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When the Camellia Blooms: Episodes 37-38

As life-altering as some goodbyes can be, daily life continues in a semblance of normality. There are lots of goodbyes this hour, but our characters try to make the best of difficult situations. With all the sadness going around, we can only hope things look up from here.

 
EPISODE 37: “7 Years and 3 Months of Motherhood”

Jeong-ryeol drinks and waxes philosophical to his baby about how things came too easily for him in life, which made him take people for granted. Dong-baek punched the realization into him that he’s never whole-heartedly fought for anything.

Meanwhile, Dong-baek happily watches Pil-gu sleep. Jung-sook comments he seems excited to be home and tries to convince Dong-baek to go out and have fun with Yong-shik—she’ll watch Pil-gu. Jung-sook is floored when Dong-baek shares she dumped Yong-shik.

Yong-shik had walked her home where they awkwardly parted ways, but he sprinted back to say she can always ask if she needs his help. Smiling with tears in his eyes, he said he knows she’ll be happy. With a small smile, she confessed his words always felt like a good-luck charm that changed her life. She thanked him, and he’d realized it was truly over.

After Jung-sook wonders if she plans to stay single her whole life, Dong-baek tells her about a time she contemplated suicide. As she was looking up a method online, Pil-gu had said “mom” for the first time and saved her. She’s fine living only for him. “Pil-gu is like a deity to me.” Well, that outlook explains a lot.

Bringing some sense into the proceedings, Jung-sook warns her she’ll die of loneliness. Dong-baek claims she won’t have the time. Sure enough, after the (frustrating) breakup, Dong-baek and Yong-shik both drown themselves in work. They narrate that unlike TV breakups, life goes on and you can’t just wallow in sadness.

Dong-baek and Jung-sook go to the mausoleum to visit Hyang-mi. Dong-baek reminisces about how proud Hyang-mi had been when Dong-baek had ridden the moped alone for the first time. Hyang-mi had been afraid Dong-baek would fall, so she’d chased the moped for blocks.

In the present, Dong-baek cries that Hyang-mi should’ve taken off with the money and lived happily. Outside, she admits to her mom that Hyang-mi’s death hasn’t sunk in. Jung-sook tells her to let go so Hyang-mi can rest in peace.

Dong-baek forbids her mom from dying and making her grieve twice. Now that she’s without Hyang-mi and Yong-shik, she needs her. Jung-sook still staunchly refuses Dong-baek’s kidney. Upset, Dong-baek asks to hold hands. Jung-sook thinks she’s weird to find her comforting, but Dong-baek says she likes calling her “mom.”

Dong-baek is surprised to see Ja-young waiting outside the Camellia. Ja-young orders one dish, but Dong-baek serves her three. When she smiles brightly, Ja-young calls her pretty smile intimidating seeing as everyone makes disparaging her their pastime.

When Ja-young tells her to keep smiling and prove them wrong, Dong-baek admits she used to see happiness as something that could be scored and ranked. Now, she’ll live by her own standards. Ja-young smiles at her positivity and says, despite acing everything, “no flowers bloomed” in her own heart. They drink together (hopefully beginning an awesome friendship).

Kyu-tae comes to pick up a wasted Ja-young whom Dong-baek is now calling “unni” (older sister). Kyu-tae is offended she still won’t call him “oppa.” She tells him to come by with Ja-young sometimes, and (looking pained) she’ll give him peanuts on the house.

Kyu-tae gets emotional at the peanut victory. “How about yearly rent?… A loan?” A disheveled Ja-young slaps the car impatiently and orders him to depart.

News of Jessica’s previous marriage is splashed all over the internet, even overtaking the Joker news. At the station, our cops are worried the Joker will worm his way out of a harsh sentence by claiming mental illness. Yong-shik can’t shake the feeling something is off.

He goes to visit Heung-shik who tells him he’s leaving Ongsan. Since he knew his father was faking his immobility and poisoning cats, Heung-shik feels culpable too. Yong-shik asks why he let it slide. Heung-shik claims his father couldn’t stand the cats being noisy and couldn’t help it.

Even now, Heung-shik worries about his dad, commenting he left his glasses. Noticing Yong-shik’s exasperation, he tears up as he says he hates his dad too. But even a serial-killer dad is a dad. (Is he though?) Yong-shik takes the glasses with him when he leaves.

To Jung-sook’s annoyance, Dong-baek tags along to the hospital and nags her about the transplant. Jung-sook argues she has the right to die. Dong-baek disagrees. “You were only my mother for seven years and three months!” Insurance money isn’t going to cut it. She wants 20 more years for the debt to be paid.

After hearing Jung-sook could die if she keeps missing dialysis appointments, Dong-baek confronts her mom. Dong-baek wants to schedule the transplant immediately, but Jung-sook stops her to ask if the seven years and three months were good. Dong-baek nods. She tells Jung-sook to hang in there and goes to see the doctor.

At the regional station, Yong-shik is blocked from meeting with the Joker, Seok-yong. He threatens to report them for human rights abuses since they won’t allow him or Heung-shik access even to give the Joker his glasses.

Inside the room, Yong-shik insists the cameras be turned off. When they’re alone, he tells Seok-yong that Heung-shik is leaving Ongsan. Seok-yong asks if he’s being harassed for being a killer’s son.

Yong-shik tells him, despite making Heung-shik look guilty and refusing to confess, Heung-shik still considers him a father. He should pay for his crimes for Heung-shik’s sake. “They were acting up!” Seok-yong’s calm façade breaks as he says that’s why they all died.

At the apartment, Jessica cries to Jong-ryeol that the posted pictures are fake. He calmly advises her not to go online for a while. She thinks he must be happy now that he’s got a reason to divorce her, but he says he won’t abandon her when she’s down. For the sake of their daughter, he’ll take care of things.

In a flashback, we see he made a call to his agency’s president, asking for help getting the photos taken down. He offered to renew his contract and do whatever they want. But he’ll retire if they refuse.

Presently, Jessica claims her lies are still better than his secret kid. In a surprising show of sensitivity, Jong-ryeol agrees and says he already knew, so she doesn’t need to feel bad. She sobs.

Back in the interrogation room, Seok-yong goes on about how those he killed couldn’t do anything for themselves yet acted like they were something. Two of his victims were ungrateful and acted like he was dirty after he’d helped them. Another victim, a little boy, had dissed him to his friends.

Seok-yong claims, in these types of situations, he hears a noise that won’t stop until he kills. (So, his defense is… tinnitus?) Dong-baek’s friend Geum-ok badmouthed him after he’d leant her an umbrella. The delivery guy had been frustrated he’d had to deliver in the pouring rain. As for Hyang-mi, Seok-yong had thought she was Dong-baek.

EPISODE 38

Seok-yong had expected Dong-baek to make the delivery but got Hyang-mi instead. When he threw her in the lake, he got scratched, hence the DNA under her nails. Yong-shik barely holds it together as he asks why he wanted to kill Dong-baek. Seok-yong answers she kept annoying him.

The cops in the observation room are impressed. They’d sent Yong-shik in to get a confession, coaching him on using Heung-shik as a way in.

Now that he’s confessed, Yong-shik tells Seok-yong he’ll make sure he’s punished for everything. Seok-yong smirks as villains are wont to do. Yong-shik doesn’t buy that he just killed on impulse and warns him not to use excuses to reduce his sentence.

At the hospital, Dong-baek speaks with Jung-sook’s doctor about the transplant process. We flash back to when he had discussed it with Jung-sook and assured her the procedure was safe for the donor. But Jung-sook was horrified to learn the disease was hereditary with a fifty percent chance of inheritance.

He had told her she’d die without a transplant, and it’d take at least five years to find another suitable donor. But she had refused to involve Dong-baek. In the present, Dong-baek tells the doctor she’ll do it. There’s no way she’s unlucky enough to have the disease.

She returns to find Jung-sook took off without finishing her treatment and calls Yong-shik for help. As she waits at home, Dong-baek finally realizes why her mom had been so adamant they eat healthy and watch their salt. She hugs Pil-gu to her when he wakes, thinking of how much her mom has done for them.

Jung-sook sits alone in a motel room and thinks back to when she left instructions for the insurance money with Yong-shik. He had passionately argued she should be trying to survive, not worrying about money. She’d told him the money was all she could give Dong-baek and was a symbol of her regret.

She’d left him two more instructions: make sure Dong-baek gets a checkup every year, and don’t break up even if she gets sick and asks him to. If they stay strong, things will work out. He assured her he’d wait for Dong-baek even if she tries to break up with him. Jung-sook tearfully asked him not to let her be lonely anymore.

In bed, Jung-sook sobs she never should’ve come. It’s making her want to live. (Sidenote: why is her motel room lit like a noraebang?) She recalls happier days when little Dong-baek came running up to excitedly tell her about an aunt’s dog’s newborn puppies. Jung-sook told her how happy she was that Dong-baek had been born.

In the middle of the night, Dong-baek wakes to the doorbell. She finds Yong-shik and Chief Byun outside looking somber. In the police car, they tell her Jung-sook was found in a motel. Dong-baek holds her mother’s bag containing the insurance policy and a letter.

Jung-sook writes that she left Dong-baek’s father after he drunkenly threw a soju bottle that hurt baby Dong-baek. She started working as a cook in a nightclub, but it broke her heart to hear Dong-baek refer to the men who frequented as “oppa.”

She also started working as a maid for the women at the club. When one of the ladies had told Dong-baek that she’d give her a job as a hostess when she got older to pay off their debt, Jung-sook lost it. She took Dong-baek and left.

Dong-baek was always hungry, and Jung-sook couldn’t even afford to buy her ice cream. They kept having to move from place to place until one day they had to sleep at Seoul Station. That was when she decided to give her up.

Jung-sook had bought her a meal and told her to say she was seven and wanted to go to school next year. They’ll give her necessities like clothes and food. She only needs to tell them her name and age. Jung-sook promised to earn money and come back for her in a year.

After she’d left Dong-baek, she’d been willing to do anything. She started working at a bar and entertained men while they drank. But poverty was a vicious cycle that she couldn’t break.

When she went to the orphanage to retrieve Dong-baek, they’d told her she immigrated to the U.S. with her adoptive parents. Jung-sook flipped out, asking how they could send her away. They pointed out she was the one who had left her there.

Before leaving the orphanage, Dong-baek had asked if people who can’t ride taxis can ride airplanes. (Jung-sook had claimed to get carsick.) Upon hearing this, Jung-sook sobbed.

Later, Jung-sook had seen the woman who had adopted Dong-baek on TV talking about her daughter growing up to be a human rights activist and attorney. Jung-sook thought, then, that she’d made the right choice and even met with the woman to thank her.

The woman claimed her daughter wanted to meet her, but when Jung-sook went, it wasn’t Dong-baek. The daughter had said those like her had to work harder to receive love because their situation was tenuous. If they weren’t loved, they could get sent back like Dong-baek had been.

Jung-sook approached the woman, asking why she sent back the first child. She answered that Dong-baek had a dark side and stage whispered that she’d been raised at a bar where she presumed the mother had worked. Clearly more concerned with her sense of propriety than not being a terrible human, she had sent her back.

Jung-sook snatched the hat she’d gifted the woman right off her head and stormed out. When she finally located Dong-baek, she’d been heartbroken to realize she was just like her—running a bar as a single mom. But unlike her, she could still smile.

She had wanted to be there for Dong-baek, but instead, Dong-baek had been there for her. She isn’t telling this story to be forgiven but so that Dong-baek can overcome her past and live confidently. “It wasn’t only for seven years and three months. I’ve loved you every day for the past 34 years.”

Dong-baek heads into the hospital to see her mom. Inside, she cries as she repeats the word “mom.”

We flash back to when they visited the hospital together. Dong-baek had turned around to ask, “What about you? How were the seven years and three months?” In a life that had felt like punishment, getting to see Dong-baek again made everything worth it. Dong-baek had scoffed at that being enough for her mom when it wasn’t for her, making Jung-sook laugh. They smiled as they held hands.

 
COMMENTS

So what was the point of that time jump last week if we were going right back where we started? I guess they were just rounding out Pil-gu’s side of things, but why not wait until the final episode if that’s the case? Although, I am glad we didn’t skip ahead, since there were lots of things to wrap up.

The details of the Joker’s crimes come to light and it’s… underwhelming. It’s a shame since I think exploring the father-son dynamic could have proved interesting. I would have preferred to focus on what Heung-shik had been through with his father rather than using him as a fakeout villain. I had hoped the Joker’s motivations would at least prove interesting, but they went the generic they-disrespected-me route. Overall, I’m not sure why this subplot was even necessary—the story wouldn’t have been much affected if it were taken out.

Jung-sook’s story was heartbreaking, as I knew it would be. I’ve found her story to be the most affecting and raw, reflecting the frightening, relentless nature of poverty. No matter how hard she worked, nothing changed. It’s horrible to be stuck in that never-ending cycle, especially when you have a child to support and don’t have friends or family to help. Watching her struggle to survive, desperate to get her child out, was rough. And to top that all off, she then has to deal with a fatal illness. Shout out to Lee Jung-eun who’s done a fantastic job with her portrayal.

Overall, I’ve enjoyed the slice-of-life vibe of the show with its realistically flawed characters and the issues they face. One thing I have to mention – and I know it’s been discussed in the comments – is the odd direction the show took when it comes to the depiction of motherhood. In the beginning, it seemed like we were headed towards a story that showcased how a single mother could live a full life and allow herself happiness. Instead, the show seems to be promoting the unhealthy idea that a mother has no identity outside of her child. Not only is this unfair for the mother, but it puts too much responsibility on the child. Just look at how much Pil-gu has given up because he feels responsible for his mother’s happiness. Codependency does no one any favors.

This plays into the handling of Dong-baek and Yong-shik’s relationship. It’s baffling to me that Dong-baek never sat down with Pil-gu and discussed her relationship with Yong-shik and what it could mean for their family. Bringing someone new into the family doesn’t equate to replacing existing bonds, but an eight-year-old doesn’t know that. If you want him to be okay with you dating, you need to include him and make him feel safe with this new person in your lives. Of course, a kid is going to feel insecure in this situation, and you shouldn’t ignore their feelings. However, that doesn’t mean you just go, “Oh well. Guess I’ll live alone forever.” Pil-gu clearly likes Yong-shik as a person, so all they need to do is help him feel comfortable with the situation. It’s upsetting that the idea of a blended family is portrayed as something that is unfair to the child when it can be a wonderful thing. Fingers crossed they’ll remedy this in the final episode.

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Ahhh I'm so excited to read about what y'all are going to say about the finale!!

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How did Jong-ryeol suddenly mature so much in this episode? It feels like he was still so self centered in the past few but suddenly he makes me feel bad for him.

Also with the underwhelming joker confessions I’m now low key hoping for a huge reversal in the finale where the Joker is actually the son (who will hopefully have something more interesting to say).

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“How did Jong-ryeol suddenly mature so much in this episode?”

It’s the magical powers of the final episode. It can redeem even the most evil characters; JR isn’t much of a challenge.

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Final episodes...plural. Sigh.

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it was Dong Baek's punch that did it..she literally knocked some sense into JR.

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🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

Your answer is the superior one!!!

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Hahahahaha thanks!

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Jong-Ryul's problem has always been that he was too self-centered and kind of oblivious to the feelings of others, so it's not a strech that once he realized that money did not make his son happy or solve his problems and actually stopped and thinked about others and not just himself he matured a little. I wouldn't say he or Jessica changed all that much just that they've made progress. Also DB's punch probably helped knock some sense into him.

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This episode brought on the water works. I think it's important to remember this is a drama where not everything is as it first appears and characters motivations and true actions are reavealed as we progress with the story (just look at Hyang-Mi and DB's mom) so in my opinion everything actually makes sense or if it doesn't yet it will by the end. I'm actually surprised at how well planned the story seems and how well rounded and nuanced every character is, they feel like their life goes on outside the drama. I had at times my issues with DB's characterization, but now looking back I can apreciate that this was always a drama about flawed, ordinary people who each had their own lessons to learn in order to grow.

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@Aidualc, I totally agree with you on “how well planned the story seems and how well rounded and nuanced every character is, they feel like their life goes on outside the drama.”

It really has been like a well crafted unfolding (blooming) of events and of characters thoughts and feelings and the developments and changes in understandings and values within the characters throughout the show. The progression is very deliberate and quite thoughtful too I think.

Most of the dialogues in this episode continue to show how much the characters care about each other, especially with the relationship between DongBaek and her mom which has always been the most impactful and moving storyline for me. I was happy that we finally have more explicit revealingly of the story about their past and about all the efforts and hardships that motivated Jung-Sook to let DongBeak go, against her own love and desire to be with her daughter. That same motivation played out in the past as it did in a similar dynamic in the current time with her illness and her choosing to die alone. But this time, DongBaek is grown-up and not just a helpless 7 year old (and with YongShik and others support) so they could be better able to help her mom realize and to prevent her to not make a choice that she would regret again.

I also really didn’t expect so much water works to happen, but once the flood gates started opening, it was like “game over”. Goodness. There have been many drama shows that have moved me to tears while watching, but this episode and the final episode would stand out as episodes that had me moved to tear beyond my control for almost the entire episode. They are not all sad tears either, but tears about the realization of the degree of love that actually exist between the characters and are so well expressed through their smiles or there agony.

Like @quirkycase comment, BRAVO to the actress Lee Jung-eun for her fantastic job portraying Jung-sook and her struggle and internal agony of wanting to live to be with her daughter and also wanting to die so that she won’t be a burden to her daughter.

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After I watched episode 18, I wrote a comment about how I felt like Pilgu's intergenerational trauma around abandonment and social ostracism came out of nowhere as a theme. But then I didn't publish it because I wondered if that was true. And now I'm glad because it's clear this show is, among other things, very much about what our parents hand down to us. Whether that's a trauma, a sense of entitlement or a disease.

We are the product of our parents, which sounds like a redundancy or a truism but can manifest in many subtle and unexpected ways.

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I think the main issue I have with this show is the writer trying to portrayal of DB as a "winning" character that goes against everything we are see on screen. Her story is very real and compelling as it is, and don't need fairytale spin.

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When I wrote this comment I hadn't seen the finale yet. Which was... interesting.

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I'm trying to forget about finale.

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Oh this episode!! Made me tear up so much. I put it on to resume watching, but damn didn't expect to bawl my eyes out. Great great episode and amazing acting from both Gong Hyo Jin and Lee Jung-eun in particular.

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I cried a lot after this episode. I feel really bad for Dong-baek. It seems she really can't catch a break. I was sure the impending death of Jung-sook would make her get together with Yong-shik again but I had hoped that she would take matters into her own hands for once.
I found it a little unfair that Jung-sook asked Yong-shik to just wait for Dong-baek if she ever breaks up with him. Its something one would expect her to say but still.

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It's so nice that they dedicated this episode to Jung-sook. I just love how this show has focussed on the side characters and made them as equally important and loveable as the main characters.

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Sometimes I have thought about watching this drama, in order to give Gong hyo jin a chance, but really when I read pieces of the recap or the last comments or some of your comments, I know I won't want to anymore.

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Ah, Show did it again. It keeps making me care about characters I felt meh about. It did it with Hyang-mi and now DB’s mom. God, what a hard and heartbreaking life.

I don’t know if it was show’s purpose but it has in general been very good about displaying issues that Korean women face on the daily. Whether it’s:
- DB being shunned for being a single mother
- Hyang-mi for having a mother who works in a bar
- Deok-soo for being a widow
- DB’s mom for being poor
- Ja-young for being more successful than her husband
- Jessica for having been married before

None of these are crimes and yet these women are facing repetitive criticism and harassment for their circumstances.

For me, this show has been very interesting in highlighting some of these issues.

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I used to be late for recaps but this time I'm too early! ><

Oh, and can they please stop breaking yong-sik's heart?? My heart can't take kang haneul's sad and teary puppy eyes :(((((

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Nooo!!! Not sure what symbols I used but now it shows only half of my comment and the rest in freaking italic 😭😭😭😭😭
Wth??? :(((

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(Anyways, the deleted part of my comment was something like this)

I kinda cheated and binged the last 6 episodes all together so it's hard to make any spoiler free consideration about this one only >.<
They really got me thinking the mother was this unforgivable person (well, not that bad tbh) just to make me bawl my eyes out on this episode ㅠㅠㅠ
And they know very well how to hold back important information just to make one instantly change their mind :(

(And then puppy haneul at the end..not sure if I forgot something -.-)

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Full of Korean stereotypes. Heartless mothers both selfish and dogmatic. In love one day and indifferent the next, Dongbaek is two totally contradictory people, consequently no credibility in either. The ending is very unpleasant. Nothing blooms in this pathetic atmosphere.

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Quirky case, you are right that Dong Baek should simply have sat Pil-gu down and talked to him about her relationship with Yong-shik. But she never had a chance to learn to do this. Part of the problem with growing up in poverty is that there are a lot of gaps in what the child learns, important lessons in hw to deal with life and people. This is the real root reason why the dysfunctional behaviors of one generation are carried along to the next and then the next, perpetuating the misery. It is the root reason why so many well-intentioned government anti-poverty programs seem to have such limited effect. Part of the reason that the people in CAMELLIA seem so real is that in fact they are being depicted very realistically- and that includes this destructive behavior that we are seeing in Dong-baek. Even the disappointing reveal as to the Joker's motivation is all to realistic- yet one more example of the banality of evil.

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“Even the disappointing reveal as to the Joker's motivation is all to realistic- yet one more example of the banality of evil.”

This is very good point. I actually did not think this was such a disappointing reveal from the confession that the father is making to be as Joker...it fact it is actually more scary...that the reason for killing can manifest to someone with the intend to kill in an ordinary way with little regard to life....and also the point the father made that it may be hardest to kill the 1st time, but then it is possible to kill many others after that.

That is more scary and more real.

Evil and cruel actions do not need grandeur explanations and motives to be committed...they can be and are committed but regular people in society too...like domestic violence and deaths caused by such violence and hate crimes ....those forms of evil/cruelty can be committed by those who thinks they are right in their minds and do not have to be a diagnosed psychopath.

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DB grew up feeling that she wasn't important to the adults in her life, that she was expendable. She was wrong about some of that, and right about other parts. She did not understand her mother giving her up, but of course she would have been deeply scarred by being *returned to the orphanage.* If that wouldn't reinforce your feelings of inferiority and simply not mattering to any grown ups, I don't know what would. JR didn't really treat her like she mattered, either- nobody could know about her, he tells her he can't bring her anywhere, because how would he explain her, and he's not even apologetic.

So, OF COURSE, when this woman who loves her son SO MUCH hears him say he's not good enough for the adults and nobody cares about him, her first response is going to be to drop everything and attempt to be everything in this child's life so that he knows he mattered, so he doesn't experience the rejections she did.

Yes, she's wrong, there is a better way, but how on earth is she supposed to have known that by herself? Her mom is talking some sense into her. I expect others will, too, and probably to Pil-Gu as well.

I see all DB's flaws and mis-steps as quite natural when watching her with the understanding that she is a deeply traumatized child who grew up in an institution governed by people who meant well but didn't understand the lasting damage trauma does to kids who experience parental rejection not once, but really 4 times - her dad, who was a drunk and who injured her, her mom leaving her at the orphanage and for all she knows, never returning, and the adoptive family who returned her for being 'dark' and having a mom who worked at a bar, and later JR, who showed her how little she mattered to him in many ways, and finally, when he made it clear he did not want her to be pregnant- and then he never looked for her when she moved to the one town he always talked about so fondly and if he wasn't so selfish, he'd have known there was a chance she could be pregnant.

DB makes perfect sense given the lifetime of rejection that makes up her back-story.

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@DHMRS
So very well and thoroughly said!!! I read what you wrote in such a way that I feel like applauding at the end of your comment :) 👏👏👏

To me too - “I [also] see all DB's flaws and mis-steps as quite natural when watching her” and she “makes perfect sense given the lifetime of rejection that makes up her back-story”!

Also as you point out, I agree the choice to break up with YongShik was the conclusion she, herself, jumped to (by her own reasoning) at the end of the last episode and also she is trying to follow through with that break up decision in this episode, despite her feelings for YongShik still going strong. And actually I like how DB and YS are both being very mature about the break up. It is refreshing that they are not wallowing in sorrow, but trying to respect the decision and situation. There is no lost of love here, just their continual trying to be understanding given the situation.

I also didn’t see any indication that Pilgu had suggested to DB to break up with YongShik. If anything from the previous episode’s chain of event, Pilgu unfortunately had a real shake up and Misunderstanding with the idea that he may be a burden to his mom and he had decided to go and stay with Jung-Ryeol because, as he said, if he was going to be a burden to anyone, he rather be a burden to Jung-Ryeol and not to his mom. And he must have thought that by going to stay with Jung-Ryeol, he could free his mom to be accepted more so that she could go and marry YongShik. But thankfully DB came to discover these insecure thoughts that was sprouting more in Pilgu’s head. Pilgu was delighted when his mom came to Seoul to take him home, because once she corrected him, he knew he was still his mom’s number one.

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Thanks @quirkycase for the great recap!
Seriously, you guys at dramabeans provide the best and most thorough and thoughtful recaps that I have been able to compare. Much appreciate reading the recaps here with the comments and snippets added!

Also on your question “So what was the point of that time jump last week if we were going right back where we started?”

That scene to me was definitely more like a teaser at the end of Episode 36. Made me feel, “well I’ll definitely have to tune in to the episode next week now to see what happened!” And also “wow he really did grow tall!” Lol

To me, it was also an assurance at least that Pilgu does grow up well...so no worries there :)

Plus, then the preview scenes showed a continuation of clips in the present time, so that does allow for us to expect these upcoming episodes could still be in the present time and to continue current lines of events.

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Help please. : )

Who was the actress who made a guest appearance as the wrong Dongbaek? I am can not remember her name or where I have seen her. Help is much appreciated so my brain stops hurting. Hehe.

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Hi @brainsandwich! Her name is Lee Shi-won, she was just in Let Me Hear Your Song so you may have seen her there.

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Thank you. I did see her in that and the Memories of the Alhambra.

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