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The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Our leading lady’s aggressive love confession has opened the door for our characters to discuss their feelings, but when one is unwilling to open his heart and the other is questioning the morality of her rash behavior, it seems unlikely that they will make any substantial progress.

 
EPISODES 5-6 WEECAP

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6 The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

After last week’s kiss between Jung-ho and Yuri, the question on everyone’s mind was: will Jung-ho smooch and run? And while most of us predicted that he would hold up his noble idiocy like a shield in battle, none of us expected him to stumble mid-makeout because of a poorly timed neck cramp. But yeah, that’s exactly what happened, and when his neck seizes up, he quickly uses it as an excuse to abort the kiss and scamper off to an acupuncturist.

Yuri follows him to the doctor because — unlike Jung-ho, who prefers to bottle up his emotions and let them ferment for 17 years like an aged wine — Yuri tackles her feelings like a linebacker and wrestles them into the ground until she has beaten all the answers out of them. So while Jung-ho lays prone on a hospital bed and a doctor places needles in his neck, he has the added torture of listening to Yuri monologue about her newly discovered feelings. But Jung-ho’s neck cramp bought him enough time to drop down from the clouds the kiss initially had him floating on, and once he returns to reality, he does what we all expected: he rejects Yuri.

Even though her assertiveness and perseverance is decidedly her, Jung-ho is thrown off kilter, largely because he’s secretly held onto his unrequited crush since high school and cannot relate to how quickly she acknowledged and confessed her feelings for him. Isn’t she afraid of losing their friendship? No she is not — largely because she trusts in her tenacity to hold on and not let go.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Following the rejection, Yuri redirects her emotions and goes after the civil servant who failed to remove Soo-ah and her sister from their abusive mother, but the resolution to the child abuse story arc flares up and extinguishes quickly and anticlimactically. Jung-ho once again steps in to help Yuri see the big picture: the blame cannot be placed on a single civil servant who hesitated to remove Soo-ah and her sister from her mother’s care without obvious signs of abuse to justify separating them from their only family.

The whole system is flawed, and thanks to Yuri’s (un)civil disobedience at the police station, she’s invited on television to discuss the issues and rectify her earlier misconception. And while she does call on the government to increase funding for the programs that have failed children like Soo-ah, there’s no satisfying resolution or suggestion that change will be implemented. So ultimately, the big takeaway following her television appearance seems to be that the airtime drummed up more business for her cafe.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6 The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

And that influx in cafe patrons is how she acquires her next client: a woman seeking to reestablish her innocence after she was unjustly convicted of assault after fighting off her lecherous employer. The case itself is only marginally important to the plot because — like every other case featured in this drama — it primarily serves to open Yuri’s eyes to a personal or societal issue she was previously ignorant to. And in this instance, the topic at hand is sexual harassment and consent.

Although I’m not a fan of the rushed setup, I whole-heartedly appreciate seeing our leading lady question her own actions (i.e. the kiss she planted on Jung-ho without his consent) and have an open discussion about the proper way to pursue someone and not cross boundaries. In my opinion, this was a lovely exploration of the topic, not only from a societal perspective, but with how consent — or lack thereof — is often portrayed in K-dramas. I think there are a fair number of us — myself included — who often look the other way when it comes to the questionable actions of our favorite characters because we viewers are privy to more information than the characters are.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Case in point: we are aware that Jung-ho has been harboring a 17-year crush and is receptive to the kiss, but Yuri doesn’t have that knowledge. She initiated the kiss based on the assumption that Jung-ho liked her because he was nice and protective of her, but as Seo-yeon so bluntly reminds Yuri, “nice” is a basic requirement for being a decent human. Someone’s niceness shouldn’t be viewed as the green light to sexually assault them.

Yuri is wracked with guilt, so when Joon, Eun-kang, and the neighborhood ajummas encourage her to drink with them, the alcohol causes her to verbally vomit her pent-up emotions on her unsuspecting audience. Their mood dampened by her mopey behavior, the group turns her over to Jung-ho, not realizing he — and the fact that she broke Article 298 of the criminal code with him — is the cause of her current emotional state.

Jung-ho patiently — and I mean patiently — takes care of her, and in the morning, Yuri apologizes for her drunken behavior and for not getting his consent when she kissed him. But Yuri is not ready to let go of her feelings for him, so she asks if it’s all right for her to keep trying to win his heart — the correct way.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Just as their relationship seems to settle into a comfortable understanding, Dohan Construction rises to the forefront of the story when Jung-ho tracks down last week’s dog murderer, beats him to a pulp, and drags him to Pyun-woong’s posh apartment. (Yes! Justice for doggo!) There, Jung-ho warns his uncle to stay away from the people he cares about.

Although Pyun-woong cowers to Jung-ho’s violent and colorful threats, he does not obey Jung-ho’s command. Instead, Pyun-woong shows up at Yuri’s cafe, supposedly with a job offer. Jung-ho is on edge the whole time, and it’s very obvious that Pyun-woong’s retaliation visit is a pointed reminder for Jung-ho: Pyun-woong knows Jung-ho’s weaknesses. How would Yuri react, for example, if she knew Jung-ho was his nephew?

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Pyun-woong’s visit somehow makes Yuri sick — seemingly from a mixture of anger and wounded pride — and while she recovers, she reads through the book that CEO Hwang gave her on the down-low. It’s one of Jung-ho’s novels that he secretly published under the Whistleblower pen name, and the book paints a story that’s similar to the fire that killed her father. Something written in the text compels her — fever, what fever? — to meet with one of her father’s former co-workers. He explains to her that the fire didn’t kill her father and the other workers. Instead, they died because the majority of the exits were blocked, which prevented them from escaping.

The news has a profound effect on Yuri, and when she runs into Jung-ho, she confesses that part of her doubted her father even though she knew Dohan Construction had shamelessly lied about his character. Jung-ho attentively comforts her in the aftermath of her emotional breakdown, showing her he loves her without verbalizing it, and Yuri points out how his actions clearly telegraph how much he treasures her. She just wishes he would stop being a coward about his feelings.

Something inside Jung-ho changes, brought on by the realization that even though Yuri may tilt at windmills and slay giants, she’s not always confident beneath the surface. That night, he updates his Korean Bar registration, and the next day he shows up at the cafe wearing a suit, prepared to take the cafe seriously.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6 The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

Among the cafe’s visitors is 14-year-old KIM MIN-KYU (Kim Jung-chul), and even though Jung-ho supposedly has a photographic memory, he fails to recognize Min-kyu from the day before, when he and the rest of Team Cafe came to his defense after they witnessed some bullies push him into the Han River. Eun-kang, however, was particularly affected by the encounter, so when Min-kyu tentatively orders a coffee, Eun-kang pays special attention to the boy and knowingly directs him to Jung-ho.

Much to Jung-ho’s annoyance, Eun-kang sits in on his consultation with Min-kyu, who asks some very pointed questions about the laws protecting juvenile offenders — especially in cases of serious criminal offenses. Jung-ho, however, does not connect the dots, so he’s perplexed when Eun-kang unexpectedly hangs up his apron and ends his shift early to follow Min-kyu out of the cafe.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6 The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

That night over dinner, Jung-ho breaks his silence and admits to Yuri that he likes her too, but for reasons he’s not ready to disclose, asks her to wait for him. Yuri is ecstatic, but she also lacks self-restraint. So she declares that they are no longer allowed to see each other at night because she’s not confident in her ability to keep her promise to wait. Hah!

Unfortunately, in the morning our lovebirds are not given much time to send each other secret flirty glances because both Min-kyu and Eun-kang are nowhere to be found. Suddenly, all the pieces fall into place, and Jung-ho realizes that Min-kyu is planning to harm his bullies before he turns fifteen and has to face the full weight of the law.

The fact that Min-kyu is probably with Eun-kang is extra worrisome, though, because Eun-kang’s sister was literally bullied to death, and Eun-kang went to prison after he locked her tormentors in a storage room and set it on fire. Although Eun-kang couldn’t bring himself to kill his sister’s tormentors and eventually opened the door so they could escape from the fire, he hasn’t let go of his anger, which he channels into helping Min-kyu. Unfortunately, his methods — albeit less murderous — are dangerous and unethical, and he doesn’t give Min-kyu much of a say in the matter.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6 The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

After the bullies arrive at an abandoned warehouse where they’re set to meet Min-kyu, Eun-kang lights a fire and locks Min-kyu in a room with instructions to climb out the second floor window. From a nearby spot, Eun-kang uses his phone to film the bullies fleeing the fire and record Min-kyu jumping to safety; the video will serve as evidence to corroborate Min-kyu’s lie that the bullies trapped him and set the building on fire.

Yuri, Jung-ho, and Joon arrive on the scene before the police, which gives Jung-ho enough time to scold Eun-kang. Not only was his plan reckless and unlawful, but his criminal background is going to make the police question his story, even with the video “evidence.” And sure enough, when Eun-kang and Min-kyu feed the police officer the fabricated lie, the officer questions why Eun-kang would be wandering around late at night in an abandoned area all by his lonesome. For a few tensely charged seconds, the police officer stares him down, but then Jung-ho comes to his rescue and surprisingly provides Eun-kang with an alibi.

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

I’ve got to say, I don’t like the direction this last case took. I’ve been wanting to know more about Eun-kang, so I’m disappointed that our first real introduction to him was so sloppy. Not only were we fed a rush-job explanation for his mysterious prison stint, but his solution to Min-kyu’s bullying problem was just plain stupid. Yes, by all means, lock the bullied kid in a burning room and make him jump out a window because that’s soooo not traumatizing or dangerous.

The whole situation left such a sour taste in my mouth that I was actually disappointed in Jung-ho for backpedaling and lying on Eun-kang’s behalf, and that’s before I take into consideration the legal implications of the situation. Jung-ho, a former prosecutor well-versed in the law, just provided an alibi for an arsonist who — good intentions or not — set fire to a building with kids in it!

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

In general, this last case highlighted the ongoing problem I have with this drama: the “law” part of the whole law cafe schtick. All of the cases aim to pull on our heartstrings, but they fail at this task because we aren’t actually given enough time to connect with the characters and feel emotionally invested in their problems.

Instead, I’m more interested in what happens after each case wraps up, as our hero and heroine learn something about themselves or society around them. For example, this week I didn’t feel anything for the woman who was sexually harassed by her boss, but everything Yuri went through afterwards as she questioned her own actions towards Jung-ho was pretty damn groundbreaking for a K-drama.

This particular gripe isn’t enough to make me hate The Law Cafe because there are many fun things that I do enjoy, but I strongly suspect the story would have been better if Yuri had quit practicing law to run a normal cafe. We still could have had the nosy neighborhood ajummas, the flower boy employees, and the track-suited landlord to provide laughs and hijinks. And without a series of legal problems to resolve — and quickly — Yuri’s character could have reflected on serious topics and evolved more organically. Not to mention, without all the cases cluttering up the plot, maybe Kim Seul-gi would have gotten more screen time. This drama is really doing her dirty. #justiceforkimseulgi

The Law Cafe: Episodes 5-6

 
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I'm really not convinced by this drama.

I'm not sure that I like Lee Se-Young's comedic acting.

For the stories and the character, they're not consistent. Jung-Ho can memorize a ton of documents but can't recognize the face of boy he saw the day before... If they couldn't fight against minors, they could take the poor boy with them, they all understood what was happening but they let him alone with his bullies.

The talk about no means no or yes means yes was interesting.

At this point, I wonder why Kim Seul-Gi is doing in this drama. The employees and nosy neigbours have way more screen time and development.

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I agree, and especially about KSG. Anyone could have played the friend with the baby. KSG's talent is wasted here.

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Oh @daebakgrits how I love your analogies haha
I'm not witty nor can I articulate things the way you and the other recappers do but you pretty much hit the nail on the head. I love "Yuri tackles her feelings like a linebacker and wrestles them into the ground until she has beaten all the answers out of them." Haha

This is one of the things I love most about Yuri, her passion and determination. I personally don't think I've ever seen a character like her before and she really is a highlight for me. I love how she wholeheartedly fights for people and when she's wrong, she actually reflects on her actions and tries her best to own up to mistakes. I think she's just so sincere even with her flaws.

I really *really* liked the conversations about consent. I just liked everything about it and I think it was done in a cool way. It felt like it was a natural conversation/exploration without it being preachy. I think that storyline was the standout for me this week.

Oh Jung Ho haha. I figured he didn't kiss her but I did not expect things to play out the way they did haha. I know I shouldn't use the word "expect" or "expectations" because I don't think I have any for this show but things never play out as I could imagine haha
I wouldn't have thought of a kiss being interrupted due to a neck spasm. I wouldn't have thought Jung Ho would do any consulting at the cafe (and make everyone appreciate Yuri even more). I wouldn't have imagined the dynamic Jung Ho and his uncle.

I personally love when a character's absence makes everyone realize just how important they are in how things function. For that reason I enjoyed Jung Ho doing the consulting. I don't know how Yuri would've handled things because Jung Ho's clients were all guilty but it also highlighted once again how Jung Ho is the brains and Yuri is the heart and what an awesome team they can be.

I also liked seeing Jung Ho with the cafe staff. His reaction to the barista just taking off without a word followed by the waiter just laughing it off and saying that means they're closed made me chuckle.

I think the reason Jung Ho didn't fully recognize Min Kyu is because his attention was on the bullies disrespecting him and the doctor instead of the wet boy in the hood. I think his outrage at them gave him tunnel vision. (At least that is the mental gymnastic explanation I came up with haha and it's plausible to me since I too have missed obvious things in different situations).

I get that he's deciding to be more active and engaged in things which means updating his law registration and dressing professionally but as soon as he started wearing the suit, I missed the tracksuit haha

I don't really mind that I'm not emotionally invested or attached to the actual cases but the reaction to them and how they make the characters grow or reflect. Could the story be richer if more time was spent on them? Sure but I don't think that's the point. I think the point...

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...I think the point is to how they affect Yuri and/or the other characters (such as the barista).

I do wonder how they are going to resolve the lie and the bully situation because it really didn't seem feasible for all the reasons mentioned plus I don't understand why the barista wouldn't have also recorded them threatening and beating up the boy before the fire stunt. (Or maybe he did and it will be further evidence)
For all the reasons mentioned, Yuri and particularly Jung Ho (since he cosigned that bunk) will need to course correct that situation.

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I just absolutely love episode 5, what an excellent way, except for the drunken antics, of showing consent. I love that she owned and understood that kissing without consent was wrong. One of my favorite episodes.

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💯!!!

There is nothing sexier than consent!!!

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I'm here for the storyline between Yuri and Jung-ho. I really like Jung-ho's character, and I appreciate that he finally took a step toward Yuri. Yuri's loud and crazy highs and lows are a little much for me.

The arson by a convicted arsonist was dangerous and stupid, and getting behind the lie was risky and out of character for Jung-ho. What lesson are we supposed to take from this case? How is this supposed to move the plot forward? Elements like this make me think the writer is too interested in shock value and not enough in a coherent tone and narrative.

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Yes to your paragraph 2. None of this made sense. Eunkang had already made the point to the bullied kid that having a criminal reputation is no easy thing - but suddenly he's ready to commit a crime that's going to land him back in prison in a heartbeat. How does that avenge your sister?? Then what possible motive does Jungho have for leaping to Eunkang's defence? They're not friends - there's just been distance and minor animosity between them. So why is Jungho willing to commit a crime which is going to get him (and everyone else - "He was with US...") in a ton of trouble? If he has spent the last 17 years holding a torch for Yuri, and the last 5 episodes going above and beyond to protect her, why would he put her and the whole shabang at such risk????? Seriously... My sceptical right eyebrow is raised higher than Crown Prince Won's at the moment as to how they're going to get round this one.

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My immediate thought was that he lied so that Yuri wouldn’t have to (admittedly that doesn’t hold up well when you think about it for long) - I guess we’ll see.

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All of what you said, plus it made even less sense when they showed how he and Yuri bonded when she took his case. Now that he has a second chance, he throws it all away to do the exact same thing? I expected Eun-Kang to have more depth behind his mysterious persona, but I guess not.

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I’m really enjoying this drama, and honestly, way more than I expected.

I’m not a huge fan of the case-per-episode format for legal dramas, but (as you noted here), the aftermath of each case is that our leads draw closer together, and now everyone’s cards are on the table. Kudos to this drama for not waiting until Episode 12, lol.

I also thought the discussion of consent in Episode 5 was really great, and much better done than in most dramas.

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I continue to really enjoy this show despite its flaws and weaknesses, and that's in large part due to the fact that I genuinely like both of the leads--actors and characters. Even during this early, push/pull phase, they're respectful of one another and I believe that they care for and understand each other (and when they don't, they're curious to find out). Yuri is passionate and sometimes impulsive but believable and charming. Jung-ho tries to be stoic but he's obviously a very caring and warm person, and he clearly recognizes and loves Yuri for the person she is.

The whole concept of a law cafe is and remains a little ridiculous as this whole story could have been accomplished with Yuri working as a local lawyer or public defender in a building owned by Jung-ho. And I do grow tired of this episodic format so prevalent in dramas recently. However, I've been more emotionally involved in the cases than I thought I would be, and I appreciate that the show tries to be nuanced in its portrayal of things like child abuse, the foster system, and consent.

I thought we were in store for a more old-school type of romantic comedy, and this is very modern in its feel, but I still like it. I feel like the writing has settled into a groove and although it seems all over the place at times with all sorts of subplots and emotional entanglements, it's keeping my interest and isn't at all confusing.

But I definitely agree that a glaring fault is the invisibility of Kim Seul-gi's character. She's such a brilliant character actress and comedian that it's baffling as to why she's MIA. I was thinking earlier that perhaps they did film multiple scenes with her but they ended up on the cutting room floor to dedicate more time to the cases. That's a shame. As I said, I really like both leads, but seeing them interacting more with their best friends and also seeing those best friends grow and change (marriage and parenthood isn't death) would only add to the drama's charms.

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It's unbelievable how much this drama, which I had no expectations of at all at the beginning, captivates me emotionally. I have already watched episode 5 twice, the scene with drunken Yu-ri even more often. Just thinking about it makes me laugh again, though I don't know what amuses me more, Yu-ri's drunken antics or Jeong-ho's horrified-disbelief expression.

The show has managed to surprise me several times. Not only because how the consensus theme was brought up, but because Jeong-ho talks about his feelings so quite early on. I was expecting this to be dragged out until he has no other choice.

I like how the typical roles are reversed. Here it is the FL who takes the initiative and chases after the ML.

And I am thrilled with the confidence with which Yu-ri wears her extravagant clothes. Not everything suits my personal taste, but I love her black dresses from the last episode.

While Yu-ri is impulsive and spontaneously follows her feelings, Jeong-ho sometimes overthinks things and he is fond Be it cooking when it comes to following a recipe (Yu-ri, on the other hand, can't cook at all) or advising the lawyer clients. You can tell that he is actually a prosecutor with heart and soul. I'm curious to see how long it takes for him and Yu-ri to face each other in the courtroom.

However, both are willing to learn from the other. Yu-ri understands that she was intrusive towards Jeong-ho and apologises. Jeong-ho, on the other hand, now has the courage to admit his feelings and tries to work as a lawyer again.

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I love how he says "kim yuri, kim yuri! Okay!" Haha
Even though he obviously frustrated and annoyed, you can also see their history there (at least to me).

Him thrown off by her is just always funny to me haha

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I haven't watched any episodes twice; maybe when it concludes? I can't believe were already at the halfway point?!

It's a gem; it's not the most smooth with its transition, but it has a sensibility that can be wholesome sometimes. I think the viewers already knew about his feelings for her, but if he confessed now, it would've cut short the episodes, lol. That said, it was nice to see him finally tell her to her face and not some half response but an actual "I like you." So now she was on the same wavelength regarding their emotions, but the way he needed time to process it felt suitable for his character. I loved when she said she needed to get out before things got more intimate; they kept teasing. Does this mean we're going to get an intimate scene?! The little daydream that Yu-ri had was kinda cute and hot.

While the styling can be hit/miss, I can't deny how well it suits LSY. It's been a while since seeing an FL dress in well-tailored clothing that's not three sizes too big. The dress she wore to visit her father's grave was aces. Even plain black dress, she incorporates Yu-ri's dynamic behavior in small ways, like the gothic lace vibes or the backless ties.

I didn't think of that interaction yet! I Am intrigued by how they would be far off in the courtroom. We are inching closer and closer to seeing Jung-ho in suits for good. Going to miss his rainbow-colored tracksuits; LSG pulls them off without looking rubbish! I hope when he does decide to wear the suit again, it's earned.

I like seeing our pair try to work on their feelings, although I will admit Jung-ho is more cautious given the whole Dohan
company ties. But it was nice to see his walls crumble around Yu-ri the more he's been around her post college.

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I'm kinda over law-related dramas at the moment, but I'm glad I picked this up. It's an easy watch once you get past the first two episodes and the cases aren't in the way of the romance plot (forgettable cases, even?). But realistically, I was all in once I saw the quick reference to Lee Seung-Gi's character in The King 2 Hearts!

I don't think Jung-Ho is a complete noble idiot because he still remained friends with Yuri in high school and part of college even after her dad died. He knew he was a Dohan chaebol grandson (although estranged) and still remained by her side after the case ruling. I also don't blame him for having enough of the fake relationship and being used by Yuri when he truly liked her. (And it may be a hard lesson, but your real/fake ex has no obligation to provide reasonings or comfort you after a break up.) They just speak different romantic languages, and it's taken 17 years for them to finally begin to understand each other.

On another note, idk why so many people are mand at the show for not featuring Kim Seul-Gi more when her character hasn't been shown much at all since day one? Her character is either a minor role or will become a bigger presence later. Seeing how little she was in the first 6 episodes, I'm sure she knew what she was signing up for and maybe deliberately wanted this kind of job/role. I don't think we should hold that against the drama. It's one thing if she had been prominent and then disappeared, but that's not the case at all.

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What reference to the king 2 hearts?

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In the first episode, Jung-Ho put his hands to his head and said, "ah, stress!" in response to Yuri annoying him, just like Lee Jae-Ha did all the time to everyone who annoyed him.

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I agree about the noble idiot thing. From day 1, I didn't understand why Jung Ho's actions were considered noble idiocy because he didn't break up with her to save or protect her or whatever and I thought that was the definition of a noble idiot.

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A noble idiot is someone who sacrifices their own happiness under the belief that they will make someone else happy through their sacrifice. Ironically, the sacrifice is what makes the other person sad. A breakup is not a requirement for noble idiocy, but in K-dramas, it often plays a role.

In this case, Jung-ho became a noble idiot after he found out his father (may have) thrown the trial for the Dohan Construction fire that killed Yuri's father and painted him a criminal. After that, Jung-ho quit being a prosecutor and started avoiding Yuri because he assumed that he didn't have the right to be in her life.

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I still disagree that he was a complete noble idiot for the reasons I stated above. Yuri never made it clear that she liked him back, so it was partly him deciding to distance himself from his one-sided love that became complicated while fake dating.

Yes, there's still some noble idiot there after he realized that his dad (may have??? Dad's comments have me questioning things) let Dohan go because they're in laws. Which is why he tells his cousin that they can't be involved with them. But he's definitely a modern version of a noble idiot because he still stays in her orbit and takes care of her when she needs it. Also, we have both characters admitting their feelings for each other and learning how to love and respect each other before the drama's midpoint! Yay progress!

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I forgot to mention how she basically said he turned her on and he could do nothing except clutch the bed haha while the acupuncturist was sneaking glances haha
When he finally snapped and said what is she saying right in front of the doctor, I was giggling so much haha. She was just in her own world with his exposed skin.
I swear there is a version of this show where people just meet up to gossip about these two haha

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My favorite scenes were
1. When Jung Ho was tilting his head while explaining her feelings for him. It was funny because it looked like he was dancing.

2. The second was when Kim Yuri expressed her anger at the Borough Office. She really acted that scene very well that it portrayed her anger and way Jung Ho carried her. I laughed so hard watching these scenes.

I think that the Barrister was clouded by his emotions that he was thinking about the consequences of his actions. He failed to realize that his actions has affected everyone around him.

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Edit: he wasn't thinking about the consequences

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I really enjoyed episode 7 here and how it dealt with consent. Really refreshing and hopefully the first of many improved consent situations in kdramas. Episode 8 wasn't as enjoyable for me, so overall quite uneven this week.

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Haha, I'm ahead of myself I mean episodes 5 and 6. Too many dramas! 🤣

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I've been enjoying the chemistry between the leads, and I love how the consent thing played out. It was really satisfying that the drama recognized that Yuri kissing Jung-ho was not consensual, whereas that kind of surprise kiss is usually romanticized. Just because the character is good-looking doesn't absolve the lack of consent.
But I'm a little thrown by the sudden shift in Jung-ho's character with the bullying/arson plot. I'm not quite sure how to view Jung-ho's decision to lie to the police. Until now he has been the one to act rationally to counterbalance Yuri's impulsivity. But lying to the police? The drama just got serious in a weird way.

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This may be one of the shows where I see the discontent between viewers and critics. I think it is absorbing. Most commenters here dig the show's vibes, even if it can be a bit awkward editing. For some reason, I find the show charming in its way. I think a lot of that has to do with the way our characters are written and presented. Jung-ho is more rational and logical given his prosecutor background, and Yu-ri is more emotional and intuitive with her work and how she is an open book. As the series progresses, we see her vulnerabilities, and I admire her spunk and strength to fight for the little ones. I think that's where our duo shines when they work together or come together eventually due to the cases. You saw the difference when he filled in for her vs. when she did it and its why their dynamic works.

Cases per episode can be hard to keep the viewers invested, mainly if it doesn't involve our main leads. I don't mind it here; as some have pointed out, it's more of their reactions and emotions after the case has broken out or settled that reveals a bit more about their characters. I don't think the main focus is on the issues, as it is on our characters dealing with the outcome or case through work or the progression of their relationship.

Episode 5 did a great job with handling consent. I thought the way Yu-ri apologized and showed growth and remorse through her actions was great! It was clever doing so in the form of their relationship, and the moment he asked to hug her was lovely. I noticed she was always there for him in his lowest moments, and I could see their deep connection and trust when he allowed her into his vulnerable moments.

The arson/barista guy isn't someone I noticed much until Ep 6. I liked how they weaved his story into the case of the bullying incident. While I can understand his frustration with the system (interesting Jung-ho still puts law above despite his frustrations with it), the arson plot was shocking because of how much it blew up in their faces. Wonder how they'll handle that in the next episode? Did Yu-ri's empathy rub off on Jung-ho? Because him going with it was a bit of a surprise move.

Also, I loved that he told her he liked her, but he just needed more time to settle things. It didn't leave the thread hanging loose on their relationship while leaving some room for growth and distance as the show heads off into the second half.

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