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Romantic Doctor Teacher Kim: Episode 8

Doing the right thing can be painful, as our romantic doctors come to learn while navigating their way through heartbreaking ethical dilemmas this episode. With the show seemingly building up to a face-off between Teacher Kim and Dr. Do, our doctors also come to learn that it’s not just about their practice anymore—it’s about politics and power.

 

 
CHAPTER 8: “Expression of Humanism”

The door bursts open with the man in black (Lee Chul-min) holding a sickle to Seo-jung’s throat. Dong-joo’s eyes widen with fear, and he tries to get the man to let her go. Dr. Nam surreptitiously calls 911 and gives them the necessary information for the police to find them while the man in black tells them to stop the surgery immediately and step away from the operating table.

Ki-tae, who has already done a thorough sweep on the rest of the hospital, tells the police who arrive that their concern is unnecessary. When they receive a radio message that a hostage has been taken in the OR, Ki-tae realizes that he forgot to check on that wing of the hospital.

The man threatens Seo-jung’s life once again and tells the surgeons to stop operating on the patient. Frantic at this point, Dong-joo tries to get them all to acquiesce to the kidnapper’s demands. Nurse Assistant Park takes a small step back when Teacher Kim demands that they keep to their places. Dong-joo asks whether he wants all of them to die, but Teacher Kim ignores him and informs Seo-jung that he has no intention of stopping his surgery. Seo-jung says she understands.

When Teacher Kim holds out his hand for his scalpel to proceed with the surgery, the man in black asks if they know who the patient on their operating table is. He informs them that the patient is a rapist, and he begins telling his heart-rending story.

Near tears, the man says that when he was out, the patient now on their operating table had broken into his home and raped his pregnant wife and eleven-year-old daughter. Afterward, he adds tearfully, his wife miscarried, and now his daughter has to live with a catheter permanently strapped to her (presumably because of the severe damage caused by the sexual assault).

He breaks down in front of them as he denounces the justice system that decided on a mere three year sentence for the patient because it was his first offense. To make matters worse, he was a model prisoner, and so he was released a year early on parole.

“So,” Teacher Kim says, “You want to serve out justice yourself?” The man replies that someone has to if the corrupt system hasn’t served its purpose. He knows that although he’s a poor, powerless father, he needs to pursue justice for his family.

Teacher Kim tells the man that he understands, but he will not give up the surgery. Furthermore, he says that he is not a lawyer or a judge, but a doctor – so whatever the man wants to do with the patient, he should do it after the surgery is done. Dong-joo takes issue with that.

Despite sweating, Teacher Kim stays resolute in his decision. The man in black asks the doctor if he is really ready to trade the life of his student for the rapist on the table. Teacher Kim just demands for his surgical tools again. Nurse Oh looks at Teacher Kim, and says that she hopes his judgement is correct as she hands over a scalpel. Dong-joo secretly grabs a scalpel in his hand just in case things take a turn for the worst.

At that moment, the man yells for them to stop, and all hell breaks loose. Ki-tae has been listening in to the kidnapper’s conversation, while Dr. Song is apprised of the situation by his spy, Deputy Nurse Ji. Director Yeo starts taking steps to ensure the safety of the rest of his hospital.

The man begs for the doctors to stop with the surgery, but Teacher Kim continues on as though he hasn’t heard him. Finally, the man tells them he’ll give them thirty minutes, to which Teacher Kim replies that it’s not that simple of a surgery, and that he’ll need two hours at least. Dong-joo, seeing the situation turn, drops his hidden scalpel.

Teacher Kim asks a nurse to turn on some music. “Hey Jude” by The Beatles fills the OR, masking the sounds of the SWAT team coming in to take their place just outside. Inside, the surgery continues smoothly, until Teacher Kim hesitates for a moment with a strange glint in his eyes. Nurse Oh asks what’s wrong, but Teacher Kim says it’s nothing.

They receive a call from Ki-tae, but it’s actually the police, who notify the man in black that his family is outside and worried for him. The man hears the voice of his daughter, who tells him to come outside quickly because she’s afraid.

Teacher Kim finishes the surgery and tells the man in black to do whatever he wants. But he also lets him know that while the patient survived, his spine was severely injured, and he will probably live as a helpless paraplegic for the rest of his life.

Teacher Kim goes on to say that if the man wants to become a murderer because of a piece of garbage like the patient, he won’t stop him. “However,” Teacher Kim tells the man, “you will face the consequences. You will never see your daughter going to high school, to college, or see her get married to some unworthy fellow.”

The man desperately asks if Teacher Kim thinks it’s even possible for his daughter to get married at this point, and Teacher Kim replies that the man should protect his family so that they can make that future possible together.

Then, Teacher Kim tells everyone to get out. Teacher Kim also tells Seo-jung to leave with the others, but looks to the man to see whether he’ll let her. The man does, and she collapses onto Teacher Kim. Dong-joo takes her out, and in his final words before leaving the OR, Teacher Kim wishes that the man will not lose his family regardless of what decision he makes.

In the OR, a cry sounds out, but the kidnapper cannot bring himself to strike the patient with his weapon. Instead, he starts weeping in front of him while the police surround him.

He’s led outside in handcuffs, where he sees his daughter and wife. He attempts a wide grin to comfort his puzzled child and turns to leave, but his family runs up to him to hug him one last time before he’s taken away. He tells them that he’s sorry for everything, and that he’ll be back soon.

Just as he’s about to get into the police van, Seo-jung runs up to him and tends to the wound on his hand. The man apologizes to Seo-jung for causing her distress and pain before Dong-joo comes up to Seo-jung to ask whether she’s okay.

She replies that she’s fine, and adds that she’s amazed that Teacher Kim was able to bring the situation to a peaceful conclusion. Dong-joo replies that it’s because Teacher Kim is either a complete psychopath, or because he’s a doctor to the core.

Dr. Song fervently presents his concerns about Teacher Kim’s handling of the situation at a meeting in Director Yeo’s room. Dr. Nam defends Teacher Kim, saying that his insight into the man in black led to a safe outcome. Ki-tae, Director Yeo, and Teacher Kim all stay silent and listen until Dr. Song says that this could mean the closure of Doldam Hospital. Suddenly, the atmosphere changes, and Teacher Kim tells Dr. Song not to make something out of nothing.

Later, Ki-tae is at the nurse’s station telling Nurse Oh that he was extremely worried about her during the hostage situation. (Do I smell romance?) When she brushes off his concerns, he frustratedly tells her that she doesn’t know his heart. Nurse Oh asks why he got married and subsequently divorced if that’s so.

He calls her by her first name, Myung-shim, and she fiercely snaps at him to not do that in the workplace. When she addresses him by his former title, he reminds her that he’s moved up in the world, and he is now Section Chief Jang. Tiredly, Nurse Oh dismisses him by saying that she’s going to go rest. His eyes linger on her, and he comments that she’s a cruel woman to her retreating back.

Outside Teacher Kim’s office, Seo-jung asks her mentor if he’s all right when he arrives, apologizing for her OR intrusion with the man in black. When Teacher Kim asks why she’s asking about his welfare when she was in the most danger from the situation, she asks whether he’s actually worrying about her. Teacher Kim can only sigh in exasperation at her cluelessness.

He then gently reprimands her, saying that she better not let her PTSD control her again because of this incident. At the end of the exchange, Teacher Kim tells her that she did a good job enduring everything in the OR. It’s only when he shuts the door on her that Seo-jung realizes he just complimented her. But around the corner, Dr. Song’s spy-nurse has heard everything, including that Seo-jung has PTSD.

Meanwhile, in their secret restaurant hideout, Dr. Nam and Nurse Oh discuss the eventful surgery at the end of a long day. She says that Teacher Kim did not repair the neural dura in the patient’s spine as he should have. Dr. Nam replies that it’s probably because they didn’t have time, but Nurse Oh ponders whether it might be because Teacher Kim also suffered from a moral dilemma due to the patient being a child rapist. In his own office, In-bum is thinking the same thoughts, as he wonders why Teacher Kim hesitated during the surgery.

Teacher Kim, on the other hand, is in the ICU looking in on his rapist patient. He remembers his encounter with the man in black’s family, where we see that he promised the little daughter that he would do everything in his power to treat her wounds, and he’d do it for free.

There’s a sweet moment when Dong-joo is on the phone with his mother, who’s sent over some dumplings. He grouses that she shouldn’t have gone to the trouble, but she tells him not to worry about it.

At Director Yeo’s house, Ki-tae introduces In-bum to his future living quarters just when Seo-jung comes out of the shower. Dong-joo isn’t present, since he has opted to stay at the hospital tonight.

Teacher Kim treats a patient with a banged up knee (cameo by 2PM’s Chansung) in the ER. He banters back and forth with the cowardly patient as he stitches up the wound quickly and efficiently.

Looking at him, Dong-joo wonders about the man who constantly makes him feel smaller as a doctor. He goes up to Teacher Kim and asks how he could have stayed so calm in a situation where Seo-jung could have been hurt, but Teacher Kim tells Dong-joo that he was not calm at all. He adds that all he did was try his best to secure the best possible outcome. Continuing, he says he was being idealistic (romantic) about the situation.

Dong-joo scoffs and says there’s not one romantic bone in Teacher Kim’s body. Blowing his non-existent bangs in a flippant manner, Teacher Kim rebuffs this statement, saying that he’d be a corpse without his romantic ideals. But, he adds sarcastically, maybe to the smart, ambitious, and logical Dr. Kang Dong-joo, romantic ideals wouldn’t be apparent.

Dong-joo asks whether he’s being insulted again, and Teacher Kim admits it isn’t a compliment as he adds that he still finds Dong-joo’s inferiority complex and his cowardice repulsive. Half-inured to these comments after having heard them repeatedly, Dong-joo replies that he was just trying his best in his sphere of influence. Then, Teacher Kim poses a question: “You know how to work, but not why. How is that meaningful as a doctor?”

Teacher Kim ambles to an empty ER bed to take a nap until he is needed. Remembering Seo-jung’s words that Teacher Kim rarely absents himself from the hospital, Dong-joo takes pity on him when another emergency patient comes in. Dong-joo tells the nurse that he’ll take the patient so that Teacher Kim can continue sleeping. Tucking in under the blue hospital blankets, Teacher Kim has heard everything, and is pleased by Dong-joo’s consideration.

The next day, Seo-jung gathers her courage to knock on In-bum’s door so that they can leave for work together. The door opens just as she’s about to knock on it, and he brushes past her. But on their walk to Doldam Hospital, she explains that he should stop drawing up a makjang drama in his head, because they are definitely not related. In-bum doesn’t believe her.

She clarifies that her mother was the object of his father’s puppy love crush, but it wasn’t reciprocated. Although she did receive generous financial support from his father, she says it probably had more to do with his positive feelings for her mother than for any other reason. When he insists on a DNA test, she happily says she’ll comply — but only if he pays for it.

At Doldam Hospital, another situation is unfolding. The son from the gallbladder patient has Dong-joo by the collar. This time, it’s about the expensive hospital fees for his father’s CT exam and operation. He calls Dong-joo and all other doctors scam artists who only want to rip off more money from poor patients.

Dong-joo says that everything was done under hospital procedure with the guardian’s approval. The son asks who signed the papers, and his sister steps up to say that she did. Their mother stays silent. Her son demands that the hospital immediately stop any treatment for his father, threatening to sue them all for medical over-prescription.

At this, Seo-jung comes forward and tells the family that there’s still hope for their comatose father according to his brain scans. However, the son isn’t having it, and says that that kind of talk is only for rich people who have the money to pay for hospital fees. He asks who will be stuck paying the bills if his father were to just die without waking up.

Suddenly, his mother slaps him and rebukes him for being an unfilial son, crying that their father spent his entire life devoted to his children and doesn’t deserve this at the end of his life. The son walks out on the family, leaving his sister to comfort their mother.

In Director Yeo’s office, a different problem has arisen. The hospital board has taken issue with Teacher Kim handling of the rapist’s surgery yesterday. In addition, they’ve found out (from Dr. Song, the rat) that Seo-jung has PTSD, so they’ve brought a psychiatrist to exam her. Teacher Kim asks what the real reason behind their visit is, wondering whether Dr. Do wants him or the hospital. That’s when he realizes that Dr. Do wants both.

Knowing the futility of arguing with Geodae’s top lawyers, he tells them to try to their best and opts to walk out without answering their questions. When he is at the door, the lawyer stands up and places a suspension on all of Teacher Kim’s medical activities.

Dong-joo bursts into Dr. Song’s room, asking whether he’s using Seo-jung to expel Teacher Kim from the hospital. Dr. Song only tells him to worry about himself first. Frustrated with the interview, Dong-joo stomps out and catches Ki-tae at the nurse’s station.

In the break room, Seo-jung is interrogated by the psychiatrist. She furtively pulls up the shirt sleeve that hides her recent self-inflicted wrist injury as he asks about the car accident with Dr. Moon. When he does so, she starts experiencing auditory hallucinations again.

Unbeknownst to her, the mental psychiatrist has strict orders from Dr. Do to break her. In a flashback, the psychiatrist asked Dr. Do if that would be okay, given that Dr. Do is her guardian. Relentless, Dr. Do gave him permission to do anything, including removing her medical license, if he deemed it necessary to get her to confess.

In the present, the psychiatrist asks Seo-jung about her slit wrist, explaining that her answer will be recorded and may be used against her. Seo-jung answers truthfully that she accidentally took too many antidepressants, which led to the injury. She says she understands the consequences, but adds that she cannot lie because she is a doctor.

Dr. Song gloats when he sees Teacher Kim’s dejected face as he walks down the hallway. Teacher Kim clenches his fist to hit his smug colleague, only to be interrupted when Dong-joo announces the arrival of a guest: CEO Shin, rolling in on his wheelchair. Mightily pleased with his own craftiness, Dong-joo claims that he has done as Teacher Kim asked (he didn’t), and brought CEO Shin to be hospitalized before his operation. The tables have now turned.

 
COMMENTS

Romantic Doctor Teacher Kim is one of those dramas where you come for the great actors, but stay for the intriguing questions it raises. In this episode, the highlighted dilemma was whether an evil person should be saved. According to the Hippocratic Oath, doctors are obligated to treat the sick. Out in the real world, many physicians, such as those in Doctors Without Borders, risk their lives to save patients on the battlefield regardless of which side they came from.

However, when confronted with a broken man whose elementary school daughter was brutally raped, any human would feel sympathy. Doctors are no different, but Teacher Kim stuck to his guns and finished the rapist’s surgery successfully. In this case, Teacher Kim stayed true to his principles, but he also stayed true to his heart by promising the girl that he would cure her in the future.

Likewise, Seo-jung has not wavered from her core principles from the beginning, and she showed great bravery even with a sickle held to her throat. Even at Geodae Hospital, her first concern was the patients, and that hasn’t changed. Her motivation to become a true doctor is admirable, especially since she now faces potential medical expulsion. The fact that Dr. Do was willing to throw her under the bus like that after twenty-odd years of support just shows how evil or desperate he really is to get the better of Teacher Kim. I like that they did avoid the whole birth secret trope when it comes to her and Dr. Do, though. It makes the In-bum and Seo-jung dynamic cuter, with a (very) slight potential of romance.

On the other hand, Dong-joo obviously feels smaller in Teacher Kim’s presence, but he also seems to be progressing. In this episode at least, he didn’t throw a temper tantrum when being insulted, or when things didn’t go his way. His only outburst was out of sincere worry for Seo-jung. In addition, it’s nice to see Dong-joo do a gradual shift rather than a sudden 180. He still retains his former political savviness, but now he’s using it for the greater good by bringing CEO Shin into the fray. It gave me hope that perhaps Dong-joo can change after all.

 

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thanks for the recap....I liked both master Kim and dong joo in this episode..

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I got the idea that Doctor Kim did save the rapist from death but in that moment of doubt he did choose to not fix him completely let him being paralysed and when he spoke with the little girl that he would cure her and paying al the aditional costs was part of not abiding by the Oath in the case of that man when he said"Now is fair'...

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I suspect as much but can't say I agree and hope it is not true. Because that goes against the Hippocratic Oath. Plus Teacher Kim was suppose to have these romantic ideals so it seems opposite of what he believes. Maybe I'm just being naive or unrealistic to think Teacher Kim would be the perfect doctor. However, I feel principals are very important especially as a doctor.

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Im not sure if he necessarily left him paralyzed on purpose, if his nerves were injured during the attack, nothing that he could have done during surgery would have changed that.

Not closing the spine dura, I think will just leave the possiblity of him having leakage of his CSF or cerebral spinal fluid (the fluid in the spine that surrounds the nerves that also surrounds the brain). This will cause symptoms of postural headache (worse on standing up) which can be very severe, nausea, vomiting, dizziness; more seriously it can also cause higher risk of infection of the spinal fluid and nerves.

It won't however affect his nerves if they were already damaged, and there isn't a surgery that can repair spinal nerves yet, unfortunately. I doubt even Teacher Kim can do that. ?

I'm not spine surgeon though so I could be wrong.

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I love the realistic dilemma that Doctor Kim was faced with. This is an awful human being who had done a despicable ack towards a defenseless young child. To some, he does not deserve the life he was given.
I thought that Doctor Kim said "now this is fair" was when he realized that he couldn't fixed him. I think he was somehow relieved because deep down inside he was being affected by what his patient did more than his desire to save him.
He was given 30mins but he said it would take probably 2hrs. Why would he say that if he had no intention of fully operating on him if needed.

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Good point Kiara! Agree with you- he decided to fix the little girl, and his comment of "this is fair" now makes a lot more sense to me- he means it's fair because the patient cannot be fixed and will be paralyzed forever.

Thanks for your insight! I was struggling a bit with understanding this scene and what Teacher Kim was thinking but it makes more sense to me now ?

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What I love most about that part is that you can take it either way, that Dr. Kim saw there was nothing more he could do for the man and skipped closing the spine dura, or that he hesitated for a bit and chose not to close it because of what the rapist had done. And the beauty is that either of these decisions would be inconsistent with who he is. He is a doctor, but he's also a bleeding heart (albeit a grouchy one).

Han Suk-kyu's killing it as usual and his smile is the cutest thing ever, how is this man 52?

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Totally agree about the great characters that draw you in and the intriguing questions that the drama leaves you with.

Although I could have done with less melodrama and screaming/shouting/scuffling in this episode, the whole hostage situation raised very important ethical questions and also questions on the roles doctors play in society. It also gave us another reason to love Master Kim even more (as if we needed another one). Am so happy we're seeing his cold exterior breakdown and we are getting more smiles from him lately!

One thing I felt was lacking though was we were deprived of seeing Seo-jung's recovery from PTSD. It was like she somehow just found the strength to recover this time, but I would have preferred if the show delved a little more into how she came to terms with the death of her ex.

More thoughts on the episode on my blog entry:
https://kdramaanalysis.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/romantic-doctor-teacher-kim-episode-8-manifestation-of-humanism/

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Yes, I love that we're seeing more of Dr. Kim's smiles!

And I agree, I was a little surprised that Seo-Jung seemed to have recovered so well and could so easily interact with Dong Joo and tease him. I feel like the PTSD sort of disappeared for a while, and while that may be true to life, in a drama I would've liked to see more of how her recovery progressed. Also wouldn't complain if the show filled us in on the details of those 5 years she was working in Doldam--how she dealt with her wrist injury, how she worked through her fiance's death, how Dr. Kim helped her, etc.

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When the psychiatrist asked Seo-Jung about her history of PTSD, Seo-Jung admitted that she has completely recovered from it two years ago. From that , I would infer that her PTSD episode we saw in an earlier episode may be a relapse after two years. I amy be wrong, tho.

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i am thinking that somehow kang dong joo is one of the reasons why her PTSD occured again. it was like he is the trigger on her ptsd

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Thanks for the recap! This is my favourite episode thus far!

Agree with tineybeanie about it being great that they tackled the issue of the Hippocratic Oath and ethical dilemmas faced by doctors. In fact I was super impressed by it! Hats off to the writer for a sensitively written episode that showed the real to life struggle of very human doctors trying to fight being judgemental towards their patient. We shouldn't play God, we are not meant to judge; but that doesn't mean that we are born impartial and will not be swayed by our emotions. And this episode encapsulated it Perfectly. I loved it.

(more thought on this on my blog- https://mydramalesslife.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/romantic-doctor-teacher-kim-episode-7-8-inspiring-deep-thoughts/)

I also want to mention that I loved the entire case of the comatose patient, including the scene with the confrontation between the family members and Dong Joo. In fact I have so many thoughts on it it's hard to put them all down!

It raised the sensitive issues of cost affecting doctors decisions regarding options for healthcare;
Administrators (Managers in their glass towers) controlling what patients can receive based on "cost effectiveness";
Doctors deciding to offer expensive treatment despite knowing it will be a financial burden on the family;

And finally it had the scene with the family confrontation- so well written! everyone in the family was grieving, and they were all trying to do what they thought was right, but ended up just hurting each other more in the process. And the tragic part is that no one was right and no one was wrong, everyone was just in pain and faced with an impossibly difficult decision.

Is it wrong to be pragmatic and avoid disappointment or more wrong to irrationally hold on to hope? How do you put a price on a life? Is it always better to offer life saving therapy? Or is sometimes better for doctors to be more conservative, especially when chances for recovery are dismal.

Like I said, loved this episode and so many thoughts! ❤️️ Coming up with a longer post on my blog about it soon because it's a topic close to my heart since I treat patient in the ICU as well. Thank you for letting me let my thoughts out here first!

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I agree!

Do we go aggressive? Do we go conservative? Are we doing it for ourselves to make us feel good that we gave it our best shot, or are we doing it for the patient?

I came across this dilemma with my own grandmother before she died. The stroke had her bedridden for a year. She improved minimally with rehab, with on-and-off pneumonia attacks and infections which we treated accordingly. She hated hospitals tho, so we converted her room with the proper bed, oxygen tank and nebulizer. So one day my dad took me to see her because she was looking weaker and I knew on first glance she was going to die. I was at a crossroads myself: as an doctor, if this was the ER, I would do EVERYTHING immediately. As her grandchild, do I really want to see my grandmother, after a year of suffering, be intubated, poked with needles, with other tubes and wires attached? And knowing fully well as a doctor the chances of her recovering be dismal? But there was a slim chance! What do I do?

In the end, we let her pass peacefully, and I think my father appreciated that I gave him all the options: all the expenses and the chances that I know. I actually had to pronounce her death myself. It doesnt make me feel sad now, and I always look back on it when I have patients in the ICU. We give all the options ahead and we discuss. We make the patient/relatives partners in decision making so they don't feel overwhelmed with medical jargon.

I think this series is doing so well in putting these issues out there, and I look forward to the future episodes!

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Yes @lessa I totally understand where you are coming from, I had something similar when it came to my grandfather. *hug*

I also am looking forward to the coming episodes! I hope the story keeps it up!

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Thank you for your keen insights!

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Totally agree with you about the issues raised and the scene with the family, @Michykdrama. I hope viewers don't just see the son as the bad guy, because his arguments were as valid as the mother's/daughter's. However, I have a feeling the show is going to take the easy way out, with the father recovering and a simplistic message of saving lives at all (financial) costs.

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I hope Dr. Do is not able to sabotage CEO Shin's surgery and then blame it on Teacher Kim. I'm kinda dreading that possibility.

I don't trust the staff from Geodae. I sorta wish they could learn to work together with the Doldam staff though.

Just last week, we were talking about the patients and maybe how we weren't hearing about their stories enough so it was good seeing their stories this time around. Heart-wrenching for sure.

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Best line here IMO, is when Teacher Kim told DJ: you know how to work, but not why, how is that meaningful as a doctor?

I could be wrong but I still think SJ is Presidents daughter. Yeah all doctors are human, but I still find it hard to believe president Dodo-brain would help his old crush's kid. Just because. He cant possibily be that romantic? Could he? Hahahaha. I just dont like President Dodo-brain.

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I respectfully disagree. Look at how he decided to turn against SJ this episode. But I don't like him either (though not as much as I hate that smug-faced Dr. Song, UGH). He is everything a doctor shouldn't be. He is the embodiment of contemptibility, the epitome of despicabilityness! I just made a new word because no word I can think of can describe how much I hate him!

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Well, yeah, president Do is being exactly president Do now. But I was wondering why he would help SJ when she was younger. It's just not very president Do-like to be kind. So I still assume there's something more to her relationship with him than just a college crush connection.

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I don't get such a good feeling about Dr. Kim playing God and also his relationship with Seo-jung and how he treats her, I've just got questions.

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i think she sees seo jung as the girl who died during the operation of Dr. Do.

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I like this drama. It take courage to be different. It takes courage to go against the norm as it is lonely path! Nobody understands you
Kim Sa Bu is so charismatic and great!

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I know that im not the majority here but is it wrong for me to think that seo jung should have loveline with teacher kim instead like beethoven virus did?

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It's not wrong of you to think this way but I hope this doesn't happen. If it does, it will coincide with my decision to drop this drama - and this will make me ?. It would not "feel" right to me.

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He would have been in his 30s to be famous and she a young kid. Just because the actor who plays him is young- ish looking doesn't mean he shouldn't be like close to 50 years old. And although she is an adult female it is just ergh. It does happen in real life but it makes me feel squeamish.

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it's just this drama feel a lot like beethoven virus, the genius charismatic teacher, a young musical genius arrogant bratty second lead, a heroine who lost her hearing ability, in beethoven the heroine in love with the young hero first before fall one sidedly to the genius old teacher. It was a beautiful story, I love that classic series!

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I was actually thinking of another route; maybe there's a 1% chance that he's the father that SJ never got to meet. That's why Dr. Do helped her. Kdramas conditioned me to expect the unexpected plot twists. Or maybe, I'm just creating my own ghost lol

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I had that tiny inclination in my head, too. Maybe President Do is the key for this secret.... or the lock for that matter.

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My reason against it isn't so much about the age gap, although that does factor into the mentorship they have. He's more of a father/mentor/reverent figure to her. And this is just a personal preference, but a mentor turn lover crosses an odd line of empowerment for me.

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I think the same way too. The big age gap aside, it is obvious that there is a big power imbalance between Seo Jung and Kim Sa Bu. SJ is hero worshipping KSB and most of the time being so submissive to him (to the point of frustration, which made want to see SJ's growth in this) that made them non shippable to me, personally.

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I honestly cried for that Father. I think this was the best episode so far.

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Lee Chul-Min was absolutely wonderful! Had me sobbing! And Teacher Kim, having a half hour time limit, saved the rapist but I suspect made it so he could never victimize again.

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For all the whining that KDJ does , that the system is all sorts of rotten esp that at dr do's hospital, it'll be, shud be, an eye opener for him when v he comes to know that seo jung is a doc bcz of the system, she got the opportunity to get her life out of dire situations n become a very very good doc. She respects dr do , needs his acknowledgement, yet is no suck up to him , his cronies n such. She's within the system working n can bring a positive change from her own side, as dr Kim says, you change yourself first for the good n it is through skill that she'll get her revenge as kim says.
KDJ has a lot of maturing to do n seo jung is another lesson in the waiting to learn form. Man, really the control coolness he has when when he woos her it's not to be seen anywhere else his work or his other interactions.

And that Chinese girl angle with KDJ is so random I'd prefer it not be there anymore.

Dr Kim , he's the man. Id fall for him even though he is what 48 50 in this series. God, that's old. Has he ever fallen in love? Been loved unrequited as his ideals are the only romantic things for him.? It ll be good to know this n I want that woman to be different, someone who stand s her own.

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This was not the right ep for me to watch right after an exam. I had a god awful migraine because of all the crying I did. Brilliant actors, though. Love each and every one of them. And Han Suk Kyu's voice is a revelation.

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Loved this episode to bits! I loved it when 'Hey Jude' was played. It felt like the scene in 'Kingsman' when the heads were exploding.

I feel that Teacher Kim is the father of Seo Jung. Since President Do met Seo Jung's mum in college but she did not choose President Do but another man. I assumed that this 'man' is also another colege student, perhaps someone whom President Do also knew. Then that will explain where the 'bad blood' between President Do and Teacher Kim comes from.

Looking forward to Monday and Tuesday! Can't wait to see what ethical questions this drama will ask.

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Oh god thank you for this episode. After 7 dramas hate-watching this I finally feel relieved to see that it got better on this episode.

We got a better look on Teacher Kim's perspectives and Dong Joo is not being childish on this episode, for once. Thanks God.

I'm worried for Seo Jung and cannot wait for the next episode.

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I have a very stupid question but I really want to know at the start of the episode what does dong joo called seo Jung 'sunbae' or 'seo Jung's I thought he called 'sunbae' but subtitles tell it's seo Jung and I m not quite sure what does he tell her

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He called her Seojung Sunbae. Its just that subtitles are not putting the sunbae or senior word to it. Dont be confused by that :)

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@tineybeanie,

Late to the party, but got here at last. Thanks for your recap and comments. Love that final screencap of Kim Sabu's beatific smile. ;-)

@Michykdrama,

Thanks for your "Take Two: Romantic Doctor Teacher Kim Episode 7-8: More Deep Thoughts…"!

This was a great episode with enough twists to keep the ball rolling but good.

My spider sense is tingling at the neuropsych's interrupted reference to Dr. Moon in his discussion with Dr. D'oh prior to grilling Seo-jung. We might be getting closer to a juicy revelation about her fiance.

According to the OnDemandKorea subtitles, Nurse Oh and Section Chief Jang were formerly married... Interesting.

I can't wait to see what kind of buzz saw Drs. D'oh and Song and their attack dogs are walking into when they cross CEO Shin. Am tickled to bits that Dong-joo came up with that counterattack.

* tightens seat belt for episode 9 *

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Ohmygawd I keep hating Seo Jung more and more each episode. As a person who's had to go through the hospital pin wheel with my own dad, I HATE her for making that TTM decision. Its easy for a doctor to make a morally high call based on their stupid judgement, but it's people like us who have to suffer the financial and human circumstances in the end. How dare she glorify her decision? How dare she spin that pinwheel when SHE herself isn't even the one who has to suffer from the consequences. I hate the drama for glorifying that.

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I might be late to reply but I agree with you I hate her 😑

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