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Doom at Your Service: Episode 9

A surprise visit from our heroine’s aunt proves both comforting for our heroine and challenging for our cohabitating couple who are used to having more freedom. As the days pass, our heroine and all her loved ones are forced to confront her limited remaining time. For our immortal hero unused to dealing in the finite, this is no easy task. Meanwhile, in addition to the stress of her best friend’s illness, our romance writer has some drama of her own involving one persistent ex and a certain stoic editor.

 
EPISODE 9

Myeol-mang narrates that he once wanted to eat, sleep, and love like humans. But he realized he could never be like mortals who have places in the world and then leave. He can only watch over them instead.

Now we’re back to him asking Dong-kyung to choose between her and the world. Dong-kyung stares at her aunt, her eyes full of emotion. And then she runs away, scared of the look in her aunt’s eye. Myeol-mang watches bemused as Soo-ja chases Dong-kyung down the street.

Jumping back to our other surprise encounter, Ji-na opens her door to find Hyun-kyu standing there. She doesn’t even let him explain why he’s there before she shuts the door in his face. After collecting herself, she says through the door that she’ll meet him downstairs.

Joo-ik sees her rushing around and offers to leave. Ji-na reveals that it was Hyun-kyu at the door and apologetically asks Joo-ik to wait a bit before leaving to avoid misunderstandings. Joo-ik agrees but looks bothered, despite saying there’s no need for her to apologize.

In a café, Hyun-kyu admits he knew he shouldn’t come to Ji-na’s apartment uninvited, but he missed her. That’s why he came back to Korea and the reunion – for her. Less than touched, Ji-na remarks that he’s always done whatever he wanted.

We flash back to Ji-na confronting him at school after hearing about his going abroad from other people. She’d accused him of using how much she liked him to get his way all the time. Ji-na broke up with him, tired of always being the one to give in.

Now, Hyun-kyu argues he was immature back then and regrets how he handled things. Ji-na points out that she waited and waited in vain back then, but he shows back up and gets to see her exactly when he wants. It’s nine years too late.

Hyun-kyu only came to answer her question about why he’s back and encourages Ji-na to forget him if it makes things easier for her. It’s not that simple for Ji-na. Seeing him takes her back to a time she’s not sure she wants to revisit. “Still, I liked it all,” Hyun-kyu says. Ji-na walks away without responding.

Outside, Soo-ja chases Dong-kyung around the block. Dong-kyung hides behind Myeol-mang, but Soo-ja still manages to get her in a headlock. They finally go inside where Soo-ja formally introduces herself to Myeol-mang who Sun-kyung has already informed her is Dong-kyung’s boyfriend.

Soo-ja clearly wants to talk to her niece alone and suggests Myeol-mang head home since it’s so late. Myeol-mang starts to say that he and Dong-kyung live together, but Dong-kyung rushes him out the door and sends him “home” under her aunt’s watchful eye. Dong-kyung slips him her phone so she can call later and shoves him outside.

Once they’re alone, Soo-ja gets emotional as she says she understands that Dong-kyung kept her illness a secret so she wouldn’t be a burden. Since Soo-ja took her in, Dong-kyung has always acted like “a polite guest” in their home. It’s no wonder she got sick with all that stress. “Until when are you going to act polite?”

Dong-kyung fights tears as Soo-ja shows her the entire suitcase full of clothes from Canada she’s stockpiled for Dong-kyung. There are clothes for every season, and Soo-ja is determined that Dong-kyung will get to wear all of them. When Dong-kyung worries she’s “stolen” Soo-ja’s life from her, Soo-ja tenderly strokes her hair and says her life was freely given.

Meanwhile, Hyun-kyu arrives home and sees Joo-ik’s phone light up with a message from Ji-na asking if he got home okay. Emerging from the shower, Joo-ik sees Hyun-kyu looking at his phone, but Hyun-kyu doesn’t say anything about the message.

That night, Dong-kyung slips away to call Myeol-mang. He mentions the resemblance between Soo-ja and Dong-kyung’s mom, so Dong-kyung explains that they were twins. She always felt like she was looking at her mom when she looked at Soo-ja, but seeing her mom again showed her their differences.

Dong-kyung thanks him for letting her see her parents and promises to think of a wish for herself. She gets awkward and weirded out by talking to him on the phone, but she has one favor to ask before hanging up.

The next day at the hospital, fake doctor Myeol-mang tells Soo-ja that Dong-kyung is on a waitlist for a promising clinical trial. She can start treatment in two weeks and doesn’t need to be immediately hospitalized. Soo-ja asks eagerly if Dong-kyung can survive. Myeol-mang confidently responds that he’ll save her.

Soo-ja leaves with a lighter heart and asks where Dong-kyung’s boyfriend’s hospital is. Dong-kyung lies that he’s an American doctor. Soo-ja jokes that this doctor was better looking than Myeol-mang and heads to pick up her husband Kevin from the airport.

Dong-kyung takes Myeol-mang to buy a phone which he finds unnecessary, but he enjoys the experience anyway. Myeol-mang then takes her on a job where he poses as the teacher of a little boy who’s graduating. Dong-kyung takes a graduation photo for the kid and his grandmother.

Myeol-mang later explains the little island school is closing, and the boy’s teacher recently passed away. When Myeol-mang says the teacher should be at “the garden” by now, Dong-kyung brings up the goddess and how she’s seen her in a hospital gown. For Dong-kyung, hearing that the goddess spends each lifetime sick as payment for the sins of the world puts her own suffering in perspective.

She wonders what a peaceful world would be like, so Myeol-mang freezes her in time for a moment. During that moment, the world was truly peaceful because it was without doom. Dong-kyung narrates that that moment of peace felt like an eternity.

While Soo-ja takes her husband with her to visit her sister at the columbarium, Dong-kyung narrates that humans’ lives are filled with impermanent things of impact like dreams, regret, memory, love, and people. Looking at Myeol-mang’s name (Saram) in her phone, she notes that it sounds like the word “sarang” (love) which, for some reason, makes her regret naming him that.

Dong-kyung calls Myeol-mang out to join her on her first shopping spree. She buys more shoes for Sun-kyung than he could ever wear and an expensive pen for Ji-na to remember her by. When another woman wants to buy the purse Dong-kyung has her eye on for Soo-ja, Dong-kyung pulls the cancer card and walks out the victor.

Myeol-mang’s mood has been increasingly melancholy as she’s gone about happily spending her money. After loading up on presents for others, Dong-kyung drags Myeol-mang to take a photo together. He thinks back to their earlier conversation about how these things are for those left behind and asks why she wants a photo. Dong-kyung says you never know who might see it.

Despite his feelings about it, he poses for the photos with her. Dong-kyung smiles as she looks at them on her phone later – these have his real face – and sets one as his phone’s background.

That night, Myeol-mang takes her for a fancy meal in her dream. They’re joined by Soo-ja, Ji-na, and Sun-kyung who are all sporting the gifts Dong-kyung bought for them. Dong-kyung smiles to see her loved ones eating and laughing together.

In the morning, Dong-kyung wakes to find reality isn’t so different from her dream. Soo-ja made breakfast and called Sun-kyung and Ji-na over to eat. While the four have a family meal, Myeol-mang goes to visit the goddess.

From the other side of her bedside curtain, Myeol-mang promises not to cause any more trouble or make the goddess worry. He no longer wants to see Dong-kyung abandon the world and is determined to make sure it doesn’t happen.

Before he leaves, Myeol-mang shares that he’s always pitied the goddess more than he’s resented her and thanks her for creating him. On the other side of the curtain, the goddess sits with a bloody hand clasped over her mouth.

At LifeStory, CEO Park throws a fit when he hears five of his writers, including one of their top earners, are refusing to renew their contracts without Dong-kyung as their editor. Joo-ik scathingly advises him to fix the problem rather than disrespectfully yelling at all his employees over it.

Joo-ik is so distracted worrying about how Hyun-kyu saw that text from Ji-na that even his colleagues notice. He finally marches down to the café to talk to Hyun-kyu, but Hyun-kyu brushes him off. Unfortunately for Joo-ik, his father chooses this moment to walk in.

His father loudly wonders what his son is doing relaxing in a café rather than working, which catches the attention of CEO Park at a nearby table. Hyun-kyu jumps in and tries to make it look like Joo-ik’s father was addressing him, but it might be too late. While he literally holds onto Joo-ik’s father so Joo-ik can escape, Hyun-kyu suddenly realizes that the woman Joo-ik was with outside the café that day was Ji-na.

As they head up to their apartment later, Hyun-kyu directly asks if Joo-ik knows Ji-na. Joo-ik says yes and wants to explain further, but Hyun-kyu claims he has somewhere to be and heads back downstairs.

Hyun-kyu calls Ji-na asking where she is and shows up moments later at the laundromat in front of her place. As if it’s any of his business, he demands to know if she has someone she likes or is seeing. This dude then spouts some misogynistic nonsense, essentially trying to call dibs on a human being by completely disregarding Ji-na’s feelings and telling her to date him over anyone else because he liked and dated her first.

Elsewhere, Myeol-mang meets Dong-kyung to recharge her bracelet. When he goes to leave, Dong-kyung holds him back. If she wants to live, is he able to grant her more life? Myeol-mang honestly answers that Doom doesn’t have that power.

Dong-kyung expected he couldn’t but had to ask. Since he can hear thoughts, he must be aware of how everyone is smiling at her while hiding their pain which is probably even greater than hers. “And you?” she asks. She feels Myeol-mang willing her to live, looking at her with soulless eyes.

How does he think she feels seeing that? Myeol-mang says vaguely she only needs to do as she first thought. About what, I’m not so sure. I’m also not sure how that was a relevant response to her question.

Later, Myeol-mang stands in front of an old tree that’s barren and dying. An elderly man stands beside him and says he misses the flowers, but it’s natural for all living creatures to die. Myeol-mang thinks of Dong-kyung and goes running. (Does Doom not have a faster means of transportation?)

Myeol-mang may not be afraid of disappearing, but he is afraid of not being able to see Dong-kyung anymore. “Like a fool, I just realized that I don’t have much time left,” he narrates. He rushes up to Dong-kyung as she stands on her rooftop.

“I love you,” he blurts out. “I’m in love with you.” Dong-kyung stares at Myeol-mang, speechless. We’re now at D-50, halfway through Dong-kyung’s 100 days.

 
COMMENTS

This episode zeroed in on the ticking clock and how Dong-kyung and Myeol-mang are feeling the pressure of the looming deadline. Although it seems a little strange that Myeol-mang is only now realizing their time is limited, as an immortal being, this is entirely new territory for him. When you’re used to eternity, it must be hard to wrap your head around having to think in days. I can see how his sudden realization that he’ll likely lose her no matter how this all turns out led him to confess in no uncertain terms. Now that he’s gotten over the fact that he has feelings, he’s pretty direct about them. I appreciate how honest he is with Dong-kyung as a whole. He doesn’t lie or sugarcoat things to make her feel better. They’re able to be honest and straightforward with each other, which I hope means we won’t have to deal with the dreaded angst of miscommunication later on.

Now onto our resident awful communicator Hyun-kyu. I was willing to give him a chance at first, but the second he acted like Ji-na was territory he staked his claim on, I was done with him. He shows up almost a decade after ghosting her and has the nerve to behave like he’s owed her attention and affection. That confession, if you can even call it that, was so self-centered and entitled. I knew he liked to make things all about him, but the way he entirely dismissed her feelings was another level of selfishness. When he actually told her to date him even if she had feelings for someone else because he “liked her first,” I about gagged. I really, really hope Ji-na continues standing up for herself and doesn’t take him back. I loved seeing her call him out and finally get to say her piece after all those years. She said what she needed to say and didn’t let him control the narrative. Hyun-kyu said he wasn’t expecting anything from her, but then disrespectfully demanded answers about her love life like a day later. I hope Ji-na realizes she deserves better treatment than this.

Joo-ik has really made an unnecessary mess of this situation, hasn’t he? I was afraid he’d get found out before he could fess up. The frustrating part is that all this drama could’ve been avoided had he just not been sneaky for no good reason. At so many points, he could easily have said to Hyun-kyu, “FYI, I’m working with your ex.” When Hyun-kyu was reading that text from Ji-na would’ve been a perfect time to bust that explanation out. He and Ji-na are nothing more than colleagues right now, so there’s no reason to treat it as this earth-shattering secret. Joo-ik and Hyun-kyu are peas in a pod with their inopportune silences. Where did they both learn such dreadful communication skills? I guess it wouldn’t be dramatic enough if they were good communicators.

I feel like there’s been a lot more filler as we dip into cutesy romance territory. Not that there’s a problem with cute romantic moments, but there’s so much emotional baggage to deal with here that isn’t being fully tapped into. We’ve kind of skimmed over the reactions of Dong-kyung’s friends and family to her illness and the way everyone is processing (or not processing) it. Even before Dong-kyung’s illness, they’ve had to deal with family trauma that still hangs over them. I’d love to delve further into their family dynamics and how they dealt with Dong-kyung’s parents’ death. I want more scenes like the heart-to-heart between Soo-ja and Dong-kyung where Soo-ja called her out for always acting like a guest in her own family. Dong-kyung’s guilt over “burdening” her aunt – although it’s obvious Soo-ja doesn’t feel that way – has made her fade to the background in her own life. It’s taken a terminal illness to break her of that, but I’m glad she’s finally learning to live more vibrantly.

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Thanks for the recap!!! When MM confessed I was like YES FINALLY !!! then they had to put the D-day 😒 seriously it was sooo funny when the aunt and niece used the poor guy as a shield you can literally see his face scream "seriously?? What are you doing??" So cute !!! In a way his confession made them realize that time is slipping so better to try and live than dance around. BTW HK officially lost my support... JI fighting !! New phone, shoes, handbag, fountain pen... wow she really went all out.

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BTW who's the old man?? How can he say MM is dying ? the goddess dying made sense since we got that earlier but MM ?? why?? Is it cuz DK loves him? The deal is chose not to wish and the person you love die so does it mean she won't wish for something ? Since clearly her PERSONAL wish can't be granted

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I think the old man is human and thinks MM is also human that's why he said what he said

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He's not saying MM is dying, he's saying we're all dying. Which is true, as long as you're not an immortal being (the man has no idea MM is anything other than a human). He's just an older man who always expected that flowering tree would be around, and who loved it in the moment, but in retrospect loves it even more because he now knows he knew it when it flowered and it's past that. Now it's a gnarled trunk that is beautiful in its own way, but the man remembers when they both had flowers.

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Yeah must be .... I really don't want him or DK to die...

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So if Dong-kyung doesn't die, she'd better hope she never runs into the lady whose purse she "snatched" :)

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Thanks for the recap @quirkycase!

Delurking for the first time in a while for this flawed, weirdly enjoyable show. It’s funny…I actually feel like I follow, quite easily, like 80% of this show, but then there is that 20% that has me understanding where others are coming from. Though I’m enjoying it, I do find myself reworking some bits in my head.

Episode 9 was bittersweet. Though both of our leads seem determined to die, which definitely added an air of meloncholy to the episode, I appreciate how it all feels more because of their own personal stake and development.

In Myeol-mang’s case, fighting for a life other than his own is a point of growth for him. After being resigned to his fate, finally he has a possibility that he can finally succeed in keeping something from disappearing. What began as an effort to let himself disappear has revealed itself to be a reaction to his true source of strife, that is, watching everything disappear and not being able to do a thing about it. With Dong-kyung, not only is he finally experiencing compassion and love for the first time, he is being given his first chance to save someone and, not only that, to do so through succeeding in what he’s always wanted — disappearing.

However, what made the ending of ep 9 so bittersweet was that, after being at peace with disappearing for so long, MM has finally something to “go towards”, something to be happy about. Just when his time may be running out, his time has become precious because he actually has a person he wants to share it with. Essentially, MM finally has something to live for.

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In Dong-kyung’s case, she’s learned that living happily is much more important than just surviving, day by day. She also has come to terms with the fact that, though she has had it hard, she has much to be thankful for. I know that some felt that the set-up for DK was a bit heavy on the misfortune. But I always felt that we just met her when she had reached her lowest point, something necessary to support the fact that, for just a moment, she could wish for doom on the world.

As someone who has had moments when I’ve felt like the universe has been conspiring against me, before getting a reality check that instructs me in the fact that I really have it very easy and have so many things to be thankful for, I feel like they’ve been capturing just this sort of energy with her character/trajectory. The last few episodes have shined a light on the fact that she has actually had a lot to be grateful for, especially in light of the strife that MM and the goddess have to deal with throughout eternity. As she realizes this, she has grown both more comfortable with the fairness of her death, has even reached genuine acceptance of it, instead of the resignation she felt at the start (although, should be noted, while skipping through some necessary stages like grief and anger).

However, with all the new happiness and peace she is feeling in all aspects of her life comes the bitter realization that it feels even harder to leave it all behind now that she is treasuring it for all it is worth. And, most importantly, she has become aware that it is impossible for her to actually put anyone she truly loves at risk, which leaves her and MM at a very difficult impasse. Consider how it must be from DK’s perspective, after all the lonliness he’s clearly had to deal with, to finally see him experience happiness. There is no way she can simply let him die for her, no matter how much it might mean to him to stop her from disappearing.

A lot of time there’s a lot of smoke-and-mirrors with fantasy dramas, an over-saturated universe with all these different beings that can take away from the main conflict of the leads when they rely too heavily on it (Hwayugi, Goblin). Here, the conflict between the leads is actually really compelling for me and it doesn’t need to rely on other things. That said, I do wish this was a 45-min 12–ep drama. Would have been much tighter that way.

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I've always felt like adult DK wasn't necessarily struggling, but she was living in a way that was safe and unassuming. She was raised with love. She makes a decent amount of money and has enough saved up that she doesn't have to work for the last 3 months of her life. Except for the CEO, people are work are nice. She buys herself nice clothes. I think she enjoyed her life though some -like her brother- may criticize it for being too boring and passion-less.

I think part of her felt fortunate enough and that she shouldn't demand or even allow herself to think that she deserves more than what she had gotten in life. But that desire for something better than what we already have and that passion for life that many humans have - that's all starting to bubble up.

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The schtick about having liked the girl first has come up in a few other kdramas... Is it perhaps a thing in Korean culture or is it just an invention of writers who need to gin up extra drama? And if it is even a bit of a real thing, does it have any connection to the "first love" obsession in kdramaland??

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I think it has to do with the weird obsession with first love that kdrama writers have. Also he is just selfish, so that probably plays into it as well.

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It's kinda sad that now DK is dying she learns to enjoy spending time with people she loves.

I love the aunt! It's so rare a parent who took kids after their parent's death and doesn't make them pay for it. The scene when she's purchasing DK with Doom in the middle was so funny, overall his reaction to this whole human mess.

Doom trying to connect with people but couldn't was sad to watch. I can understand why he wants to disapear, he doesn't have a goal to reach, he just exists alone and watch everything around him dying, even the deity.

The trio is a big mess and Ji-Na should just find a nice guy who isn't one of them.

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The brother!

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The SL trio just.... *shakes head* I haven't been sold on it from the start and much prefer Ji-na's scenes when she's with DK and friends, but I fundamentally cannot stand Hyun-kyu (for reasons everyone has also noted, including this "date me because I claim you" nonsense) and I'm actually kind of disappointed that Kang Tae-oh would take a role like this after Run On. It's like a parallel universe warped version of episode 16 Yeong-hwa somehow. I'm both disappointed by kind of how similar the roles are in a weird way, but also how this character is a definite step down in terms of, well, character.

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I kind of like that he's an immature dick. Because some of them? That's just how they are. They peaked in high school/college, and just don't understand how to be mature. If he'd come back and immediately gone to Ji Na, telling her that he'd been a moron but had come back for her and wanted to make it work, then that would be significant. But he didn't. He just came back and put himself in her path, once again trying to make her initiate. He hasn't grown up.

The character in Run On was sort of the opposite, a guy who could be carefree but who actually wanted to tie himself down. He sort of put on the mask of being immature because he knew it made things easier for his partner, but when push came to shove? He made it clear that there was something much deeper in him and that he wanted that valued.

In contrast, all Ji Na sees is a guy who vanished for a decade and then came back demanding things from her, and he can eff right off. I have questions about how Joo Ik is handling this whole thing, but at least he hasn't been consistently awful

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I agree that when push comes to shove, Young-hwa (who was 23-24, younger than Hyeon-kyu) was someone strong-willed, principled, and understood the concept of self-respect for both himself and the people around him.

Hyeon-kyu here is 29. He's nice, but in many ways, self-centered and wishy-washy.

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In the hospital scene, the Goddess says "What is it that I want?". I was like please, YOU tell us what is it that you want because no one can figure it out!
Also, Hyun Kyu is such a jerk. The sense of entitlement he has just because he liked her first is so off-putting. The reason behind him breaking up with Ji Na was also pretty stupid.

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It's not that different to understand, just look at the detail.

Myeol-mang just said the Goddess spends each lifetime sick as payment for the sins of the world. Watching the pool of blood on her bed, I am thinking she may sacrifice herself so that Myeol-mang become human and Dong-kyung can survive. When she see the pot plant sprout for the first time, she seems pleased, and she did said to Dong-kyung in the garden that she want people (which means, Dong-kyung included) happy.

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I found it kind of touching that she hid her illness from Myul Mang. They both know this happens to her, it’s been happening every twenty-ish years it sounds like, but she shields him from the reality of it.

Moms do that, and even though the goddess is the ultimate in tough love, she’s also still his mom. He grieves when she dies and doesn’t tell her, and she doesn’t tell him when she’s approaching death and getting really sick. Their relationship is pretty unimaginable, but on at least some level, they’re parent and child.

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Agreed. I’m probably one of the only ones, but I like the dynamic between SIG and Jung Ji So. I think she’s doing pretty well switching between her enigmatic and caring sides. She’s frustrating, but not completely annoying to me, kind of like Yoo Seung Ho’s Jade Emporer from Arang (though admittedly not nearly as entertaining as him).

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I'm confused as to what her plans are. I get the sense she wants Doom to find his happiness and create a pathway for that. But i wonder how she can do that and not screw up the world, because don't we require Doom? As long as Doom exists, she would have to exist (ugh and what a sucky existence). Maybe she'll get rid of both her existence and Doom (by making him human).

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Maybe she will allow DK to die but then to "resurrect" her as a companion to Doom. The personification of "Hope", maybe.

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The funniest thing about the love triangle to me is that I always forget it exists until they pop up on screen. The triangle is made more absurd by the fact that all the events that happened, happened almost 10 years ago. This level of melodrama is unnecessary almost 10 years later. As for our main couple continue with your sizzling chemistry because the rest is nonsense.

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I believe Hyun Kyu is selfish and said all that rubbish becos he doesn't want Mr Cha to have her. He's a spoilt, selfish child that needs to grow up

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I’m just not emotionally invested in these characters. They are not tugging on my heartstrings. They look like they’re acting, not really immersed in the story or characters. I think that’s the problem. For all the actors, I just don’t see any spark between them. I wanted to feel more with SIG’s confession. I didn’t. Maybe it’s the other dramas I’m watching too. Even without much skinship and no kissing, Bossam manages to tear my heart out and make it flutter and give me palpitations every episode. The confession in Roommate is a Gumiho was so much better, and again, hardly any skinship or spoken words between those two leads. This one is definitely the weakest drama of those. Which is unfortunate, because the actors, we know, are better than this.

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I agree. I love Bossam. And there's more feelings in 20 mins of one episode of "mad for each other" than three hours of this show. I really wanted to like it but I cannot care any of them. I dropped the show and tried to watch the recap but even that is not interesting enough. Literally nothing had hapenned. So sad, Park Bo young was my favorite but this and Abyss were the two worst kdrama I have ever watched

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I really don’t know why I am watching this drama. I don’t feel their romance. I don’t feel their pain. If they have to verbalize things for me to get the feeling then the writers/direction didn’t do a fine job.

Second leads was the reason I was continuing. And this week made me rage. I really hope she doesn’t go back to him. It would be awful.

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What I really want to say I will say it on next recap (other than this: I really hate Hyun-kyu, he's like a jerk in terms of his ex).

For this week, I would love to point out that as in South Korea its viewership rating drop to 2.4 (Ep.10), in Taiwan it has become one of the most popular shows in town. Some blogs I read from Taiwan state: "I love the pair (Myeol-mang and Dong-kyung);" while at the same time mourn: "Can Myeol-mang and Goddess speak in a more layman language so that we commoners can understand?" But meanwhile, people like the philosophical tone and the romance of the ending of the world (or at least one life).

This is an interesting phenomenon of cultural difference. While some shows have bad reputation in local market, it is a hit outside of it. One of the most interesting example is Moon Lovers: Scarlett Heart Ryeo. Other then the obvious problem on the script, It gain lots of praise as well rating outside South Korea (Maybe not as extreme as Doom at Your Service, probably the way audience consume K-drama are different from in Korea (They mostly view it through some app like Netflix, and there are quite a few in those countries)? Or people outside of Korea take more time thinking about the meaning of the drama (I don't mean it badly: afterall TV drama is for us to relax and being entertained)?

Love to see you reaction.

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I'm convinced there is more story behind HK's reasons for leaving Korea and they involve Joo Ik and his family. I think Joo Ik feels some guilt about it and that's why he is providing work (cafe) and shelter (sharing the penthouse apartment).
I feel perhaps Hyun Kyu is realizing his sacrifice (in leaving) has allowed Joo Ik to get close to Ji Na and he has decided to take back what he lost. But in the worst way ever. Yes he is a complete ass in his attempt to get back his girl from 10 years ago. Frankly, the fact that Ji Na attended the reunion and has trouble with her writing tells me she is definitely not over him. So let them blunder it out and Ji Na will realize she doesn't want to return to high school love and will shut that down so she can move on with her life with neither man.

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This show is a hot mess. I keep watching because I like Park Bo Young but I feel like the writing is pretty bad.

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I'll say straight off that the people editing the previews are my nemeses, and I swear are setting people up to actively hate what's about to happen. "Let's get married" indeed.

This show is melancholy. It's about the sadness of things ending, and the sadness of things you love ending, and the beauty of ephemeral things. I actually think Ji Na's relationship will play into this, a relationship that had its season and then that season passed. Not everything is reclaimable.

Doom is starting to understand the worth of deeply loving something that will die. Dong Kyung is beginning to get that there is so much to live for that you have to fill your life with everything that you want (whether that's other people or nature or whatever). The second lead romance is a case of one who loved deeply and another who ran and has regrets (but very possibly not the RIGHT regrets).

I like this show as I like a melancholy song. It makes sense to me.

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The designer bag scene LOL! And the dream lunch scene of her loved ones using her gifts :*) And looks like Dong-kyung is coming to terms that she is truly dying and leaving her loved ones behind.

I had liked the love triangle even though it's too contrived, but now Hyeon-kyu is hitting on one of my kdrama character annoyances- the person who abandons her gf/bf and then comes back EXPECTING the gf/bf to be single (sure he asked her status in this episode, but you know he assumed she was single) and feels entitled to picking up the relationship from where they left off.

I find the overarching story too opaque and meandering, but I get immersed in the individual scenes. PBY and SIG and the direction are great at infusing warmth in a story that can sometimes be alienating and contrived and almost self-indulgent in the examination of life and death. Wish the writer had a cowriter to organize the drama. There's good things in there that are being obscured.

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Agree on this totally. I can’t get immersed in a drama if I hate the leads, but the characters are well portrayed and individual scenes suck me in. The narrative is sort of graspable and the theming is there but I feel I have to work too hard for too little reward.

The triangle is starting to feel like a game of pinball releasing a bunch of bonus balls. They’re shooting off all over the place and I’m having trouble following any of their trajectories. Do any of them actually have genuine feelings for each other?

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As far as "chemistry" goes, this was my very favorite from Seo In Guk dramas. It just felt so "real"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tp3rLX_9LE

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