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Our Blues: Episodes 17-18

Fate can seem cruel especially to those who have experienced immeasurable loss and heartache. Though our strong Jeju leader accepts her misfortunes as unavoidable, her young granddaughter chooses to believe in miracles and shows her that hope still exists in this world. As for our other resident grandma, the wrongs from her past continue to keep her apart from her son, and even though her days are numbered, they both stubbornly refuse to talk to each other.

 
EPISODES 17-18 WEECAP: Choon-hee & Eun-ki; Ok-dong & Dong-suk

Living together in Jeju for Choon-hee and her granddaughter Eun-ki has been a learning curve for both parties, but as they spend more time with each other, the two of them grow closer and bridge the gap between them. After making amends, Choon-hee changes her approach to Eun-ki, and instead of denying all of her wishes, she makes an effort to cross off the little items on her bucket list.

Despite the relative peace that has fallen upon her house now, the nagging suspicions about her son and daughter-in-law remain for Choon-hee until a slip of the tongue from Eun-ki reveals the truth. In tears, Eun-ki tries to keep her mom’s secret, but Choon-hee realizes from her lies that her son is in the hospital.

Leaving Eun-ki with Eun-hee, Choon-hee heads to the mainland and finds herself at the hospital where her son lies unconscious. She remains silent during her entire visit and only speaks at the end to her daughter-in-law. With a heavy heart, she tells her to remove him from life support if the doctor suggests it.

As Choon-hee laments her cursed fate, she receives a call later that week from her daughter-in-law: the doctor told them to be prepared to say goodbye. Due to the storm, they can only leave tomorrow at the earliest, so Choon-hee continues with her chores while Eun-ki hangs out in the house. Noticing the family photos, she asks about the people in them, so Choon-hee tells her about her late grandpa and three uncles.

Eun-ki remembers what her dad told her about death and says that her uncles must all be stars in the sky. Choon-hee scoffs at her silly notion and tells her that everyone turns into dirt once they die. When Eun-ki starts to cry, Choon-hee loses her cool and tells Eun-ki that her dad is a liar. Both grandma and granddaughter openly weep with one calling her dad to come back and the other crying that he cannot.

The storm continues through the night, and Eun-ki stays by the door, hopelessly waiting for her parents to pick her up. Choon-hee coaxes her to eat dinner and finally gets her to agree when she promises to take her to see the hundred moons. Though it seems like an impossible endeavor in this weather, Jung-joon and Eun-hee’s persistence help Choon-hee make a little girl’s dream come true.

The various sailors in town gather in their boats with lights strung across and float out into sea. They honk their horns, letting the others know that they are ready, and Eun-hee takes Eun-ki and the two grannies up a hill to see the hundred moons. At first, all Eun-ki sees is darkness, but one by one the water is dotted with moons. Her face lights up, but her eyes pool with tears as she prays for her new wish: make her dad healthy. The others kneel beside Eun-ki, and Choon-hee makes a wish as well.

In an epilogue of sorts, Choon-hee receives a video message from her daughter-in-law of Eun-ki sitting next to her dad who is now awake. She brags to her grandma that she was right and sings her a song at her dad’s request. It’s a sweet ending for Choon-hee who has lost so much, and though it feels like a fairy tale, I’m happy with how things worked out for them. Losing her youngest son may have been the “realistic” outcome, but narratively, his recovery has a bigger impact.

The part that moved me the most about their story was how Choon-hee saw herself as cursed yet she touched so many people in her life in a positive way. Everyone gathers at the end to create the hundred moons because it is for Choon-hee, and thus, we see that miracles are the result of little, mundane things piling up to create something remarkable. To Eun-ki, it’s a spectacular scene of a hundred moons, but to Choon-hee, it’s the concerted effort of the people she knows trying their best to help her even if the task seems silly. Maybe Eun-ki’s dad is a similar story — just untold in this particular drama — about the hospital staff and his family working tirelessly to help him. Either way, I’m happy for both Choon-hee and Eun-ki that their wish came true because life would be too dull if even our stories were void of miracles.

With only a week left before its end, the show finally gets to the biggest unsolved problem: Ok-dong and Dong-suk. Diagnosed with terminal cancer, Ok-dong prepares for her death and gets rid of her belongings from her family photos to her numerous blankets. Word of her illness spreads throughout the town, and eventually, Dong-suk hears of it, too. Though conflicted by the news, he pretends to not care.

While in Seoul to restock his supplies, he texts Sun-ah, asking if she would be happy to see him again. She tells him that she would, so he waits outside her workplace, hoping to surprise her. Right when he spots her, her son calls her name, and Dong-suk’s face turns grim as he watches Sun-ah with her ex-husband. He drives away in anger and ignores her calls.

Once Dong-suk is back in Jeju, the others corner him to talk about his mom and tell him to take Ok-dong to his stepdad’s memorial since that is her wish. They all claim to understand his feelings, but Dong-suk lashes out at them for acting like they know what he went through. His outburst leaves them speechless, and Jung-joon chases after Dong-suk to give him a ride back home.

At the house on the ranch, Dong-suk finally answers Sun-ah’s call and shares his dilemma about his mom with her. She is the first person to take his side and tells him not to go if he does not want to do it. Hearing her response, Dong-suk opens up about his past and describes the day Ok-dong took him to his stepdad’s house after his dad and sister died.

Ok-dong ordered her son to call her aunt, but young Dong-suk begged his mom to change her mind because she was the only family he had left. When he kept calling her mom, Ok-dong slapped him across the face repeatedly until he started to bleed. Even after that, Dong-suk trailed after his mom and promised to do better if she would come back to him.

Dong-suk wonders why his mom acts so entitled towards him and vents his frustrations to Sun-ah. Listening to his grievances, Sun-ah advises Dong-suk to confront his mom while he still has the chance since she wishes she could ask her dad all her lingering questions. Her words help him work through his own feelings, and Dong-suk decides to asks Ok-dong everything that he carried in his heart.

The next day, Dong-suk joins the others at Ho-shik’s stall for lunch, but everyone gives him the cold shoulder. He asks Ok-dong when the memorial starts, and she asks if he will come. Dong-suk remains silent for a moment and then finally answers her. He suggests taking a plane, but Ok-dong tells him to pick her up for the morning ferry. He agrees, and the others break into a smile.

Dong-suk arrives at Ok-dong’s place early in the morning as promised and finds her cleaning the toilet. She gives him a few tasks to complete before they leave, and Dong-suk does them all between his grumbles. To his surprise, they have to pick up Choon-hee next, and he is given even more things to load onto his truck. Dong-suk speeds down the road to make up for the unexpected delays, but his crazy driving skills are not enough. He sits in disbelief as they watch the ferry leave the harbor, and the grannies awkwardly suggest grabbing coffee and breakfast.

At this point, I don’t understand why everyone sides with Ok-dong and gives Dong-suk such a hard time about his mom. In-kwon is clearly projecting his own regrets onto Dong-suk, but why are Eun-hee and Ho-shik so inconsiderate of his feelings? They say that they understand him, but if they did, then why are they not more compassionate? I feel like both the audience and the characters are lacking one side of the story — we don’t know Ok-dong’s, and they don’t know Dong-suk’s — which is causing this disconnect, and hopefully, the final episodes will shed some light on their relationship.

With each passing flashback, my sympathies for Dong-suk grow more and more. He’s an angry and reckless person who can be terrifying, but behind that volatile nature is also a young boy who wants to be loved. The biggest question that still haunts Dong-suk is whether or not his mom loved him. Everything he wants to know about her boils down to this one issue, which is why Dong-suk could never let go of their relationship even if it meant getting hurt. I think it says a lot that Dong-suk asked Ok-dong to run away with him that night he stole from his stepdad’s house because he still thought of her as family. It has always been Dong-suk who reaches out to Ok-dong, and every time he makes himself vulnerable, she tramples on his heart. It’s not surprising that he resents her so much right now, and it also explains why he’s so hesitant to ask her about their past. Ok-dong is a strange and stubborn soul, but just as I have come to understand Dong-suk, I’m sure the show will make me see Ok-dong in a new light once they tell her story.

 
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I know I may be in the minority in this, but there has always been this idea that when someone is about to die, you have to forgive them for any wrong they have done toward you; the idea is to let the person die in peace. I DO NOT agree with that sentiment at all. I have had some people in my life who treated me terribly and when they were dying and wanted to talk to me, I didn't see any reason to listen. They didn't let me live in peace, so why am I obligated to let them die in peace? A death sentence doesn't give someone an automatic pass for all the hurt they have caused. I also don't feel that age alone warrants respect. If you are older, you should behave in a way that is deserving of respect. So the way everyone ganged up on Dong-suk opened up old wounds for me. I know that he needs to forgive, just as I need to forgive, not for the other person but for myself. But what people don't realize is that Dong-suk never got an apology or explanation (neither did I), and so it can be hard to forgive and move on when the person seems to show no remorse. Now as was mentioned, we don't know what his mother was thinking and I'm sure she has her side of the story to tell. But for others to say they know how Dong-suk felt, they can't really understand unless they experienced everything he did exactly the way he did, and no one can. So I really disliked the way everyone turned on him in town without really trying to understand where he was coming from. His mom may be nice now, but what was she like toward him growing up? I bet most have no idea.

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While we can trust Our Blues to give a solid reason for Okdong's actions next week that could actually make one question this well thought-out opinion you've made, I can't help but agree with you on this. I'm definitely not cool with the way he regards his mother, but whatever drove him to that point had to be something really huge, something Ok-dong's arc next week doesn't have to change and turn the table on him.

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I am of the school of thought that you should forgive not necessarily for the person who hurt you but for your own peace if mind because at the end of the day it's almost always the person who was hurt who carries that burden longer.

But I also strongly believe that no one should be entitled to the forgiveness of the person they have wronged (even more so in this case where we haven't even seen an ounce of apology from her). You have every right to ask for forgiveness but I'm under no obligation to accept the forgiveness

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I agree with you about the real reason for forgiveness- not to benefit the forgiven but to remove the burden of anger from one's own self. That is the only reason that Dong-suk would have for forgiveness.

As for the 'duty' to forgive Ok-dong- she needs to express any real penitence and she refuses to do so. Please also note that her own mis-treatment of her child encouraged the others to mistreat him as well.

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Yes, forgiveness is a personal choice.

And I don't think the people want him to forgive his mother but to be there when she dies. The theme is about goodbyes. There is one last opportunity for her to explain her actions and apologize. Dong-seok may not agree with her answers or accept her apology or forgive her.

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Agree, 100%. When they kept saying they understood him, I was getting frustrated too. I was like, but you don't understand him. I don't believe you have to forgive people for any terrible thing they do to you. I am also not sure I believe forgiving makes the forgiver feel better. Some people don't deserve it and shouldn't be forgiven. If they want forgiveness take it up with God.

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I am so sorry that the storyline has caused old wounds to open. I am not watching the show so don’t know the context of the issues raised but your points are really important. Making assumptions and picking a side leads to the people on the other side feeling unheard, misunderstood and judged unfairly. For most situations in life there is a whole back story and without having a fuller understanding making an informed decision is impossible. More importantly a lot of the time it is not helpful for others to get involved in the ways you described.

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I just want to take a peak on a set to see how these amazing Korean child actors pull up these performances! Her portrayal of Eun-gi was stellar.
I was really happy that Mansu made despite all odds.

I'm sure we will eventually see things from Ok Dong's point of view but It was uncomfortable watching all the Jeju guys pushing Dong-seok to forgive his mom. She hasn't even apologised FFS! And from what we have seen, she was really really awful to him.
As much as it would ideally be good if they made up ; the fact that she's dying doesn't automatically mean he's obliged to forgive her. He still has the right to accept her apology (which she hasn't GIVEN) or not. And I really just hate that she seems to be feeling entitled in all this 🥴 when she has not given him any closure

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Episode 17 was heartbreaking. The scene where Chun-hui broke down was brutal.

The little girl playing Eun-gi is amazing. The scene where she saw the hundred moons was lovely.

I’m glad Man-su survived. Chun-hui and Eun-gi deserved a miracle.

Dong-seok honking the horn was such a dick move. Keep your distance, Seon-ah.

I dislike Dong-seok most of the time, but I do think he has every reason to hate his mother and everyone should butt out. Maybe she just had nothing left after her husband and daughter died but her treatment of Dong-seok was terrible. I'm sure we will get Ok-dong's side, but as nice of an old lady she is now, her treatment of Dong-seok still sucks. She hasn't explained or apologized, just demanded that he take her to Mokpo for his stepdads's memorial, opening old wounds of him being tormented while she turned a blind eye. I'm glad Seon-ah just listened and let him make his own decision to get the answers he clearly needs while he has the chance.

In-gwon and Ho-sik sitting outside the hospital, holding hands and crying cracked me up. They’ve come a long way.

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I am behind on the eps so my comment is out of sync with the others. I just can’t stand Lee Byunghun’s acting. He is so one note and just tedious. I can’t help thinking that if a better actor with a more adept emotional palette had played Lee Deonseok, the character’s constant and unremitting abrasiveness could have been properly layered and made interesting. As it is, he has made it really difficult for me to tolerate the character. I wish the actor playing the younger version could have had a much more prominent role.

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wow, i think LBH is doing an amazing job. the subtleties he conveys with just his eyes or his jaw muscles--but to each his or her own.

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Another pair of hard watches in emotional story arc about saying goodbye. At least there was clarity in the fishing community about respect for their elders (Choon-hee and her situation) along with the symbolism of nature: the cruel sea both feeds and takes away people. Even hardened souls come to prayer at their darkest hour. It took 18 episodes to get a true happy ending Eun-gi.

Dong-seok’s relationship with his mother is still troubling, even though he had a bad childhood, he has welcomed deep seeded anger issues that projects harsh negativity on all his personal interactions (such as when he saw Seon-A with her child and ex-husband). In some respects, he has never grown up. He never wanted to understand his mother's plight of poverty taking her into a second marriage. Some people never reconcile their broken family relationships. He claims he will not take care of his mother to possibly regret it later, but it is unlikely he will ask his mother his questions because he does not want to know her answers. He is more comfortable in the projection from his past than wanting to know the truth.

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The baby girl playing Eun Gi is a fabulous little actress. She was so delightful. I will say though I feel like Korean directors make kids cry far more than they actually do. It is weird or maybe I don't know a lot of 4-5 year Olds who cry that much.

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This is why I want to take a sneak peak on set to see how they "make" these child actors cry so much while delivering their lines perfectly. I'm truly puzzled 😅

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It did seem like alot of crying but if you put a child that age through alll those traumatic scenarios it seems justified, all security and safety ripped away from her and instilling the fear that she could make her grandmother collapse by telling her the truth (that was a truly bullshit move) the crying and tantrums seem justified to me

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The crying was justified for her age and what she went through. I'm just amazed by the child actor

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You never met my niece lol. She is a crier.

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The best of Korean drama deliver wonderful moments of poignant grace and we saw this as our wonderful Captain Park has led a flotilla of fishing boats out onto the water at night to deliver to a young girl the Hundred Moons that her now comatose father had promised her- at the time when we have been told that he might have to be taken off life support. She is praying and then her grandmother and the others with her are doing the same. Then cut to the very final scene when we see that instead he is being rolled down the hall - obviously on the way to the operating room- and we know that she is about to get the miracle she was praying for. Talk about playing with our hearts…. Anyone who did not get teary eyed must have a heart of stone. It was a wonderful moment.

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I am going to guess that she purposely hurt him by telling she is no longer his mom so that he is no longer a family. If he is no longer her son he will be safe and live a long life. Maybe she felt she is cursed after losing both husband and daughter. That is my take on her stubborn decision to detach herself from him.

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With the addition of hearing the mothers side of the story, maybe she'll be forgiven by him but to me treating your own son like that is unforgivable, she had no explanations just unkindness. He needs an explanation for his peace of mind but I wouldn't find any that could possibly justify that treatment

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Defiantly agree. I am sure next episode will tell her side of story and try to make us teary :) but I will not buy it !

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“ we see that miracles are the result of little, mundane things piling up to create something remarkable.” ❤️❤️ This episode reminded me of why I watch k-dramas.

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