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Two Cops: Episodes 31-21 (Final)

Hang on tight, because things are going to get very dark before we get to the end of our story. Dong-tak and Su-chang have a few more secrets to uncover before they can even think about saving Su-chang’s life, and time is quickly running out. But they’ve learned some important lessons about themselves during their ordeal, and no matter what happens, they’ve both become better people for having known each other.

 
EPISODE 31 RECAP

Confused, Su-chang asks Dong-tak why Jae-hee said he was responsible for the accident sixteen years ago. His eyes fill with tears as he asks Dong-tak if it’s true, and Dong-tak says that if what he did means he’s at fault, then yes, he caused the accident.

Su-chang says in disbelief, “So it’s all because of you… the accident that happened, that my dad died, and that I’m here in this state?” Dong-tak can only say that he’s sorry, hanging his head as Su-chang begs him to deny it.

When Dong-tak stays silent, Su-chang sobs that he should have just lied to him after everything they’ve done together. He wails, “What am I supposed to do now, you son of a bitch?!”

 

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Please just lie to me

 

Ji-an calls out to Dong-tak, and Su-chang is gone when he turns back. Su-chang walks the streets aimlessly, his voice hitching as he says that he’d thought he wouldn’t be alone anymore, but the person who helped him turned out to be the person who ruined his life.

Detective Yoo interrogates Chief Prosecutor Tak, informing him that Soo-ah is being charged with murder. Chief Prosecutor Tak confirms that he’s supported Soo-ah since she was a child at the orphanage, but he smugly denies any connection to her crimes.

In another interrogation room, Dong-tak tells Soo-ah that the nun at the orphanage informed him that she can hear and speak. He places the lighter/audio recorder on the table between them and tells her that this is the real one — the one she stole was a fake.

He asks if the recording on the lighter is the reason she killed Kim Jong-doo and Hang-joon. He asks if she did it on Chief Prosecutor Tak’s orders and her eyes widen in surprise, giving away the truth.

Dong-tak asks if she murdered Kim Jong-doo for threatening Chief Prosecutor Tak, and Hang-joon for investigating Kim Jong-doo’s murder. Soo-ah stays frustratingly silent, so Dong-tak tells her that she can write her confession if she prefers.

He guesses that she targeted Su-chang because she wanted personal vengeance for the accident that killed her parents, but he wants her motive for killing the others. Soo-ah maintains her silence, so Dong-tak asks if she’s ever wondered why Chief Prosecutor Tak made her commit the murders.

In the other room, Detective Yoo asks Chief Prosecutor Tak if Soo-ah committed murder on his orders. Smirking, Chief Prosecutor Tak says that it he wouldn’t be asking if Soo-ah has given them any information. Unfortunately, Jae-hee arrives and gets his father released.

They run into Ji-an on their way out, and she asks Chief Prosecutor Tak why he instigated a murder. He tells her it’s a misunderstanding, but Dong-tak calls out that the lighter Soo-ah gave him is a fake. Chief Prosecutor Tak looks nervous for the first time as Dong-tak quips that he’ll see him again soon.

Dong-tak takes Ji-an aside to speak privately. She says that she learned that he was the last person her father spoke to before he died, and he remembers that he said he envied Detective Song’s daughter. Detective Song replied that he wanted to be a detective his daughter could be proud of.

Dong-tak’s theory is that Detective Song didn’t turn in the proof of Su-chang’s innocence at first, but that their conversation changed his mind. He thinks that Ji-an’s father went to talk to Chief Prosecutor Tak, the person who asked him to fabricate the evidence in the first place.

Ji-an says that Chief Prosecutor Tak denies having seen her father that day. But Dong-tak guesses that Chief Prosecutor Tak was referring to Kim Jong-doo when he told Ji-an that the witness died. He says that he believes it was Chief Prosecutor Tak who asked Chairman Jo to frame her father as corrupt, and that it was Chief Prosecutor Tak who killed her father.

He drives Ji-an home, but instead of getting out of the car, she bursts into tears. She sobs at the knowledge that the man she asked to help her vindicate her father is the man who killed him, and says she feels guilty that her father died because he wanted her to be proud of him. All Dong-tak can do is hug her as she cries.

Later Dong-tak heads to the hospital, where he spots Miss Bong in the lobby, but she says she hasn’t seen Su-chang. She puts a hand on her chest and says that it hurts because he found out everything, and she tells him that it all began with him, so he has to finish it.

She asks if he wants that soul to live, adding, “Then give it to him.” Dong-tak asks what she means, but she says that he has to figure that out for himself.

Su-chang is with Chief Prosecutor Tak, watching as he glares angrily at the fake lighter and growls that Dong-tak must have the real one. He threatens to “show Dong-tak a funny picture,” and tosses the fake lighter into the river with an evil cackle.

Worried, Su-chang goes back to the station to find Dong-tak. He says he’s not there to forgive Dong-tak, but to tell him that after Chief Prosecutor Tak was released, he’d told Jae-hee not to let Ji-an dig any deeper into her father’s case. He also mentions Chief Prosecutor Tak’s threat, scared that he’s planning something.

Knowing that Soo-ah is the key, Dong-tak decides to talk to her. On the way, he tells Su-chang that the nun called him earlier to tell him how Soo-ah met Chief Prosecutor Tak, in the hopes that it would help.

When she was still young, an older boy at the orphanage had bullied Soo-ah. She’d smashed the boy’s foot with a brick, which Chief Prosecutor Tak happened to witness. He’d taken her aside and given her a dove, which she’d brutally crushed, then smiled at him with its blood still on her face (shudder).

Chief Prosecutor Tak became very interested in Soo-ah, and sent her to Japan for a special education. In other words, he made Soo-ah into a puppet who would do anything for him.

Dong-tak finds Soo-ah in her cell and calls her a child who saw the world through twisted eyes. He says he was the same way after his parents’ deaths, and that he rebelled against the world until he met a man who urged him to start over. He tells Soo-ah, “If you had met such a person, then you could have changed, too.”

Soo-ah sits up that night, unaware that Su-chang is in her cell with her. He asks if she knows that Doo-shik is dead, or that he liked her. He says that Doo-shik didn’t take the fall so she could sit in a cell, asking angrily why she’s keeping quiet.

The following day, Chief Prosecutor Tak visits an elementary school to talk to the children while the press covers the story. Ji-an is there, and she ignores his pandering to ask about the orphan he sponsored, and whether he’s involved in the murders she committed.

Addressing one of the children, Chief Prosecutor Tak croons that the pretty reporter thinks he asked someone to hit another person for him. The boy just happens to be Joon-soo, Hang-joon’s son, and he chirps that “Wife” (meaning Dong-tak) says they should always play fair. Chief Prosecutor Tak hugs Joon-soo and swears to always be honest once he takes public office.

When the story airs, Dong-tak bursts into Chief Prosecutor Tak’s office, furious that he touched Joon-soo. Chief Prosecutor Tak laughs and says that his opponent’s weakness is very visible. He asks about Ji-an, blaming her for putting everyone in danger.

He warns Dong-tak to stop or he’ll make him disappear. Undaunted, Dong-tak promises to take down Chief Prosecutor Tak himself.

Ji-an goes directly to Jae-hee to ask if his father rigged the accident case sixteen years ago, then had the witness, Hang-joon, and her father all killed. She tells Jae-hee that as a prosecutor, he has the ability to put it all to right.

As soon as she leaves, Jae-hee calls his father and asks if he killed Ji-an’s father. Chief Prosecutor Tak just tells him to be understanding, because he’ll be a great politician when this all blows over. He orders Jae-hee to free Soo-ah, and Jae-hee slumps, defeated.

Dong-tak calls another detectives’ meeting, telling the team that Chief Prosecutor Tak doesn’t know that his voice on the lighter’s recorder is damaged. He tells Detective Yoo to call the reporters for a press conference, planning to set a trap for Chief Prosecutor Tak.

Soon after, Soo-ah is taken from the station to be transported to the prosecutor’s office. The transport van is tailed by Yong-pal, who maneuvers the van into an intersection so that his minion can drive another car into it. After checking that his minion is okay, Yong-pal runs to the transport van to find that Soo-ah has escaped.

He calls the police station, and the detectives jump into action. When Chief Prosecutor Tak gets a call about Soo-ah’s escape, he tells Ja-hee that they’re lucky he didn’t do anything illegal, and that this will all be over once Soo-ah finds the lighter.

At the press conference, Detective Yoo tells the reporters that there will be an announcement the following day regarding Hang-joon’s murder case. As for Soo-ah’s escape, he simply says that they have information on the person who’s been shielding the real culprit.

Jae-hee denies the cops the freedom to search for Soo-ah, which is all part of Dong-tak’s plan. He’s counting on the fact that Chief Prosecutor Tak will have asked Soo-ah to do one more job for him. As they wait, Yong-pal asks who Soo-ah will be ordered to kill, and Dong-tak answers darkly, “Cha Dong-tak.”

We see the meeting between Chief Prosecutor Tak and Soo-ah, where he asks her to bring him the person most important to Dong-tak and hands her a photograph of Su-chang. She heads to the hospital dressed as a doctor and takes Su-chang’s body from his room.

Chief Prosecutor Tak calls Dong-tak and tells him to bring him the lighter if he wants to save his friend.

 
EPISODE 32 RECAP

Su-chang rides with Dong-tak as he goes to meet with Chief Prosecutor Tak. They find themselves in an abandoned building, where by several burly lackeys tie Dong-tak to a chair in front of Chief Prosecutor Tak and Soo-ah. Soo-ah takes the lighter and gives it to Chief Prosecutor Tak.

Now that he’s given Chief Prosecutor Tak what he wants, Dong-tak demands his friend back, but Chief Prosecutor Tak chuckles at the idea of a detective and a con man being friends. He asks Soo-ah if she “got rid of him” and she nods, making Dong-tak gasp that this wasn’t the deal.

He notes that this isn’t Chief Prosecutor Tak’s usual method, which is to cover things up until they become dangerous. Chief Prosecutor Tak agrees that he ignored Chairman Jo’s corruption just once, and Dong-tak asks how he framed Detective Song.

We flash back to the night that Detective Song confronted Chief Prosecutor Tak with the recording that he’d been hiding. He’d said he didn’t want to be an embarrassment to Ji-an, and that he was going to turn in the recording that Su-chang and Dong-tak worked so hard to get.

Chief Prosecutor Tak had grabbed for the recorder, and in the struggle, he’d pushed Detective Song out of the unfinished building to his death. Below, the taxi driver Kim Jong-doo watched in horror, but his shock had turned into a greedy smile when he saw Chief Prosecutor Tak.

In the present, Chief Prosecutor Tak tells Dong-tak that pushing Detective Song was an impulse, but that he never regretted it. Su-chang gleefully asks Dong-tak if they’re done. Wait, what now?

Dong-tak just laughs, which has Chief Prosecutor Tak scrambling to open the lighter. He finds the recorder inside, and when he plays it, he realizes that the audio is damaged.

Dong-tak confirms that the important parts have been destroyed, but he and Su-chang still look smug. We see that Dong-tak’s plan was to make Chief Prosecutor Tak confess while holding the lighter… which has been fitted with a tiny camera. Chief Prosecutor Tak shakes with rage as he realizes that he just confessed directly to the police.

Dong-tak confirms that the lighter just recorded Chief Prosecutor Tak admitting to everything. Chief Prosecutor Tak turns on his phone and checks the news to find Ji-an reporting on his confession live in progress. That is so awesome.

Stunned, Chief Prosecutor Tak drops the lighter, but he refuses to admit that it’s over. He asks Soo-ah for one last favor, and she pulls her knife. Dong-tak attempts to stall, telling Chief Prosecutor Tak to kill him himself if he wants him dead, but Soo-ah approaches Dong-tak and swings her arm back.

But she freezes when Chief Prosecutor Tak says that he’s meant to do great things, and killing is what Soo-ah was born to do. She looks stricken as Dong-tak asks her, “Now do you see what the man you were so loyal to made you do?” She turns to look at Chief Prosecutor Tak when he asks her again to do this favor, and with tears in her eyes, she utters a single word: “No.”

He goes to her and tries to take the knife from her hand. Soo-ah pulls him close and stabs… then she falls to the floor, bleeding from the stomach. Chief Prosecutor Tak screams her name, asking why she would stab herself and calling for an ambulance.

As Su-chang watches, he remembers that last night in jail, Soo-ah had written a confession letter apologizing to those she harmed. Su-chang had let Dong-tak know that he thought she could be turned, and Dong-tak had told Soo-ah that someone else would be in Su-chang’s hospital bed when she went to kidnap him.

The police storm the building, freeing Dong-tak and arresting Chief Prosecutor Tak. But there’s no time to relax as Yong-pal calls from the hospital to say that Su-chang’s body isn’t doing well.

As Dong-tak speeds to the hospital, Su-chang watches his hands flicker in and out, realizing that today is the 49th day. They’re both terrified, scared that they won’t get to the hospital in time.

Reporters swarm the building as Chief Prosecutor Tak is led out. He tells them confidently that he’ll go free because the investigation wasn’t legal, claiming that he was targeted because he’s about to take office.

Jae-hee arrives, and the reporters let him through to his father. He announces that the investigation was legal and carried out under his supervision, having been convinced to do the right thing by both Dong-tak and Ji-an.

Before he’s taken away, Chief Prosecutor Tak tells Jae-hee to remember that he did it all for him. Looking resigned and weary, Jae-hee says, “Yes, I know. And I am doing this for your sake.”

Dong-tak and Su-chang arrive at the hospital to find Su-chang’s body in cardiac arrest, with the doctors working frantically to revive him. Su-chang holds out his fading hands to Dong-tak, and he says in a frightened voice that he thinks he’s about to die.

Dong-tak remembers Miss Bong telling him to “give it to him” if he wants to save his friend, and now he realizes what she meant. Su-chang looks at him sadly and says, “You did well, Cha Dong-tak.”

Not ready to give up, Dong-tak finds a bottle of water and dumps it over his head., then rushes at Su-chang. Su-chang wakes up in Dong-tak’s body, Miss Bong in front of him. She tells him that this is atonement — that Dong-tak gave him his body.

She tells Su-chang that if he stays there until his own body dies, then he can live in Dong-tak’s body forever. He asks what would happen to Dong-tak, and she tells him, “He’ll never come back.”

As his body flatlines, Su-chang realizes that he can’t do it. He finds a scalpel and slashes his palm, sending his soul back out of Dong-tak’s body. Dong-tak asks him why, and Su-chang yells at him, “Why did you do it? Why?! Do you want to make me a thief who stole your body?”

The doctors stop laboring over Su-chang’s body, and Su-chang’s soul begins to fade. He looks terrified as he disappears in front of Dong-tak’s eyes, and Dong-tak lunges at his body and begins chest compressions again. He tries desperately to revive Su-chang, but Su-chang’s eyes remain closed.

Some time later, Bong-sook and Ji-an enter Su-chang’s hospital room to find him sitting up in bed — he’s alive! But he backs away from Bong-sook, not recognizing her and taking offense when she says they used to con people together.

Su-chang squints at Ji-an, and asks if they’ve met, then decides they haven’t and grumbles that she’s totally not his type. LOL. He picks up a pot of flowers from the windowsill and gives them to nurse Da-jung, thanking her for taking care of him and gifting her with that blinding smile.

When Dong-tak visits and says that it’s good to see him back in his body, Su-chang asks sarcastically if he was walking around like a ghost or something. Upset, Dong-tak asks if he really doesn’t remember, and Su-chang swears he doesn’t. He asks who he is, and Dong-tak says somberly, “You’re my forever partner.”

He tells Su-chang that they got into a lot of trouble together, and even caught some bad guys. Su-chang lights up, asking if he was a cop, but Dong-tak tells him that he was better than a cop.

As he walks away, he says under his breath, “You were a fraud.” Su-chang calls after him, asking what he said. He doesn’t get an answer, but he smiles a tiny, affectionate smile — wait, is he faking??

The detectives (and even former-Detective Park!) go out drinking to celebrate their success in catching Chief Prosecutor Tak, Soo-ah, and even Chairman Jo. Detective Yoo pours an extra shot for Hang-joon, and they all bellow at Yong-pal when he plunks himself down and drinks it. Detective Lee pours another shot for Hang-joon, which is similarly stolen by Doc, hee.

Sung-hyun visits the bakery to buy a cake, and Bong-sook says defiantly that she doesn’t pick pockets anymore. He gives her the hiccups by asking her to date him again, sending the Bakery Boys into excited fits.

On a date with Ji-an, Dong-tak tells her that Soo-ah is recovering from her stab wound and that Chief Prosecutor Tak is probably meeting with the prosecutor he hates the most. Heh, he’s with Jae-hee, and he smiles proudly as Jae-hee reads him his rights before beginning his interrogation.

Ji-an thanks Dong-tak for helping her clear her father’s name and catch the real culprits. Dong-tak says there are still a lot of victims out there, and that it’s his job as a detective to catch the criminals.

She asks where Su-chang is, worried that they may never see him again if he doesn’t regain his memory. She denies being disappointed at the thought, and Dong-tak suddenly becomes more relaxed as he says in a light tone, “I like your attitude. Song, from now on, you will only look at me, get angry at me, and smile at me.”

At the familiar words, Ji-an looks wary, but Dong-tak grins and says that that’s what Su-chang said once. Damn, he scared me!

Dong-tak visits Hang-joon’s grave dressed in his formal uniform, and he can practically hear Hang-joon asking if he’s been crying. He tells his friend that he finally got them, hearing Hang-joon’s voice say that Dong-tak will live well without him: “You did well, Cha Dong-tak.”

He leaves a bouquet of flowers and sits on a nearby bench, looking up at the sky for the first time in a long while. A hooded figure sits next to him, and after a moment Dong-tak asks if the person has a lighter. It’s Su-chang, and he chides Dong-tak for asking for a lighter when he’s a detective.

He spins around when Dong-tak calls him rude and says that he talked to Hang-joon, who told them to be friends. Dong-tak grudgingly agrees to be friends, though he warns Su-chang that he’ll kill him if he pretends not to remember again. Su-chang says that he’ll keep joking around because he wants to be himself.

Dong-tak takes out a pair of handcuffs, cuffing Su-chang’s hand to one of his own. He asks Su-chang what he wants to do now, and Su-chang replies that he wants to do what he’s good at.

When Dong-tak asks if he means being a crook, Su-chang answers, “No. I’m going to stick next to you.” Dong-tak thinks he means as his sidekick, but Su-chang says there’s a better word for it: “Partner.”

 

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COMMENTS

What a great finale, chock-full of action and suspense and even a few more surprises for good measure. I had a feeling that the ending would be worth waiting for, and I wasn’t disappointed. Chief Prosecutor Tak’s takedown was so satisfying, the way he was tricked into confessing live on television with the whole country watching. It felt like proper revenge for the lives he ruined, and the best part was the rejection from Jae-hee, the very person he claimed to have done it all for. I still bemoan the way Two Cops unnecessarily lagged in the middle — it’s a damn shame, because the beginning was strong and the ending even stronger. I know it’s a matter of opinion and many will disagree, but as pure entertainment and exciting storytelling go, this one ranks pretty highly for me.

Once again, I really applaud Two Cops for doing a great job at keeping its cards close to the vest, and for the way it doled out surprises until the very end. I genuinely believed that Chief Prosecutor Tak didn’t know about the killings that Soo-ah was doing on his behalf, only to learn that not only did he know, but that he specifically chose and groomed her for that purpose. That shows a chilling propensity for forethought and a ruthless willingness to use people to his own ends. I’m incredibly impressed with Choi Il-hwa’s performance here, because he really kept me guessing right up until the full truth was revealed.

One of my favorite things about the show is how it portrayed its characters not as absolutes, but as fallible people whose paths were shaped by those around them. Su-chang and Dong-tak had very similar childhoods, both of them losing their parents traumatically at a young age and becoming delinquents as a result. The only difference is that Dong-tak met someone who told him he could do better, while Su-chang was left without a positive influence, at least until he met Dong-tak. Soo-ah was warped by Chief Prosecutor Tak, who saw a potential for violence in her and instead of teaching her to be a good person, he nurtured and encouraged that side of her.

Even Chief Prosecutor Tak became twisted out of love for his son, going so far as to ruin at least one young child’s life and using her to end the lives of others. There must have been some good in him or he wouldn’t have raised a strong, decent man like Jae-hee, but he was so blinded by his need to protect Jae-hee from one bad decision in his youth that he was willing to go to any lengths, even murder. Luckily, Soo-ah was given the chance to redeem herself in the end, helping to put the true murderer away and almost sacrificing herself in the process.

Su-chang definitely stands out as my favorite character from Two Cops, and not just because he’s cheeky and endearing (although goodness knows, he is both of those things). As cheerful and upbeat as he appears on the outside, he’s actually a very tragic character because despite having been portrayed as the “bad guy” con man at the outset, Su-chang actually turned out to be a person who was horribly wronged. He was orphaned through no fault of his own, his father branded as a killer, and as a result he wasn’t able to realize his own dream of being a detective. Then on top of everything else he’s put into a coma and forced to beg for help to the one person least willing to help him. He felt so helpless throughout his 49-day ordeal, relying on others to solve the mystery and get him back into his body. And yet he never lost his optimism, or his belief that everything would be set right and he’d get his life back.

I didn’t talk much about the bromance between Su-chang and Dong-tak in previous recaps, mostly because they never really cemented their friendship until this final episode. I always loved the way they bantered and bickered, and how that bickering morphed over time from antagonistic, to harmless, and finally to affectionate. Their teamwork was fantastic once they learned to trust each other, and I was really touched when everything culminated in their each being willing to sacrifice themselves so the other could live.

That’s ultimately why Su-chang survived and woke up — because Dong-tak was ready to trade his life for Su-chang’s, after the way he altered it for the worse when they were kids. He didn’t offer up his own life because he felt he owed it to Su-chang, or because he was guilty, but simply because he cares for Su-chang more than himself. And Su-chang passed his test by choosing to do the unselfish thing, and being willing to die for Dong-tak. They each made up for their past actions in that one choice, which felt fitting and right for them both. I’m so happy that they were able to mend their fences and make plans to be real partners, just like Hang-joon always wanted for them. I only wish I could be there to see the shenanigans that Su-chang and Dong-tak manage to get up to in the future, because if one thing is certain, it’s that their lives as partners will never be boring.

 
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Thank you for this wonderful recap! I loved this show in the beginning, but it lost me in the middle. So glad to hear that it got strong at the end :D

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without reading the recap and spoiling the whole drama for myself, is it worth watching?

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If you’re not a huge Jo Jung Seok fan, then it’s not worth it. The show felt flat and characters were written not so smartly. I was banging my head from frustration few times.

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It was plodding along in mediocre-ville until this week when it lost me completely. JJS is amazing but he couldn't save this for me. While the overall resolution is satisfying, I was very annoyed by the execution. And I felt Prosecutor Tak skated on his responsibility for a lot of things.

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Phew... It ended. For a drama that fell flat fot most of its run, it surprisingly wrapped things up well for characters that I truly cared for. In the end, I'm happy enough to watch Jo Jung-seok pull off playing two very different characters awesomely and also find out that Kim Sun-ho is one promising actor. Better luck next time, Oppa.

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Thanks for recapping, LollyPip! You're the best!

So... not much was made of Dongtak's role in the accident that started this all. So why would they stick that in there? Did he even tell Ssong?

Despite things like this, I enjoyed the drama also, mostly because of the two partners and also the real partner, Hoya, lol.

Just a note, the title of the recap should probably be Episodes 31-32.

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He’d taken her aside and given her a dove, which she’d brutally crushed, then smiled at him with its blood still on her face (shudder).

So he just carries a dove around in his pocket all the time in case he needs to test a promising young killer?

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ROFLMAO!!! I'd forgotten that scene, @redfox. Now I feel an urge to play "Indian Love Call."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCppUtS9vLk

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Chief Prosecutor Tak must have been a Boy Scout. Always prepared. Or was he moonlighting as a magician?!

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He’d said he didn’t want to be an embarrassment to Ji-an, and that he was going to turn in the recording

How many kdrama would poof into non-existence if people who want to turn in valuable evidence would just to that instead of telling the baddies what they plan?
And don't meet them upstairs in the Unfinished Building of Doom. Try the coffee shop across from the police station.

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Lord C, you must have been reading my mind. Unfinished/Abandoned Building of Doom strikes again. It was bad enough in LOOKOUT.

Maybe there should be a Stratagem 37: Don't tip off the baddies. About anything. Ever. ;-)

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While that’s one of the “charms” of kdramas. Stand conveniently where a baddie can push you over the edge. It’s borderline stupid and insulting to viewers.

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Though I dropped this drama a long time ago, I am happy Dimples survived. See you in your next project and hopefully it will be written better without the need to drag issues that could have been solved at episode 6.

Jo Jung-seok, I love you and your awesome acting, but the Hyeri curse doomed this drama from the start.

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It’s not HR’s fault mainly it’s the writing, why everyone is blaming her she’s not a skilled actress but she’s better in my opinion than Go Ara and Ara didn’t ruin Black for me despite her terrible acting I watched The whole drama because the plot was amazingly good and gripping, when the writing is good I think people will find it hard to drop the drama because of one terrible actor.

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She got unlucky she didn’t get a writer that creates a character for her. No matter how good a character is written, if the actor cannot distinguish it from her previous roles, then that will ruin the experience of watching the drama. Many people would stick to it. If you enjoyed it, good for you. Others do not have the luxury to waste their time on something they do not enjoy. If somebody has to find excuses and force themselves to continue, it will spoil the experience.

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I dropped Two Cops because of the plot, i didn’t like the writing so I don’t have a reason to stick around even if I like JJS, for me if I don’t enjoy the writing I can’t keep watching. I haven’t seen HR in anything before but I didn’t mind her acting.

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I think Hyeri is a decent actress. I think that the writing ambushed her character more than anything as well. She was interesting in the first few episodes of the show, even though the situations were somewhat unbelievable. Up until they got that child slavery guy she was important to the show. And then she wasn't. Definitely just a badly written character, unlike Suzy's Hong Joo in WYWS, where her role as a reporter made her more interesting up till the end. Especially her dream of how she's wearing her SBC vest . . .

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@brian agree Suzy was very important character in the plot and was well written despite Suzy not having the acting skills but her character was loved because of the good writing, but HR feels like a side character and she's just there for the romance, this reminds how Kim So Hyun was in Ruler she was supposed to be a main character but Yoon So Hee (the second lead) was much layered and outshone her (not in the acting skills because she's a bad actress) but of how interesting the character was written, that's prove how a bad writing can waste a talented actor/actress or make a bad actress character shine for viewers.

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I'm also in the camp where writing makes a much bigger difference in my perception of how good a drama is and in my enjoyment and I agree that how a character is written can affect the ultimate delivery of that character. So many ingredients go into make a successful character.

I find it weird that I pay more attention to acting in kdramas than in US dramas evne though every country has their share of bad/limited actors.

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Hyeri's acting was not the only reason Two Cops lost its audience, but still, IMHO Hyeri should stop taking lead roles and focus on improving her acting, maybe taking supporting roles could help her. There are many problems with her acting. I would say Suzy is a decent actress, but Hyeri is far from one. Hyeri's acting and Go Ara's acting are just as bad.

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I watched Black because of the plot. Tried so hard to let go of Go Ara’s acting, or lack thereof. No matter their reputation, I still give every new project a chance. Who knows they might have stumbled a project that finally suit them.

But Go Ara is the main lead and all I see is her sour expression with pursed lips and wrinkled forehead, the same exact thing in her previous projects. Stopped watching it, but followed the recaps because I wanted to know how the story unfolds.

If you see the same thing from the same actor in every project, there’s only so much we could do to justify their shortcomings.

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Hyeri’s character popped out of nowhere just so they can say the lead has a love interest. Sloppy and lazy writing. Hyeri’s portrayal made it even more unbearable. Conflicts were interesting but they decided to drag it. Hope these actors get better projects with better production/writing team next time.

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I think this is unfair. Her character was so badly written. She was one thirds damsel, one thirds love interest, one thirds bromance complication. She completely disappeared when they decided they didn't need her then popped up randomly when they did. It's a thankless task to any actor. I think she did fine with the material she had, which was pretty terrible.

If I'm going to judge her acting, it'll be in a part that's decently written. She was nothing but a plot device in this and a poorly-used one.

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I think part of the Hyeri curse is the production’s agenda of using an idol actor’s popularity to promote the drama. With her limited ability to act, she will be always be judged early on so I understand the anticipation of seeing some improvements in skills. The poor writing of her character is not doing her any favor, thus, the Hyeri curse continued.

Too sad because director and writer could have executed this drama better. They had a promising start. Despite Ji-an’s poorly written character, coupled with Hyeri’s lacking portrayal, I was willing to overlook it. But the following episodes were disappointing.

I realize the drama is not doing well, with dismal ratings and limited comments in recaps. Wishing them better luck next time.

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Thank you for recapping and your final summation of TWO COPS, LollyPip! Your clarifications have been most helpful, and enabled me to really enjoy this drama.

There were still plenty of twists during the final episode. I agree with you about Choi Il-hwa's performance. He totally fooled me as to the true nature of Chief Prosecutor Tak. Who could guess that dear old dad is so warped? The guy is a walking, talking case of malice aforethought.

I had figured that Dong-tak would try to give Su-chang his body, but hadn't anticipated the latter's reaction when he realized what Dong-tak had done -- or what would happen to him as a result. Thanks for spelling that out, Ms. Bong. After all the times he'd taken over the detective's body against his will, this was a great turnabout.

That fade to white when Su-chang flatlined confused the heck out of me. At first I thought that they'd both somehow croaked and gone to the afterlife, although I couldn't come up with a good reason for Dong-tak to die. The fact that Su-chang was pretending not to recognize anyone later added to my confusion. Har! The trickster never quits. I felt bad for Go Bongs. On the other hand, Sung-hyun hasn't given up on her. I think it was all part of Su-chang's plan to ensure that she ended up with someone better than himself.

I didn't realize that the little boy Chief Prosecutor Tak hugged at the elementary school was Hang-joon's son. Yuck!

Although it's poetic justice that Jae-hee investigates his father in preparation for charging him with murder and other crimes, in real life I'm sure he would have had to recuse himself.

As our heroes head off to the precinct following their visit with Hang-joon, Dong-tak tells Su-chang that the key for the handcuffs is back at the office. This is a reprise of their meeting when they were surrounded by bikers and had to jump off the bridge.

I agree that Su-chang is a tragic character. He got a truly raw deal, yet somehow remained optimistic. In many ways he's very much like the falsely accused Jong-sam in DOUBTFUL VICTORY, who passed the exam for the police academy but was framed for murder -- and had no one to go to bat for him. Doo-shik and Soo-ah are also quite tragic. If only they'd met honorable adults who could have been good mentors and role models.

All in all, I've enjoyed TWO COPS. It was moribund in the middle, but eventually got its mojo back. It has truly been a blast to watch Jo Jung-seok transform himself into Su-chang -- especially with the accompanying sound effects. But it was Kim Sun-ho who snuck in and stole the show when I wasn't looking. Like you, LollyPip, I'd like to be able to see the unlikely pair of allies who have truly turned into Two Cops in their future endeavors. I'll imagine Su-chang passing the police exam with flying colors. ;-)

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I did watch all the episodes, and the finale redeemed the show a bit, but it was still very disjointed. I am not sure why Soo Chang forgave Dong Tak, and how he survived his death experience. I also can't imagine that any judicial system would allow a son to prosecute his own father, whether it's because he would be too tough or too lenient on him, it would definitely be a conflict of interest. It does seem to happen a lot in Korean dramas though, where prosecutors tend to end up grilling people they knew from the past or even had a relationship.

To me, the only thing that wasn't very unconvincing was the exoneration of Ji An's father. Otherwise, I think they seemed to let Soo A off easily, and Jae Hee's guilt in the car accident seems to be glossed over as well. You don't think Chairman Jo will bring this up when he also got busted as well? And Detective Park sort of got screwed as well. Sure he apparently has a new job but still, he was tricked.

Anyway, while I enjoyed parts of the show, I probably wouldn't recommend it to anyone except for really hardcore JJS fans.

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Ji An's father wasn't corrupt! Except, he was. He just changed his mind about his corruption. Soo A was a victim but also a cold-blooded murderer. It was Jae He's decision to drive recklessly, regardless of who called him chicken, and so the accident was his fault. Also, he covered up his father's crimes even when he knew they included corruption and murder.

All these people skated on culpability while Dong Tak took full responsibility for something that was barely his fault.

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Oh dimples! Why are you so cute!
I'm satisfied with the ending, the last 4 episodes were action packed and full of twists which made an interesting and fun watch. But suchang tears in episode 31 broke my heart 😢.

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Thank you for recapping this so faithfully, Lollypip! I stopped watching it halfway through and just read the recaps. Except for the whole Dong Tak being the one to cause the accident due to recklessness, which left a bad taste, the ending sounds really good. Probably one of the more satisfying ones I've encountered in kdramas. I'm going to have to go back to watch the last few and this episode. I love how it ended on the bromance note, and I think it is implied that Dong Tak and Soo-chang have a much stronger love than Dong Tak and Ji An. Dong Tak was willing to die for Soo-chang and vice versa. I got pretty teary-eyed from just reading this recap. I think the drama should have been marketed as a bromance instead of trying to make it a hijinx-y love triangle.

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Totally agree with you. I stuck it out for the bromance.

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Thank you Lollypip for this awesome recap! I loved reading it. Two Cops also is ranked pretty high for me in "entertainment and storytelling value." Its so refreshing to focus on the wonderful parts of the drama and truly enjoy them rather than picking apart the weaker parts.

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This drama was pretty disapointing. I watched until the end only for JJS who was great as usual.

But the story was weird. There is a very big accident and the both teenagers don't remember. Dong Tak helped the son when he was young and then in the present but he doesn't remember that he was guilty... The father of Hyery wasn't very clear, once he was good the other time he was bad...
The character of Su-chang was boring in the middle of the drama, his actions looked more like the actions of angry teenager than a guy who will die in 49 days.
The character of Hyeri was pretty useless and the fact that was Hyeri didn't help. Her voice ton sounds cute and not natural, so it was very hard to take her in serious.

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The plot is full of holes and it was weird how both Jae Hee and Dong Tak didn't remember their roles in the accident at first..I kept waiting for the story to get better and by the time we got halfway through i decided to just stick it out for JJS.

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Two Cops definitely saved the best for last!
Absolutely loved the bromance between Dong Tak & Soo Chang and i also really enjoyed how the Avengers and cop team worked together. I'm happy Jae Hee didn't go over to the dark side but i'm really bummed (despite being fully aware that Hyeri's character is sadly underdeveloped and the romance much to be desired) that we didn't even get a final kiss scene. Boo..

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So Prosecutor Tak managed to slide through without taking any responsibility for his own actions, even turning a blind eye to his father's crimes until he had no choice but to act?

While Cha Dong Tak was forced to willingly sacrifice himself to atone for that time he called somebody chicken?

Wow this show sucked.

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I'm sorely disappointed with how finale week went down. For the most part, I've been able to enjoy this show and ignore the writing flaws for Jo Jung Seok's magic and the hilarious bickering between Dong Tak and Soo Chang. And even if the plot got weak in the middle, at least it still mostly made sense. But then they completely threw that out the window this last week just to be able to say they pulled one on us. I HATE when the writer(s) insert something game-changing at the very end for which there's absolutely no supporting evidence of at earlier points. You're really gonna have us believe that Dong Tak was investigating Soo Chang's father's 5-car accident - not exactly common - this entire show without ever remembering that he'd been partially responsible for one in the past? Amnesia's always so convenient. And then Dong Tak doesn't have to take any kind of responsibility now???

Where even was Ji An? That's the thought I had when we were almost through the second-to-last hour, and she hadn't shown up. Even though the touch of romance was sweet, I honestly think the show could've been written without her character and still have been pretty much the same. She never felt essential and became an afterthought that needed to be kept in the dark for her own protection. Because, of course. Ugh. The part of the mystery that involved her father's murder could've been omitted too.

I like that they're just gonna casually hand-wave how Soo Chang ended up living... There was so much happening that I almost forgot to question that, and maybe that's what they were hoping for, lol.

The finale was all very rushed, and I felt like they were bringing up all these issues just so there would be resolution. It didn't even feel like the finale until the last half hour. It was frustrating that they didn't truly delve into anything - Dong Tak's guilt for causing the accident, Jae Hee's dilemma in prosecuting his own father for the crimes that were done to protect him, how Soo Ah came to terms with her realization that she'd been raised to be a killing machine, etc. If they'd just written the show more evenly and developed these issues during the weeks where nothing happened, it would've gone down better.

For what it's worth, JJS and Kim Sun Ho together were gold.

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Thank you for the recap! Great to hear that you like the drama.. For me, being JJS fans made me stay with the drama. I agree that the few last episodes gave more power to the drama. It lost its way in the middle. Overall, I would say the drama is very average. JJS is always great, never got bored to watch him. But I won’t do a second watch of this drama. Kim Soen Ho is also good in here. Hyeri is better here than in Entertainer.

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This drama is really just so-so. Too bad really, with such 2 wonderful actors. The only thing that made me able to watch it 'till the end was JJS & Kim Sun-ho. Hope they'll both got dramas with better stories and writing next time. Now I just want to re-watch Jealousy Incarnate again lol 😄

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Loved this show from start to finish and especially the characters and their closeness💛the writers and director made a great ending

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Glad it atleast finished strong. I had to stop watching midway because I couldnt do it anymore. I came here for Jo Jung Suk and wanting to see some bromance, but all I got is a no plot and annoying romance. not even Jo Jung Suk was able to save this for me. :(

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