Rating:
Average user rating 4.2
52

Angel’s Last Mission: Love: Episodes 17-18

Our ballerina and her angel have been through more than enough storms in their lifetime — storms that have led to a lot of loss and suffering. This time, they’re not sure if they can hold out until the rain stops, until they can find their rainbow. But they found it once before, so there must be some way for them to find it again.

 
EPISODES 17-18 RECAP

After Yeon-seo’s heartbroken portrayal of Giselle, Kang-woo takes her aside and asks why she’s still letting thoughts of Dan distract her. Frustrated, he admits that he’d once lost someone and gone crazy over it too, so her emotions are nothing special.
In that case, Yeon-seo replies, he must know this as well: “I may get angry and resent him, but in the end, I just really miss him. And that’s why I’m sad.”

Kang-woo yells that sadness is useless and that if Giselle and Albrecht truly loved each other, they both would’ve died. Something clicks, and Yeon-seo guesses that Kang-woo’s anger has to do with that friend he has at the Buddhist temple. He dismisses this and warns her not to disappoint him again.

At home, Yeon-seo tries calling Dan’s number, only to realize his phone was left in his room. She goes through his missed calls — all from her — and sees that her number is named “Noisy Gong,” his nickname for her. That night, she dreams of being in a field of yellow flowers and seeing her childhood friend (the younger Dan).

Later, Chief Jung finds Yeon-seo cleaning her practice room, unable to sleep. Yeon-seo admits that she dreamt of her childhood, making Jung suggest she go to “that place” to get some fresh air. So, the next day, Yeon-seo goes to the island, telling Kang-woo over the phone that she needs a day off.

He wants to speak in person, but she merely asks him to reconsider the “Giselle” ending and hangs up. He turns back for Fantasia but is blocked by the eccentric Elena. He has no idea who she is, though, and is confused as she randomly twirls around and notes that he’s more indecisive than she thought.

Yeon-seo turns away from the ocean and finds herself face-to-face with none other than Dan. She asks why he’s here, and overwhelmed from his recent revelation, he starts rambling that he came looking for answers and that those answers turned out to be painful.

She doesn’t understand what he’s saying, so she tells him to do whatever he has to do, just as she will. She walks away, telling him not to follow. And she’s slightly annoyed that he listens to her, hee.

At the nearby homestay, Yeon-seo asks one of the natives about the boy who lived in the house with the blue gate, explaining that they were friends. The native asks for more details, so she starts at the very beginning, on the day they met. She’d gone out to enjoy the rain and she’d seen little Sung-woo standing on a cliff.

Dan stands on that cliff now, narrating, “I thought it’d be better if I died. At the mere age of twelve.” He then heard someone say to be careful and turned to see Yeon-seo. She saved him from falling and, afterwards, the two became great friends.

The native and her friends stop Yeon-seo’s story, asking how she’s so confident that this Sung-woo will remember her after hanging out for only a couple of days. She brings up the most important day, when she was told she had to go away to Russia for ballet.

She’d run off to a flower field to cry, scared to leave her parents and her first friend behind. Sung-woo had found her there and held her until she was all cried out. It was then that she decided to dance and show him a rainbow, since he’d never seen one before.

Dan goes to the stage on the beach where he teared up and told Yeon-seo that she danced beautifully. As he sees the memory of them hugging, he narrates, “After meeting you, I wanted to live for the first time in my life. You were so beautiful that it made me want to see more beautiful things in life.” My. Heaaaart.

Yeon-seo tells the natives that she really wants to meet Sung-woo again. However, her face goes pale when one of the natives points out that Sung-woo was the boy who died all those years ago. His father had been abusive, so he jumped into the ocean one day. And when the police came to arrest the father, he was already gone.

Yeon-seo refuses to believe any of this, but as she wanders off, she remembers the bruises all over Sung-woo’s body and his excuses that he’d fallen. She falls to the ground in tears, ashamed that she never knew.

Dan stands on the cliff again, remembering the rainy day when his father had chased him outside. He hid behind the rocks, clinging onto the edge, until his father finally gave up and walked away.

He’d tried to hang on, but the rocks had been so slippery from the rain that he lost his hold and fell into the water.

The memory of drowning is too much for Dan — he clutches his head and yells out, falling to his knees. He and Yeon-seo cry in their respective spots on the island, mourning the loss of Yoo Sung-woo.

Meanwhile, back at Fantasia, Mr. Park (now a mole for Chief Jung) gives Director Choi a list of the dancers’ financial situations. He asks if she’ll be bribing them for votes on the “Giselle” auditions, which she laughs off.

She offers to send him abroad to visit his children, and he fearfully asks if she plans to quietly rid of him like she did to someone named Moon Ji-woong. He tells her to stop threatening him and runs out, to Choi’s confusion.

Still in a state of disbelief, Yeon-seo finds the flower field where she and Sung-woo used to play. She asks aloud why Sung-woo isn’t here and crouches down in a ball. She hears Sung-woo’s voice ask, “What are you doing here?” and turns to see Dan.

Dan helps her stand, and she shakily says that her friend died. She hated him for never writing back, and after a while, she just forgot him. She cries that she missed all the obvious signs of his abuse, but both Dan and the young Sung-woo assure her that it wasn’t her fault. Still, she can’t believe that someone who’d been so determined to grow up had died like that. She breaks into sobs, and Dan/Sung-woo silently embraces her.

The two head back to the pier, with Yeon-seo holding a small bouquet of yellow flowers. She admits that just thinking of what Sung-woo’s final thoughts must’ve been drives her crazy. To that, Dan says that Sung-woo probably thought of her. He’s sure that Sung-woo would be thankful that she’s the only one who remembers him.

The tearful Yeon-seo tosses the bouquet in the water and says, “I’m sorry I’m late, Sung-woo.” She then tells Dan to pray to his deity and ask why He would give such a horrible life to a child. Dan mutters, almost to himself, that he’d like to know why He was so harsh too.

Sometime later, we see Kang-woo arrive on the island, determined to find Yeon-seo. Dude, you are the definition of going too far.

Dan turns to Yeon-seo and apologizes for everything — for hurting her before and even now. She interprets that into him wanting to leave again, saying that everyone from her parents to her only friend left her. For her, it’s felt like she was abandoned in an endless desert. “So,” she begs, “can’t you stay by my side?”

Dan just smiles and reminds her of the three wishes she promised to grant him; he’ll be using his second wish now. He says that he’ll come back, but he has to figure out a few things first. He holds out his handkerchief and continues that his wish is for her to take care of herself in the meantime.

“You can do it, right?” he asks. She looks at him with pleading eyes and shakes her head. He gives her the handkerchief anyway, holding her hand in his before walking away. And behind them, Kang-woo is watching the whole thing.

Once Dan is gone, Kang-woo marches up to Yeon-seo and pulls her into a hug, telling her to forget “that jerk.” She wriggles free and slaps him (thank you), but he continues that she shouldn’t depend on someone like Dan. So he tells her to lean on him, since he won’t run away or disappear.

Yeon-seo steps back, wanting to make something clear: she appreciates all his help as her director, but he’s crossing the line in trying to mess with her feelings. Kang-woo apologizes for startling her but doesn’t promise that something like this won’t happen again.

That evening, Kang-woo drops Yeon-seo off at home and then stops by the Buddhist temple where Seol-hee’s ashes are kept. He takes off his ring and places it next to her urn, admitting that he feels like the average human these days.

Back on the island, Dan steps to the edge of the cliff and looks up to the sky, wondering if this is the deity’s answer to his prayer. He then jumps into the water and lets himself sink. Why was he even born, he thinks. Why did the deity let him remember everything? Though it may not be an answer, he does see a stream of light.

The next morning, before leaving, Yeon-seo ties Dan’s handkerchief around her purse strap. She also tells Chief Jung that Dan will be returning — though she doesn’t know when — so she doesn’t want a new secretary.

When Yeon-seo gets to Fantasia, Nina pulls her aside to address some rumors. Nina doesn’t like the fact that Yeon-seo is skipping practice and meeting up with their director, but Yeon-seo flatly says that it’s not like that.

Yeon-seo then asks if Nina likes Kang-woo, and though Nina denies this, Yeon-seo can see that she does. Kang-woo then appears to see what’s going on, and he’s displeased to see the handkerchief on Yeon-seo’s purse.

Kang-woo reminds Yeon-seo that he won’t be able to keep the promise she asked of him, and she calmly tells him to stay professional. The three of them head to practice, with Nina staring at Kang-woo and Kang-woo staring at Yeon-seo.

After practice, Nina’s dad takes Nina out to cheer her up a bit. He advises her to cool it with her feud with Yeon-seo, saying she’s pitiful, but Nina doesn’t think so — not when God gave her all the beauty, wealth, and talent.

None of that matters, Dad points out, since she lost her parents so early. He asks her to take care of Yeon-seo, but Nina wants to see this competition through. Dad sighs, wishing his daughters would just stay kind-hearted.

Speaking of which, Luna is busy not being kind-hearted; she’s carrying out her mom’s orders by bribing the dancers.

Yeon-seo, still thinking of Dan, sits Chief Jung down and asks — for a friend — what it means when a guy tells you to wait for them. “He’s running away,” Jung says matter-of-factly. She tells Yeon-seo to give up on this guy, knowing very well she wasn’t asking for a friend, and an upset Yeon-seo stands to leave.

Yeon-seo wonders what Dan could be doing, and we see that he’s currently navigating his way through a hospital, an ominous storm rumbling outside. He finds a room labeled “Yoo Jong-chul,” remembering that very name on the gate of his childhood home, and hesitantly walks in.

He sees the ill man in bed, and his face matches that of the man who used to beat him. His father opens his eyes, terrified to see him, especially as he starts demanding why he treated him so poorly. “I was your son,” Dan says through angry tears. “I was only twelve years old.”

Dad weakly grips Dan’s hand, struggling to speak. “I’m sorry,” Dad rasps out. “I did wrong.” Dan jumps back as Dad repeats himself over and over, as if he’d been waiting to say those words. Dan begs for him to stop and runs out, and with one last “I’m sorry,” Dad flatlines.

Dan hurries past the doctors and comes face-to-face with Hoo. He tells Hoo that he’s still angry even after Dad’s apology, and Hoo explains that humans are often like that — they do bad things, then they regret and atone for their sins. Dad did just that by donating all of his money to benefit children.

Hoo reveals that Dad even saved a child once, but Dan expresses that he has no forgiveness in his heart. He still doesn’t understand why the deity let him remember everything, and he’s not at all satisfied when Hoo says that they’re often blind to the deity’s obvious answers.

From now on, Dan plans to search for his own answers. Hoo starts to say, “You’re not, by any chance…” but Dan interrupts by thanking him for looking after him. He then turns and leaves the hospital.

Dan goes to drown his sorrows in the neighborhood bar, where Kang-woo appears and confronts him once and for all, addressing him as “Angel Dan.” He pushes Dan’s sleeve up, revealing that the healed wounds gave him away.

Kang-woo warns Dan to stay away from Yeon-seo if he doesn’t want his terrifying identity revealed. He plans to keep Dan’s promise of making Yeon-seo happy, so he tells Dan not to worry and to get lost. He gets up, leaving Dan completely speechless.

The next day, Mr. Park informs Chief Jung over the phone that he recorded his conversation with Choi about the bribes. Before he can explain further, someone snatches his phone — Uncle Kim.

Kim gets on his knees and begs Park to withhold information until Nina’s big break. After “Giselle,” he swears that he’ll go to the police and accept the punishment himself. Park, now conflicted, doesn’t know how to answer.

Chief Jung continues her investigation by meeting up with a masked man. “You were on the lighting team three years ago, right?” Jung asks. “Mr. Moon Ji-woong?” Mr. Moon takes off his mask, ready to talk.

Dan is starting his own investigation on Kang-woo by sneaking into his apartment. Though, he needs a little help from an annoyed Hoo (disguised as Kang-woo) to get past the lobby’s guard.

Once inside, Dan opens Kang-woo’s laptop and sees that the background picture is… Yeon-seo? No, Dan realizes — it’s someone else. He watches the home videos of Seol-hee on the TV until Kang-woo finally comes home.

Dan faces Kang-woo and admits that he thought Kang-woo was Yeon-seo’s destiny. Finding Yeon-seo love was his last mission before returning to heaven. Kang-woo says that his mission is complete then, but Dan firmly states that he’s no longer needed. In fact, he thinks it’s Kang-woo who should back off from Yeon-seo.

Kang-woo smirks and asks if Dan wants to become Yeon-seo’s destiny now. “That’s none of your business,” Dan says. “Whether I turn into dust or disappear, that’s for me to deal with.” Kang-woo steps forward and snaps that Dan better hope he disappears, because the alternative punishment would be worse than he can imagine.

Night falls, and Yeon-seo sits out in her courtyard, plucking rose petals and playing the “He will come, he won’t come” game. After several roses giving her the “He won’t come” answer, she curses and throws them to the ground. And that’s when she sees Dan standing in front of her. Omo, he really came.

He apologizes for coming late, and she shakes her head, just happy that he’s here and, hopefully, done with whatever he had to figure out. She tells him not to leave again, nor get sick or die in her presence, and he wordlessly nods.

She stubbornly holds out her pinky, wanting an official promise. He steps closer, but instead of locking pinkies, he cups her face and looks deep into her eyes. “I love you,” he confesses. “I love you, Lee Yeon-seo.”

He smiles at her surprised expression and then pulls her in for a kiss, which she happily reciprocates.

   
COMMENTS

Yay, he told her he loves her! But oh no, he told her he loves her… I’m glad he did (finally some needed relief for our heroine), but that just means he’s accepted a potentially dangerous path. They’re really gonna do this. He may not have outright promised to stay by her side, but I think his saying he loves her is a promise that he’ll try. I’ve believed from day one that these two could make their love work, but I do hope that Dan reveals who and what he is soon. Or that she at least finds out. Because if something happens to him and she finds out later, how awful would that be? Both Dan and Kang-woo have mentioned how scary it would be for a human to see an angel, but would Yeon-seo really be that scared? She could react in a number of different ways, but something tells me that fear won’t be a factor.

Now, over halfway through the series, was the perfect time to reveal the entire childhood backstory, because I was starting to get impatient. Having Yeon-seo recount her memories and then Dan actually re-enact them was so great that the first half of the episode flew by for me. And then the sadness that enveloped both characters as they realized that Sung-woo was dead and had been for a long time — what a blow. It’s easy to understand why Dan would refuse to forgive his father, but it still surprised me a little bit. It felt like a truly human moment for him. (Also, did Dad actually die? That was somewhat unclear.) What really surprised me this episode, though, was Yeon-seo. Even after everything she has been through, even after all the times Dan has hurt her and walked away, she still trusted him enough to wait. I love this childlike innocence of hers; it urges her to trust in what she sees in Dan and not in what others — Dan included — says about him.

It was nice to see our couple stand up to Kang-woo in their own ways, but one thing he said does bother me. He told Dan that he could suffer a punishment worse than disappearing, referring to the way he lost Seol-hee. But… what does this mean? Does he believe that the black and white angels intentionally killed Seol-hee? Does he believe the same could happen to Yeon-seo? Their deity couldn’t possibly be that cruel, right? To kill an innocent human over an angel’s mistake? Though Dan’s faith is wavering, I doubt even he would believe that. Behind all his anger and frustration, Dan still has a sliver of hope that the deity pushed him and Yeon-seo together for a reason.

I want to put our main trio aside for a moment to discuss the other characters. I’ve appreciated Nina as a second female lead all this time, as well as her desire to shed her nice persona. Even so, I don’t want her to forget who she is, or forget that she’s Yeon-seo’s family. I wish she could find some kind of balance to Kang-woo’s initial advice, but it seems like she wants to go all the way to secure his heart. And unfortunately, unbeknownst to her, his heart is unattainable. I wouldn’t say she’s disappointed me, but she’s very close to doing so. Her dad, on the other hand… He needs a good talking to. If he cares so much about Yeon-seo, why would he withhold harmful information? And for a freaking ballet performance? He’s a sweet dad, but Nina would not appreciate him doing this for her sake.

Ever since the boat episode, I can’t help but compare Angel’s Last Mission: Love to You From Another Star, which is not at all a negative. Both dramas have supernatural heroes with unlikable yet, at the same time, lovable heroines. Both romances have all odds against them, and the fact that the couples could be torn apart so easily is truly scary. One issue I had with YFAS, though, was how everything was tied up. Certain things happened, and certain things weren’t explained, which bothered some people and, yeah, didn’t so much bother others. I’m seeing signs of the writer doing that here, and that worries me. She has a lot of questions set up and if she leaves most of them unanswered? I will not be happy. I like that we’re seeing Dan’s faith tested, and I like that we’re seeing him bend the rules a bit, so I’d also like him get some of the answers he’s been looking for. I don’t want some “He works in mysterious ways” spiel by the end of this.

This episode had the best ending we had in a while, not just because it had a kiss (you best believe I squealed), but because it was a sweet, vulnerable moment for our couple. I was getting nervous after Dan’s encounter with Kang-woo in his apartment, so to have Dan come home to a waiting Yeon-seo — phew, the relief! I can feel the tension building more and more with the people around them, but when it’s just those two in their own world, that’s where the magic happens. I can’t wait for the cute dating hijinks because, man, have we earned them.

RELATED POSTS

  

Tags: , , , ,

52

Required fields are marked *

This was a truly well rounded episode emotionally. The childhood story was really tragic and Yeon Seo's realization that Seung Woo died was truly heartbreaking. They both did so well in those emotional scenes that I had tears for most of the episode.

I half thought Dan was just going to confess that he was her childhood friend and went with that direction (to give a credible cover to his true identity) before revealing the truth. But kind of glad he didn't.

The kiss scene was unexpected but really well timed. I was marvelling at L's chiseled jawline! 😉

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i really like how the leads are both honest with each other in the sense that they don’t make promises they know they can’t keep. i found dan’s refusal to accept / ignoring of the pinky promise as well as yeonseo’s little head shake when he asked her if she could wait for him particularly poignant, and the the cinematography / directing / writing really brought that out.

7
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Their honesty is really refreshing. Yeonseo used to lash out at people and then cry alone, so its nice to have her be so open with her feelings now.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I actually don't like Ni Na, I find her incredibly annoying and whiny. I do like her former teacher though, that woman is a kook. As for Shin Hye Sun, I am just in awe of her talent.

4
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ni-na was alright at first, but she is getting on my last nerve now. That girl needs to learn how to deal with failure. Rather than whining about how unfair it all is, learn from the experience and grow.

In the words of Aaliyah, "If at first you don't succeed, dust yourself off and try again."

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

after watching these episodes ive realized that everything bad that is happening to yeon so is because of ni na. Ni na family is going to lengths for her..

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

i wonder how Nina would react if she found everything out. Maybe that would be somewhat of a wakeup call for her.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't care for the side stories, Nina, the evil family and the always disappearing evidence anywhere near as much as I love the main story.

It was a very emotional episode and you could feel his anger and sadness. Probably some of the better acting he has done in this series.

7
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that L definitely stepped it up a notch or ten in these episodes.

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really liked the way the childhood backstory was handled. Having them rediscover and come to terms with the past simultaneously, but each having room to grieve in their own way was a nice touch. The past affected Dan and Yeon-seo strongly but differently, and I'm glad we got to see them both deal with the emotional impact of Sung-woo's life and death.

Ok, Kang-woo is making me angry now. He was previously annoying, but now he's becoming insufferable. His disrespect toward Yeon-seo is unacceptable. She has repeatedly told him to back off, but he acts like she's his property. He treats her like a child who doesn't know what she needs, while he oh-so-kindly tells her 🙄. He needs to go.

13
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree, he is way past the point of acceptable behavior. It makes me so happy when Yeon-soo Very firmly outlines the boundaries she expects him to abide by. So often in shows women are made uncomfortable in situations similar to this, but never clearly say stop I am uncomfortable which sadly is kind of realistic since alot of times girls are brought to expect and accept behavior they shouldn't, so it is so nice to see her calling him on his ridiculous expectations and behaviors.

2
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

You're right. Yeon-seo is assertive and always stands up for herself, which is one of my favorite things about her.

3
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

She is overall one of my favorite female characters. Alot of times when zI look back on shoes I've watched I often only remember the make leads clearly. Partly for aesthetic(heh) reasons but alot of it is the writing .

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

*male

0

Same. There are only a handful of female leads I've found memorable from beginning to end, and Yeon-seo is falling in that category for me.

1

She conveys more emotion with her eyebrows than most can with their whole body.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Haha very true. One of my favorite actresses right now.

1

Oh my goodness. If there ends up being a wormhole in the last episode... actually that might not be bad.

I'm glad Dan found out Kangwoo's past and won't be pushing Yeonseo in that direction anymore. Kangwoo is just bad news all around.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap!

Listen up, Kang Woo, nobody wants you here! I mean, Nina does, and that's fine and all, but the massive sigh I gave upon seeing him on that island... the lady can't say it any clearer than by whacking you.

I surprised myself by feeling very proud of L (a handsome famous adult male I'm not acquainted with) but he's doing so well with the slight angelic detachment wobbling but not collapsing as he talked about his own fate. Most especially when he was assuring her, voice catching, that he's sure he thought of her when he was dying. And the fact he's always at his best when reacting to Shin Hye Sun shows she's a generous as well as good performer--she lifts other actors closer to her level. (Is he at her level? No, but I really don't think any actors I've seen her paired with have been, and I've liked several of her other pairings! She's just reeeeeally good.)

What really struck me here was the potential ineffable plan. On one hand, I'm with Angel Dan--screw the guy who drove his own kid to death, his expiation didn't help Dan. But would kind Dan trade his life to save a kid? Yes, I'm sure he would. The idea that his father was granted the unthinkable grace of making a miraculous apology is both horrifying and appealing. And all kid-Dan wanted was to somehow find himself grown up at Yeon Seo's side, able to protect and love her, and the poor dead kid's wish (and I do feel bad for him of course, though neither kid ever convinces me as being even vaguely like Yeon Seo or Dan) was granted, in the same weird and wonderful way Dan's father's wish was granted. Dan's human life was still a cruel travesty, and yet... is it all God's plan in the end, with many horrors redeemed by the destination?

11
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think you are onto something here. The deity's plan seems to have been granting Sung Woo's wish by fast forwarding him into an adult and skipping more painful years by his father's side and at the same time punishing his father (though I find it unrealistic for someone so systematically abusive to repent by the death of his child, especially when he runs away from legal punishment).

I wondered whether the kid his father saved would turn out to be Yeon Seo and that's how Dan will forgive his father (and they may go there yet).

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Was this God's plan from the beginning- no. Because people have free will God's will is frequently thwarted. The better way to think of it is to realize that God is constantly having to make new plans. Which may be part of the point to this drama.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

neither kid ever convinces me as being even vaguely like Yeon Seo or Dan

I think the boy playing Sung Woo could play Lee Dong Gun's youth. They have the same eyes. He looks nothing like L, that's for sure.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Unthinkable grace, indeed! This is to me one of the most important tenets of Christian faith. The writer is doing a hotch potch of religious beliefs because the subject of karma was also touched upon and that is incompatible with grace.

I kind of like the questions thrown up in the drama and also by viewers, I just doubt the writer can answer them satisfactorily, much less be faithful to the theology which she borrows from.

Why did God let an innocent child like Dan die and his father live? Worse, the father never serve time and got a shot at redemption. Why did God send Sung Woo/Dan to Yeon Seo but deny them the chance to love each other? Isn't the mission love and isn't God love?

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

The oldest book in the bible is actually the book of JOB. Which squarely faces the very question that you ask- Why does God let these things happen? The answer is actually quite simple- it is not because He wants them to happen but because people have the freedom to do bad things. This is the price that God pays for creating people with free will: Even God doesn't get a free lunch. This is why it is such an important thing to help others who are poor or are suffering: When, in the parable of the sheep and the goats Jesus says "even as you did this to others you did this to me" he meant it literally- these acts of charity are a way in which we help to redress the inevitable suffering which has resulted from the bad choices and bad situations that are the result of free will. When we reach out and help others we are also helping God by relieving the suffering.

You are right that the idea of karma is incompatible with idea of grace- as we saw with the story of Dan's father. And I will respectfully disagree with you that the father had to be locked up to find redemption. If you listened to Hoo's description of his father's life you will realize that, instead of being locked up for a decade or less Dan's father effectively locked himself up for the rest of his life- and saved his country a great deal of money as a result. Incarceration is quite costly- in the US the cost is at least $25K per year per inmate. And by devoting himself to raising money to help the abused he was acting to redress the situation for others- something he could not have done if he were in prison. Hoo tells us that the reason he is dying much sooner is because he neglected himself in order to do these things- so this was no mere minor effort. Jesus made it clear that even the worst sinner could be saved- and that is exactly what we see happen with this story.

As for your last question: Why send Dan to Yeon-seol but deny them the chance to love each other? Very good question. I too am waiting to see the answer which the writer will choose to give us. Because your first observation about muddled theology is right on- so who knows what will happen in the end? If the answer is a Christian one than we will see Dan being 'cast out' of the ranks of the angels and 'condemned' to live as a man with Yeon-seo. If the answer is a non-Christian one then we will see something else.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I didn't mean Dan's father had to be locked up to get redemption. Jail time is the world's justice system. Many would think even serving time cannot redeem what he has done to Dan. The next question people would ask is - by repenting , does it give him a ticket to redemption? It would appear unfair. The idea of unmerited favor(grace) is simple yet difficult to comprehend and accept. Earning one's way to heaven is a lot easier to understand and rationalize.

The last question - there's no way to answer this with Christian theology because this premise wouldn't even happen in the first place. Angels are created before humans. Humans don't become angels when they die and Angels don't become humans through whatever action they take.
The Christian answer to Dan wouldn't sit well with viewers. For disobedience, Dan would be cast down to earth to join the devil and his legions, not live as a human. For drama sake, we can't possibly use theology in this instance. So, the answer to the question would be a non-Christian one and for that, we cannot use God to reason it out.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that the 'theology' in this story does not square with any formal Christian theology. There is a fair measure of artistic license going on here.
You could have made the same complaint about the distorted Buddhist/traditional religion theology in GOBLIN- but that did not make it a bad drama.

1

I don’t like the love triangle and I don’t believe Kang Woo wants Yeon Seo for herself but due to her resemblance to his ex-lover. I also don't like the direction Nina and her dad are going. Your love of your daughter cannot be an excuse for cheating others of what they deserve.

1
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

He is so deluded, taking off his ring because he's sure that he's destined to be with YS now. No matter how she slaps him down, he's sure because that's what he decided. Who cares how she feels? (Did you notice that he keeps saying, "You don't know what I'm feeling right now?" Get a clue, buddy, she doesn't want to know.)

I can't help thinking that the woman who died for him is going to come back and cause his death finally somehow. Isn't that a Giselle theme?

4
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

The Willis were the spirits of women betrayed, but he didn't betray his girlfriend. Ni-na might, if she says anything around her crazy sister, she's already threatened him(the sister)

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Isn't he betraying her now? Taking off his ring and imagining that he's in love with YS?

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

True, he is such an idiot. He doesn't LISTEN. Yeon- soo has been more than clear. Ugh

2

Oh wow I didn't think about that. But now taking off his ring does look like a betrayal. Regardless, I think Seolhee would be disappointed to see how Kangwoo has been acting all this time..

0

In Giselle the Willis want Giselle to destroy the man she loved but instead she saves him.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

It would be great if Seol-hee would come and save him -- save him by taking him away before he does any more harm.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

While it would be a betrayal to forget the woman who died for you I think saving Kang Woo is more fitting than revenge for the character of Seol Hee we have seen so far.

1

That would be a cool way to bring Seolhee back. If she could talk to him now, she could probably snap him out of it. she seemed like such a lovely and mature soul.

0

I like this episode. Not too much of the evil duo. Nina should start to grow up because she's tiring now.

I don't understand how Kang Woo can think is a better choice for Yeon Seo than Dan? He's neither a human neither an angel. The most important, she chose Dan over him!

I'm curious about His plan about Kim Dan. As a child, he suffered a lot, he died and was changed in angel. Why? And now his mission is his childhood friend, it can't be a coincidence...

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The scene when Dan was remembering how he died – while Yeon-seo is just learning that her first friend had died- was riveting.

Dan finally sees where Kang-woo is coming from. This is good.

It was interesting to watch Mr. Park’s reaction when Aunt Choi Young-ja offered him a bonus and a three month vacation. And her genuine puzzlement at his response. Her truly diabolical daughter Ru-na has done much greater damage than she realized. Do Ji-won is a good actress- if you want to see her in a role that is the total opposite of Choi Young-ja go see the weekend family drama SMILE AGAIN (aka SMILE DONGHAE) where she played Anna Laker, the beautiful brain-damaged mother of the male lead.

I thought that Uncle Kim’s meeting with Mr. Park was a neat twist. But why is he saying he will turn himself in? Is he planning on taking the fall for his wife and evil daughter?

We were treated to a story of redemption when Dan visits his dying father. It turns out that his father had spent the rest of his life in penitence, atoning for what he had done. And at the very end God granted him a miraculous blessing- he was actually able to apologize to his son before he died. That Dan was not able to forgive him is irrelevant- the fact that he was able to make that apology was what really mattered. It is God's forgiveness which truly matters- and the fact that Dan was brought to his father's deathbed for that apology shows us that his father has received the grace of God. This is the very essence of Christianity. I agree that the portrayal of Christianity has at times been less than perfect, but here the writer got it right.

That fact that Dan was not able to forgive his dad at that time also tells us something else. It tells us that Dan is steadily leaving his Angelic nature behind and becoming more human. Dan the Angel is becoming simply Dan the Man.
.
Which is why Kang-woo’s warning is wrong. Because what is worse than being dissipated? To not be dissipated and, instead, be cast out, wandering in useless despair. Kang-woo obviously thinks that the heavenly hit squad deliberately murdered Choi Seol-hee and would do the same to Yeon-seo. I doubt it. Rather to me it appears that the death of Choi Seol-hee compounded Kang-woo’s transgressions- leading to his more severe punishment (and perhaps to being used as a tool in the present mission). But Dan was originally a person, and it appears that returning him to simply being a person- and the love of Yeon-seo's life- may be the point of his mission. Just a conjecture, but we shall see.

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think the harsher punishment that Kang woo was referring to is his situation - being neither alive nor dead. His lover probably intentionally died, so that his world is basically a living hell, where he can neither live happily without his lover, nor can he die. Basically living is the worst torture for him, since it’s not ending, or at least until he met yeon-seo and maybe he thinks that he’ll want to be happy with her.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

can we take a minute and talk about L and his acting?

yes, shin hye sun was amazing but when is she not? i’m more interested in how L became amazingly believable in his role.

i’m not a fan of L or his boy band and i have never been. yes, he’s cute. yes, he looks handsome. but when it comes to acting, he was very green.

i watched this because i wanted to see shin hye sun and how my girl has come from second lead to first lead so fast. i love her and every role she portrays.

but then when L came in and acted as the ditzy angel, i was blown.

in this episode he shows love, heartbreak, loneliness and so many more emotions and all i could say is as someone who would usually swoon at handsome actors, i never expected him to capture my heart like this.

watch out for this angel who will steal your heart.

jesus, i need to take a cold shower. or two.

5
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shin Hye-sun is one of my very favorite actresses- and she has never been better than in this show. If I gush over her that is simply how I feel about her. Even as a secondary character she almost stole the show in FIVE CHILDREN. And somehow she keeps getting better- even though it would seem impossible to get any better.

Maybe it is because he has her as a living example of how to do good acting well that L is becoming noticeably better too. He is right there with her so he is able to absorb her attitudes as well as watch her technique. In the last episode he was a little flat but you are right that in this episode he has come a very long way. L will probably never be one of my favorite actors but I appreciate the fact that he is pulling his weight in this show. He has definitely learned a great deal. If he has captured your heart there is good reason for it. Just as Shin Hye-sun already had mine before this show even started.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shin Hye Sun already had my heart before this drama too. She’s one of the rare actresses one is unable to hate even as an evil villain living in a castle made of rock and thorns. But yes, L has absolutely captured me and my frail heart.

I also want to mention, like you said how L has absorbed and watched Hye Sun in her element I think that is the reason he is able to come out as a live human being (no pun intended) and not as an animation character that you would feel sorry for once and forget entirely afterwards. Have you seen the BTS scenes of them? They have chemistry on and off screen and maybe that’s why they work so well together. I mean Hye Sun can have a chemistry even with a rock but that’s an entirely different story.

L and Hye Sun have amazing chemistry together and that’s why L lights up when he’s with her. There’s a very not so subtle change in the way he acts, IMO.

Anyway, what I’m saying is, in this drama every actor/actress is good. But who comes forwards to me is Hye Sun and L.

Also I don’t think this is a popular opinion but Lee Dong Gun is wasted here, as a veteran. I don’t sympathize with his character and the absolute greed he has to have Yeon Seo to himself. He has crossed the line between professionalism and personal and not just me, but even Dan and Yeon Seo isn’t appreciating it. That whack Yeon Seo gave satisfied me immensely. I feel bad for Lee Dong Gun for being a character somebody should love to hate but he’s just being hateable. It’s not the actor, it’s the writing. I think they’re also aiming towards him being Lucifer?

Also not a popular opinion, but Hoo annoys me. He’s hot and he’s cold, he’s yes and he’s no, he’s in and he’s out, he’s up and he’s down.. what I’m saying is, as a sunbae angel, Hoo shouldn’t have this much power over Dan. Like, doesn’t the angel police keep watch over their rogue angels like they did with Kang Woo and the 80’s gangster style shoot out? So I’m not gonna be all omgicantbelieveit and say that Hoo is God (cuz that’s not believable, pfft) but I’m once again crediting it to bad writing.

Overall, I only wanted to talk about L and his acting and his undeniable chemistry with Hye Sun (if they don’t date one day I’m not Heartoppaya) but I ended up analyzing the drama.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hoo is definitely not God- and his behavior is best explained as the result of God not disclosing his plans to him. If you understand that Hoo is flying blind his behavior makes some sense. Hoo is actually always guessing about what the right thing would be for this last mission by Dan.

I agree that Lee Dong Gun is wasted in his role- he is in fact a very fine actor but trapped in a very narrow role. His character is not Lucifer either- if it was the writer could have written him far better dialogue and given him the sort of range that Lee Dong Gun is capable of.

I agree that Hye-sun and L have definite chemistry.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

L is much better this episode. I;ve been impressed as well. Been impressed with everyone, honestly, even the cartoony villains (think this is more of the writer's fault anyway).

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

A few things on this episode:

1. I absolutely loved how the alternating POVs of Dan and Yeon Seo were used to tell their backstory. Every part of it was stitched so seamlessly, adding to the overall poignancy of their shared past. That said, although I am not a big fan of the childhood connection trope (as most of you are), I really think that it works well for this show. There wouldn't be a solid explanation to support why it has to be Dan and Yeon Seo, otherwise.

2. By now, we can all agree that Shin Hye Sun is a brilliant actress who pretty much carries the weight of every scene she's in with such finesse. So can we please talk about Myungsoo for a moment? I've long been sceptical of his acting skills. He's got the looks, sure. He even has a decent singing voice for OSTs. But you can't deny that Myungsoo still has a lot of room for improvement acting-wise. However, in all fairness, I could say that what's so admirable about him is how he keeps challenging himself. Look at him take on a variety of roles and pour his heart into them to see which one works best for him. In episodes 17-18, his efforts actually paid off. I FELT his character. I felt Dan and not Myungsoo the idol-actor. I felt how he is starting to come into terms with his human emotions, how he is realising that the world can be cruel, and how unfair the deity may be. This is arguably among his best performances to date, and I commend him for that.

3. I don't think I have ever cheered so much while watching a K-Drama before. That SLAP Yeon Seo gave Kang Woo was satisfying AF. It was crisp. It was necessary. I don't mind watching it over and over again.

9
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I completely agree about the childhood connection trope. It usually drives me crazy, but here I think it actually adds to the story and is done well.

Although L is still learning, he has definitely improved. I'm always happy to see actors (or anyone, really) challenging themselves and putting the work in to improve. I think he's been doing relatively well here and hope he does even better in the future :).

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love this comment!

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You are so right about the alternating POVs of Dan and Yeon-seo when telling there backstory. I too thought it was brilliantly done.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

👏👏👏 Amen to all three points.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Dan learning about his past was HEARTBREAKING 😭 Asking the Deity why He even allowed him to be born in the first place ugh... my heart... And the scene in the sanatorium with his dad crushed me. So proud of Myungsoo and his performance in this Drama. I really admire his hard work and how he’s constantly trying to push himself to be better in everything he does. Dan is changing and I knew that would happen. He’s becoming more human. He doesn’t want to forgive his father for abusing him. I’m no angel so I’m pretty sure I’d react the same way. It’d be extremely hard to forgive someone who did those things to you as a child even if that person ended up trying to better themself and help others. I did find myself feeling a little bad for the dad at the end but I still don’t know if I’d be able to forgive him. So many complicated and mixed emotions. I just really hope Dan doesn’t turn into a fallen angel. Still waiting to see him dressed in all black and looking completely unlike himself from the teasers we got in the beginning for this Drama... I’m nervous and scared for Dan. I just want him and Yeonseo to be happy please. 🙏🙏🙏

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I want to know what the connection is between YS and KW's deceased lover. They look alike but cannot be the same person based upon the age difference. They cannot be twin sisters for the same reason. She is not YS mother because we saw a picture of her.
I do not want a writer's trick to try to explain this key plot point like it was a parallel universe, KW transference of YS image on his former lover or it was all just a dream.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

My favorite episode since episodes 9-10. I think 11-12 made the drama go downhill a bit but happy to see that things are looking up!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *