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Red Moon, Blue Sun: Episodes 27-28

With Red Cry caught and no longer a threat, it would seem like the case is closed and there’s little left to investigate. Except the case was a little too neatly closed — that can’t be the real end of things, can it? There’s also the on-going mystery of the little girl in the green dress, which Woo-kyung gets closer to solving thanks to the help of an old friend.

 
EPISODES 27-28 RECAP

The threat of a shotgun in her face causes Woo-kyung to remember playing with Se-kyung as a child — and child Se-kyung is the same girl as the little girl in the green dress. But when Eun-ho cocks the gun, a shot rings out as Ji-heon, in order to protect Woo-kyung, fatally shoots Eun-ho in the chest.

Some time later, Soo-young stops by Ji-heon’s home, letting herself in when he doesn’t answer the doorbell. She sees his house littered with photos and notes on the Red Cry cases, and imagines the long nights Ji-heon must have spent poring over the evidence, searching for clues, and being frustrated when nothing seemed to add up.

She finds Ji-heon in his bathtub — fully dressed, the bath devoid of water. It’s eerily reminiscent of the first time we met Ji-heon, where he was sleeping off a drunken night after begging his ex-girlfriend to take him back. He explains that the pain from his bodily discomfort from sleeping in the bathtub distracts him from his thoughts.

Soo-young reminds Ji-heon did his best — he saved Woo-kyung’s life. But it’s clear that Ji-heon can only think about the life he took.

At the nursing home, Mom tucks a sleeping Se-kyung into bed. Sighing, Mom apologizes for acting so cold towards Se-kyung — and then Mom’s nose starts to bleed. Uh-oh. That can only mean two things: either Mom has been studying too hard (unlikely), or she has cancer.

Her illness is something Mom seems to want to keep secret, as she quickly hides her bloody tissue when Woo-kyung arrives. Staring at Se-kyung, Woo-kyung wonders if they really look alike. Mom insists that of course they do — they’re sisters, after all.

At her therapy appointment with Dr. Yoon, Woo-kyung tells him about her encounter with Eun-ho. She explains that Eun-ho said it would be better that she didn’t remember who the little girl in the green dress was, or else she would end up becoming miserable like him. In the end, Eun-ho was convinced it would be better if Woo-kyung died.

She adds that her hallucinations of the little girl in the green dress weren’t hallucinations, but memories. However, Woo-kyung’s confused because the little girl doesn’t look like the child Se-kyung from her family’s photo albums.

Woo-kyung doesn’t really remember playing much with Se-kyung, since when their mother got sick, Se-kyung was sent to live with relatives until their birth mother passed away. Dr. Yoon gently asks leading questions, encouraging Woo-kyung to open up her memories, but Woo-kyung can’t recall anything except the stories her father told.

Dr. Yoon points out that Woo-kyung doesn’t have any real memories before age seven — the only so-called memories she has are from her father and his photo albums. He encourages her to go through hypnotherapy to see if they can unlock her memories. When Woo-kyung hesitates, he asks if she’s really afraid she’ll end up like Eun-ho, but she schedules an appointment for next week.

Watch the video

I want to retrieve my real memories

 

Escorting her to the door, Dr. Yoon asks why Eun-ho had her drive him out to the seaside in the middle of winter. Woo-kyung says it’s because he wanted to see where his mother left him.

After Woo-kyung leaves, Dr. Yoon picks up his tablet device and stares at it. His home screen photo is of the same pier where Eun-ho was killed. Well, well, well, look who’s suddenly got a bright red arrow pointed at him, accompanied by a blinking sign that says, “Suspicious Character.”

Ji-heon stops by the columbarium to pay his respects to Eun-ho, but he’s surprised that there’s another young man already there. He recognizes the teenager as Min-ki, the boy from the arson case. Ji-heon marvels at how the boy has grown, and asks if Min-ki remembers him.

Yes, he does, and Min-ki angrily says that Ji-heon kept bothering Eun-ho until he ultimately killed him. When Ji-heon tries to pleasantly ask if Min-ki is doing well, the boy says he’s doing fine now that he’s no longer being abused by his father. He adds that Eun-ho wasn’t a murderer — Ji-heon’s the real murderer for killing Eun-ho.

Min-ki adds that “they” all beleve that Eun-ho was in the right, but Ji-heon grabs the boy, demanding to know who “they” are. Min-ki shakes off the detective and defensively says that “they” are the children who were abused and neglected by their parents.

After the boy leaves, Ji-heon stands before Eun-ho’s burial place, wondering why Eun-ho gave such a detailed confession to Woo-kyung before he died. Ji-heon suddenly realizes that Min-ki had the same tattoo on his wrist that the student truck driver did. Even though Hee-soo’s mother didn’t die in the accident, Ji-heon realizes that it must have been connected to Red Cry.

Ji-heon returns to the police station, surprised that Soo-young and Chan-wook are busy packing up the command center. Now that Eun-ho confessed to being Red Cry, there’s no reason for them to continue their secret investigation. But Ji-heon’s convinced that it’s odd a poor college student managed to easily pay the 20,000,000 won settlement for the hit-and-run.

Soo-young thinks Ji-heon is trying too hard to make connections that don’t exist, but Ji-heon believes the young men must be connected to Red Cry, possibly the ones who sent messages to Woo-kyung as Red Cry in order to give Eun-ho an alibi. The other detectives point out that the case is closed, full stop, so Ji-heon should stop worrying about it.

Ji-heon can’t stop thinking about Eun-ho’s confession to Woo-kyung — it was too perfect, too detailed. Ji-heon’s convinced Eun-ho was hiding something. Soo-young pointedly asks Ji-heon if this is really about Eun-ho’s death — it was clear that Eun-ho wanted to be found that day, and that he incited Ji-heon to shoot him.

She warns Ji-heon that he should leave the case alone, adding that she agrees with Captain Hong — Ji-heon should seek therapy for the trauma of shooting Eun-ho. Then she follows Chan-wook out of the office, leaving Ji-heon to sit alone with his thoughts.

Ji-heon is obsessed with the last few conversations he had with Eun-ho, desperately replaying them over and over again in his mind, searching for any clues or details. Believing Eun-ho sacrificed himself, Ji-heon’s determined to figure out who Eun-ho was trying to hide.

At the nursing home, Woo-kyung shows Se-kyung the photos she found in the suitcase, including the one of the two of them with their birth mother. Se-kyung admits she doesn’t have any memories of their birth mother, and Woo-kyung sadly admits that she doesn’t, either. They’re interrupted by a visit from Mom and Eun-seo, who sweetly gives an adorable toy dog to her aunt. Woo-kyung quickly hides the photos from Mom.

Ji-heon tracks down Min-ki at the convenience store where the teenager works, but it’s mostly to ask about the student truck driver. Min-ki recognizes him as Jae-kwang, a friend that he met at a youth center he joined when he had to do community service. They got matching tattoos because that was the trend at the time.

Min-ki doesn’t know if Jae-kwang ever met Eun-ho, but Eun-ho used to go to the youth center so it’s possible they could have met. Ji-heon thanks the boy for his help, but Min-ki bluntly asks why Ji-heon killed Eun-ho.

Ji-heon points out that it’s not like a police officer kills on purpose, but Min-ki knows Ji-heon hated Eun-ho. Ji-heon retorts that he never hated Eun-ho — he was just investigating Min-ki’s father’s death. Min-ki insists that Eun-ho didn’t kill his father. As Ji-heon leaves, he tells Min-ki to keep studying for his GED and to not let Eun-ho down.

Ji-heon finds Hee-soo’s mother and asks her about the settlement. The woman explains that it was given to her, but only on the condition that she babysit Hee-soo at least three times. She was hesitant to do it at first, but ended up enjoying the time she spent with her daughter.

She vaguely describes the man who gave the money as a little bit older than Ji-heon and a “studious type.” That’s definitely not Eun-ho, much to Ji-heon’s consternation, but the woman happily confesses that being free of creditors means she’s been able to spend more time with her daughter.

Speaking of mothers, So-ra’s mother has now opened up a restaurant, thanks to her husband’s insurance payout. Both she and So-ra are happier than we’ve ever seen them. Woo-kyung stops by for a visit, pleased to see that they’re doing so well.

Photos on the restaurant wall catch Woo-kyung’s attention, especially since Eun-ho is in one of them. So-ra’s mother explains that Eun-ho was always so kind and sweet to them, even taking them to a show that So-ra really wanted to see. Woo-kyung notices the date on the photo, realizing that this proves Eun-ho was elsewhere the night of the fake-evidence drop, when Ji-heon chased after Red Cry.

She shows the photo to Ji-heon, who is unsurprised since he’s already convinced that Red Cry must be someone other than Eun-ho. Ji-heon explains his theory about how neatly everything was tied up with Eun-ho’s death, wondering who Eun-ho risked everything to protect.

Remembering the way Eun-ho confessed his desire to go to the pier, Woo-kyung realizes that he must have been quoting someone who described it to him. When she had asked him questions about being left there as a baby, he had quickly changed the subject. Woo-kyung suggests that Eun-ho could be protecting the person who found him as a child — or possibly a family member.

Woo-kyung also thanks Ji-heon for saving her life. Ji-heon immediately asks if she believes that Eun-ho would have really shot her. He’s thought about it a thousand times, and he’s not sure — but Woo-kyung immediately says that she believes Eun-ho would indeed have killed her. She reassures Ji-heon that he really did save her. Ji-heon doesn’t seem particularly comforted by her words, although he desperately needed to hear them.

Watch the video

Thank you for saving my life

 

Reenergized by a new focus on the case, Ji-heon convinces Soo-young and Chan-wook to help him look into Eun-ho’s past and search for anyone who might be related to him. If the real Red Cry is out there, then that means there will be more murders — they need to find and catch him before someone else dies.

Woo-kyung returns to Dr. Yoon’s office for her hypnotherapy appointment. Dr. Yoon guides her into a trance, where she remembers a time when she was playing with Se-kyung — their stepmother was there, too. Woo-kyung recalls that all she wanted to do was to make their stepmother happy, but she doesn’t know why.

Dr. Yoon gently guides her deeper into her subconscious, unlocking another memory of when Se-kyung returned from where she had been living with her relatives. Distressed, Woo-kyung realizes she was bothered by the fact that Se-kyung looked different.

Going even deeper into her subconscious, Dr. Yoon encourages her to open another door to her memories. Woo-kyung starts to panic when the door is locked, so Dr. Yoon wakes her up from the trance.

Woo-kyung’s distressed that she couldn’t remember everything, but Dr. Yoon pleasantly reassures her that it’s not an easy task, and that she did well for the day. Trembling, Woo-kyung says that she’s frightened, but Dr. Yoon gently promises that he’ll help her. Just like Ha-na, she’s distracted — and possibly mesmerized — by the ballerina music box.

Dr. Yoon’s next patient is none other than Shi-wan, who’s there for his last official meeting (well, at least until he pushes another kid down the stairs). But Dr. Yoon cheerfully tells Shi-wan that since this is the last time they’ll see each other, Shi-wan should feel free to tell him anything.

That night, Woo-kyung gets a call from Shi-wan, letting her know that he and his mother are moving to America (so I guess that really was his last therapy session), but his father will be staying in Korea. He asks to meet with Woo-kyung one last time before he leaves, and she happily agrees.

Meanwhile, Shi-wan’s mother nervously makes sure that Shi-wan hasn’t tell anyone about them leaving — if his father finds out, they’ll be in trouble. Shi-wan’s more interested in playing his video games and annoyedly tells her that he hasn’t said anything. (Except, of course, to Woo-kyung.)

As Shi-wan’s mother sets out dinner for her family, she gets a message. It’s from the anonymous chat site, and the sender is… Red Cry! Dun, dun, dun. Red Cry asks if she’s made up her mind. Shi-wan’s mother messages that she’ll do it, and Red Cry warns her that there’s no turning back now.

She quickly hides her phone as Shi-wan and his father sit down at the table. Even though Dad is more focused on reading his magazine than his family, Shi-wan and his mother are careful to quietly eat their dinner and not disturb him.

Soo-young’s discovered that Eun-ho actually has a brother who’s eleven years older, and both were found abandoned at the pier. They were taken to an orphanage, but the older brother was adopted by an American family and moved overseas. The adoption center closed a decade ago and she hasn’t been able to trace the brother’s records beyond that.

Meanwhile, Chan-wook has been investigating the youth center where Eun-ho worked temporarily as a mentor (and how he presumably met Min-ki and Jae-kwang). But Chan-wook says the kids aren’t important — what’s notable is that one of the youth center consultants is Dr. Yoon, who also consults for the children’s center.

Ji-heon visits the doctor, asking him about Eun-ho. Dr. Yoon admits he’s heard about Eun-ho from Woo-kyung. When Ji-heon asks about his connection to Woo-kyung, Dr. Yoon explains that they’ve been friends since college. She’s the reason he helps out with the children’s center. As for Eun-ho, he only knew of the young man — they had never actually met.

However, he does know Jae-kwang, and admits that he’s the one who paid the 20,000,000 won settlement. Dr. Yoon didn’t want the boy to have his life ruined when Jae-kwang has worked so hard to get where he is, so he paid the fee so that Jae-kwang could return to school.

Dr. Yoon explains that the condition to have Hee-soo’s mother spend time with her children was because he felt sorry for her — it was due to her debt that she couldn’t spend time with her children. Or so she told him. Ji-heon finds it suspicious how smooth and rehearsed Dr. Yoon’s answers are, but the doactor laughs it off, explaining that it’s his habit as a therapist to anticipate people’s questions.

Ji-heon asks where Dr. Yoon was on December 21st, and as the doctor pulls up his calendar on his phone, he wonders why Ji-heon wants to know. Ji-heon bluntly explains that someone beat him up that night, but the doctor laughs at the absurdity of him having the physical prowess to beat up the detective. Besides, he was at a party that night where there were hundreds of witnesses.

Woo-kyung is on Dr. Yoon’s side, finding it impossible to believe that he could be Red Cry. She’s been his friend for a long time and can affirm he’s the type of generous soul who would pay a large sum if it made someone else’s life better.

Besides, Dr. Yoon’s position as a psychiatrist goes against Red Cry’s philosophy. Dr. Yoon would believe he could help heal the abusive parents and make them better people — not punish them, and especially not kill anyone. He’s not the type!

Ji-heon argues that Eun-ho didn’t seem the type to kill anyone, either, yet despite his sweet demeanor and angelic face, Eun-ho managed to kill five people in a fit of fury. Appearances are deceiving! Even so, Woo-kyung insists that Dr. Yoon is different, and Ji-heon should look elsewhere for Red Cry.

Soo-young confirms Dr. Yoon’s alibi, but does admit that the hotel where the party was being held was near the drop-point. Theoretically, Dr. Yoon could have slipped out for a few minutes and no one would have noticed his absence.

Also, Chan-wook has discovered that Dr. Yoon is actually a naturalized citizen. The doctor was adopted as a child and grew up in America before moving back to Korea to attend university. It certainly sounds like Dr. Yoon could be Eun-ho’s long-lost brother — but the detectives need proof before they move forward with this theory.

Mom tends to Se-kyung, who finds it disconcerting to see her stepmother being so kind and considerate. Se-kyung tells Mom to act as cold and hateful as she used to be — it’s too unsettling to see Mom pretend like she actually cares about Se-kyung.

Woo-kyung’s hired a private investigator to track down her birth mother’s family, and meets up with her long-lost aunt, who’s delighted to see Woo-kyung for the first time since Woo-kyung was born. Woo-kyung asks about when Se-kyung went to live with their grandmother, but her aunt is bewildered by her question, since Se-kyung never lived with her grandmother.

In fact, Woo-kyung’s grandmother wished she could see the girls more often, but once Woo-kyung’s father remarried, their new stepmother made him cut off all contact with his previous wife’s family. Woo-kyung’s aunt grumbles over the fact “that woman” even abandoned her own daughter to care for her stepchildren. Woo-kyung is stunned to discover that Mom had a child of her own.

Ji-heon gets a call to go to a crime scene, and he’s annoyed because he’s focused on his Red Cry case. But his team are investigating their Red Cry theories unofficially since the department considers the case closed, so they still need to respond to Violent Crimes cases like the detectives they are.

When Ji-heon arrives at the crime scene, he’s told it was a robbery-turned-murder. As he investigates the home where the man was killed, he meets the man’s family — it’s Shi-wan and his mother. Ooooh, maybe this is actually a Red Cry case after all!

Woo-kyung stops by Mom’s house to pick Eun-seo up, but first she tells Mom that she met her birth mother’s sister. Woo-kyung knows that Se-kyung never lived with Grandma, and demands to know what really happened. Annoyed, Mom dismissively says that maybe Se-kyung was sent to live with someone else that she thought was her grandmother. It happened so long ago — who can really remember, anyway?

Woo-kyung suddenly demands to know what happened to Mom’s real child. Angry, Mom asks if Woo-kyung’s aunt said that she was just some low-life single mother who saw Woo-kyung’s father as a way to escape her situation. She screams at Woo-kyung, telling her that Woo-kyung’s birth family was terrible to her, making up lies and rumors, so that’s why their father cut off contact with them. The exertion from her anger causes Mom to pass out.

Watch the video

Is being a stepmother a sin?

 

At the hospital, Woo-kyung waits outside the ER to hear about Mom’s condition. While she waits, Ji-heon calls to confirm that Shi-wan went to the children’s center. He’s shocked to discover that Shi-wan was the boy on which Woo-kyung based her story to Red Cry — the boy who fell down the stairs.

Woo-kyung receives a message from Red Cry, asking if she wants to know the truth about her sister.

 
COMMENTS

I’m not sure how I feel. I think I’m still reeling over Eun-ho’s death, so the fact that the show is hurtling towards a conclusion that so obviously involves Dr. Yoon is somehow… tiresome. Which is not a word I’d normally ever associate with this drama, because so far it has been utterly compelling and has kept me on the edge of my seat the entire time — until now. All the editing in this episode has made it painfully obvious that Dr. Yoon is the culprit, the real Red Cry, the man we should all be keeping an eye on. Which almost feels insulting, since the little red herrings that have been scattered throughout up until now have at least felt almost believable, and I was willing to be fooled — but there’s something so smug about the “gotcha” of revealing that a tertiary character we know next-to-nothing about is actually the linchpin to the entire show.

I wish we could have spent more time dealing with the grief and guilt that Ji-heon feels about shooting Eun-ho. I wish we were given the chance to actually watch someone mourn Eun-ho’s death, to see who stood by when his body was turned to ashes — did he have anyone? Did Woo-kyung stay with him, just like she did with the body of the boy she accidentally killed many, many episodes ago? I guess I just wanted more time to say “good-bye.” I realize that I am mourning a murderer (he might not be the Red Cry, but he was a Red Cry, and he definitely killed those people, no matter how awful they were). But I am also mourning the loss of a complicated and compelling character that we only really got to truly meet in the last few episodes.

I had the blind hope that perhaps Eun-ho didn’t really die at the end of the last episode — maybe he’d fall into a vegetative state, just like Se-kyung. But still be alive. If Dr. Yoon is really Eun-ho’s older brother (which seems like the painfully obvious conclusion), then wow, what a shitty brother. Even giving Dr. Yoon the benefit of the doubt that maybe he only discovered who Eun-ho really was much after the fact, how can he be so cavalier as to not want to do all he could to save his brother? If Red Cry is adamant about punishing abusive parents and saving the children, why would he not want to rescue his own sibling? Eun-ho may be a murderer, but his life was horrifically tragic — it’s no surprise that his only friends were children, and that his primary joy in life was seeing them smile. He was likely attracted to the happy life he was never allowed to have. No wonder there lurked so much rage beneath his beatific smile.

So, yeah, perhaps this episode didn’t sit well with me because I just wanted more time reflecting on the terrible hand of fate that Eun-ho was dealt, and the bitter resolution that forced Ji-heon to kill him. Instead, it was was a whirlwind of (comparatively) awkward plot, bulldozing the way to a finale. Of course, I’m still eager to see how everything truly connects (and will pretend to be shocked when we ultimately discover that the real Se-kyung died and was replaced by the new Se-kyung who’s probably Mom’s real daughter, and which leads me to wonder what the heck this writer has against younger siblings that nearly all of them are killed off) — but only because I want Ji-heon and Woo-kyung to find redemption and healing as they solve their respective mysteries and put their demons to rest. For now, though, I’ll be sleeping in the bathtub.

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I have no problem with EunHo not being the Red Cry, because for me that was logical conclusion of what we knew about him so far, he was a killer but know mastermind, and the way he killed was up close and personal, I wouldn't want him as cold blooded killer.
And it's not bad writings when can pick up clues through out the series, I honestly prefer it that way, than having one of established characters having 180 turnaround in the finale.

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I admit @odilettante i didn't have the problems with this episode you did. I found it just as gripping as the others. I never believed that somehow as sweet and inherently gentle as Eun Ho was Red Cry (all the murders notwithstanding). If anything I thought the greatest tragedy of his death was that he was clearly sacrificing himself for somebody else - again. And had clearly been manipulated by a stronger personality - again. To me, what makes Eun-ho's death so utterly tragic was that he was a lifelong victim - even when he was killing people. Abuse, neglect and abandonment broke him and after that he mostly just did as he was told right until the end.

Which is to say, the "real" Red Cry had to be somebody almost sociopathic in their ability to manipulate people and pass as 'normal'. I'm happy with the Red Cry we have (although I could have used marginally more screen time on him earlier).

Mostly I think this is MK's story and heading into the final episodes the show is asking some really powerful questions about what makes a "good" person. On paper, MK could be Red Cry herself. But in reality? Well, that's the question. And I think that's a fantastic question for the show to be asking.

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Woo Kyung seems not very good at judging adults. She understands very well children but for the adults she's pretty clueless.

For Eun Ho, I always thought he was not clear, so I didn't feel attached to him. I really pity him because he suffered a lot but I think that with his childhood's memories back and the killing, he couldn't be happy anymore.

Personaly, I'm glad that Ji Heon continue to investigate and not have blues too long. It doesn't mean that he's feeling good and at least the story's still running in the mean time.

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In danger of being consistently wrong about something, I just find it telling that almost every Red Cry case has been about abuse happening right under WK's nose that she didn't notice. I still think Red Cry is either angry at her obliviousness or he wants her to wake up to it.

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I think she noticed but the parents stopped the therapy for Shi Wan, the same fot Bit Na.

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what the heck this writer has against younger siblings that nearly all of them are killed off

LOL ?????

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it's exactly what the drama is all about: Sun turning blue so moon can turn red

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I agree that the tonal shift after EunHo's death makes these last episodes more difficult -- but I guess some part of me always knew that I would struggle a bit more with the ending. I still think things are honestly wrapping up quite nicely, though I doubt I will sympathize quite as much with Dr. Yoon as I did with EunHo, in part simply because I don't see why Dr. Yoon wouldn't have done more to care for EunHo.

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I don't think Dr. Yoon is a bad brother if he is Eun Ho's long-lost sibling. What could he do? Multiple people tried to help Eun Ho leave the directors but he freely admitted he couldn't bring himself to break off that attachment, awful as it was.

I think Dr. Yoon is definitely involved but not a killer, maybe he's the judge? Or maybe there are several higher ups in the site and I think Woo Kyung will be tempted into becoming one.

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My heart is aching. I don't think I have cried that hard in a very long time. I was devastated. I feel like I am grieving the loss of a loved one. Poor, sweet, damaged child. The horror of watching what was done to him topped by his death just about killed me. I too need time to grieve for him, so it is jarring to see everyone busily moving on. But I also know that, even in real life, people will keep busy to hold off the grief.

It was pretty obvious to me, in his death scene, that he was covering for someone. It's sad that death by cop had to be his chosen way to go. Ji-Heon is never going to recover from killing him...and having people continue to accuse him of it won't help. Everything now seems like it is rushing to an ending. Only 2 episodes to go and we have so many major issues out there that we want to spend more time with!

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Like the recapper said, I couldn't FEEL for this episode as much as others because there's no time of grief for Eun Ho. I'm still 'grieving' for him even when I finished watching till the very end.

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Despite what WK believed (or maybe wanted JH to believe so he'd stop torturing himself), it’s clear the only death EH wanted was his own suicide-by-cop. Or rather, by JH.

Because really, why take WK hostage? He could’ve given her his confession to pass onto the police & his warning not to remember, then locked her up or knocked her out while he ran off. He could’ve killed himself where his mother abandoned him a dozen times over by the time the cops found him.

But instead, he aimed his gun at someone he’d never use it on. And though EH didn’t intend to kill WK, he said that he did and acted like he did and made a warning shot like he did – all after JH arrived and started yelling.

It actually makes me so sad bc EH must’ve known that JH had a soft spot for him now. He must've known JH would never easily shoot him. That’s why he used WK as a hostage, bc he knew that JH had a soft spot for her, too. He knew that putting her in danger would make JH more panicky, more prone to a split-second impulse spurred on by fear.

It’s horrifying, but it fits so perfectly with EH's childish character. What better way to get to the unshakeable cop than make him an unwilling murderer? Funnily enough, I think EH actually liked JH too, in the end. I mean, he definitely wanted his death to shake him up, but I don’t think it was out of hatred. More like childish pique.

EH had been touched at how WK and JH wanted him to leave the director, so it makes sense he wanted to try and justify himself to them both. With WK, his defence was obvious. With JH, I think EH used his death to not only get at the detective, but to get in the last word too. To start one last argument trying to make JH see where he was coming from.

See? You'd kill to save someone too.

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"You'd kill to save someone too."

Such a powerful argument. Never thought that would be applied in this scene. This sentence was resonating throughout this series.

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Me: It'sjustfiction it'sjustfiction it'sjustfiction. Y'all and ur philosophical comments are giving me additional (morbidly satisfying) torture on top of the drama itself. GOSH I SHOULD JUST GO AND WATCH LAUGHTER IN WAIKIKI TO MAKE ME FEEL BETTER.

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At first, I was ready to be suspicious of Woo-kyung's sunbae because like what Ji-heon said, he has the access to all the things Red Cry needed to run his operations and he clearly knows how to read people well. But with Woo-kyung's explanation about how Tae-joo would see those abusive parent more as people he could heal, I have to agree with her. Tae-joo's response to the racy star mom's case is him showing her what it meant to have a child and him trying to build a way for her to reconnect with her daughter (which thankfully is successful). It's clearly at odds with Red Cry's philosophy so far. And now with Si-wan's case once more becomes the forefront of this story, I'm even more inclined to look elsewhere for Red Cry's real identity. I don't think someone who cares so much for Si-wan's mental well-being would kill the child's father right after his last psychiatric appointment that easily.

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I too still find this drama gripping. I think the characters, even the ones without as much screen time or backstory are really well developed. It made sense that it wasn't Eun Ho that was red cry, just as it made sense that he killed those people. Is it heartbreaking, yes, absolutely, but does it still work.

Dr. Yoon makes sense not only because this episode made it obvious, but also because of all the little clues before hand. The fact that Red Cry knew all about her, his disgust with terrible parenting, his rather take charming personality, even Eun Ho saying Ji-Heon MUST catch him, all this, plus other little things have led to this conclusion.

I love love this show.

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I’ll admit I’d have preferred more tidbits along the way pointing towards Dr. Yoon. The buildup with Eun Ho was SO good that it feels a bit wasted to have a character more on the sidelines than most end up being the mastermind. Most the mothers had way more characterization than Dr. Yoon, who was mostly just a sounding board.

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I admire the writer in picturing so well that planned suicide from EH. You can see how he prepared everything with that focus people have when doing farewell, when they've decided it's time to go. He'd chosen his own "headsman" carefully and he did waver for a second, because he didn't believe in being respected or loved unconditionally by adults. He opened and closed some doors in front of him or behind. Those doors were eyes into the deeps of soul of humankind. He wishes to stop Red Cry opening well closed windows because it causes so much pain. Hate is an awful thing, it can manipulate you and blind you.

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I agree, having Dr. Yoo as the big bad is a bit anticlimactic, since we spend so much time exploring Eun-Ho. Right now I'm not interested in Red Cry anymore, I want to know, what happened to Woo-kyung's sister. Let the last mystery of this suspensful show be solved!

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I too, had a different opinion from odilettante the moment I finished watching this ep. Here's the 1st part of what I wrote immediately after watching this and the next one.
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Red Moon, Blue Sun ep 27-28
How riveting and mind-blowing the writing of a drama should be so I’d be thinking; “Disappointed. This had so much potential, but they tried to pull a Reverse Psychology…which failed and came out as predictable and lame!” at the last week’s episodes, but this week I’m thinking; “ OMG this is one of best dramas! It’s exceeding expectations the last minute.”
An 180◦ change of opinion! Last week, I was ready to delete all my downloaded episodes once the drama is over, but now I’m ready to save them securely and show this to my cousin sisters once they’re old enough so they too can learn life lessons! It looks like the writer has actually pulled a DOUBLE Reverse Psychology, and I fell for the trick just like our police officers.
Well at least in my defense, I can say last week’s execution was off and that’s why I thought it was weak. I mean, we’ve suspected Eun-ho for so long, we had more than enough clues, and the only thing that held us back was the fact that if it happens, it’d be predictable. So when the writer went and did exactly that,….well I was angry. But here…of course we’ve speculated about the Green-girl mystery and, um..things-that-get-revaealed-next-episode, but our focus wasn’t much on those, and neither were there enough clues. That’s probably why when they finally dropped EVERYTHING on us within the time span of TWO hours it worked so well. The execution worked well. Clues for Eun-ho was always handed-out in an obvious, tedious manner, but the clues for this week’s eps were given here and there, on-and-off and were exposed properly within two/three intricately written final episodes. It was an explosion. Especially for my voided-out/blank and unexpecting mind after the last week’s eps.
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P.S.- However I too, found it utterly annoying that they didn't spare enough time to send-off Eun-ho properly. I mean, c'mmon people, he's one of the four leads!!!

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So... Let's say, if Dr. Yoon is really Eun-ho long lost brother, he should have known that Eun-ho is his brother and what his brother has been through... Why, as a psychiatrist, he didn't "cure" Eun-ho? But still let Eun-ho so obedient toward Head Director?

As JH started to suspect D. Yoon, just remember in the episode he's consulting Hana to tell him her secret, but we didn't know what Hana told him, like what Si-wan has told him. If Dr. Yoon is the Red Cry, the writer was actually giving us the clue.

I'm happy that writer doesn't forget Si-wan story, and gives us the closure...

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I have a feeling that the show is hinting at the concept of failure to cure. There are lot of cases where there is no cure highlighted by all the cases in which a murder took place except the one of Bit-na mother which was a suicide but in as Eun-Ho said had more hints of betrayal.
Also at the same time this shows that these are exactly the places where vigilantism crosses over to psychopathy.
The show wonderfully puts forth its points.

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I was so adment last week that Eun Ho was The RedCry and and leader of that group who came up with everything and not just another person manipulated by red cry I feel like such an idiot.
maybe Eun Ho and Dr. Yoon came up together with the idea, I just dont want Eun Ho to be another lackey in this, like how much of what happened was he manupilated or led into doing and how much did he do by himself, I think to me this will determjn if I enjoy this "twist" or not.

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I loved this episode a lot like all the other ones. I think we were wondering long ago whether Red Cry are multiple people and both Eun Ho and Dr. Yoon could be possible. So the episode was not a surprise or a deviation at all. Also there were a bit of hints before and a major one was the consultation scene when Hana was sent to Dr. Yoon and WK had asked for Dr. Yoon to be the consultant.

On the other note, the cinematography of this series is just so amazing, it makes the show so much more mesmerizing.

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Ji zheon didn’t have to shoot Eun-ho in the chest, he could have aimed at his legs, damn. A good steady cop would not hit anywhere above the waistline. Such an unnecessary death.

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Snub nose revolver, he was frankly luck he hit him at all from that distance.

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Eun-ho could've never set up and maintained (and moderated) a high tech black web site so there was always going to be 'the man behind the curtain' still to find. And there weren't many extraneous characters floating around to pin the blame on.
Funeral rites for Eun-ho? What funeral rites? He was a handyman who murdered his boss then committed 'suicide by cop'. You were never going to get a 'My Ajusshi'-style funeral at the end of the series for this guy.

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