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Cheese in the Trap: Episode 3

Cheese in the Trap has all the makings of a crack drama and pop-culture sensation, which the ever-climbing ratings only serve to confirm. But more than a sweet, potentially giddifying romance with appealing characters, I’m really responding to the thread of thoughtfulness running through the show, and the development of the characters beyond the romantic. You’ll never hear me complain about romantic development as a bad thing, but you’ll also never hear me complain about a romance that suggests hidden layers and emotional depth. When you get them both together, you’ve got something special, and while it’s still very early to make definitive conclusions, Cheese does hint at something special.

 
SONG OF THE DAY

Tearliner with Yozoh – “I Am Love” from the Cheese in the Trap OST [ Download ]

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EPISODE 3 RECAP

Jung’s face is stony as he tells Seol she’s “just like everyone else” for approaching him with ulterior motive in mind, leaving her feeling bad for springing the set-up date on him.

The next day in class, Jung ignores Seol entirely, and she notes that he’s back to being as cold as he was last year. She approaches him and apologizes for the night before, and he acknowledges her with pleasant indifference, as though nothing happened or mattered.

Their professor announces that team projects will be their next assignment, and warns that team cooperation is crucial—nobody had better coast by on their teammates’ efforts. She directs that at Seol in particular.

The reason becomes clear when we see Seol’s team, which includes bossy sunbae Sang-chul, who’s eager to foist things off on her. The other members are just as happy to name her leader.

Seol leaves class preoccupied by Jung’s chilly reception, telling herself everything should be settled, since she apologized and he acknowledged it. Recalling his words about Seol being like everyone else, she thinks, “Was he expecting me to be different from other people? Why me?”

She has lunch with hoobae Ah-young, who describes how strange things got after Seol left them—Jung got silent and withdrawn, and she’d felt for the first time that he was cold and scary. Ah-young shares her hunch that Jung likes Seol, explaining that his demeanor changed after she’d mentioned Seol’s blind date. Seol immediately laughs off the thought, but Ah-young is pretty sure she read him accurately as jealous and angry.

Seol can’t shake off the thought, even as she tells herself it’s ridiculous. Her buddies Bora and Eun-taek assume her mood is directed at them because they pushed her into the blind date, and while she is annoyed about that, it’s not as bad as they’d feared.

Seol explains about losing her phone and uses Bora’s phone to call her own, then heads over right away to meet the person who answers—In-ho, who insists she join him at dinner before handing it over. He makes her spit-take by asking point-blank if she’s dating Jung, but her reaction confirms that as a no, and he supposes she’s not Jung’s type anyway, calling her hairstyle “dog hair” and her bangs “pig tails.”

But when Seol asks what In-ho’s relationship is with Jung, he has to think and can only reply, “I don’t know.”

In-ho sticks her with the hefty dinner bill (adding that she owes him two more meals) before returning her phone, then comments that her glare hardly seems like a grateful enough response. He throws in an extra tip: “Be careful of Yoo Jung. He’s not all he seems.”

As she walks home deep in thought, Seol is mulls over how In-ho knows Jung well enough to say that about him. She makes a frustrated sound, and it’s only now that she and In-ho become aware of each other—she’s been trailing behind him all this time. She asks in surprise if he’s been following her, while he points out who’s in front and who’s behind.

He guesses she lives on the same street, and she lies and hurries off in the opposite direction. She sneaks into her room, not thrilled to be living nearby the guy who seems determined to weasel more money out of her, and is further alarmed when he texts her: “See you again, Dog Hair.”

The next day, Seol meets with her group for the class project, and already it looks like she’ll be doing more work than she should: sunbae Sang-chul is hungover and half-asleep, another classmate asks Seol to reduce her workload, and mousy Min-soo doesn’t even know where to start with the research.

A group of sunbaes walks in, not realizing a group was already in there, and their leader, Do-hyun, introduces himself to Seol. Jung is with them and continues ignoring Seol and her offer to give up the room soon.

Jung offers to do much of the preparation work for his own team, and his sunbaes appreciate having their time freed. Do-hyun expresses his interest in Seol, saying that model student types like her can have a really hot hidden side. Spoken like a true douchebag.

Jung remains silent despite being bothered by the leering, and his other teammate comments that Seol and Jung are actually very alike, busy taking care of other people to their own detriment. Jung is one thing, he says, but how is Seol going to manage Sang-chul, knowing his personality?

As expected, Sang-chul wastes no time trying to get out of doing his work, telling Seol she’ll get an A if she does more. The rest of the team is no better, and Seol finds herself moaning, “Why am I doing everything?!”

Then everybody flakes on their team meeting, hitting her up with excuses. Sang-chul even posts pictures of himself drinking with his buddies, which sends Seol charging over to the nearby bar.

Sang-chul is infuriatingly flippant about missing the meeting, while Douchey Do-hyun sizes her up and insists she stay for a drink. Sang-chul goads her with soju, offering to work extra hard if she drinks it up. Fuming, she grabs the glass and chugs it down.

Jung is working on his project when he realizes he and Douchey Do-hyun have mixed up their papers. Upon calling, he hears the guys chanting in the background for Seol to drink, and offers to go to Do-hyun to exchange papers. He acts indifferent to news of Seol being there, but can’t hide his unease when his friend calls it a “dangerous” situation for her—Do-hyun has a reputation of getting girls drunk and taking them to motels. Jung heads out in a hurry.

At the bar, Seol is pretty drunk and Do-hyun eyes her lecherously, waiting to make his move. When she gets up to leave, he offers to take her home—just as Jung arrives and volunteers himself for the errand instead.

He holds her firmly by the arms and leads her away, berating her for not being able to say no and not taking care of herself. She’s more bewildered than anything by his behavior, unable to protest as he pushes her into a cab and pays the driver. He sends her off with the warning to come to her senses.

Do-hyun confronts him outside, peeved at the cock-blocking, not to mention the follow-up lecture. But when Do-hyun starts to challenge him, Jung gets steely, making a veiled threat to ruin the internship Do-hyun has lined up. Do-hyun asks if this is because of Seol, and Jung merely replies, “It makes me sick to watch. If you’ve understood me, you’d better be careful—unless you want to spend your whole life an unemployed loafer.”

Do-hyun’s the bigger asshole, but Jung… there’s real menace behind those words, and what’s scarier, a sense of power. Do-hyun gets the message.

Seol makes it back home and stumbles into bed, where she mumbles sleepily, “Come to my senses? What did I even do?”

At school the next day, Seol rushes for the closing elevator and barely makes it, only to make eye contact with Jung inside. Instead of getting on, she quietly turns and walks away.

Jung receives a call from his father the chairman, who then also calls In-ho. Dad addresses In-ho warmly, wanting to see him after so long, and despite In-ho’s reluctance to go, he agrees to drop by the house to see him.

In-ho and noona In-ha arrive at the mansion just moments before Jung pulls up in his car, and the air is immediately tense between the boys. In-ha grabs each boy by the arm, talking brightly, but they both shake her off and head inside separately.

They keep up appearances for the sake of Chairman Yoo, who looks fondly on the siblings and is pleased to have In-ho back in the fold. He offers his help to the siblings and encourages Jung to do the same, and In-ha chatters about how she’d love living with the Yoos forever. (In-ho hisses at her to shut it.)

Chairman Yoo speaks to In-ho individually, telling him he understands why In-ho would feel upset, and encourages him to forget the past and start up with piano. In-ho tells him, “I have no interest in the piano anymore, so you don’t have to worry about me.”

He says he’s young and can figure out what to do with his life, and is grateful that the chairman took care of him all this while. He politely but firmly declines the chairman’s offer of assistance, says he was happy to see him again, and excuses himself.

Even so, he can’t stop himself from pausing at the sight of the piano on his way out the door.

In-ha is pretty shameless about her place in this family, and isn’t fazed when Jung asks how long she’s going to mooch off his family, which can’t happen forever. She fires back, “This is all I can do—do you think I’ll quit? If you don’t like it, you should treat me well. If you just do that, everyone will be more comfortable.”

In-ha takes off in a taxi alone, stranding her brother at the house. Jung scoffs at In-ho showing up when he acted like he’d never see them again, and In-ho retorts that his father seems to feel differently from Jung: “After his well-to-do son ruined someone’s life, he must be feeling sorry.”

Jung replies, “It’s someone else’s fault through and through, is it? And it’s Father’s fault for saving you two from that terrible place. And your hand being messed up is my fault. But if you really want to blame somebody, shouldn’t it be you, who disappeared when I offered to pay for rehab?”

That makes In-ho angrier: “Rehab? You can even say that word to me?” Jung’s cold response inflames him more, and In-ho launches himself at Jung’s car, kicking off the side mirror.

He asks how Jung dares to look down on others: “Do you think everything will happen in this world the way you want it?!” Is it such cause for anger and outrage that some pitiable kids took a bit of food they were given? He goads Jung to hit him: “Don’t manipulate people from the back like a coward and hit me now, you bastard.”

Jung kicks him in the shin, calls it payment for the car, and drives off coolly, ignoring In-ho shouting furiously after him.

Seol’s team doesn’t turn in their parts or respond to her messages, with only one night before their group presentation. She gives up with a sigh, figuring they can all fail together… for all of two seconds, before she turns back to the project, telling herself that anger won’t do anything when it’s the grade she needs. She resigns herself to just doing it all herself.

She stays up all night, slaving away, and even prepares her team’s parts of the presentation. She’s peeved but gives them their parts, and when the presentations begin, she finds them all promising for being messy and flawed—maybe their group isn’t tanked, then.

Jung does leads his team in a professional presentation that earns applause and awe, but Seol feels optimistic about her chances of an A as they take their places to start.

But it quickly becomes clear that her team has no idea what they’re presenting, and the professor easily figures out that the team didn’t do the work. She asks each member questions, and Seol’s the only one who knows any answers. So while the professor deems the report well-done, she reminds everyone of the team nature of the assignment—and gives them each D’s and the designation as the worst team project in her class’s history.

As soon as class is over, her team starts in with the half-assed apologies and pointy fingers at each other. Seol sits there silently fuming, and when she sees that her teammate wrote her individual project—despite being too “sick” to do the team work—that just makes her angrier.

She appeals to the professor, saying she worked really hard on the assignment. The professor recognizes her solo efforts, but adds, “Don’t you know that’s the biggest problem?” She says that Seol probably things she’s very hard-working, and figured that nobody would work hard and gave up and did everything herself. But the real world isn’t like that, and her business major hinges on communication.

She’s in a deep funk afterward when Bora and Eun-taek find her, chattering on about their vacation plans. Seol tells Bora to pick whatever she wants, and when Bora keeps talking, she snaps at her before explaining about her grade and scholarship woes. Bora’s hurt, though, and doesn’t let her off the hook, saying that Seol always keeps everything bottled up inside and never says what she’s really thinking.

Feelings hurt on both sides, the girls head off in opposite directions, and Seol trudges on with heavy heart. Jung watches her walk by, looking sympathetic for once, and calls out to her. But she doesn’t hear or register him, just listening to music as she walks on. (Background song sings, “I haven’t been able to say it yet / When I see you, I act like nothing’s happened / like I have no interest / that’s how I’ve been.”)

So Jung follows on foot as she walks through town, keeping his distance. I’m not sure whether he’d approach her, but he doesn’t get the chance because In-ho spots her in the street and joins her, and Jung stops in his tracks. He just watches, growing smaller in the distance as In-ho walks Seol home, asking if something’s wrong.

Seol starts to ask a question, but only asks it in her head: “Everybody tells me I’ve been living wrong. But what am I supposed to do in times like this?

In-ho holds up a cold drink to her forehead, telling her to cool her head and let sweets help with the gloom. For what it’s worth, it appears In-ho does lift Seol’s spirits, and she manages a smile.

Jung stares, alone in the distance. I’m sure I’ll love you later, or even very soon, but: Serves you right.

Jung comes to a decision and calls his father to suggest helping the Baek siblings become self-sufficient, rather than just giving them aid. To that end, he proposes getting In-ha a job at the company, and his father is pleased at Jung’s show of interest in them.

Jung calls In-ha about it, but she scoffs at the idea of taking a class to get the requisite certificate. While she’s whining his ear off, he just tells her warningly, “Listen up, Baek In-ha. This is your last chance.” He hangs up without checking or caring that she’s heard.

He settles back with a sigh, saying, “Yeah, this is the right way. There are too many things that went wrong.”

Seol blinks back tears and mulls over her professors’ words, thinking of her busy life working multiple part-time jobs: “I had no chance to even look to the side. To keep from falling, I had to keep my gaze looking forward, and thought that I worked harder than anybody.” Her professor had said she thought she worked harder than her team, and Seol asks herself, “What was it that went wrong? If everything wasn’t other people’s fault, but a problem with me…”

At school, she has an awkward moment when she runs into Bora, who wishes her well on her exam politely, but leaves without anything further. Seol wonders where she has to start in straightening everything out, feeling adrift, not knowing what she can do.

She stops by the vending machine and inserts a coin, then fumbles to find another one. Another hand beats her to it, dropping a coin into the slot for her, and she realizes, “What I can do… is doing right now what needs to be done.”

She turns to see Jung walking away, and calls out to him. His eyes widen in surprise, and he turns back.

They head outside to talk, and she starts by bowing and apologizing for springing that set-up date on him. “But I hope you won’t misunderstand. I didn’t spend time with you because of Ah-young. After growing closer with you, I thought you were a good person, and that’s why I introduced you two.”

He looks softer today, and surprises her by apologizing too. “To be honest, I acted like a kid and it embarrassed me and felt frustrating.” Seol wonders internally what would have frustrated him, while he smiles and suggests that they forget anything that made them feel bad about each other, and she agrees.

Then she asks him to dinner tonight, promising to buy something really proper and expensive. He asks how much, and she tells him to pick what he wants.

Which leads them to… more triangle kimbap. Aw, that’s super adorable. This time, he figures out the knack of opening the package and is proud of himself for it, admitting he practiced “a lot.”

He walks her home that night, and catches her looking at him. He asks why, and she says she’s glad they made up, because it was really uncomfortable being on the outs. Jung admits that he felt the same, and when she says it didn’t seem like he did, he says, “I acted like I didn’t.”

She recalls In-ho’s warning about Jung and asks if he knows the guy. He doesn’t explain, but warns her against talking to him and says she should just ignore him, making Seol think there’s more, but that she ought not ask.

Jung notes that it’s a dark and potentially dangerous neighborhood, and offers to walk her home from now on. She assures him that it’s fine and makes it to her front door, thanking him for walking her home. But he just stares at her intently, not saying anything, and makes her uneasy.

Then he reaches out to take her wrist to keep her from leaving. He asks, “Seol-ah. Want to date?”

 
COMMENTS

Wow, that happened a lot faster than I was expecting, but that’s not a complaint. In fact, it’s something of a relief, because when it’s clear the characters are feeling something, and starting to clue into it themselves, it can be frustrating to wait forever for a drama to do anything about it. We knew right off the bat that these two were going to date—not just because this is a romance drama and duh, but because the webtoon description pretty much introduces the two as a couple. And apparently there’s plenty of story material to feed the plot after they become a couple, so I’m only too happy to get there quickly and explore what happens next.

(Speaking of the webtoon, it’s only natural that fans of the source material would come into the show with that background and want to compare it to the new version, but my policy is always to discuss the material at hand, not the stuff that exists outside this drama’s inner world. So I’m pretty much ignoring anything outside of the drama at this point, and while I won’t tell anybody else to do the same, I will ask that we keep most of the discussions to the drama itself. I apologize and thank you in advance!)

I’m pleased with the development of this drama, which I wasn’t sure would live up to its hype—how could it, when the hype was astronomical? But what this drama has done right is in somehow finding its voice and sticking to it without getting stuck in the trap of trying to cater to what they think the audience wants. Of course it’s important to be in tune with your viewership, otherwise you risk alienating them entirely, but there’s a fine line between going too far in either direction. And I feel safe in putting my faith in the show to continue, knowing that they’ve already written up to Episode 14 and will be wrapping filming soon—the show already knows what it is, and won’t be deviating too far from that.

What I was struck with most in today’s episode was actually less the romance and more its coming-of-age sentiment, with its suggestion of an emotional journey for our heroine. The episode did contain some rewindable relationship moments and I’m definitely all about the romantic build-ups, but it’s nice to think that the drama’s heart is about more than a love story. Coupled with the drama’s sense of melancholy and wistfulness (a directorial touch I particularly appreciate), we’re looking at a more introspective kind of rom-com, which is refreshing.

As for the characters, I was so all set to feel the sting of Second Lead Syndrome—and pleasantly surprised at Seo Kang-joon stepping it up for this role, because, um, he hasn’t always been this engaging—because when you present me with a wounded wild spirit and a repressed, potentially sociopathic one (okay, Jung’s probably not a sociopath… but I’m only 95% sure of that. Maybe 90%), it’s not hard to feel pangs of empathy for the lost boy.

After all, even with my brain jumping through mental hoops to explain (or excuse) Jung’s behavior, he did tick me off with his cold dismissal of Seol and immediate shut-down. I could offer up any number of explanations for it, like maybe he was too hurt, or maybe he felt like his rare attempt to put himself out there got trampled, or maybe oppa just didn’t mean it, okay? But at the end of the day he was exactly as In-ho described, all high and mighty and sneering down at people less fortunate that him—it’s almost like he considers himself in his fortunate position through pure merit and not, say, tremendous amounts of privilege and luck. So that’s a little infuriating, no?

But then he turned it around, admitted he was being childish, apologized for his behavior, and made it up to Seol with triangle kimbap! Dramaland is full of supercilious heroes who can’t cop to their mistakes that readily, so points for that. And it warmed my heart that he matched his desires to Seol, for a few reasons: One, it grates my nerves when rich heroes treat poor heroines to finery without batting an eye, as though they’re “elevating” her somehow, and two, because it shows him making an effort through an action that doesn’t fall back on his privilege and gobs and gobs of money. I mean, sure she can enjoy the gobs and gobs of money… eventually… down the line when they’ve both done the work of meeting each other and showing understanding for each other. That can be the icing on the Cheese cake. (Badum-ching!) (I apologize for nothing.)

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My question is, what changed in Jung?

One moment he was ignoring her in class, and next thing we know he asks her out on a date?

Did he feel pity for her because she did all the group work herself?

Or was he jealous of the second male lead's interactions with her?

What triggered his change in attitude?

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Maybe he was ignoring her because it hurt his pride? When seol went on the date, his pride might have gotten hurt. So when he realizes that it wasn't that and sees how dejected she was from getting a unfair grade he softened up?

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I think he was hurt because he thought that Seol approached him with pure attentions.

The guy is smart, and rich and you see how many hanger ons he had to dealt with. I'm sure people want something from him all the time. But Seol was different, I think he really thought that they were forming a friendship which is rare for him (obviously) so when he discovered that she wanted something from him after all, I think he shut down quickly.

It's weird, but people call him pretentious, I don't think he's pretentious at all. I think he's just cautious and yeah hella manipulative, but I get where he's coming from.

When you come from a background such as his and came from money, you have to deal with a lot of crap and have to protect yourself. You have to have an outside image to deal with other people and I think that's why he comes off as menacing at times.

I'm not excusing him, mind you. I guess I've always been interested in people like him. Wouldn't want to meet him, but he's interesting to watch and analyze.

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Hadn't Jung promised to help her with the class in Episode 2? (Not that she solicited help, just that he offered). Did I remember that wrong?
If that's the case then he might feel guilty for withdrawing from her at a critical time.

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I think its more that he knew how bad she must be feeling and his pride and anger were not important to him in the face of that.

So also when he hears that she's drinking with that creepy guy. He knows whats important i guess.

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Seol figured it would be easier to do the presentation herself after trying multiple times to get her classmates to do their portion of the work. I think Jung recognized that and saw himself in Seol.

Jung is clearly someone who needs to have things just the way he wants it to be-- he keeps meticulous track of things that allows him to manipulate others into a position he wants them to be in, so that events unfold as he planned them. He also doesn't seem to trust anyone but himself, as putting faith in someone else has too high of a risk factor for him to think is worth.

What I meant by Jung seeing himself in Seol is the mutual worldview that as long as they do fine themselves-- alone-- things will be alright, and he empathizes with how things turned out for Seol.

There's definitely also the threat of Inho, and obviously Jung doesn't want to lose out to him. In terms of Seol, Jung has shown that he feels certain emotions just like any other normal person, but the extent to which he acts upon them is a point of concern, since he has to be content with the end result.

End of essay-- I just find Jung to be such an interesting character, but I don't necessarily would want to be close to someone like that in real life for obvious reasons....

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I love the way explained it and enjoyed reading it ;)

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You've explained Jung so well here. It's always what I've felt but could never put it to words. Awesome. He's an interesting character to see on the screen or read from a webtoon, but not necessarily to meet in real life. That would be frustrating as hell. Also a bit creepy and scary.

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Same here!
Thanks!

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she definitely isnt someone who's good at expressing herself (like the teacher misunderstanding.. i know even if she defended herself it probably doesnt change the fact of her getting a D since its team work the teacher is looking at.. but she's clearly fail in even explaining to the teacher..i mean i could understand why she do the project herself.. but its not because she looked down or think its more effective that way that she finished it alone without needing their help.. in reality was that she was left with no choice since the team mate wasnt helpful and basically ignore her plea and she cant just leave it and kill herself too....

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That's where the mystery part comes from I guess. It's something that will slowly be revealed in the drama.

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Yes, slowly and painfully but beautifully. And I think that's one of the charms of CITT.

I'm withholding myself from watching because I really don't have the time other than to read recaps. Waiting for it to be finished so I can watch all 16 episodes. For this, I'm thankful that I marathoned the webtoon before. But at the same time like JB said, I can't help but comparing, not to find fault but just to see how well the scriptwriter managed to tie in the plot. And I read that they've finished the script! Kudos to the team.

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Yes they have! All 16 episodes of script is done, so we don't have to worry about makjang endings, or tight deadlines and bad acting either. So thankful for the team and TvN for this.

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I think it's because he can relate to Seol. These are two people who others like to use for their petty advantages, and he realized during that presentation that Seol was a victim, just like he is. It's why he's so distant from everyone, but starting last year he's been seeing sparse but hopeful moments where Seol might just different. What differs Jung from Seol is his high status not to get walked over, whereas she is more timid and overall less powerful on the social ladder.

Also, him seeing her with In-ho may have sped up his confession, lol. First one to confess might get you the girl?

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I agree. Jung has learned to be manipulative ('behind the scenes' as In Ho said) because he otherwise gets walked all over (ie. everyone using him for his money). And unlike Seol he has more social capital and willingness to use it. I agree with Jung's friend (whose name I don't know) that they are both alike (work/study hard for what they want) and they both get taken advantage of by others. The difference is that Jung has learned ways to live with it (and get the upper hand), whereas Seol is still kind of taking it for the most part (I do love how assertive she can be though).

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Have you noticed that Jung's friend is like a representation of us? He's the one voicing our concerns, like when he worried over Seol's team, and when he's worried about that slimy pig of a sunbae.

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Which is strange, because apparently he's Oh Young Gon...

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Wait, is he Young Gon? At first I thought he was but since he's only has a few lines I thought he was just..a hanger on. Huh, that would be sneaky of the writers.

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i'm not really sure, but i think the friend that always with Yoo Jung is another friend - Kyung Hwan.

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He's not Young Gon, he hasn't been introduced yet and is being played by Ji Yoon-Ho.

http://asianwiki.com/Cheese_in_the_Trap

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I find Jung's behavior way too moody. I know he's supposed to be like that and PHJ is playing him well but I like our heroine too much for her to be couples with him. I'm sure he'll grow to be maybe less sociopathic, cold, distance, calculating, and a bit stalkerish (ok, following a girl THAT long is NOT romantic it's just damn stalker).

I find Seol's scenes with In Ho the most refreshing, entertaining and filled with snap, crackle and pop! I feel like it's In Ho's advice that make Seol reflect and change. He is perceptive or in tune with her enough to know when she is down, or pensive or needing someone to make her laugh. He seems to be a jokester but he seem deep with a lot of life experience that he could teach our Seol. So, I don't consider this just your average Second Lead Syndrome just because he's a nice guy, which he is but is also the prankster but because he really gets her.

In fact, I think the Lead and the Second Leads are switched in this drama! I thought it was the Lead who was supposed to be a tough guy jokester who is actually sweet, thoughtful on the inside and concerned about the girl and gets her in that je ne sais pas kind of way, and the Second Lead is just supposed to be the nice rich guy who is just nice but really boring. I find Yoo Jung really just boring. Yes, he has that element of "oh, think he might be an evil creep" but take that away and he is just boring and too uppity for our girl. In Ho, on the other hand is awesome! And his scenes with Seol - even though they are short - are very filing and rewatchable. Can't wait for the next episodes!

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Amen.

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Remember in ep 6 there was a flashback when Hong Seol asked him how he started to feel differently about her. I think thats when he started to become interested.. :)

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I can't even count how many times I refreshed to read this recap because I needed to know if anyone else reacted the same way I did. It's only episode 3, and I'm already a goner — lol I definitely fell for the cheese in this trap haha

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Crack drama alert!

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"It’s only episode 3, and I’m already a goner — lol I definitely fell for the cheese in this trap haha"

Nope, you're not the only one. Me too. Lock, stock, and barrel.

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me three! hahaha...

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Me 4! Lol

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and I'm already refreshing to watch tonight's raw
didn't expect this to be such a crack drama
T_T

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me five hahaha!

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First episode in, I think I was already hooked. XD

also, I haven't even seen ep 3 and I already love it! (working in night shift is rather disorienting)

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is it only me but my favourite ep so far is still episode 1? i've never loved a first episode as much as i've loved CITT's. it had the right amount of mystery, creepiness and enigma that completely hooked me - and for a moment i really doubted that yoo jung would ever be seol's romantic interest and that this drama would be a thriller/murder mystery instead! i love it so much.

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OHH MAI GAWD. RIGHT? Usually it'd take me at least 3-4 episodes to get me so invested but I was hooked since episode 1!

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Me too! I love this drama! There isn't anything gimmicky about it but I think the chemistry between the actors, the acting, the writing, all of it is really great. I'm already starting to count the hours and days for each episode! Oh no!!

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After watching ep 3, the first thing came to my mind is that ' thanks god suzy for rejecting the role'.

she gonna f**** ruins the hong seol's character with her mediocre acting.

btw, thz for recap. amazing episode

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exactly. kim go eun nail it. She is my new favorite actress. After I watch first episode of Cheese in a Trap. I went and watch her other movies Coin Locker Girl, Memories of Sword, Monster.... she is awesome. She can act and so adorable. She nailed all. She also got fighting skills in her. Hope can see more of her movies and more drama.

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I agree. I found her interesting in Coin Locker Girl too - not your stereotypical pretty face, which I find interesting and very appealing - but her acting her got me. I LOVE the way she is playing Seol. She gets the details and the tiniest expressions just right. It's fantastic to watch. I think it's a real treat to watch dramas that are well acted. It's not just about a pretty face but someone who can really breathe life and soul into the character. Kim Go Eun is really doing it for me and I'm loving her the best in this drama. Well, Seo Kang Joon as In Ho is a close second. I know how the drama will end up - with Seol and Jung together - but man, I wish it was In Ho and Seol. They're better matched!!

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Thanks to the PD's work hard in keep asking Kim Go Eun to be Hong Seol and even adjusting the filming schedule to suit with her schedule ;)

This girl is too talented.

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I'm loving how fast this show moves. And that presentation scene pissed me off. Poor Hong Seol. I felt so bad for her for being in that ridiculous group. I can't stand that Sang-chul guy ugh!

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I agree! But I also found that super timid girl with the glasses just as annoying. I've met many a girls like that in school and it's like, ok, you don't belong in this class or this subject if you are going to pull the I'm so helpless and timid BS and not do a thing. I'm sure our Seol will grow and develop to become someone who would actually speak her mind and get people in line by the end of the show but I agree with you, that presentation scene was annoying to watch - on behalf of Seol that is.

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Anyone know the song at the end of the episode? I'm pretty obsessed with this OST.

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Can we post a link here?

just in case: here's a playlist of the available songs

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJweYKiRQt3MqPHqPrNaWVuSezNIo-dl3

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omggg you're a doll!! <3

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Is that ost even release? I guess its not in this playlist.

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released*

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it's not the complete OST! Just the "background" music for some scenes.
The latest one I found is Cosmos Hippie - Maybe I like you. Search it up on youtube!

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I am also looking for this English song (played at the end of ep 3)! It's not in the OSTs released so far.

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I am also looking for this English song...couldn't catch all of the lyrics to google it. But it sounds like such a sweet song.

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Here is the answer :) we just have to wait a little bit more. http://www.icaruswalks.com/myk-releases-an-ost-for-cheese-in-the-trap-kdrama/

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Such a great epoisode. I totally felt for Work during her presentation. I've been there, being walked all over on, by rude group mates. And what can she do to stand up for herself? She's the only one in the group who's on scholarship. I felt so bad for her.

So many rewindable moments, as jb said. The leads have such great chemistry!

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How did Soel get autocorrected to Work? It's no where similar!

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LOL! That got me laughing hard!

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Hahaha

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Easy answer. On the keyboard, S is close to W, E is close to R and L is close to K. But her name is Seol not Soel.

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What even annoys me is that Sunbae Sang Chul should have felt at least a little guilt towards Seol for dropping her at the other prof's class. He also should have helped her with this group work because he really needs to pass this class in order to graduate.

I feel so mad that students like him graduate by mooching off to hardworking ones like Seol.

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I know right? Why the hell is Sang Chul still goofing off! He clearly can't afford to fail anymore, yet he's out getting pissed and trying to skive off everyone else. Get it together you stupid, jerkface!

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If he was in jung's team .. jung would have probably blackmailed him to do the work... ah I want to see that now....jung ways are perfect for people like sang chul ....

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I said the same while reading the webtoon. I understand him being creepy in his dealings with people, but that school is filled with people who needs to be manipulated that way. Sometimes I am shocked this is Uni, then again, I did see similar behavior during my bachelor days.

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My niece was one of the few female students in engineering at her university, and she was a star. Everybody wanted to work in group projects with her because she was smart and a girl. But the boys soon figured out it was not a free ride. She made them sign a written agreement covering proper behavior and work ethic in a group project, and recorded all of their meetings. If they messed up they were OUT of the group, and the professors respected her so much they didn't argue with her. One time a guy kept her waiting for material for a project. One more hour, he kept saying. She was upset, but when she took a walk and saw him sitting with a guitar and hanging out with friends on campus she was livid. She literally lifted him off the ground by his collar (she is 6ft tall, he was not) and said things I can't repeat here. Obviously he was out of the group. Upon graduation she had multiple job offers, just based on her professors' recommendations.

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omg who is this amazing woman and where can i watch a movie about her?

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Agreed. Where?

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wow. that's amazing...

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I think the teacher was mean to Seol. It was not her fault at all!!! She didn't give up on her classmates, because she talked with them on the phone a couple of times and even set up a date to do the work with them and they didn't show up.
I know how it is, it happened to me before but now I ask for individual works, or else I complain to the teachers. The thing is the teachers are also unfair. Seol worked so much all day and night, and because of the presentation they got a D??? What about the paper work? She is even on a scholarship, her teacher doesn't care if she has dificulties or not.

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I don't think you understood the (very valid) point that the teacher made. Yes, Seol was hardworking, that was very obvious. But the whole point of the project was to show that you can work well in a team.

There's always gonna be those lazy ass people who somehow made it where you are. When you work in an actual office setting, are you going to still do all the work? It's one thing when it's a group of only 4 people, what are you going to do if it's 20 people? 100 people? Especially considering, like the teacher said, shes in MANAGEMENT she needs to learn to do exactly that. Manage people.

Her teacher is harsh but its teachers like that that will really teach you lessons you remember in life. Better to fail in school than to fail in the workplace imo.

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I was going to say the same. She's a business major, which will prepare her to manage a team in a company. She will be dealing with similar people who do not pull their weight. It does not matter if you are hard working, but if you are not a good leader and figure out how to encourage and get employees to work toward your goal, your team/company will sink ship. Business is definitely all about cooperation and communication, not about doing things herself

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Somehow 'work' actually makes sense in case of Seol!! :D Your autocorrect is brilliant!

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wow. my reply was supposed to for comment nr 6.. :S weird.

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Oh man I had to hit the fast forward button during the group work scenes. For someone so intuitive, Seol seems to be incredibly submissive. I personally HATE freeloaders or people who try to wheedle their way out of group work with big talk, and as a person in college, I'm so glad that I haven't had the misfortune to meet people like that. UGH SANGCHUL GO AWAY.

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I agree! I did feel that her teacher's assessment of her was incorrect. Like, I get that the show is trying to say that Seol often isolates herself and wants to do everything on her own because she hates letting people in and burdening people, no matter how close they may be to her (not entirely an incorrect assessment), but in this particular project she did her best to get everyone involved. She only did it herself at the last moment when there was no alternative option at all. She didn't do it all by herself because she thought the others wouldn't do a good job of it, or give up after a half-hearted attempt to convince them. She tried her darned most to work with the group. There was literally nothing she could have done, except not do the work and risk her scholarship anyway.

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(On the other hand, having been in that setting, I can't say that the point by itself is not valid. Because when you're in that position, especially in an actual job with real-world stakes, you need to be able to get that work out of people. And a lot would be naturally disinclined to work, so it depends a lot on how you go about it and how you're able to handle it. A shoddy performance by a team reflects on the entire team, because in that situation, individual star-performers are irrelevant, since it's not merely for grades, but has consequences beyond.)

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I think Professor Kang was too harsh in giving Seol a D and too easy on the loafers. They should have gotten an F!
She did turn in the group paper for them, so she didn't deserve that grade. Shouldn't her group paper count?
Like Professor Kang said it was a group effort, but why was Seol stuck with all goof offs? Unfortunately, the goof offs didn't even try to learn the material for the assignment so they could fake it so they got caught red handed. Seol was too easy and a pushover. She wasn't strong enough to get them to do their job. So in real business environment, she would be a Wuss.

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Omg, that scene of Seol staying up and doing all the work for her useless group members. It gave me flashbacks to doing the same thing (or rather very similar) in university.

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ditto! that's why i'm not a big fan of group projects.

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me tooo for a successful team project you should have a good team .... uagh....it reminds me so much of my final year project ... all the team members were my best friends for 4 years... we made up the group ourselves... you can do report and presentation even script them but answering question is out of question... you can never predict... come on we all listen to same classes why can't you answer...these are the kids who don't listen to their parents or teachers.. them listening to our words is impossible... glad i was an engineering student no need for communication and i took the teachers assistance so he gave me more marks ...... the best part was they even argued for me getting more marks ....
that's why love this drama and webtoon so much ... it can be related to real life....

i read and follow webtoon like a crazy fan i waited for every sunday for it to update but drama has its own perspective and i love it ...i totally agree with jb....

when will this day end i want more cheese.....

PARK HYE JIN it might be hard to believe him for a college student but no one can be that dark yet be adorable at the same time .....

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Ditto! I've always hated group project in college. The worst was when we had a semester-long project, my friend and I had done our share in the first month, but the other three guys hadn't made any progress. About a week before the presentation, two of them felt bad and started working. The last guy works as a part-time manager at Taco Bell, so he complained all the time that he's busy, but he'd pull through and do his part before the deadline.

The evening before, our group met to finalize the paper, and his part was still blank. At this point, I'm too pissed off to let it go. The other two guys tried to sooth my friend and I, but we swore off working together with them. I called the other guy and told him that if he didn't start working on his part now, I swore I would march in Taco Bell to call him out.

The douchebag did put like a page of zero content in at 5am, but the paper sucked. I ended up spending the whole morning proofreading and even skipped lunch, so by the time the group gave the presentation, I was shaking from low blood sugar. The only silver lining is that the cute guy sitting in the front row sent me an email right after class to compliment my speaking skill xD.

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One of my last project was for a human resources management class. I was already in an emotional bind because of bereavement and I ended up the group leader. Two of the women in my team were lagging in their work and we were close to the deadline. Being emotionally drained I had a short temper and was getting irritated with them, so I talked with the teacher to find a solution and he reminded me that I had the power as the manager to discipline them, which I did

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I'm really enjoying it so far. But damn that professor pissed me off! I mean what was Seol supposed to do to get her teammates to do the work? She already went and confronted that annoying senior. Was she supposed to physically force them?

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The professor is tough, but everything she said is true. Being a business major requires great communication skills, persuasion and team effort, all areas that Seol needs to improve on, which was perfectly illustrated when she saw her friends afterwards.

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Exactly! right? What could she do? Maybe if she had not done everyone's work for them and given an incomplete presentation, the teacher may have given her a better grade.

But the thing is, that's totally dependent on the teacher. You never know what you get stuck with.

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The worst thing about it in my opinion is that Seol is the only one that needs an A. All the other 3 can limp along with a D (it's still a passing grade) even though she 'still' did all the work. For me that's the argument I would have tried with Professor Kang. Seol had zero leverage, even if she hadn't done their parts, she's the only one in the group (that we know of, but makes sense given how they acted) that would have been adversely affected. For the rest of the 3, only a failing grade would have bothered them and they knew that Seol wouldn't be able to do that.

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She did teach a good lesson though, you gotta admit that. I'd like to believe the sole reason why the professor gave a group project was to teach the lesson that teams are win-all lose-all situation, especially in the working world. No one gets special treatment in a team from a higher-up-- they're collectively responsible for their actions as a group. Working in teams is a reality, and Seol found out the hard way that not everything can be done on her own.

The other group members were undeniably irresponsible though, and it sucks that Seol tried so hard until the end to get everyone to do their fair share. This is a large reason why group projects are a hit or miss, and I think the drama did a good job exemplifying something so relatable as a student myself.

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I completely agree with you.

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Okay, I understand the lesson and believe it can be a valuable one, but that still doesn't answer the question: what was she supposed to do in that situation? She texted, she called, she divvied the project fairly, and set up meetings, and responded to questions? What else was she supposed to do. This isn't a work situation, she doesn't have power to actually make people work if they refuse to.

And it annoys that they were sitting in class the entire time and didn't even bother to read through the material and learn it before the presentation. Ugh! I'm sorry, this rant isn't actually directed at you, that scenario just made me so mad. A thousand times worse than the report situation from last episode. I wanted to scream and cry.

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what is she supposed to do

And to me, this is why Yoo Jung manipulates. He doesn't seem to manipulate for the fun of it (otherwise that'll just make him a psychopath) but when people try to play him, he'll serve it back - underhanded or not because frontal attacks are sometimes difficult to make without killing yourself. But when people realize that they got played by him, people think he's a psychopath/get scared of him. He seems highly vengeful and self-protective.

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Absolutely agree. Jung has learned that if he doesn't manipulate he'll end up being walked all over just like what is happening to Seol. Jung/Seol are like different sides of the same coin. They are very similar but deal with things differently. I love Jung, scary dead eyes and all.

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+1 the way jung at start took all the responsibility and made others to just do their part instead letting them dump the work on you is the only way.... you can have everything in control (which gives you the upper hand) without expecting them to do anything. that's what the teacher told even if don't do team work don't get caught... only a master manipulator like jung can do that ....

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God right? She did the work for you! Just memorize the paper while all the other groups are talking. I was sooooo mad. Clearly all the nerds in real life (hi!) are going to relate to both Jung and Seol. I wanted Jung to give some backhanded comeuppance to Sang Chul (and Da Young and Min Soo). Like come on! It's like you all want to fail.

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Tbh, it was already too late for them to memorise the presentation material. Especially when they were also being distracted by the other presentations. In my experience, this never works out. And even if they miraculously had been able to present well, I don't think they would have been able to answer the following questions, since they had no deep understanding of the material like Seol did (who actually researched it, formed opinions based on it, made hypotheses and conclusions etc etc). So to me it was a failure from the start.

I feel bad for Seol, she's clearly an introverted girl and having her manage such a difficult group must have been particularly tough. Though the teacher wasn't entirely wrong, and she didn't argue with the others when they decided to make her leader.

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You can deal with this in a few ways, but it mostly involves self-management. In short: you just don't do work that isn't yours, and refuse to work on overarching structure until each team member puts in their work.

And you hammer them with this. You send a nightly email with your piece attached and say "this is where I got to, look forward to seeing your take", leaving large empty PowerPoint slides with "Dan TBD" stamped across the middle. You make yourself available, but only in person and in limited amount. You do NOT type for people. You kindly offer to review and edit the final draft, but make it clear you can't get started until there's an assembled piece. And no, you can't do the assembly. You make your piece AMAZING, and then make it clear that everyone else is approaching a point where they'll stand in front of a blank projector screen for their parts and babble.

Browbeating only works sparingly and to a point, and is most useful for later-in-the-game stuff like rehearsal. You bribe people with dinner, and then lock the doors and make them repeat again and again. This doesn't end in school, I still rehearse for client pitches every month with a team spanning 25-60 years old).

But all of this means you MUST accept that there is a chance that you'll get an F if the other group members don't pull through. But usually these approaches will result in a 1:3 ratio (where the 1 works and the 3 freeload) into an even 2:2, or 3:1, which increase pressure on the freeloader and also increase the chance that the teacher's wrath will fall on the obvious target, the slacker.

Slackers can scent a Type-A student, and they'll take advantage unless you make it clear you're not playing. Enjoy 10 gorgeous slides in a 40 slide deck, slackers - as the deadline gets closer they tend to get VERY motivated by the obvious difference in quality between your stuff and theirs. And you can even be nice and offer to dress their slides up a bit in the final draft, but ONLY the final draft.

I'm guessing Yoo Jung employs all of these methods, plus a terrifyingly void expression when he repeats your excuse for not providing research, making it sound exactly as stupid as it should.

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looking for a like button for your concrete points and suggestions, Miranda. My kids have asked me this question on what to do with slacker group members and i could not come up with an explanation like this. thanks. Big shout to JB for the recap. Still of half mind and relying on recaps at this point. I probably will not have much patience if this were just a romance story; better be a coming of age type of story for Seol. I hope she grows a backbone.

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This is almost similar to what I do but I try to frame it in a more positive way? At the start I volunteer to do something like the integration of parts, and I frame it as if their work will now be super easier lol. Like saying, I'll handle the integration so you just have to focus on doing your part, send it to me on this date. And then I make sure I do my part on time or a little earlier so that they get a bit pressured to also start their parts. Sometimes my groupmates are clueless where to start but don't want to ask questions so when they see my part they also get an idea of how they can do their part. I do the dinner thing too but usually i just bring snacks and then put them through a meeting which lasts as long as it takes. Another thing that I do is try to find things that motivate them and relate it to what we're doing. I encourage them to have a sense of ownership over our project by making them feel that what they contribute is super important and amazing lol. Basically, I try to make them more than just interested, I try to get them to be passionate. Almost all our undergraduate work was done in teams since the work load in community development based programs is really designed to be done in teams. It's harder when you're friends with a groupmate that constantly slacks off since it can affect your personal relationship... But I have learned that it is best to talk about things upfront.

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Also wanted to say that it also pays to really communicate well. Like, you don't just divide the parts and say see you online lol... I ask for their opinions on other parts while also giving my opinions on what they can do. Often they get a bit more into the whole thing if they see you're also into it and not just interested in your part aka your grade. It kinda saddens me when we do something that is so worthwhile and such a big benefit to a community and they don't seem to get just how much we will be able to contribute if we do things well. I dislike half-assed work more than late submissions done well because it points to the group just winging it and not even thinking about the future use of that work.

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wow, I wish I knew these things when I was in Uni.. haha! but I guess this could still be applied in the workforce... but then again my career path is rather in the "do your own thing" way..

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Wow! I'm definitely gonna copy paste your comment in my notes for future reference...!!

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I still feel bad for Seol, but I do like this list of suggestions and will be saving for real life situations.

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Pretty much this

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damn I love this comment oh so much, I even saved it as a note on my laptop! in my intro to marketing class last semester I ended up spending over 15 hours straight creating a new slide deck with better information 24 hrs before it was due (bc our old one was so booty), but one girl in my group refused to let us use the new one because it was too new and different (tbh she was salty bc she created the old slide deck). My friends were too timid to challenge her and her friends went along with what she said so we ended up submitting the old slide deck and getting a B :/ so i v much feel Seol and hate group projects sometimes >.>

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Me too! I thought it was not a good way of teaching from the Prof. In real life, most good bosses would still give credit to the one that work their as*es off. To be honest, this episode made me so upset I ended up with heartburn from it. I had an experience like that, where a four people's job ended up being worked by two people. The two of us didn't sleep for a few hours in weeks, literally. The professor gave us a chance to grade each other, but unfortunately it didn't matter...all of us ended up with A grade even though only two worked.
I thought this drama's professor didn't teach anything useful.

I'm also pis*ed off with Bora. Completely! I mean a good friend would know when her friend is down, and not trying to run her off with some useless non-stop comment about nothing. Honestly when Bora got mad back and said the problem was with Seol not letting her own feelings out, I wanted to slap her. She can't take Seol being honest! Sure, Seol lashed out without Bora knowing what's going on, but what kind of a friend not letting Seol let her anger out and give her excuses for that. What a load of bull*hit of a friend. It's sad that In Ho, a stranger still, knows how to be a good friend than Bora. That's just sad.

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She did all that, divvied up the work and whatnot, and it still didn't work, so at that point, she should've gone straight to the professor. In a work situation, if something is going to fail or cost you profit, you nip it in the bud as soon as possible. She should not have waited until the presentation day with the hope that all would turn out well. A week in and they were flaking, she should've gone to the professor for advice. At the very least, the professor would have been told of the situation and been made aware of it. The grading would've been more lenient later, I'm sure.

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Good advice. If she had gone to the professor, the other three would have made sure they helped her out, even if they cursed her and treated her badly, but they would have been too afraid not to do the work. Even the threat of going to the professor might have worked.

By saving them from not getting in trouble with the professor, she got into trouble herself.

And serious one at that. She lost her shcolarship. I'm still so mad at the three group mates.

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I suspect this professor would have told Soel as the team leader she has to find a way to make it work while also offering some thinly veiled advice on how to do it.

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As a future manager, she should have found a way to lead her team to do the work, be it by using warnings and going to see the teacher to let her know that her teammates weren't pulling their weight or find a way to incentivize them to do their work. She needs to stop thinking as a student and make the switch as a future manager

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Except in a professional setting many teams are made up of experts in different areas and it is obvious which team members do not fulfill their obligations. At least, that's been my experience.

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I really dislike her group members, but I thought Prof Kang was being fair, if tough. Seol is in business management--she *has* to learn to work with and lead team members who are sub-par, lazy and who she dislikes if she wants to succeed in her field.

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The problem I have with that is...when a hired member clearly does not do any work, they should be expecting to get fired. And I mean *any* work, because if they do just a little bit they can sometimes get away with it. Yes, the rest of their team members suffer as well, but that member? Fired. In the real world, unless you have crazy manipulative powers or have some special status, you do not get away with that schtick. This is not a life lesson.

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Exactly. Also when your superior gives you and your coworkers a task, it needs to get done no matter what.If it doesn't it can harm the company or your place in the company. For the people who do not work their are ways to report them such as performance reviews, but even still the project needs to be completely done

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And if someone does all the work, it shows to the higher-ups, assuming they're careful to show it!

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As much as I hate to agree here, I do.

Even though a group member might get fired for poor performance after the fact, the performance itself is vital. And when it was clear that all members had to participate, that means everyone being fully aware of the materials.

There is merit to making Seol suffer here, though again I hate to say it. She needs to learn to starve the people feeding off of her, or to absolutely dominate them, or whatever else is needed. There were ways to manage even the least motivated group that she could have used - at the bare minimum you get them all in a room and pound them until they get the script right and can understand the concepts. That might mean turning in a B project rather than using the extra 2 hours to refine the A, but those two hours are what you needed to whip everyone into shape.

I was a Seol and I learned this exact lesson, though not as harshly. It was worth it and in the long run it's been one of my stronger professional skills because now I know the true value of drawing the line. It genuinely doesn't matter how amazingly smart you are if the client turns to an unprepared team member and he whiffs the answer. You can't save that, and you won't win the project.

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Wow, only this drama that gets comments about college/working life like this. Long comments at that! Daebak!

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She was being super, super tough but I agree; Seol should've only done her work and refused to do theirs (I'm finished with my part now I'm going to work on my individual project. Bye.)
She needs to work on her communication. If she couldn't figure out how to handle her group mates, I thought she could've at least asked her professor for advice.
Personally (I've been in a similar situation and have done this but my professor wasn't as strict) I would've shown the professor proof of all of the times I tried to contact them to show that I didn't give up on them until the last day. Maybe that could've given her brownie points?

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Yes, this is what I was just saying, that Seol should only have done her own work and also shown her professor her attempts at managing that lazy lot.

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I think the professor, however grating it seems; was correct.

Jung had it right because he accurately assessed his group's capabilities and gave them bits they could handle.

Seol, in her own little world, attempted to do the whole 'fair equal parts' plan; which was obviously not going to work. She did not adjust. To make matters worse, she stuck with that ridiculousness up to the presentation. No other group in the class had more than one presenter, did they?

In summary, her refusal to assess people, adjust methods, or understand her situation was what caused the D. It was, in the end....her own fault.

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Agreed.

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I think the Prof did gave her wise advice, since I always believe university life is not about pass with good grades.. just ... it is too cruel give her D.

We know how she tried to ask her group mates about their assignment. All of her group mates are too useless, and not even making any effort to improve.

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I agree. I really like the actress playing the professor. She was so CRAZY in "She Was Pretty" as the Chief Editor and she is pretty sound and grounded here in this drama and I love it. I think she's a great professor. What she said to Seol was correct. I think she could have given her something better than a D since the written work was still good, but she was right. It's a group assignment and she's in business school so a huge part of that is communication and working with others and getting others to work with you. I like that the professor is not portrayed as a crazy, super eccentric nutjob who has it in for Seol. I think she sees potential in Seol and is actually trying to have Seol break out of her shell so she can elevate herself to becoming great, and not just good at doing what she is told to do, get good test results and working hard. Professor Kang is pretty awesome and realistic as a professor - I hope they keep her that way.

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Wow! Reading all these replies and mini conversations is so interesting :) I think I understand the other side of the argument, I think it just sucks a lot because for them its just a grade, but for Seol its potentially a scholarship, so while she may have learnt a lesson, it might be at the cost of her education tuition. Plus as a fellow uni student it definitely gave me some group project flash backs :P

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For Sung Cheol, though, it wasn't just a grade, it was also his grade that he needed to do well and get better job offers.

Anyway, I think Seol should have shown the professor how her team blew her off again and again with the texts and emails they sent her and then, if the professor insisted it was still all Seol's fault, to have asked her clearly, "So, how was I supposed to handle these lazy people? What should I have done?" That's only fair for the professor to tell her how to handle the others.

Alternatively, Seol should only have done her own work and then let the others flounder, saying, "But you were going to do this part? We talked about this in our meeting. Oh well, guess we'll all get a lower grade since it's only partially done."

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Stacking up proof isn't going to help with a professor like this, and very likely will dig you into a hole. The professor knows exactly what happened, being a seasoned teacher with years of classes under her belt, and Seol will only be another in a series of students who work like this.

The teacher clearly warned the entire class about working together, and Seol didn't handle it. If Seol were to ask about how to handle group dynamics, it would have to be in a totally neutral, forward-looking way - any hint of whining and expecting the given grade to change would be MUCH worse for Seol in the long run.

The worst, worst possible approach would be bringing in the presentation and asking for a grade change, showing off how much of it you'd done (the prof knows!), then asking "well, what was I supposed to do?". The time to ask about dynamics was before the presentation. The teacher told you the rules and you didn't follow them, you got caught, and now you're whining about getting caught. Noooooo no no. The grade isn't the problem, your ability to work as a team is the problem. That's what you need to ask the teacher to help you fix.

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@Monique

While it might look unfair for Seol to be given a D because she did all the work; I have to argue that Seol did in some ways deserve the D because she failed to get cooperation of her team mates when doing the project.

First of all, who chose the project topic? It was Seol. Did she even ask her team mates for their contributions when choosing the topic of their project? Maybe if they had chosen the topic together, the other team mates would have been more eager to do their parts of the project if it was a topic that was more familiar to them.

And when Sang Chul complained that he didn't know anything about South Africa, and all the materials were in English - did she even address his complaints by having a one on one with him to show him how to research his project? No, she just left him vague instructions and relied on group meetings which could fit everyone's schedule.

From the information she got from her team mates, it was obvious that the scheduled times didn't work for everyone, but Seol was inflexible and unwilling to reschedule.

A good leader, leads. And goes the extra mile for results even when it is sometimes highly inconvienient. Seol was too focused on her hectic schedule and her grades to lead her team properly and her team members became disengaged.

When she was asked out to lunch by Min Soo, Seol blew her off to eat lunch with her friend. In business, wining and dining gets you very far with clients and colleagues, especially in cultures like South Korea, but also in the US where I'm from. Networking is done over business meals, and also after work in bars and pubs. Seol should at least have asked Min Soo to join her and her friend at lunch. Eating together would have broken the ice, they would have found common interests, and she would have secured Min Soo's cooperation. By refusing to have lunch with her team mate, she sent a message that her team mate is not important as a person, merely as a means to an end - just a way to get a higher grade. It's no wonder that Min soo ignored her texts.

When she received text from her team mate that they didn't know how to format their material. She could have gotten on the phone and walked them through it. An extra step that migh seem like baby sitting, and requires a lot of patience but is so worth it in the end. Also, it conveys to your team mate you care enough about them to call. But Seol responds with an impatient text. I bet the team mate on the other side was getting pretty frustrated too. The teacher is right Seol needs to work on her communication and delivery.

Business is about reading people, and working well with people. The ones who go the farthest in business, are those who know how to network and work with people to their advantage. The presentation wasn't a test on how well one could research their material, or how well they knew their topic. It was a test on how well you could work with your teammates and carry them along...

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Just to be fair here, a lot of that is assuming she has spare time to coach/mentor her group mates - she's dealing with a number of competing priorities here, like tuition/living expenses money, pressure to keep up a grade A for the team project because she already got an unfair grade for an individual project assignment that was not her fault but because some other jealous female student stole her assignment and caused her to turn it in late, a sense of feeling that NONE of her group mates knew what to do and were just dumping it all on her. Maybe if it wasn't a confluence of factors she would have been able to cope with it or respond to it better. The lecturer did deliver a tough and realistic lesson but what pisses me off (in all schools) is that I feel people should be coached through these things too, which seldom happens - I suppose that's what differentiates the chaff from the wheat but damn it's cold and sometimes it takes people a while to figure out what went wrong and how they could have handled it differently. I feel like if people do project teams, there should be a mentor/coach who coaches them through the process (get them to realise what they are learning thru the project work, and discovering of themselves) and I wish more school work was done in this way. It's a more sensible way to approach work because let's be honest, these are the skill sets that get you further in the workplace than just knowledge pieces that can be easily picked up if you spend some time working on the content building.

Anyways, just saying that this is a particularly complex situation and I completely empathise w Hong Seol, especially if she was never put in a leadership position and isn't aware of how some of these have an impact on how she works. It also pisses me off that her lecturer seems to look down on her for being so hardworking (without considering why it is that she responds like that) ugh.

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@Rainerust.

You raise good points.

My assumptions are based on the ideal scenario where she has a mentor/coach to help her with these issues. Considering she has a witch of a professor who is more interested in dealing out a lesson, rather than helping her students resolve problems or navigate the complex and myriad problems they face academically, simply means Seol was s*** out of luck.

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I don't necessarily think the professor is a witch or she refused to help coach Seol or anyone else for that matter. But I don't think Seol even asked. As the professor pointed out, Seol just acted alone, wanted to act alone in a way, didn't ask for help and didn't try different ways to bring her group together. One of her biggest problems is that she thinks she is alone, she has always been alone and having to deal with her problems and she never asks for help or tries to work with others.

Yeah, her classmates are assholes and they were lazy. But the commonality is that they all probably don't want a D either. If getting a bad grade is not what Seol wanted then she should've tried to find different ways to get others to cooperate. Not one method works for everyone and she should have tried different methods and find a way to get them to work with each other and work with her. That's a very important skill she needs to learn. Yes, it will be very difficult to work with different personalities but the key is to find a commonality and motivation shared by each one that will force them or compel them or entice them to work together. And she didn't do it. That was part of the assignment more than just the project itself. That's what she failed. I do think the prof was a bit harsh with the D, and should have had the presentation be just a part of the grade and the written work make up another part, but with regard to the presentation, Seol just didn't get it done.

Also, in life, you are going to have many things that require your attention and that compete as priorities and you will also have a ton of stress dealing with a hundred different things. But that's life. Everyone has that. If you want to succeed, you have to find a way to deal with that and still find a way to succeed.

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totally agree with you. i said something akin to this above....i'd forgotten though, about how she ignored the team's texts & appeals....spot on.

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AHHHHH ims creaming
honestly 3 episodes in and... i like it???? i honestly thought i wouldn't, judging from the casting but citt's surprising me so far

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Heehee I love this show and I love this recap.

Now I want cheesecake.......

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That group project scene always has a special way of ticking me off. I'm sure any student can relate. She took it way better than I ever would(even in the webtoon). Heads would've flown if it was me haha.

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Hahaha! Me too! I have to be grateful I don't grow up with the Sunbae-hoobae thing ingrained, some heads would've rolled off. Honest.

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Thanks so much JB!

I just adore this cast, especially the heroine. I think the pacing is really on point too.

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i'm loving it because the plot is moving so fast.. it's really a cheese in the trap for me, i know there's something behind Jung behavior, but i can't help falling for him when he's so sweet.

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Does anyone know the name and artist of the song that Seol is listening to as Jung is following her after she received her D grade? I can't seem to find it....

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would love to know that song's tittle and artist too! Anyone who knows the song? Please help. :) thanks!

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Yes!!! That last picture coupled with your joke lol! *claps*

I'm actually the opposite, I was all set to be Team Jung (ignoring the random mood changes and slightly scary undertones) but this episode has done it for me. SECOND LEAD SYNDROME ALL THE WAY. Here's how I make my case: every second with Seol and In Ho on screen was flat-out, ridiculous, oozing with cheese, adorable. I know I'm presenting this in a very biased manner but as soon as I saw that last scene with Seol and In Ho where he's stomping his feet pretending to walk when actually he's waiting for her to catch up, I was done. In Ho, In Ho, In Ho all the way.

Now, for the rest of the episode, I really liked it. It continues to take apart my expectations, with the exclusion of Sangchul and that creep, I find myself wanting to know more about our characters every episode. I'm crazy excited for tomorrow's and side note: I love how Jung's hobbies are paper-cut-outs of butterflies and adult coloring books (as shown in the preview for tomorrow) I don't know what I was expecting his hobbies to be but that just takes the cheese

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His hobby surprised me, too. Although it does make sense, he is very detail oriented. I just didn't think of him as "artsy"

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Isn't it weird though, he was stuck with everyone's work but he was not working on the presentation doing that instead.

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maybe he's super smart, so it only takes him 10 minutes. I know some people like that.

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He knew he was doing everyone's work, so he didn't have to do it at the last minute like the heroine.

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Not to me? I mean, he isn't literally doing everyone's work - he just does a significantly bigger part in the prep work and the others still have to do their part whilst Seol is actually doing the whole A to Z for all three group mates. Thus it makes sense that he has time while Seol doesn't since she spent all her time doing work for 4 AND had lost some trying to push them to do theirs and hoping they would. (I find her too nice in this respect. I'd have literally dragged that drunk ass out of the pub by the collar and make him work in front of me.)

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She couldn't, because 'sunbae'. :(

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Gurrl, why you gotta set yourself for heartbreak so early on? :'D

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