Beanie level: Loan shark with a heart of gold

Heyyyy @beffels! Ways to fix those messed up sound dynamics:

https://www.popsci.com/story/diy/movies-too-quiet-too-loud/

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    Ooh! I am on holiday at the moment but when I get home I’m playing with my sound system settings. Thanks!

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Happy Korean-American Day! 🇰🇷 🇺🇸
https://nationaldaycalendar.com/korean-american-day-january-13/

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🤦🏼‍♀️ “Desperate Kim Jong Un Pleads With Citizens to Make More Poop”
https://www.thedailybeast.com/desperate-kim-jong-un-pleads-with-north-korean-citizens-to-make-more-poop?via=ios

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    That was really interesting! I was actually just talking about this with my husband the other day – I’ve been not that interested in movies lately and I put it down to them all being the same shade of grey-blue.

    Now if they could move away from that and also fix the sound so I could hear people talking, that would be great 😂

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      Yes, that sound thing has bugged me for years. I read something about how the sound for movies has vast highs and lows that are designed for theater systems and our tvs/screens aren’t equipped for that.

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        I’ve read that too, the sound mixed for one situation but it’s not the one we normally watch it in now. It’s awkward!

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          Yeah it is. I’m embarrassed to admit I just discovered what the ↪️ button is for on the Roku remote, likewise the option to only see “captions on replay”. It’s like a whole new life for me 🤦🏼‍♀️

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            Don’t be embarrassed – I don’t know what most of the buttons on my remote do 😅 possibly nothing 😂

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            @beffels I feel that way about all the buttons in my car as well 😬

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Omg, SO much to unpack here:

The New Political Cry in South Korea: ‘Out With Man Haters’
https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/01/world/asia/south-korea-men-anti-feminists.html?referringSource=articleShare

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    I read about this in the summer when the Olympic archer was being attacked for having short hair. It was ugly. I fear it’s only going to get worse, as the SK conservative party has tapped into the angry young male vote much the way Trump tapped into the angry white male vote in the U.S, and look where we are.

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      Yep. That’s what I’m sayin’. What a bunch of knuckleheads.

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“The Trauma Plot” made me think of almost every kdrama ML since forever.

The Case Against the Trauma Plot
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/01/03/the-case-against-the-trauma-plot

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“The Spectacular Vindication of BTS” – The Atlantic Magazine

https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2021/12/bts-concert-permission-to-dance-sofi/621031/

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Roundup Day 13.
I didn’t like and Beanies loved: Racket Boys. I couldn’t stand the coach and dropped pretty early.
I didn’t get and Beanies loved: On the Verge of Insanity. It was just ok for me.
I liked a lot and Beanies didn’t (not really sure anyone else watched it?): Mine. Great performances from the actresses, fabulous costumes, crazy MIL and, I can’t lie, soap opera-ish stories and still I liked it 😊

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Day 12. I never remember much but thanks, I think, to Lord Cobol I can offer this line that rang home with me in a big way.

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    This is why Jun-wan is my favourite. You know apart from being played by Jung Kyung-ho

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    This. Is. Me…So.Me.

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Saw this in a store and thought of all the Beanies, for whom goat sounds have a special meaning.
🐐🐐🐐

https://mcphee.com/products/emergency-goat

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    I want to get one! 😆 🐐 ❤

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      Right? I want to play the bleat sound whenever I’m in a conversation that runs out of steam 😆

      Except no one but kdrama fans would get the joke 🤷🏻‍♀️

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        That would be funny though! 😆 I want to get this when I go back to the office for my obnoxious coworkers who chitchat all day
        🤣 😂 🤣

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    That store is so much fun!!! @mmmmm add this to your list for when you come to Seattle to eat salmon.

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      Ok! Though I wonder what need I will have for a goat sound.

      For the record, Mugy convinced me that salmon is really good there and I want to see the first Starbucks branch. Oh.. there is a movie named Sleepless in Seattle which makes me interested I traveling there.

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😁
Sesame Street’ will debut Asian American muppet during Thanksgiving special
The long-running children\’s show will introduce 7-year-old Ji-Young during an upcoming special.
By Lateshia Beachum

https://www.washingtonpost.com/arts-entertainment/2021/11/15/sesame-street-asian-character-thanksgiving/

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Interesting
Read This: \”Are the ‘Squid Game’ Subtitles Actually Botched? \”
https://www.thedailybeast.com/are-netflixs-squid-game-subtitles-actually-botched-not-entirely-korean-speakers-say?via=ios

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    I didn’t realize that subtitles and Closed Caption are different things. Why would that be?

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      Closed captions are essentially a transcription of the English dub. The kind of thing you’d see for English “subtitles” of English shows. They serve different purposes and are for different audiences. The closed captions also include descriptions of sound or music played for this reason: they’re mainly for deaf/HOH people or those who for whatever reason can’t have the sound on. The subtitles, on the other hand, are intended for hearing audiences who don’t speak the language.

      So because dubs are always worse than subs (because you have to edit the meaning to roughly match the lips and timing of what is being said in Korean), the closed captions are inherently worse than the subtitles, which also have their issues but not nearly as many as the dub/closed captions.

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    Well i guess that’s one pro for SG’s popularity – maybe Netflix will improve their subs. Most of the time I don’t even know it’s bad but people keep saying it is. Gotta trust people who knows more than oppa…daebak!

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    I notice that netflix tend to simplify their subs if that the correct way to say it. it is not wrong but some of the nuances are lost. I notice it while watching Homcha too.

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    @bbstl Thank you for sharing this. Hopefully, Netflix will put more of an effort when they provide subtitles for foreign language shows.

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      My thoughts exactly. Netflix (the Giant) in the area of Korean subtitles you are being outgunned by the volunteers (David) at Viki!

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        The heads number counts too. Netflix/any other providers that using payed translator only done by about 1 person (at least they only show 1 name); while an episode of drama in viki done by at least 4 people into english, someone else would rechecking it, and another atleast 4 would translate them into their own language; and another someone else would reviewing it.
        … and if it still somehow misstranslate, a viewer could suggest a better translation, and then correct them. So yeah, a village done the translating for viki for free (and happily); and one (or two or maybe three) person under the deadline stress done it for neflix.

        Viki picks the better choice. (Cmiiw, iqiyi now also doing this)

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Well, I’ve waited 15 years for kdrama to teach me Korean via osmosis and that hasn’t worked well. Maybe it’s time for this book! (The Cultural Encounter sound interesting!)

https://k-dramakorean.com

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    I definitely am in the same boat. I’ve learned a lot of words, phrases, and honorific use, but diddly about grammar/conjugation. So unless I can simply toss out a word or phrase that gets repeated umpteen times, I can’t really form sentences on my own just from watching shows.

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      Yep, completely!
      Chuggeleh?
      Eepoda!
      spring to mind 😁

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        Even my cats know some Korean, including the different variations of “not just yet” when they’re begging for food and I’m trying to dole out the canned portions. (No idea how to Romanize them correctly–chakamon, hanamon?)

        On the worst days of begging when they start early because they just happen to notice me going in the kitchen, I even switch gears and resort to rolling through the “no” honorifics until they leave me alone. Rarely do they persist mewling past anyo before giving up, but some days–they force my ever growing louder “an-i-mi-DA!” before they sulk off to another room. 😼

        One bit that I still find surprised it stuck in my noggin because I only remember it from one show was from She was pretty” I do a lot of walking, so when the crosswalk turns green? “Kajooda!”

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          Comment was deleted

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          I am failing typing today. “a-ni-mi-DA”. But you knew I meant to break it up that way, krichee? (So failing with Romanizing.) 😂

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            Romanizing is very hard! We can just make our best shots at the phonetics.

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          That’s hilarious about your cats! My cat only hears “ChinCHA???” Because he’s always doing something that I can’t believe.

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    Osmosis doesn’t work???? D*mm

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      Maybe it’s just me?

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        I’ve got Korean language feeds on Insta, I’ve downloaded and printed a workbook. I have made so many false starts and I know less than a cat.

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          Don’t feel bad, I had weekly personal tutoring for a couple of years and learned very little (I have no memory for vocabulary, it turns out). All we did was gossip about dramas 😁 In English, of course.

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            What a blissful time. I go around frightening people who might be Korean asking them if they are watching any k-dramas.

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            @jorobertson “blissful time”,perfect description. I think I know what you mean, I frightened my tutor and her co-teachers when I pulled out a Hyun Bin Kleenex holder on my first day of class. 😮

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            🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 you just cracked me up – a Kleenex holder, just for HB – the best way to frighten people. 😨😨😨 I sourced a Korean restaurant and let drop to the owner that I knew Hyun Bin had been in the Marines, Some people think I’m odd.

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            @jorobertson Yuh. I was in a Korean costume jewelry/accessories store and dropped “eepodah!” when the lady showed me a scarf. She just ignored it. ☺️
            Then again, I was in a meeting in Seoul when the Compant President joined us and I gleefully greeted him , “YABOSEYO, MR KIM!” The whole room dissolved in laughter because it turns out you only say yaboseyo on the phone to acknowledge that you’re answering, it is in no way a version of “hello” ☺️

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            It was great that they all laughed. So brave of you. 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

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          Not sure how long you’ve been watching Kdramas, but my habit started thanks to Hulu in 2010ish I think? So that’s a decade of oodles of shows/movies to get things beat into my head from repetition.

          We’re a weirdly sporadic language family for two folks that grew up in American families that had pretty much switched to English only at home at least two generations ago, honestly. (His side was here longer than mine.) On my side of things, there’s what I think of as “aga Hangul” (baby talk Korean); mostly forgotten high school French; the rare Swedish utterance; and a few German phrases I picked up when I was freelance editing publications for two Albanian scientists who had emigrated to the US via Germany. I’m also just starting to try to learn Spanish beyond counting and basic vocab because I’ve made friends in this area that are native speakers and I love languages. My partner’s side includes Japanese; some German; and Spanish he picked up as a kid in Florida that’s diminished over the years (he also knows a lot more ASL than I do from his college days and one lady he worked with when he was still with corporate).

          I joke that we’re illiterate in many languages. 😂

          [I should point out that I haven’t done much serious editing or proofreading work in ages, and spending time on the internet has totally helped my skills slide into a dumpster because I’ve been too lazy to keep them sharp.🤭]

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            LOL I’m monolingual from generations back. I joke that I’m still learning English, but when I worked in the UK, I discovered that I truly had been speaking in a borrowed language. The English wield their language like a sharp sword. It can be cutting, and it does not depend on your class. The working class use it equally efficiently, if not more so. My biggest regret is that I have not acquired a swathe of other languages. I learnt French at school and worked in Geneva on and off for a couple of years doing some research. I discovered that the French there sounds very different (to my ear unrecognizable) to what I heard in Paris, although they hotly claim it’s the same. (dialect perchance). I am not fluent in French but I can stumble through docs written in French. The dogs of Geneva knew more French than me, and I amused my landlady by speaking formally to them. I wish I had Portuguese and Spanish, and now Korean. Korean is my project. I’ve only been watching dramas since 2019, and I am recognizing some isolated words, and I can read Hangul phonetically, but because my vocab is less than a newborn child’s, I don’t yet know what the words mean. (BTW Tree With Deep Roots was so wonderful and said such profound things about the power of language. I consider it amazing that it was the women and the poor uneducated who kept it alive until after the war.) At the risk of being a koreaboo, who also still loves their own culture but resents the Americanization of it, I am fascinated with Korean culture.

            I love writing and find dbs an outlet. I detest editing, but I consider it a mark of shame to have a typo in my own writing, although I’ve let it slide on dbs, sometimes. Usually I delete and redo. Having said that I edit my writing obsessively because it helps me find what I’m wanting to say. I’m in awe that you edited scientific papers for Albanian scientists. I edited a dissertation on the history of medicine in Angola for a Portuguese student once. It was hard going. Is it a myth that some people are just good at languages? They are usually good at music and mathematics too. It seems like that to me, while some of us have to take the hard road. Anyway that’s where you’ll find me, toiling uphill on my motor scooter, swotting vocab and sentence structure between deliveries.

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            @jorobertson, one of the things I enjoy learning with new languages is how they “turn a phrase”, and localized slang/idioms. It’s also part of why I do remember bits I do because the word play when roughly translated is amazingly hilarious. (“Hurry, but wait,” is a favorite, and one I can’t recall about where that either doesn’t have a word for no or it’s rude to say no, I forget which. So you get conversations like, “Are you on fire?” “Not just yet.”) I do know a few folks that truly are polyglots, but of them, many also have the opportunity to frequently use the languages they know so they don’t lose bits over time. The others, they might not speak a language in years and have no trouble falling back into it. I am not a true polyglot, but I was amazed at how much French I did remember after not using it for over a decade when I had a short visit in France when I was visiting Europe one time.

            Related, one thing I do have is the “ear” for picking up dialects and accents when with a given community for a time which has caused all manner of interesting situations. I grew up in a resort town and one year in particular, I wound up work with Irish folks on work visas and we hung out a lot outside work as well while they were here, which in this case was hilarious because they were all from different counties, so my “Irish accent” I’d slip into it from hanging around them was a mess. I didn’t even realize this was a thing because they’d never pointed it out until I happened to meet another Irish fellow while I was taking a ferry, and as soon as I heard his accent, my brain kicked into Irish mode and after we had chatted a bit, he paused and said, “I cannot place your accent, what county are ya from?”, and that’s when I had to break the news to him that I was actually an American but had picked up random bits from other Irish folk I’d been working with. His face was priceless after hearing that, especially because I had to force myself to say so without that mangled mess of Irish counties coloring my words, so it was quite clear that I was indeed an American. Similar, in my freshman year at college, when I hung out with a particular group which were all from the Finger Lake area in NY State, and I had no idea I’d picked up the vowel shift that differs from where I grew up in southern NJ until I went back home for Thanksgiving and my family asked why I was talking so weird.😆 Currently, I live in MA where I had lived prior for work and school for short bits. Whenever I talk to a native with the heavy accent for a bit, I do slip into it!

            There was a time I did start learning the Hangul alphabet, and if I go back to the one site where it has a test of what each character is, I’d probably still do pretty well I think. I did download the file so I could type Hangul on the laptop I had then so I could try to actually learn to type words to help me learn, but other things happened and I stopped spending so much time trying to get better at it.

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            @jorobertson, Oh! And about the scientists–one of them was my landlord at the time, the other was his friend. So right place, right time because I typically did not do that sort of specialized work. It was challenging because I had to research a lot to make sure I knew what some words really meant and of course spelling, but it was a great experience!

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            @lilyleftthevalley My second-generation father swore that a Czech phrase he employed to say “oh, you’re full of it” translated as “you talk like a sausage “. It cracks me up just typing that.

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            @bbstl Love it! Thanks for sharing that. 😊 Now I’m trying to remember the Korean idiom that I often see subbed as “You’re blowing air/full of wind”, but I seem to recall someone once saying in a live chat that the rougher translation is “You’re full of **it”. It’s in a few sageuks, but my brain just won’t give it up right now for me to badly Romanize. (Tried to look it up and closest I could find was ba-rahm-eul nuh-da but my brain is rebelling and won’t confirm or deny. Maybe this is a modern variation? Now that would be interesting if so. Translates to “put wind”, as in to help something happen (like helping a boat sail), but can be used in a more negative fashion that something is ridiculous/overblown.)

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😃Crash Landing is even mentioned in the comments!

Tracing Freedom to a Pair of Jeans
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/04/style/north-korean-defector-fashion.html?referringSource=articleShare

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