29

Our Blues: Episodes 13-14

Relationships are hard, and people are complicated. Even the best of friends can hurt each other, and the sweetest partners can break hearts. Though it may be easier to pretend everything is all right in the moment, our characters learn that if they want a healthy relationship with the ones they love, then sometimes difficult conversations are necessary to heal wounds and grow.

 
EPISODES 13-14 WEECAP: Mi-ran & Eun-hee; Young-ok, Jung-joon & Young-hee

Mi-ran’s short visit to Jeju stirs up Eun-hee’s bottled feelings, but instead of addressing these issues, she continues playing the part of the loyal friend. Unaware of their growing rift, Mi-ran tidies up Eun-hee’s house in the morning and casually flips through her diary since she believes there are no secrets between them. At first, the entries are nothing more than mundane sales logs, but Mi-ran sits in shock when she reads the latest page where Eun-hee describes her as a selfish, two-faced brat.

When Eun-hee comes home from work, Mi-ran greets her friend with a smile, and Eun-hee goes along with the ruse despite her frustrations. Later that day, as Mi-ran helps Eun-hee get ready for their class reunion, Mi-ran asks if she ever hurt her. Eun-hee lies about being fine, so Mi-ran tells her that she loves her and drops the topic.

At the party, Mi-ran and Eun-hee recreate their high school dance routine, but the guys intervene and push Eun-hee out of the way. Resigning to the sidelines, Eun-hee grabs a drink by herself, and Myung-bo’s wife joins her to badmouth Mi-ran for looking down on all of them.

Mi-ran steps out to buy some learning materials for Ok-dong and finds Myung-bo drinking alone at a park. While she keeps him company, Myung-bo admits to Mi-ran that he is going to divorce his wife. As a divorcee, she advises him to talk things out first, so Myung-bo shows her the bruises and scratches on his body as well as his broken toenails. He tells Mi-ran that his wife has delusional jealousy and has been physically abusing him for years.

Mi-ran comforts her crying friend, and in that moment, Myung-bo’s wife witnesses them together and grabs Mi-ran’s hair. When Eun-hee comes out to check on them, she immediately jumps in the fight and hits Mi-ran on the back to stop her. Enraged, Mi-ran twists around and slaps her friend across the face. Clutching her cheek, Eun-hee stares back speechless, but Mi-ran walks away.

At home, the two friends sit at the table — both sides fueled with unspoken grievances — and their emotions clash. Eun-hee blames Mi-ran for earlier and distrusts her explanation of Myung-bo’s situation. Feeling betrayed, Mi-ran repeats what she read in Eun-hee’s diary and tells her that her words hurt her because they came from the person who knows her the best.

Mi-ran asks again why Eun-hee is mad at her, but her friend refuses to talk about the past. Lashing out, Mi-ran calls her disloyal and gives her a chance to cut ties with her. When Eun-hee stays silent, Mi-ran offers to do it for her and leaves the house.

Once Mi-ran is gone, Eun-hee realizes how much she has misunderstood her friend, and the things she once saw as Mi-ran’s blessings were her own assumptions. Instead of the town star, Mi-ran was a passing breeze, and Eun-hee notices how little Mi-ran truly has. She sees the traces of her friend left behind in her house and decides to go to Seoul to confront her.

Eun-hee visits Mi-ran’s shop as a guest, and while getting a massage, she finally tells her about the incident from last year. She thought Mi-ran only considered her as a pushover and a maid, so Mi-ran corrects her: she was never her maid, but she does think she is a pushover. Explaining her comment, Mi-ran says that everyone in her life is embarrassed of her for being divorced, and the only person who makes her comfortable is Eun-hee.

Eun-hee asks why she is a disloyal friend then, and Mi-ran says that Eun-hee should have been honest with her if she was loyal. They both realize how much the other means to them, and as Mi-ran massages her back, Eun-hee grasps the depth of her confession. Even with a family, husbands, and a daughter — things Eun-hee does not have — the only person who truly knew her was Eun-hee. Likewise, Mi-ran fills that same hole in Eun-hee’s life, and the two friends reaffirm their friendship.

While there are bigger issues in their relationship that still need to be discussed, they are clearly headed in the right direction, and the show makes it clear that both Eun-hee and Mi-ran want to fix their friendship. It’s true that Mi-ran can be selfish and inconsiderate, but she is also generous with Eun-hee, not just materially but also emotionally.

Mi-ran was hurt after reading the diary, but her first response was to understand Eun-hee’s feelings and make amends. She never questions or belittles Eun-hee’s emotions, and only grew frustrated with her when she refused to address their problem. Mi-ran wants to apologize for hurting her because she knows how immature she can be at times, and her ability to love wholeheartedly is what makes her a good friend to Eun-hee despite her faults.

Though I think Eun-hee had every right to be mad at her friend after the prank, it seems that her anger also stemmed from jealousy. Decades of people comparing them as the princess and the maid caused a lot of resentment to pile up. It wasn’t until she heard how everyone really saw Mi-ran that Eun-hee realized that they weren’t so different after all. Even though Mi-ran looked carefree and beloved, she was also lonely and misunderstood.

In essence, Eun-hee was hurt by Mi-ran’s words more than the prank itself because she thought her friend looked down on their friendship. She started to think Mi-ran saw her as a maid like everyone else, and instead of communicating her feelings, she built a wall around herself to avoid more heartache. She only saw the error of her way when she learned that no one really understands Mi-ran the way she does, and it reminded her of the fact that they are friends no matter what others might think.

I’m glad that out of all the stories, these two got the clearest happy ending. Friendships are rarely the focus of stories, especially between adults, so it was nice to see a complex portrayal of one between two women that did not revolve around men. From beginning to end, this arc was about Eun-hee and Mi-ran; and even if the road ahead has a few bumps, I think this time they’ll be able to navigate it better together.

Saying goodbye to Mi-ran, the show returns to Young-ok and Jung-joon’s story… with a new face added to the mix: Young-hee, her twin sister who has Down syndrome and schizophrenia. Young-hee currently lives in a home with others like herself, and it’s been two years since Young-ok has seen her.

Young-ok tries her best to push her sister out of her life as she enjoys her budding relationship with Jung-joon and gets closer to the other haenyeos after sharing her secret. Things seem to be looking up for her until she receives a text from Young-hee’s caretaker, explaining how Young-hee needs to stay with her while they renovate the house for a week.

Unable to hide her sister from Jung-joon, Young-ok breaks up with him before they can meet, but Jung-joon does not take the news well and thinks she is pushing him away because he mentioned marriage. Exasperated, Young-ok allows him to follow her to the airport where she picks up Young-hee, and Jung-joon is shocked to see her.

On their way home, Young-ok stops for a bathroom break for her sister and reluctantly introduces her to the others. Though some of them fail to hide their surprise, Choon-hee and the vocal haenyeo (the one who wanted Young-ok gone the most) stand up for her and make sure no one says anything bad about her sister.

Jung-joon comes by to talk with Young-ok again and reintroduces himself to Young-hee properly this time. Leaving her sister with the others for a moment, Young-ok takes Jung-joon aside for a private chat and tells him that their relationship is no longer fun. He tells her that he will not bring up marriage again but explains how life cannot always be “fun.”

He does not understand why they have to break up when they still love each other, but Young-ok says that all her past boyfriends were like him at first. However, they got tired of her and Young-hee, and Young-ok refuses to be hurt again like before. She thinks he should run away while he still can, but Jung-joon grabs her hand and refuses to let go. He tells her that she underestimated him and will prove to her how much he loves her.

The omnibus format may not be for everyone, but personally, I love the way the show highlights the various stories and lives of its characters every week. There’s more opportunity to explore side characters this way and give them depth because the audience gets to see different aspects to them as they interact with new groups of people.

For example, Myung-bo could have been another background friend, but the show gives him a story and highlights the fact that anyone can be a victim of abuse. The vocal haenyeo is not just an unreasonable antagonist but an understanding grandmother with an autistic granddaughter. It’s because of characters like them that the world of Our Blues feels lived-in.

I’m looking forward to Young-hee’s introduction to the story, and I trust the show to handle the topic of disabilities with care. There were already a few subtle hints from the show depicting the struggles of people with disabilities and their families in a society that is often unaccommodating, and I don’t think they will vilify Young-ok or Young-hee for the sake of drama. Hopefully, things will work out for the sisters, and maybe Young-ok can finally find a place she can call home.

 
RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

29

Required fields are marked *

Noh Hee Kyung always managed to portray the underprivileged in the most thoughtful ways. Disabilities, mental health survivor, single moms, poverty-ridden families and all.... makes us understand all of them a little better.

5
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Have been only reading recaps since episode 8 as I decide I can't endure the agony of waiting for next week episode (will binge watch it once it's done). And I definitely didn't see this coming. I thought of some abusive exboyfriends, lol, though relationship with disabled family members can be toxic (DMF portrays this so well too!). Makes me question my own judgment to Young ok type of person. We are just so quick to judge

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

In most thoughtful ways indeed. She treats every interactions without judgement but understanding. What I mean is, she didn’t sugarcoat reactions. When Captain met YH for the first time, she didn’t made him a perfect man by having him showing a cool and all accepting demeanor. She made him human. He was flustered and taken aback by the discovery. And this kind of thing happen in many instances, like when In Gwon who was excited to meeting MR, later in this episode we found out that he talked behind her. Saying her only fleeting breeze. If only in that context we saw him, we might think he is unkind, and at the time he is actually being unkind. But there is something human in it. Like we know IG is not all gentleman, but because this drama showed a lot of side of him, we didn’t straightly hate his entire character or branded him as antagonist. Cause they showed him being a hard working and good father too. If it’s another drama, he’ll be sure to be one. They will potray him as someone unworthy of any good thing in life. But in this drama, and like any other No Hee Kyung’s dramas, I say, have a very realistic stand point in telling the stories of life, that is shouldn’t be judged by one trait of character. That people don’t being only pleasant or disturbance, cool or tacky, patient or angry, kind or evil, joyful or sorrowful, brave or cowardice all the time. That most of people are human, not angels or demons. But again there are good lives and bad lives lived, and most of us must learn and pursue to become the better version of ourselve. To have a better life. You can’t debate me when I said No Hee Kyung is the best slice of drama writer.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You said it best!! The challenge is to view these characters as multidimensional, flawed and real human. The antagonist in these stories are just the cruel harsh life that these people led.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeong hee will be my most favorite character and story arc. This is just so close to home. I am sure I will shed a lot more tears next week. I already shed a lot of tears in this series. Please handle it with so much care writernim.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think the writer tried to adress too many themes and characters in a little time. If I understand the characters, I don't care about them.

Young-ok and Jung-joon don't work as a couple for me. They gave them big declarations when they just started to know each other...

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The focus on the friendship was a nice one but I think they still have a long way to go. I personally feel that Mi-Ran didn't apologise for the prank or for the mean thing she said while they were in school. Saying that Eun-hee is her only person and that's why she can say those things doesn't really cut it for me. Eun-hee pretending to be fine for a whole year wasn't it... You either cut ties completely or face your friend.

Yeong-ok's sister and her disability is a sensitive topic. It was well handled in the last episode and I hope they continue to handle it with care.

For some reason, it felt weird watching Jung-Jun and Yeong-ok being all lovely dovey in that room 😅 and the mariage talk etc seemed to just come out of nowhere but the video itself was really cute 😆.

I'm not a big fan of Myung-bo because he never really seemed to care about his marriage but it was sad seeing him like that. No one deserves abuse

5
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Abused husbands are not as uncommon as some people might thing. All spousal abuse is utterly abhorrent.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah in the past I was among those who thought it was uncommon

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is only recently that it has even been discussed. In part this was due to the shame that abused husbands felt about speaking up (There was a time when women also felt that they could not speak, and some sadly still do- fortunately we have come some way from that point, although more needs to be done). But the second reason is simply physics- men are generally much stronger so an abused wife is more likely to suffer injuries at a level which proves the abuse. This is the sole real difference. The emotional trauma is still the same regardless of gender.

In any case it is something we should strive to prevent and to stop regardless of gender.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

When Eun-hee comes home from work, Mi-ran greets her friend with a smile, and Eun-hee goes along with the ruse despite her frustrations.

I don't think Eun-hee kept a ruse. She really disliked her friend for what she did and still was excited to have her around. Perhaps she knew how to put her hurt to one side of her mind and enjoy the time she has with Eun-hee. More like she let the sleeping dogs lie - with a heart of sincerity instead of ruse.

Last week the show spent time making me dislike Mi-ran and this week the show made me eat my own words. With or without her hurt, Mi-ran really loved the Eun-hee she gets from Eun-hee, it meant a lot to her. So while she didn't bother explaining herself to Ho-sik, she knew that it was a must to owe it to Eun-hee, and I kinda began forgiving her from that point - the point when she began asking what she did, both before and after the party.
After everything having being done and said by this two, they couldn't just lose thier friendship- they care for each other soo much they shouldn't stay angry at each other.

3
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like the fact she wanted to know what exactly did she do to hurt Eunhee. So she could properly apologize and see if she could do something to rectify.

When you had been friends for so long it really is easy to hurt the other because you thought she would understand even if other people won't. It's like you're supposed to be on my side.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

To me the most beautiful thing about the re-conciliation of the friends was Mi-ran insisting that for the sake of their important friendship Eun-hee has to confront her when she has done something has hurt her. Mi-ran is taking ownership of her actions and responsibility for them- and is actually asking Eun-hee to see herself as someone who has real worth as a person.

As another person has already pointed out to Eun-hee she is not the poor girl anymore but rather the pillar of her community, their real leader who everyone depends upon. Everyone respects her and with good reason.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Her insistence was the final ink that changed my view of her totally. Others could have left you to your version of events and say 'suit yourself', she didn't.
Eun-hee might have depended on her during their younger years and it's just so endearing that she is the one depending on Eun-hee now, on her validation. Eun-hee means so much to her now as she meant so much to Eun-hee then.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought both episodes were really good this week. I appreciate that the drama is exploring issues that you don’t normally see in k-dramas.

Eun-hee and Mi-ran’s storyline really showed the complexities of friendship. Both contributed in making the relationship toxic. I thought Uhm Jung-hwa was really good as Mi-ran. Both women truly cared about each other, so I’m glad they hashed things out and hopefully can build a healthier friendship going forward.

I guessed Young-ok had a relative with a disability. It was really nice to see someone with Down Syndrome in a k-drama. Young-ok’s relationship with her twin is complicated. It would be hard to be in Young-hee and Young-ok’s situation anywhere but especially somewhere where disabilities are still so stigmatized.

5
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I didn't like these episodes. I thought Eun Hui was gaslit by Mi Ran. Also I really though Young Ok's sibling was a serial killer the way they were talking about her. When I found out she had down syndrome, I literally yelled "that's it" and rolled my eyes. Maybe it is where I grew up, and maybe it is different in SK, but I was like you can not possibly be serious. Who cares? People with down syndrome are just a little slower than those of us without it, they are disable, but not to the melodramatic extent the show made it out to be. Then they added she had Schizophrenia and recovered and I was like WHAT? SIGH. Okay. I was just not a fan of these episodes. meh.

0
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is my understanding that there's still a lot of stigma in South Korea around disabilities (and mental health, single moms etc) so while it seems overly melodramatic to us it's unfortunately not there.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

interesting that you think having down syndrome family can't be more melodramatic than this..this is really the most realistic portrayal ever, as family like yeongok who has no other family members so she has to take care of her twin for the rest of her life...and how scary to see the eyes of people who views your family member as "disaster"..welcome to asia

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sorry for judging but you must have been so privileged to think that stories like this are too melodramatic, when it is very common to find all across Asia. I have met or encounter stories like this often, it's very real stigma. Acknowledging the toll taking care of taking care of the disabled esp when coupled with poverty is also important. I hope you can open your mind and see the reality we have, accurately summed up here in a Kdrama

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

You are correct, I have been privileged. All the down syndrome folks I know live fulfilling lives with a small amount of help. It is why I said maybe it is where I am from. How terrible that it is such a stigma. It came out as over the top because she called her sister a disaster, which is offensive to disabled folks, so for me this is melodrama. It may be hard, but I would never call a relative let a lone a stranger a disaster simply for needing a little help.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I wanted to add I never ignore the affect of poverty on a family. However, I have family that had down syndrome and was never considered a disaster or someone to hide. They were poor, very poor. I hope this didn't come off as rude, I realize I didn't clarify that in my other comment. My privilege stems from the fact that family takes care of family, even when it is hard, and it is always done with love. So in my view it is melodrama, but I can acknowledge, not everyone feels that way.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Cool, I understand where you're coming from. The disabled person in your family is very lucky to have you guys. It's unfortunate that many others are not the same. In my country, some of the poverty-stricken people even put a shackle to keep the mentally unhealthy person/down syndrome person to stay at home, so that they would not be a 'burden'. Or simply abandoning the kid elsewhere. It's really sad.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That is sad. My comment comes off as arrogant and I am sorry. That is terrible., I hope some of the disabled people get help.

1

It was not over Eun Hee and Mi-Ran friendship for me as the drama tried to make a positive end. I felt like I have just left my last work meeting which everybody shaked hand but nothing is solved :) Long lasting friendships like a relations can turn out nasty and Eun Hee should deserves better :) It is hard to cut off but I feel it is high time in their friendship to put an end . LYO and the Captain somehow They have no chemistry together. They are both separately such a beautiful people to look at but I don't get the romance part unfortunately :) LYO's sister was amazing ! Go girl. She could have been in main cast sometime ago instead of trying to guess who was calling !

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

These were the two best episodes of the series since they brought hope and acceptance into the story lines.

The Mi-Ran story line could have ended with the friendship termination, but Eun-hee cannot let go of people. Perhaps since she is alone, she cannot afford to lose people close to her, no matter how badly they treat her. She is just too nice of a person. At least we got the acknowledgement that she is the pillar of their community.

Young-Ok's story is sadder than we imaged but the lady divers acceptance of her and her sister was genuine. Captain Joon flashed egotistical anger and arrogance when Young-Ok tried to break up with him. He claimed to be different, but he would not listen to her experience that all her ex-boyfriends said the same thing. Joon was out of character with his emotional, forceful and clingy behavior to keep the relationship going forward.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think this show is essentially very grounded on cultural attitudes and the place of family, and things that don't always translate to other contexts. And that might be the strength of the show, in conveying a series of pictures of daily life totally focused on that context. I think Eun-hee serves as the anchor of the show, a woman who has established herself in the community, sometimes at the expense of her own personal growth. But, she is growing as a character and facing her own fears finally.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Next weekend we will get to see the conclusion of Young-Ok's story. I am looking forward to it.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I still don’t care for Young-ok, but my heart goes out to her. Being a caregiver or guardian of a disabled family member is challenging, and no matter how much they love them, caregivers need a break. That being said, I found Young-hee a delight. I loved the sisters’ kiss on the cheek and sticking out their tongues. I found it touching and typical of the relationship complexities between siblings.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Our blues has a way of making you hate one character and then totally back track and like them the following week. That was Mi Ran for me last week and this week. I like how the show portrays character as multi-dimensional and real. It is very refreshing in a k- drama. Friendships need honesty. As for me if I cannot be honest with my friend then this person is not my friend, in this sense I think Eun Hui was also in the wrong. Now onto Young- Ok. I understand it must be difficult for her. I loved how the ladies welcomed Young-Hee. I feel like she will love staying in Jeju. I still feel like there is something amiss in Young-ok and Jeon Ju 's relationship, but I still can't figure out what bothers me. I thought it was heartwarming when he held her hand and told her he would prove to her how much he loves her.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *