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Reborn Rich: Episodes 1-3

I love it. With three hour-plus-long episodes in one weekend, murder/reincarnation/time-slip hijinks, and a scheming chaebol family, Reborn Rich throws a lot at us this premiere week. But rather than a convoluted mass of information, we’re fed a tantalizing mystery that leaves me hungry for more.

 
EPISODES 1-3 WEECAP

In a slick, cinematic opening, a man visits a fancy foreign bank to make a deposit of $600 million. But how did he amass such wealth at his young age — through hard work or luck? To answer that, we jump back in time one week.

Our soon-to-be multimillionaire is YOON HYUN-WOO (Song Joong-ki), and he works for the infamous Soonyang Conglomerate owned by the family of the late Chairman JIN YANG-CHEOL (Lee Sung-min). They’ve got their hands in pretty much everything that makes big money, and they’re basically untouchable when it comes to committing white-collar crimes and walking away with measly penalties.

Hyun-woo has earned and kept the family’s trust by strictly adhering to three personal rules: 1) never refuse an order from a Soonyang family member, 2) never ask questions, and 3) never make his own judgments. But while a starstruck new recruit (cameo by Jinyoung) idolizes him as the family’s “right-hand man,” other employees sneer that he’s more like a disposable glove worn to keep your actual hands clean. Ouch.

As such, he gets to deal with things like fixing toilets and being on-call at all times — even in the shower. And when the up-and-coming Soonyang successor JIN SUNG-JOON (Kim Nam-hee) renounces his inheritance the day he’s supposed to be announced as the new chairman, it falls to Hyun-woo to chase after him and bring him back within 30 minutes.

This is no easy task, and not just because of traffic. Sung-joon has deep insecurities tracing back to an incident with a broken vase in 1987, where his late grandfather told him he was too emotionally driven to take up the family business. There might be an element of truth to that, because when Hyun-woo arrives to collect him, he’s swinging a golf club at fish tanks and potted plants because his staff tried to serve him lunch.

Unfortunate timing means Hyun-woo takes that golf club straight to the head. He pauses just a moment to pull himself together and then manages to talk Sung-joon into accepting the chairman position just in time. Ego reinstated for now, Sung-joon announces big plans to make Soonyang a company that serves the nation, and judging by the reaction, the rest of the family is not pleased. But that’s not their only worry at the moment.

First is the fact that Sung-joon’s pre-ceremony walkout drove his father, eldest Soonyang son JIN YOUNG-KI (Yoon Jae-moon), to collapse. He’s stabilized, but the circumstances prompt a visit from family black sheep JIN YOON-KI (Kim Young-jae) and his wife LEE HAE-IN (Jung Hye-young).

The two were ostracized because the rest of the family opposed their marriage and career choices. However, Hae-in holds 3% shares in Soonyang Group, and uses them as a bargaining chip to demand answers about a mysterious accident involving her son.

The second problem is an audit headed up by Prosecutor SEO MIN-YOUNG (Shin Hyun-bin). She has a reputation for jumping at any and every chance to challenge the Soonyang family, and she and Hyun-woo engage in verbal sparring as she clears out documents and computers.

…which all turn out to be decoys. The real files are all hidden in a secret room accessed via a fake refrigerator.

While putting everything back where it belongs, Hyun-woo comes across files on a paper company that’s being used to siphon millions of dollars into an overseas slush fund. The senior finance manager pressures him to bury it, but a heart-to-heart with Sung-joon smites his conscience and he reports it anyway. Sung-joon, in response, fires the finance manager and promotes Hyun-woo in his place. His first task in his new role? To go retrieve that slush fund.

And that’s how Hyun-woo ends up in Turkey making a $600 million deposit. The problem is that his conversation with Sung-joon was recorded and turned over to Min-young. And the even bigger problem is that he’s waylaid and carted to the edge of a cliff by none other than that bright-eyed new recruit. The recruit does at least look apologetic, but he quotes Hyun-woo’s three rules (never refuse, question, or think for yourself) back at him and leaves as hired thugs shoot Hyun-woo in the head, sending him tumbling to his death.

But then he wakes up in 1987 in the body of a child. And not just any child — he is now JIN DO-JOON (young version played by Kim Kang-hoon), youngest son of Yoon-ki and Hae-in. A person who, according to his extensive knowledge of the Soonyang family, shouldn’t exist.

Understandably, Do-joon (as he’ll now be called) struggles to process it all, especially when he comes face-to-face with people — like Chairman Jin Yang-cheol and his own mother — who were deceased in the present day but are very much still alive in 1987.

Do-joon has “arrived” just in time for Chairman Jin’s 60th birthday, and walks straight into Sung-joon’s confidence-crushing vase incident. That is, Do-joon sees Sung-joon pilfering some of Chairman Jin’s valuables, and Sung-joon stumbles into the vase when he realizes he’s been caught. Still, Do-joon doesn’t recognize what he’s witnessing until Chairman Jin launches into his I’m very disappointed in you, Sung-joon speech. Then the full reality of his new circumstances crashes over him.

Interestingly, Hyun-woo still appears to exist in this timeline. And once Do-joon grows up, he looks much the same as he did when he was Hyun-woo. Time will tell if there’s an in-universe reason for that, or if we just didn’t want to lose out on having Song Joong-ki on our screens as much as possible (which, fair).

In any case, Do-joon decides that he must be here for a reason. Namely, to figure out who had him killed. And since he has to live much of his (well, Do-joon’s) life all over again, he puts that time to good use. He’s retained all his previous life’s memories, so he uses his persuasion skills to guide the adults around him in making pivotal decisions (like convincing his father — who works in the American film industry — to have Home Alone released at Christmas or to invest in the production of Titanic).

But, of course, the big fish he’s got his eye on is Chairman Jin. Do-joon starts with offering advice on which presidential candidate to back, and works up to recommending a business deal that not only prevents Chairman Jin from getting muscled out by bigger players but also saves his life by convincing him to take an earlier flight — sparing him from a tragic plane crash.

Chairman Jin may be a power-hungry tyrant, but he’s no fool. It doesn’t take him long to acknowledge that this kid knows things he shouldn’t, be it by intuition, luck, or actual foresight. They strike a deal: Do-joon will earn a law degree from Seoul National University (the one thing Soonyang money can’t buy), and in return Do-joon’s family are re-invited to Soonyang gatherings and Do-joon gets ownership of land in Bundang. Which, of course, later becomes a major development area.

By the time Do-joon is 20 and ready to enter law school, the land has earned him $24 million, which Chairman Jin presents in cash for shock value (it’s very effective). Do-joon turns right around and converts it all from Korean won into American dollars, pinging Chairman Jin’s radar, but the rest of Do-joon’s actions indicate he’s just your everyday rich college kid. This, of course, is by design.

At law school, however, Do-joon meets someone unexpected: Min-young, studying to become the prosecutor he met as Hyun-woo. He uses her love for Seo Taiji (and his knowledge of the singer’s future solo comeback) to finagle a “date” that’s actually a chance for him to join Sung-joon’s elitist social club (and, okay, yes, also to verbally spar with her some more once she realizes what he’s invited her to).

While all of this is going on, Do-joon starts making his first big moves against Chairman Jin now that he’s earned his trust. While attending a New York film festival with his father, he meets investment agent OH SE-HYUN (Park Hyuk-kwon). After sprinkling a little future knowledge to get Se-hyun’s attention, Do-joon enlists him to help cast the winning bid on a company Chairman Jin has been desperately trying to acquire.

Chairman Jin seethes that someone snatched the acquisition right out from under his nose, and eldest son Young-ki worries that Sung-joon’s (and his) inheritance may be in jeopardy. The game is on.

Color me intrigued. I have so many questions about the time-travel (if that’s what it was) element, because if there are two versions of Hyun-woo/Do-joon’s consciousness alive at the same time in the same time stream, that seems to me to break a lot of typical time travel “rules.” Not to mention, did Do-joon exist before (was he scrubbed from public knowledge due to that mysterious accident his mom mentioned?), or is his very existence something that changed when Hyun-woo was sent back to 1987?

I was initially worried my eyes would start glazing over when the show launched into all the politicking and business dealing, but I found it surprisingly easy to keep up with the really important pieces. Reborn Rich does a great job with using visual cues to keep things interesting and digestible — like going black-and-white for a while as Do-joon slowly became aware that he was in the past, or using real-life news footage to confirm the accuracy of his “predictions.” Even learning a bit of the security team’s number codes for family members helped introduce the major characters and their relation to each other in an orderly way.

On another note, Jinyoung’s cameo was such an impactful way to drive Hyun-woo’s betrayal and abandonment home. Hyun-woo gave the Soonyang family his literal everything, and they took it all and used it against him, right down to his own words delivered through one of the only people who looked at him with genuine respect.

It’s interesting — and rather sad — that the only time Hyun-woo can actually be himself is when he literally becomes someone else. As Do-joon, he’s confident and outspoken, no longer living by his three rules but instead throwing them completely out the window. And yet, he’s still not living for himself. He can’t take advantage of the incredible opportunity to see his mother alive again, and everything he does is calculated according to the impact it will have on the Soonyang family. So in my opinion, the big question will be not only can he identify the person behind his murder and take Soonyang down, but can he ever break free from their influence over his life?

 
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I loved this a lot more than I expected to. I don't generally like reincarnation or time slip stories, but this in more like wealthy family drama and underdog revenge narrative. Definitely hooked.

As for Do-Jun, I'm not sure if it's that he doesn't exist in the present day or that Hyun-Woo's memories of him have been erased. I personally suspect that Do-Jun is the accident victim mentioned by Jin Sung-Joon when he resigns and also by Do-Jun's parents, so that adds tension to the narrative. (Will Hyun-Woo escape that fate or will he be murdered by the definitely not Samgung based conglomerate all over again?)

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I agree with you about DoJun being the victim mentioned in the accident, not only but his mother but also by SungJung, who was so mad about learning about it that he even renounced to his inheritance... probably because he thinks his father is behind that accident and if that accident had never happened he wouldn't be the actual heir to the obviously not Samsung based conglomerate.

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Yes. That's what I meant by Sung-Joon resigning. He directly accuses his father of being responsible.

Additional speculation: Min-young wears all black and is after Soonyang because of Do-Jun's death.

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We definitely share a certain brain cell...

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How does this work? Dojoon and Hyunwoo are the same person so they look like twins. Wouldn't the family and other people react differently to Hyunwoo if he looked exactly like the person they murdered?

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Well Do Jun's mother asks all of them what happen to her son, so they maybe know something about his "death" that we don't. So maybe they aren't surprised.

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Currently I don't put too much weight on SJK playing both characters. As mistyisles mentioned: "Time will tell if there’s an in-universe reason for that, or if we just didn’t want to lose out on having Song Joong-ki on our screens as much as possible (which, fair)."

I mean there could be all sorts of timey-whimey explanations and in some shows we are supposed to believe that people are unrecognizable due to hair gel and glasses, so... *shrugs*

However, repeated and prominent mention of a son of child number 4 who was being groomed as a potential heir and died in an "accident" and then having our lead being reborn as a son of child number 4 who is being watched as a potential heir seems too big a coincidence to ignore.

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Maybe they don't look the same, only we see them the same way, because that is what Hyunwoo sees. I mean, when he pays a visit to his mum, he looks exactly like himself and his mum doesn't even mention he looks like her son, so maybe it's just that he doesn't look like him.

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@eazal: I think you are right. This seems to be the case with “Curtain Call” as well where Kang Haneul plays 2 different characters in the past and the present, and a person who knew that other character in the past, doesn’t comment at all that kH is the spitting image of the person they knew. It is just taken for granted. I assume it is a common practice in such dramas and hence unremarkable or what you mentioned is the likely explanation even if it is never acknowledged.

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If your teory is true, yeah no matter what happened, our leading man will lead to his demise, and our female lead will unfold everything. His action now might be the reason which lead to his accident in the future.

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Not necessarily. Just because he died in the original timeline doesn't mean he dies in the new one. Also unclear what "dying" would mean. Like if Do-Jun died, would Hyun Woo then go back to his original body (now with new knowledge)?

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Wouldn't it be something if Do-Jun survives all the way to the present in the new timeline and that he faked his death so he could hide behind the scenes . . . and it turns out Do-jun is the one who orders Hyun-Woo's death in the original timeline?

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No offense, but some beanie in some post mentioned Song Joong Ki looks like a mouse and I can't unsee it especially, after watching the scene where his ears alone were red from light reflection (refer Pic 2). He looks like Stewart Little T_T

Regarding the story:
Ep 1: Yawn
Ep 2: Engaging due to the crackling chemistry between the granpa and young Do Joon. Both actors were amazing and I wouldn't mind having him in few more episodes.
Ep 3: I waited for the drama to impress me, but it looked like regular chaebol push and pull business war. I found no reason to root for either the granpa or Do Joon because the drama did not provide enough motivation behind their actions. Also, this is my first SJK drama, but apart from his stunning smile, I did not see any nunances in his acting and was disappointed after a riveting EP 2. Dropped!

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No offense, but some beanie in some post mentioned Song Joong Ki looks like a mouse and I can't unsee it especially, after watching the scene where his ears alone were red from light reflection (refer Pic 2). He looks like Stewart Little T_T

Goddamnit. I can't unsee.

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LMAO, I totally see it.

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Omg haha a mouse! But for me a still totally attractive mouse 😂

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@emsel: I agree that SJ’s acting was nothing special but I found the deliberate humiliations of his character nauseating. The show-runners lean so heavily on his servile and obsequious character and how he is seen as nothing more than a means to provide the comfort and entitlement these vile rich people believe they deserve at a moment’s notice. Hierarchical societies are brutal no matter where they are and how they justify their nature. It is painful to watch the brutalisation of those who are regarded as subservient in a made up world because millions upon millions of people have been subject to these unjust hierarchies in RL.

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Agree 100% with your Episode 2 observations! It was riveting to watch young Do-jun navigate the family dynamics and amazing to see his harsh and stern grandfather outright smiling and chuckling at his grandson.

The third episode was less compelling, but I will take that in stride and view it as the necessary setup "tax" we pay for more interesting plot twists to come.

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Bahaha. I wanted to say that when I watched the show, he looked like a mouse, especially. in the younger days. It's all due to that Dramabeans member who made that memorable comment lol! But a good-looking 'mouse' might I add ha!

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🐭

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😂 once you’ve seen it, you can never un-see it 🐭

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This is the closest thing we might get to a kdrama Succession. I love watching (intelligent) power struggles, so I'm tuning in for now.

The MVPs of the first 3 episodes are Lee Sungmin and the child actor. Now this show's (gargantuan) cast members are all delivering good performances, but Lee Sungmin's acting is in a class of its own. His acting feels effortless, like he isn't so much acting as he became the character. There are some actors (including ones on this show) where you can map their expressions and movements to thoughts in their head (okay, here I should grimace, and here I should scowl), but I don't see a trace of it in LSM's acting. He is a marvel to watch.

The child actor was incredible. I know they cut short his time so they could shove SJK in ASAP, but I don't mind watching more of the child actor. He went toe-to-toe with LSM and held his own. Not to mention he was able to mirror SJK's facial expressions, so that it really felt like he was playing child SJK despite the fact the two don't look alike.

I thought SJK was just...there for the first 3 episodes. He was meh in episode 1, and I'm not a fan when actors try to act kawaii, so teenage Dojoon isn't for me. I'm waiting for the time to speed up where his character matures and he has meatier material to work with.

The draw of this show is the power struggle and chess game unfolding between grandfather and (fake) grandson, so hope to see this struggle executed intelligently and not have this show rely heavily on Dojoon's future-knowing abilities.

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Good call on the Succession similarity! This could also have been a solid two-season show, considering how many memorable character actors are here! I thought it was 20 episodes before learning it's 16 episodes.

The child actor was incredible. He showed Do-jun's intelligence and capability at such a young age. However, I do feel like once they got to college/present-day Do-jun, they made his intelligence come to him more easily, IMO. Since he knows all the major companies that will blow up since he's from the future. I know the webtoon's version, the ML there, was more intelligent (but some say that might have been a tad un-realistic here), but I say why not?

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I enjoyed it so much. I usually don't like sageuks because I hate all the politics, but when politcs are done well it's totally different. Same goes with this makjangish kind gender, politics and intrigues were so well done during this three episodes that I enjoyed it a lot.

All actors are doing a great job, of course Lee Sung Min never disappoints, but here he is excelling. Wow, just wow. And in his duels with the child actor you could hardly know which one is better. I am wondering if Kim Kang Hoon is the new Nam Da Reum...

I'm happy with this three episode a week format. And even if the episodes last more than one hour, it never felt there were too long.

Only one thing took me out of the drama for a moment... you can not have Song JoonKi and paper company in the same scene and not expect me to remember a certain board. No way.

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I feel the same way about sageuks for the same reason.

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Oh, THAT board!!.. LOL..

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With just three episodes in, this is already quite interesting. Lee Sung-min as the Chairman is amazing to watch.

What I'm particularly intrigued about is how up to this point, Do-jun's advice (or rather, predictions based on the memories only he has from the past), doesn't seem to alter the chain of events. He now has a hand in influencing what happens, yet the events and exchanges within the family seem to continue as they did before. Nothing seems to be altered. I initially thought that even with just one thing that Do-jun "changed", so to speak, it would alter the outcome of things, perhaps to the point that his memories would not be useful anymore. But it doesn't seem to be that way. Very interesting!

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Who doesn't love a time paradox, because I do. Maybe Sooyang has been successful because Hyunwoo travelled to the past and helped built is as he had read, ignoring he was the one to make it big. He has to break the circle, whether it is by preventing his death or DoJun's.

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Yes, I found this point interesting too! Do-jun's interventions have thus far been intended to preserve the timeline rather than alter them.

Maybe it's because he wants to get back to the present with the timeline intact, so he can learn who ordered his death. Or maybe he doesn't want to change things too much because it will make his memory of coming events less useful. It will be entertaining to find out.

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Two complaints:

1. Just because you put Arabic letters next to each other, it doesn't mean it is a word. It was so bad I started laughing. Production couldn't just google something and create a banner.

2. The small itty bitty pizza that man was eating was not a New York pizza and I rebuke it. lol

Special Shout out: We need to stop making clearly late 30s actors play 20 year olds, just cast younger. Also the age differences between all the older actors playing father and sons is literally between 1 and 2 years, the weird filter they use that they think makes people look younger is hilarious.

That being said I really enjoyed these three episodes. It was a good set up. Lee Sung Min and Kim Kang Hoon played beautifully off of each other.

Shoutout to the show for properly explaining and pointing out the lawyer's privilege as well.

SJK is great as always. It seems to be a switching of children when one of them dies. Which one dies I am not sure. However, Kim Kang Joon plays both Hyun Woo and Do Joon.

I am in for the revenge and fun!!

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@kafiyah-bello: it is appalling not to do a cursory check to make sure nonsense isn’t portrayed as words in another language. Korean TV industry should up its game when portraying other cultures and people. I still cringe at the horrifying mess that “Descendants of the Sun” made of the portrayal of the presumptive internally displaced people in that country in ‘Uruk’. And, the drama was praised by so many despite its many and glaring shortcomings.

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Yeah, it was pretty bad in DOTS. DOTS had a stupid number of flaws, but the OTP really saved that drama, however it was also a Kim Eun Sook drama, I stopped watching her dramas a while ago because they are so bad and I know I will hate them. DOTS was the beginning of the end for me. Lol

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@kafiyah-bello: Flaws galore. I also couldn’t take seriously the other Song’s acting and what they dressed her in. Shorts in an alleged war zone.
For my money, the other pair were much better actors and had much better chemistry but the drama overall was execrable.

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I just want to take a sec and make a word appreciation post, your use of the word execrable made my little English major heart soar.

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@Kafiyah Bello: Glad it did. I love all kinds of words and we need to use a much bigger variety in our daily lives otherwise they’ll get lonely!:)

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Yes to the filter... my gosh... not a single wrinkle... I need it!!!

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Pilgu-ya~ how much you've grown

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Kim Kang-hoon grew up so much! He did really well in this role. I will miss him.

I wonder how the 1997 financial crisis will play a role. I guess Yoon Hyun-Woo changed his money in dollars because he knows the future. His motivations are not very clear, he wants to take over the family group by revenge? To find who killed him in the future? He is interested by himself or only by his real mother when he went to the restaurant?

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Love episode 1 and 2, underwhelming for the 3rd episode because this is yhe first episode I can't connect with Hyun Woo./Do Joon. It's not it's bad. And i know it's to set up the conflict as Do Joon start to play his card.... but it's just underwhelming episode so far.

Kim Nam Hee, Soong Joong Ki is doing great on the first episode. And Kang Hoon and Lee Sung Min is dominate the screen in episode 2. I really can't to watch an upcoming episode. Seems writers bring the unequal circumstances both Hyun Woo and Doo Joon into the light.

It sadden me it seems he has no attachment to his own family now, but it's really make sense though.

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Mistyisles, thank you for the recap.

The show has been a bit uneven for me.
Ep1 was a snooze .
Ep2 had some of the year’s best acting from Lee Sung-min & Kim Kang-hoon, I wish all the Eps could be this good.
Ep3 was so-so.
I do like halmoni. There are a lot of characters, hopefully the writer can keep it exciting .

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i'm going to LOVE this drama.

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I'm in. Echoing others by saying episodes 1 and 3 weren't much to write home about, but I liked episode 2, I like time slip stories, and I like so much of this cast that I'll stick around for now. Also doesn't hurt that this drama is airing 3x a week.

I just hope it doesn't end up falling flat for me like Again My Life did. (If episode 3 is any indication, it might just be a dud after all is said and done.)

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Another person who feels the same way I do about AML! For me, after they moved away from his college life to the prosecutor the show lost me emotionally. I think LJG is charismatic/talented, but his drama picks (minus FoE) are meh.

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Yeah, it was very underwhelming and I didn't finish it. And I'm a Lee Joon-gi devotee, so it hurt to drop it. Still hopeful that Reborn Rich will be better, especially after how last weekend's episodes ended.

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I too thought I wouldn't be able to stand the scheming and politics but then Song Joong Ki's smiles and charms made it worth it haha

I loved the mentions or referrences to future events such as Parasite and Gangnam Style (I think it was referring to Gangnam Style). Those kinds of things to tickle me and makes me want more. The way he handled future information for his own benefit also felt realistic to me. I've often mentioned or wondered what it would be like if I could travel back in time with current knowledge; could I stop or inform or prevent terrible events and the answer is realistically nope. Things could only be done on a small scale and in a way that could be played off as rational leaps in logic or luck. So I liked all the moments he used his future knowledge as well as how it was displayed such as the real life news footage.

I also liked when Do Jun talked about Min Young's priviledge.

I think Do Jun was somehow killed/taken (maybe he's hidden away in an incapacitated state) and erased from the family history because Chairman Jin ordered it and I think this is why Min Young seems to be gung ho on taking down the family/company. Also might explain why the wife with the 3 shares came after her husband instead of with him; they divorced or are estranged because his siblings did something to their son but he's not saying or doing anything about it.

I know they're rich and powerful but being able to erase a person's whole existence seems extreme. I wonder if that's why Do Jin makes sure to be recorded on camera or why he went to that dinner/meeting of the future big shots.

I really hate how people allow themselves to be mistreated. The chairman disowned the son and treated him and his family horribly which led to everyone else treating them horribly and yet they still have to show up for his 60th birthday only to be mistreated some more. I just wish the fourth son and his family could be in their own movie production world away from the toxicity of the Soonyang folks.

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I like your point about probably not being able to change the future even if we go back in time with all our current knowledge. Do-Jun knew the plane disaster, but no one believed him. He was only able to make a small impact on one individual who took a chance on him.

If we tried to warn everyone about an impending natural disaster, terrorist attack, or war, etc., I don't think anyone would believe us on a grand scale, because the people would think it's unlikely. Maybe we could convince a friend or family member to change their routine for the moment out of courtesy of our relationship, but that's it.

So it'll be interesting to see how much Do-Jun can change and if he can truly avoid the inevitable. It's good that the time travel rules prevent him from remembering anything about 4-2. Because even with all his future knowledge, he ultimately can't predict what will happen to himself.

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All I will say is after you watch episode 2 - rewatch episode 1 and look at how the the family treats YOON HYUN-WOO.. the way 4 -0 touches his arm and welcomes him to the way 4 Alpha stares at him when she gets on the evaluator. As for 4-2, I ADORED him as a kid with knowledge of the future.. when he said that about the single candidacy and had the same facial expression as SJK I lost it..

Theories not spoilers..
YOON HYUN-WOO has the same facial expressions as 4-2 .. . very interesting.. I am toying with the idea of memory loss and he thinks he is YOON HYUN-WOO when he is really 4-2 but anyway.. I am Love love loving this drama and OMG.. 3 episodes in one week DAEBAK!!!

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I honestly have barely seen Lee Sung Min in anything.
Only in some guest roles. (Shocking, I know. I still have Misaeng on my watchlist. :3) Anywho, it was cool to see him act. He has a strong presence. His character Chairman Jin is already cryptic and intimidating.

Haven't seen Song Joong Ki in so long too! (skims his list of dramas. Omg. I haven't seen him since Arthdal! O_O That was in 2019). It's quite nice to see him in a modern drama and playing with different expressions.

The first episode had the mystery, tension, and drama. Definitely hooked me for the next episode. Chairman Jin's family besides Yoon Ki & Hae In were all so dark and menacing. Surprisingly, the politics and business talk weren't too hard to follow. The gratification from Do Joon saving the day reeled me in. The child actor Kim Kang Hoon was excellent and it was fun to see how he convinced the adults around him, especially Chairman Jin.

The third episode was much lighter. I've only seen Shin Hyun Bin in Hospital Playlist so I'm curious about her new role here.

And geez, do we really need another secret club/society for the rich and elites??? *rolls eyes* Too common of a trope.

I was just reminded of another recent reincarnation drama - Again My Life starring Lee Joon Gi which was disappointing by the end (much like other dramas this year...). Well, I hope Reborn Rich will fare a lot better!!

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Chairman's family beside Grandma* too!

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Big thumbs up from me. I like the title sequence - the portrait eyes following DJ/HW strikes just the right note: he's beneath them but cannot be ignored. I liked the abduction in Turkey - it seemed pretty realistic: HW didn't stand a chance, was captured quickly and shot efficiently without the usual 10 minute conversation to reveal motives. I like DJ's plan to take his revenge but also to bless his family by getting them re-instated in the family and successful in the movie industry. I like the way HW's memorisation of grandpa's autobiography is proving to be a useful tool. I like the way grandpa is already definitely suspicious of his grandson's knowledge and he will hunt him down in a heartbeat if he suspects foul play. With that in mind, I was a little surprised (alarmed?) that DJ showed his hand against the company so early. I'm suspecting the fall out might not be immediate, but it will come and it will not be pretty...

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I'm here for Forrest Gump meets Again My Life meets Evil Chaebols.

Like everyone is says Ep 2 was the best out of the 3. Ep 3 felt a little all over for me whereas Ep 2 was really tightly scripted and really about young DJ and how he builds trust with Grandpa.
Unless this goes totally off the walls, I'm definitely along for the ride.

I hope they age up DJ soon so SJK can stop pretending to be 20.

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I'm in! I wasn't sure if this was for me, as chaebol corruption just isn't my thing, but the time slip thing I love and of course, SJK. I love what they've done so far, I'm waiting for the explanation of how he died/disappeared first time round and if he can avoid the same fate this time. 3 episodes a week too, fab.
Loving some of the theories expressed by other beanies above, particularly about the prosecutor.
The chemistry between the chairman and young DJ was amazing and had me completely engrossed. Wondering if they will go more for a reincarnation vibe to get around time travel questions or how they will square them off (or if they address them at all).

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Noticing that the first episode was a whole 80 minutes got me worried there would be too much information but the drama really nailed the introduction stage I could keep up with everything easily. Even despite being a lot of family members, I could catch on their relationships together using the family codes, unlike other times when I struggled to identify their relationships.
I am looking forward to Do-joon and Yang-cheol's relationship development. At first, Yang-cheol thought of Do-joon as a useless kid but after listening to his point of view regarding the elections, he admired him but still didn't acknowledge him completely. That is made clear when he gave Do-joon the quiz on the whale and the shrimp.
After presenting Yang-cheol with a solution to protect his semiconductor business, Yang-cheol looked at Do-joon in another light, a grandson who is qualified to continue his legacy. However, Do-joon shouldn't let his guard down even for a moment as falling out of Yang-cheol's favor is much easier than gaining his trust.
I am also curious if the one who is currently Hyun-woo would play a role in the drama.
It isn't a coincidence that Hyun-woo got reborn as Yoon-ki's son who he didn't know anything about. I wonder if it is to uncover the truth behind that person's accident or what.

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It’s a King 2Hearts reunion, waiting for oldest brother to kill the Chairman

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More than the family corporation drama, it's the explanation for the soul-jumping bit that I look forward to in future episodes. It's technically not time travel, so I guess the writers deemed it okay for younger Hyun-woo to co-exist with adult-Hyun-woo-in-chaebol-form in the same timeline. Where's the original Do-jun's soul while Hyun-woo is in his body? Why had he disappeared in the original timeline? What kind of 'alchemy of souls' started all this?

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It's been so long since the last time I felt this giddy and excited for a new drama. Not to mention that this is also the first semi-makjang revenge piece I've watched in years (and I also miss Song Joong-ki a lot, Descendant of the Sun was forever ago already).

I forgot how fun this kind of story could be in the right hands, and boy, does Reborn Rich delivers.

Our reincarnated lead was one of the most compelling hero whose journey I've followed. As Yoon Hyun-woo, he displayed an unusual combination of subservience and subtly commanding which made him interesting. This very traits shone tenfold with him as Jin Do-jin. The way he combined those and his future knowledge with unleashed wit, pretend precociousness, quick decision making, and willingness to take risk just made him a hell of a captivating character.

What makes this story unique, though, was the condition that precluded the long-term revenge Do-jin unleashed to the Jin family. It was interesting that our lead was almost "forced" into revenge by his reborn situation. How he inhabited the body of the only Jin family member who was non-existent (or maybe deliberately erased??) in the 2022 timeline. How he was reborn into the only decent subfamily of the bunch, the one who had nothing to do with Hyun-woo's death. It was almost terrifying how accommodating the Fate was regarding Do-jin's needs of answer and payback.

On one hand, it's exhilarating that Do-jin was not burdened by knowledge of the original Do-jin's past decisions. On the other hand, it's absolutely terrifying that our hero didn't have any measurement of whether he has screwed up or not. I couldn't help wondering if instead of finding the real culprit behind his future death, he would inadvertently created a bigger, scarier enemy for himself.

I mean, just look at Grandpa. He might treated Do-jin simply as a preternaturally clever and lucky (and cunning) grandson at first. But now that he was an adult and proved to pose some serious threat for the family business, I shuddered to thing what this revenge would eventually unleash. For now Do-jin could still safely used his double knowledge as someone who has experienced life through both extremes of social-economy class. But for how long??

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It’s the use of the word “reincarnate” in the review that has made us all believe he’s the same person. The others characters do not see him as the former staff who is now dead and his mum does not see him as the same. The drams will unfold this as it goes on **hopefully. My problem is the in time travel narrative 2 different human beings do not coexist in the same timeline????

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Finally, we got some good 'food' in drama land! Jokes aside, it's been a long while before I got a meaty drama again since Through the Darkness ended this year.

First, major Again my Life vibes with the second chance at life (ML's that retained their memory). But Reborn Rich is that show but 10 times better. I can tell JTBC spent a lot of $$ on scale, scope, and size. Those things add a lot to the viewer's immersion, and I immediately bought Soonyang's dominance in Korea.

SJK was well cast here; he's our defacto audience, the moral compass. But I'll say, I notice some flack towards the FL in other sites. This is a shame b/c SHB is a good actress. She's not charismatic, but that's not a slight against her. I think having an FL that's not as well known helps b/c I only see the role and not her. From the few scenes, I liked her character. She's headstrong but also doesn't afraid to stand up for herself. It is funny that she immediately doubts herself in private, showing she's human.

But is a minus, is Do-jun is non-descript as a character. He's boring, which shows in comparison due to LSM's more complex/multi-faceted character. This would've been solved if we could see more scenes of him with the FL, IMO, in college, scenes of his personality outside of being the chaebol's grandson. I want to see how he balances being a top law student and his double life of duping/revenging his 'family.' Alias (spy/grad student) showed that double life very well, and while that's not the overarching theme here. It would add more depth to his role. Since this is pre-produced, I assume that SJK knew this going forward and perhaps wanted to work with LSM/the writer of this show that blew his career again.

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