Beanie level: Jang Geu-rae

I posted this a couple days ago. Didn’t know the word limit, so didn’t come out as intended. But I’ve to get this out of my system, even if as a reply to my own post.

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    What’s wrong with looking at world in a romantic way and believing it’s right to avoid hurting people just to take out your anger. Why are people who admit to being sensitive to violence served in award-winning, critically acclaimed dramas/ cinema looked down upon? I’ve been mocked by my friends for the same. Many of you must have been too. That is why we come here at dramabeans and express our likings under a pseudonym to avoid being teased as wishy-washy.
    It is a sad reality that such a bias exists. No matter how commendable and relatable they are, feminine themes like romance and women’s issues are considered less important at big award stages. Take a look at this video. https://youtu.be/DSaa7F0ykzg
    Even if women directors have started to gain recognition that they deserve, when will we stop conveniently ignoring how some big-budget productions are grabbing eyeballs by blatantly mistreating female characters. The real-world is filled with violence against women as it is, why do we have to watch ourselves portrayed as hapless creatures beaten to pulp; or, brainless whores who ‘deserve’ to be mistreated, on our screens too? Why glorify violence against women and objectify their bodies?
    Also, romance is not being corny, kissing or hugging. It’s not even physical. It’s a philosophy, a way of life. It is looking at world with optimism, believing the best in others, and envisioning a world where everyone feels included. What’s wrong with that?

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      Great message, thanks for sharing. It is hard for the writers that want to tell a different story or the parents who want to raise their children differently to be a lone voice in a world dominated by systems designed to maintain the status quo.

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      Thank you for posting this (and feeling comfortable to do so here!). I agree with your overall sentiments. I think there’s a very, very fine line between using graphic violence etc. – especially against women – in film and TV to make some sort of social commentary and using it as a shock factor, in a weird exercise of gratification, or as nothing but an excessive plot device. I think what defines that line is how respectfully the subject matter is treated and whether the intention is genuine in that it’s less about graphically enacting that kind of violence for the sake of it. For the most part, I’ve been feeling the same about a lot of recent releases that I think falls under the category of unnecessary and graphic exploitation when it comes to the the depiction of violence against women – even when it’s based on real instances. And, worse, sometimes it does seem like a tick-box activity, that if you want to win an award you need to have ‘raw and unfiltered’ violence in it sometimes to be considered ‘art’.

      And further, I think it’s awful though to be mocked for saying you find it unnecessary/are sensitive to it. And equally, being looked down on for not appreciating “real cinema”. I had a similar conversation with a friend about how a lot of film wins tended to, on average, go to films that all fall under similar thematic categories of things like war, violence and or just really depressing themes, and there’s the overall societal perception that if it’s not screaming ‘tortured souls’ it’s not intelligent, sophisticated or ‘real’. And subsequently, if you say you’re not a fan of those kinds of movies or simply that you like genres like romance, suddenly you’re viewed has having slightly infantile and basic tastes. So yes, to your last point, why is romance viewed so narrowly?? Why is optimism perceived as corny? Especially when media is a a medium of escape – sometimes I want to run away to a better world than the one I currently live in. I don’t mean to disrespect any director of course nor do I think all media should only be ‘happy’ but I do question, like you do, why we seem to sometimes value the darker stuff more than the lighter stuff.

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        Thank you for understanding. That is exactly what I wanted to say.

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      I totally agree. I used to really like thrillers and crime dramas but I’ve come to realise that excessive violence does nothing for good storytelling. The victimisation of women is really uncomfortable to watch considering it’s a painful reality (I can’t rewatch Signal, for example). And sometimes you just know they are making it gratuitous for the screen – most recent example being the Glory. I did watch part 1 but I skipped a lot of the bullying scenes (which were repeated too many times) and don’t feel the need to watch part 2.

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    Now you know how to get around the word limit, you compose offline then post on here. If you notice it has cut off the end, you add the rest of the post in a reply to yourself. Offline composition saves the pain of trying to remember what you said in the bits that were cut off. Sometimes we forget, usually when it’s a reply to someone and we don’t realise until we have pressed send that it was longer than expected and went over the limit. So I try to remember to copy those before pressing send too.

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