actors. like no.. please... lol

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Was it just me or ep 7-8 felt different than older episodes, like a different drama? Didnt hate it but i have no idea what’s going on anymore..

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I saw the reveal coming from a mile away, but the actual execution of said reveal still left me breathless. At the hands of someone less competent, Little Women could’ve easily devolved into weekender makjang nonsense, yet the story remains concise and thrilling without ever losing its edge. You can absolutely tell that this is the same woman who wrote The Handmaiden. I remain hooked weekly.

This would get me killed within hours if I were a character in the show, but I’ll say it: I would trust Choi Do-il over Park Jae-sang or Won Sang-ah any day. I realize that’s a catastrophically bad idea and maybe it’s just my weakness towards pretty faces taking hold, but even his mysterious, money-hungry shadiness seem more dependable to me than whatever the hell the real bourgeoisie and their sadistic crony are up to. That, and the fact he clearly has some semblance of a soft spot for In-joo. Can’t say for sure if it’s attraction, but it’s definitely not malice.

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He's so pretty I'd follow him and probably be dead too.

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Basically, he's very sane and the other two are not. So I agree that Do-il is at least somewhat trustworthy. He also clearly has a bit of thing for In-joo, which she seems to reciprocate. But I'm not sure he'd be the best boyfriend in the world--way too stoic and emotionally distant.

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As far as I can tell, Do-il may be a money launderer but he's been completely honest with the sisters.

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I continue to be very impressed with this show; it's so tightly written and directed that not one single moment is wasted. I was in awe this week of so many things:

--In-kyung's crazy and gutsy decision to lure the dog into biting her. Also, stupid because rabies.

--That utterly beautiful and tragic doll house/art project in the attic.

--The reveals about Do-il's parents.

--The junior Nancy Drews slowly peeling back the layers of all the madness and deception.

I do feel bad for Jong-ho, though. I was hoping his relationship with In-kyung wouldn't follow the same path as Jo and Laurie's, but In-kyung is so clearly indifferent and takes him for granted, while he would die for her. I wondered early on if In-kyung's boss might be the Frederick character, but I can't see Jong-ho somehow turning to an Amy this young. If he ends up all alone I'll feel sad for him.

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If there's one thing I got out of this week it's that I feel vindicated in my feelings towards the set design in the first 2 weeks.

When we were first introduced to the Crazy Orchid Mansion I felt the biggest immersive whiplash, from a production and art direction perspective, I've probably felt in a while. The way the Mansion was designed was SO jarring to me compared to the rest of the drama. The colours, the sets, the props, the decor, the frakking tree in the basement. It felt much more like an actual set (id est, when you can tell something is a production set piece and not a real location) than everything else; a polished up and fancy façade.
I concluded that a. I really didn't like this and b. that it had to be on purpose considering everything else but that even if it was on purpose and I was right about what it was trying to achieve, that c. I still really didn't like it.
Well, I was right. The Mansion feeling fake, and like a literal stage set piece fits right in with Sang A's life of theatrics, closed rooms, closed stages, toy houses, model houses, and playing people like puppets and dolls, including herself, which explains the jarring dissociation I got when first introduced to it, and get with every subsequent scene set therein.

Unfortunately, I'm not as big a fan of this drama as all its technical qualities SHOULD produce.
It has the direction, the symbolism, the colour, the design, of the sort I usually love, and also a lot of similar story concepts, actually, in a lot of ways, to Adamas (which I did for the most part enjoy), all of which would suggest it should or perhaps could be hooking me substantially, but so far I mostly just find this show u n h i n g e d, and not in a way I really enjoy.

Wi Ha Joon on the other hand... and his styling? Yes.

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I was feeling disappointed (another series focused on the corrupt?) but episode 8 perked me up.

My faith in writer-nim (who penned Mother adaptation, one of my favorites) is restored.

I love the musical score as well. There is no cliche kpop boy band singing nor cheesy English lyrics pounding repetitively in my eardrum. Just masterful score. Ala Money Flower.

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the music is superb in this drama. definitely another level compared to what we usually see in korean dramas. it's so moody, atmospheric, and stylish. great work. I wonder if the person responsible usually works with movies and not dramas. wouldn't be surprised if it was the case

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I don't think this is an adaptation of Alcott's novel... This KDrama is a psychological thriller with very different plot and plot twist ...

This is an original story

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Psychological thriller is this writer's bread and butter, and this is tame enough for dramaland.
I thought of Hans Christian Andersen's "The Red Shoes" but more from a villain's perspective. Perhaps, creating Karens out of the poor and volunerable.

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Why did she drink the Blue Ghost Orchid Drank ?

In -joo needs to remembers Tuco’s rule;
"When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk."

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I don't think anyone was surprised that Sang-Ah was the villain, but I was surprised that nearly *everyone* was an actor in Singapore. These episodes had a theater play aesthetic, and Do-il felt very much like an audience member making commentary (á la, there's no one with your exact face, In-Joo, pay attention).

There was foreshadowing that Sang-Ah plays the long game. She built that closed room as a student and waited years to do the live action version.

I appreciate that In-Joo is (slowly) learning from her mistakes. I was so happy that she didn't actually drag her money all over the city like last time. In-Hye is quite smart and resourceful. In-Kyung still gets on my nerves, and I'm not seeing that changing as we continue on...

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As mentioned by others these two episodes were as riveting as the premiere episodes. Also, I understand why I am not that bothered with In Joo's gullibility because I did not expect Sang Ah to be the villian. The show has done a good job of fooling the viewers by masking Sang Ah's evilness with the abuse plot.

I started to like In Hye. She surely has realized that having money does not mean being happy. I hope the drama concludes in a satisfying manner.

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This drama is such a fresh air in the months form the typical drama land story. Wish for more shows like this!

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The doll house death scene reminded me of Frances Glessner Lee, “the mother of forensic science “. An interesting story. Frances constructed crime scene dioramas so investigators could study crime scenes, way ahead of it’s time in the 1940’s. The amount of detail is amazing.

I

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Ok I mma put some thoughts down on the weird dynamic between PJS and In Hye. The couples inclusion of IH to their family has always been in service of protecting their weak child, but the last 2 episodes and PJS offering to include IH into their fam for realz got me thinking if he has begun to see her as a stand in for mini PJS. There’s been indications of that from their first talk that PJS is seeing some parallels between the weirdly strong girl and his steely determination to infiltrate the family of his benefactor. Both parents unfortunately do not consider Hyo Rin to amount to much as a person who would need soemone strong as IH to get her through the world. But while SH seems to just see her as a supplementary character who’s needed to support her favorite doll PJS seems to have identified some patterns of ambitions and grit and maybe down the line would be looking to mold her into a successor. Not that I don’t think he’d sacrifice her without missing a beat if it seems to be in his favor but at some level he does seem to understand the quiet hunger that made her turn on her real family. Afterall true capitalism values utility over anything

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Hi, there's a tune that plays in the background in episode 8 as from 26:18 when Oh In Joo gets out of the car and does some sight-seeing before meeting Choi Do-il. Would you by any chance know the song? Thanks.

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