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98

One Spring Night: Episodes 31-32 (Final)

It turns out that nothing can shake the connection between our main couple, so now it’s time to accept what’s meant to be. That doesn’t mean that they have overcome every challenge, but they’re more than ready to become a family of three. Our main couple recognizes their good fortune, having someone that they cherish by their side, and their devotion promises to overcome even the most difficult obstacles.

 
EPISODE 31

Ji-ho sits in the closed pharmacy with Jung-in and explains that ever since Eun-woo was a baby, he’s had to bottle up his feelings to survive. Jung-in asks Ji-ho he ever thought of leaving Eun-woo and when he turns away, she breathes, “That’s insane.”

Ji-ho explains that on the day that he got drunk he wasn’t able to successfully suppress his feelings. Jung-in gulps down her tea and tells Ji-ho, “A verbal apology is one thing, but that can’t be all. Let’s go.”

Ji-hi sits across from Jung-in in his kitchen and does his best to explain away his drunken episode, “It was a mistake. Doesn’t that just make me human?” When Jung-in threatens to sign him up for a sober clinic, Ji-ho puts his pen to paper.

Under Jung-in’s watchful eye, Ji-ho reluctantly writes, “No drinking allowed. Engagement with Jung-in to be broken off upon violation.” Jung-in smears lipstick on Ji-ho’s thumb so that he can affix his thumbprint and then posts the pledge on his refrigerator.

During dinner, Chairman Kwon confronts Principal Lee, “So is your daughter going to marry my son or what?” Principal Lee explains that parents must respect the decisions of adult children, “That’s how I’ve treated my daughters all this time.”

Ki-seok haltingly agrees with Principal Lee, “You’re right. Marriage should be our decision.” When Ki-seok announces that he and Jung-in will marry by the year’s end, Chairman Kwon and Principal Lee hide their surprise by emptying their cups.

Over dinner at Ji-ho’s place, Jung-in admits that she always expected to get her mother’s support. Ji-ho appreciates how difficult it must have been for Jung-in’s mother to give him her approval, so he accepts that it will be harder for her father. Jung-in is touched when Ji-ho explains how he copes with her parents, “Because of you. You approve of me.”

Both dads are drunk by the time that dinner is over and Chairman Kwon again asks if their kids are ever getting married. Chairman Kwon admits that he doesn’t trust his own son or Jung-in but he’s offended when Principal Lee confesses that he doesn’t trust Ki-seok either. The men argue about the kids and the dads are about to trade blows until Ki-seok and Chairman Kwon’s driver intervene.

Ki-seok takes Principal Lee home and helps to get him into bed. He sits down with Jung-in’s mother and explains why he had dinner with his father and Principal Lee, “It’s about time we talked in detail about our wedding.”

Ki-seok tells Jung-in’s surprised mother that he has to marry Jung-in because Ji-ho isn’t “decent” enough for her. Ki-seok shares that Ji-ho came to his workplace to threaten him with the photos and concludes that Ji-ho is after money. Mom scoffs in disbelief when Ki-seok promises to guide Jung-in back to her proper place.

Ji-ho is at the pharmacy when Jung-in calls with the news that her mother asked for an official meeting. Ji-ho agrees but he asks if he can bring Eun-woo along as well. Jung-in can’t believe that she didn’t think of it herself and she readily agrees.

When Jung-in tells her friends about the meeting, Ha-rin and Young-joo are impressed by Ji-ho’s bravery. Ha-rin teases that she should buy something at the pharmacy and Jung-in playfully quips, “Don’t forget your wallet.”

Ji-ho visits his parents to discuss his meeting with Jung-in’s mother. They’re worried that Eun-woo’s presence will make Jung-in’s mother uncomfortable but they relax once they learn that Jung-in wants Eun-woo there. When Ji-ho leaves, his father praises him for being a great father and tells Ji-ho that he’s proud of him.

After leaving Principal Lee’s house, Ki-seok goes to see his father. Chairman Kwon can’t understand how Ki-seok can marry a girl who’s with another man and wonders, “Can you still love her for the rest of your life?” Ki-seok insists that staying married is all that matters.

Ki-seok blames his father for his failed relationship with Jung-in — he never approved of her, he took those photos and picked a fight with Principal Lee. Ki-seok is convinced that he has to force Jung-in to marry him in order to protect his father from Ji-ho’s threat.

Hyun-soo is on the phone with Young-jae while waiting for the elevator at the bank, unaware that Ki-seok is right behind him. When Hyun-soo learns about the meeting with Jung-in’s mother, he exclaims, “We’ll see who marries after Ji-ho.”

Ki-seok asks about Ji-ho and Hyun-soo has to explain, “Oh, it’s just I think he’s getting married soon.” Hyun-soo escapes into the elevator, leaving behind a stunned Ki-seok.

Jae-in arrives at Seo-in’s place while Jung-in and Seo-in set aside baby gifts from Shi-hoon. Jae-in complains, “Showering you with baby gifts won’t change anything. How did he become a dentist with this level of stupidity?” When Jae-in blurts out, “You should’ve pressed charges that day,” Jung-in asks what she’s talking about. Jung-in refuses to be left in the dark, forcing Jae-in to reveal, “Shi-hoon assaulted Seo-in.”

Shi-hoon sits in his office with Seo-in’s divorce petition in front of him. After a great deal of hesitation, Shi-hoon finally places his stamp on the form.

Back at Seo-in’s place, a tearful Jung-in searches for Seo-in, who’s taken refuge in her bedroom. Jung-in hugs her sister tightly and when Jae-in joins them, the sisters all sob together.

On the day of the meeting, Ji-ho’s mother and father watch happily as Ji-ho drives away with Eun-woo. Ji-ho joins up with Jung-in in the parking lot of the restaurant where they’re meeting and introduces himself to her mother. After greeting Eun-woo warmly, Jung-in introduces the little boy to her mother and sisters.

During lunch, Jae-in confesses that she already knows Ji-ho quite well. Ji-ho asks her to be kind but Jae-in teases Jung-in, “How much is it worth?” Jung-in forgets all about Eun-woo when she pulls back her fist and threatens, “Do you want a piece of me?”

After everyone laughs at Jung-in, Jae-in invites Eun-woo to play outside. Seo-in tells Ji-ho that she’ll need pointers as a single parent and he agrees to share what he’s learned, even though his parents raised Eun-woo.

Seo-in has one question for Ji-ho, “What went through your mind as you handled it all?” Ji-ho explains his responsibility towards Eun-woo, “He’s living his life with only me to look up to, so I couldn’t crumble. The same goes for Jung-in. She’s putting her entire faith in me, so I’ll protect her no matter what.” Suddenly Jung-in, her mother and Seo-in are all weeping, moved by Ji-ho’s words.

In a modest restaurant, Shi-hoon eats lunch accompanied by a couple of bottles of soju. Ki-seok happens to walk in and at the sight of Shi-hoon, he asks why he’s drinking in the middle of the day. Shi-hoon confesses that he’s getting divorced and blames Ki-seok, who failed to approve his loan.

Over dessert, Jung-in’s mother confesses that she was flustered when she heard that Eun-woo was coming along but as a parent, she was touched. Ji-ho thanks Jung-in’s mother for her kind acceptance of him and Eun-woo.

Jung-in’s mother warns Ji-ho, “…you have a long way to go to persuade Jung-in’s dad.” Ji-ho is prepared for that but he’s worried about Jung-in. Jung-in assures her mother and sisters, “We’ll get through it. We’ll wait for Dad to change his mind and accept Ji-ho.”

Jung-in promises that she’ll be able to endure the challenging times, “…because I’ll have Ji-ho right by my side.” Ji-ho reaches over for Jung-in’s hand and when they smile at each other, Jung-in’s mother sheds more tears.

EPISODE 32

Ki-seok has joined Shi-hoon for lunch and drunkenly complains, “Seriously, I never thought a loser like Yoo Ji-ho would…How dare she even compare me to Ji-ho?” Shocked that to hear that Ki-seok had a competitor, Shi-hoon regrets that he’s only hearing about it now, “You should’ve told me sooner…I would’ve told the entire family.”

Shi-hoon comes up with a plan that he insists is a win-win for him and Ki-seok. Shi-hoon wants to inform Seo-in’s parents about the divorce, convinced that they’ll step in to delay it until after Jung-in and Ki-seok are married. That gives Shi-hoon time to fix his marriage.

Even though he’s drunk, Ki-seok finally sees Shi-hoon clearly. Ki-seok stands up and after he slips on his shoes, he tells Shi-hoon, “Let’s just figure things out separately.” Ki-seok walks away and leaves Shi-hoon behind.

Jung-in’s mother and sisters seem at peace after meeting Ji-ho. Seo-in added a photo of her and Eun-woo to the journal that she started for her baby. Written under the sonogram photo is Seo-in’s wish, “I hope you only see, listen, say and dream beautiful things.” Seo-in sits at her desk to add her version of Ji-ho’s words, “I promise you that I’ll protect you forever.”

Jung-in’s mother smiles as she strolls down a street lined with shops while Jae-in drinks beer with Young-jae by the river. He asks what she’s thinking about and Jae-in confesses, “The reason I came back to Korea,” which she just realized had nothing to do with her studies.

Stopped at a light on the drive home, Ji-ho confesses that he can’t believe that this day actually came. Eun-woo asks, “Are you and Ms. Lee getting married?” When Ji-ho answers, “Yes,” Eun-woo wants to know, “Then, is she going to be my mom?” Ji-ho and Eun-woo smile when Jung-in answers the young boy, “Yes, I’ll be your mom.”

Surprisingly, Pharmacist Wang isn’t thrilled with Ji-ho’s good news, “You’d better not get married. I won’t go to your wedding or give you a money gift.” Ye-seul guesses that Pharmacist Wang is worried that Ji-ho will quit so he promises that he’ll remain at the pharmacy, no matter where he lives.

When Pharmacist Wang asks Ji-ho to sign a pledge, he escapes to the back room. Ye-seul is amused that Ji-ho is taking his pledge so seriously but Pharmacist Wang reminds her, “He’ll be such a sucker for his wife.”

Principal Lee visits Chairman Kwon’s office and both men apologize for their drunken behavior. Chairman Kwon takes the opportunity to offer Principal Lee a director position once he retires but Principal Lee asks for some time to think about it.

At the library, Jung-in ducks into the break room to answer a call from her father, who asks, “Is there no chance for you and Ki-seok anymore?” Jung-in knows that her father’s heart aches whenever he sees Seo-in and promises that if he’s patient, he’ll soon see her living happily. When Principal Lee leaves the school for the day, he walks away with heavy footsteps.

Chairman Kwon is at home when Principal Lee calls but he doesn’t answer his phone. Instead, Chairman Kwon calls Ki-seok and tells his son, “You’ve done more than enough.” Jung-in is alone at home when Ki-seok texts her, “I’m sorry about everything.”

Ji-ho arrives at his place with Hyun-soo and Young-jae, who are laden with drinks and snacks. Ji-ho makes it clear to his friends that they must leave after watching the soccer game. Young-jae explains that Jung-in won’t let Ji-ho drink and Hyun-soo complains, “She has him wrapped around her finger.”

Ji-ho does try not to drink that night but he can’t resist. He calls Jung-in as she’s going to bed, claiming that his friends left after the game. Jung-in thinks that Ji-ho sounds down because he couldn’t drink but he explains that it’s because he’s already in bed. Ji-ho tells Jung-in, “I love you,” before hanging up.

When Ji-ho walks out of his bedroom, Hyun-soo and Young-jae praise him for successfully fooling Jung-in. Ji-ho feels guilty and is about to call Jung-in to confess that they’ve been drinking but Young-jae takes his phone and pushes Ji-ho back into his bedroom. Hyun-soo uses Ji-ho’s phone to order delivery while Ji-ho is trapped.

Young-joo pokes her head out of her window when she hears deliverymen running up and down the stairs. Jung-in wakes up when she gets a text from Young-joo, “Is Ji-ho having a housewarming party today?”

In the morning, a taxi drops Jung-in off at Ji-ho’s place. She finds Ji-ho, Hyun-soo and Young-jae sprawled out in the living room littered with empty beer cans and soju bottles. She opens the door and slams it, waking up Young-jae who then wakes up Ji-ho.

Ji-ho mumbles that they didn’t drink..that much. Jung-in pulls Ji-ho’s pledge from the refrigerator but Ji-ho stops her before she can leave.

Ji-ho isn’t the only one in trouble. Jae-in is at Seo-in’s place but that doesn’t stop her from shouting into her phone, “Young-jae, are you not going to study? I’m really going to break up with you if you don’t pass the exam again.”

Back at his place, Ji-ho kneels in front of an angry Jung-in. Ji-ho argues that Jung-in is being too harsh and when she doesn’t relent, he claims, “My stomach is upset.” Jung-in has to stifle a smile before asking Ji-ho if he got that move from Eun-woo.

Ji-ho promises that he’ll never drink again but that’s not why Jung-in is angry. Jung-in wants an explanation for all of the lies he told her when he called and Ji-ho admits, “I didn’t want to be scolded.” When Jung-in asks, “Did you really think you could fool me,” Ji-ho smiles and admits, “Yes.” Once Jung-in laughs, Ji-ho turns on the charm, “Forgive me just this one time.” Jung-in agrees but she grabs the pledge and informs Ji-ho, “I won’t marry you though.”

Jung-in tries to escape to Ji-ho’s bedroom but Ji-ho is right behind her. Jung-in jumps onto the bed to keep the pledge away from Ji-ho but soon they collapse onto the bed where they laugh and kiss.

Jung-in exits the flower shop next-door to Ji-ho’s parents’ house and asks Ji-ho if she looks all right. Ji-ho has never seen Jung-in so nervous but she’s worried, “What if they won’t let me marry you?” When Ji-ho’s parents greet them, Jung-in hands his mother a bouquet and an excited Eun-woo jumps into her arms.

Jung-in’s mother is on the phone with Seo-in, discussing Jung-in’s meeting with Ji-ho’s parents, but she hangs up when her husband walks in. Jung-in’s mom sees how low her husband is feeling and suggests how they should deal with their daughters from now on, “Let’s neither expect too much from them nor pressure them in any way. Let’s be that kind of parents.” When Jung-in’s father sighs heavily, Jung-in’s mother invites him out for a nice dinner.

Ji-ho’s father can’t take his eyes off of Jung-in as she looks up dinosaurs with Eun-woo. Jung-in perks up when Ji-ho’s father asks if she drinks but when he offers something to Ji-ho, she announces that he quit drinking.

Ki-seok across from the assemblyman’s daughter in a restaurant. She asks Ki-seok when he had his last relationship but he answers that he doesn’t remember. When asked if he’s interested in marriage, Ki-seok answers, “Obviously, that’s why I’m here.” Ki-seok adds, “I was just thinking that I’m glad I decided to come here today,” but when the assemblyman’s daughter isn’t looking, his smile fades.

After putting Eun-woo to bed, Ji-ho rejoins the party and recognizes that Jung-in has had a lot to drink. Eager to put Ji-ho’s parents at ease, Jung-in promises, “We’ll be considerate of each other and be happy together. And I’ll do my best to be a good mom to Eun-woo.” When his mother starts to cry and his father has to look away, Ji-ho takes Jung-in’s hand and nods approvingly.

In the morning, Jung-in wakes up in Eun-woo’s bed and moans, “Oh, no.” She grabs her phone to call Ji-ho, who’s been watching her through the door. When Ji-ho walks in, he has to explain that he couldn’t take Jung-in home because she insisted on staying there for the night.

Ji-ho teases a worried Jung-in that his mother is angry, “She said she can’t let you marry me.” Ji-ho adds that on the other hand, his father is thrilled that he has a new drinking buddy.

When Jung-in asks how to sneak out, Ji-ho hands her some paper and Jung-in suddenly complains that her stomach hurts. Jung-in can’t keep from laughing when Ji-ho insists that she has to write down her pledge.

At her place, Jung-in grabs a water bottle from her refrigerator where Ji-ho’s amended pledge is posted, “I will never lie. Engagement with Jung-in to be broken off upon violation.” Jung-in’s pledge is posted on Ji-ho’s refrigerator, “I, Lee Jung-in will marry Yoo Ji-ho no matter what. If not, I’ll stay single forever.”

Jung-in smiles when Ji-ho texts her at work, “Thank you for coming to me.” Ji-ho is just as happy when Jung-in texts back, “Spring brought you to me.”

It’s dark when Jung-in passes by the street crew working outside the pharmacy. Jung-in recreates their first meeting when she asks Ji-ho if he has medicine for hangovers. Ji-ho offers to open the medicine for her, but warns, “I don’t do it for women who brought their wallets.” They both laugh when the jackhammer starts up.

Ji-ho needs to finish before he can leave and while Jung-in waits, she gets a text. When she looks for Ji-ho, he pulls her into the back room and they pass by the doorway many times, hugging, laughing and kissing.

 
COMMENTS

I’m so grateful that One Spring Night didn’t let its viewers down, concluding with a very sweet and satisfying ending. The finale mirrored the relationship between Jung-in and Ji-ho, it was committed to the pair at the heart of this drama to the end. Honestly, I want to go back and watch it all over again.

One Spring Night tackled so many difficult subjects but it never felt too heavy. That’s in large part due to the well defined characters who were at the center of the controversies, especially the Lee sisters. They are three loving sisters who inspire and uplift one another through the tough times and together, they look forward to a more promising future with a new generation. Even though she didn’t explain it, I’m positive that Jae-in returned to Korea because she missed her sisters.

While Jung-in’s and Ji-ho’s commitment to each other and to Eun-woo is undeniably solid, there are lots of adjustments to be made as they face marriage and become a family of their own. Like many bachelors, Ji-ho has to learn how to behave with his friends so as not to cause problems on the home front. Since Ji-ho is the first one in his circle to settle down, neither he nor his friends have any experience with that so it was only a matter of time before they would clash with Jung-in. What’s funny is that Jung-in has similar struggles and Ji-ho is more than happy to point that out, as evidenced by the two pledges.

There’s no doubt that Jung-in will be a demanding wife, she’s admitted as much, but only someone with such a strong personality would be able to defy established norms and date a single father. Ji-ho’s calmness helps to temper Jung-in’s feistiness and they continue to prove what a good match they are. Jung-in’s mother and sisters got to see this firsthand when they met formally which is why there were so many tears and a sense of peace in the aftermath. Jung-in may not have made as strong of a positive impression on Ji-ho’s parents thanks to her overindulgence, but her love for Eun-woo buys a great deal of goodwill.

So now, we launch these characters into the future. It’s a given that Ji-ho and Jung-in will get married and that Eun-woo will now have a mother of his own plus a loving maternal grandmother and some pretty awesome aunts. Young-jae had better pass his civil exam if he wants to continue his relationship with Jae-in, who’s easy, breezy attitude has morphed into Jung-in’s toughness. Seo-in finally got her divorce and now everyone in her family knows what a brute Shi-hoon really is. Sadly, Shi-hoon hasn’t changed a bit, but surprisingly, Ki-seok has. Thanks to Shi-hoon, Ki-seok finally saw how pitiful it was to cling to someone who has moved on and he accepted that his future doesn’t include Jung-in.

I found it really hard to watch the breakup of Jung-in’s father, Principal Lee, and Chairman Kwon. It honestly broke my heart. These two men, who had gotten used to each other over the years, realized how much they meant to each other as their children’s relationship fell apart. Principal Lee really wanted to work with Chairman Kwon after he retires and I believe that was in part because they’re so used to each other. And Chairman Kwon, as much as he may have disapproved of Jung-in in the beginning, he sincerely appreciated her qualities and envisioned a future with her and a continued future with her father. When Principal Lee walked away from the school after his conversation with Jung-in, it was clear that he had accepted that his relationship with Chairman Kwon would be a casualty of Ki-seok’s and Jung-in’s breakup.

What I appreciated the most about Jung-in and Ji-ho’s relationship was its focus on simple, stolen moments of happiness with the right person by your side. That’s the goal, to go through the ups and downs of life with your best friend while being good to each other. I can imagine Jung-in and Ji-ho growing old together, surrounded by loving family and friends. I can’t ask for anything more.

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I really liked that this show stuck to the low-key moments and didn't go for high drama. It felt completely real throughout.

I also enjoyed watching those two losers drinking with each other, each blaming the other for the predicament of their own making. Finally, I think Gi-Seok saw himself in the loser ex-husband and had to run away from the bitter truth that he was at fault and not anyone else.

The mark of a good show with a good ending is that you wish you could see just a little bit more. Peer into the wedding. See what happens with the baby and the civil service exam. Always leave them wanting more.

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I was grateful that Gi-seok ended up being the decent person we all kind of thought he was at the beginning. I'm going to chalk this episode up to being his one "stupid" moment in life (we all have one!!!). If he's learned from it and changed, I can go back to liking him.

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Had to take a break after completing episode 9— haven’t read any of the recaps since—haven’t read this one, either, and just skipped down here to leave a comment—and have skipped through spoilers whenever they appeared in the Beanies Section 🙈 Was it still good?? Was it all worth it in the end?? Should I be going back to it and finishing it?????

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I think your little heart will be safe with this end :p

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Yay 🥰🥰🥰

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it's worth it. I've really enjoyed this show. Fear not.

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🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻

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Don't ever miss it. Go on watching. You will never regret it.

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The plan is to go back to it soon!!

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So many lovely, cute and funny scenes!

The fight between the fathers was so funny! I mean they should have understood it was not their battle neither their story and just be watchers...

I wished Jung In's mother said something to Ki Seok and not let him convince her that Jiho could be not decent. I mean Ki Seok was so obvious and when he said he did that for Jung In, that he will guide her to her place? >_<

The scene between the 3 sisters was so sad, I was just crying with them. But I'm happy now. Seo In has all her family to help her.

The meetings with the parents was funny. Jiho made cry all the women and Jung In ended drunk. Jung In's father was not here but it didn't bother me that we don't see their official meeting. His acceptation will take time and it was not credible to see it now.

Shi Hoon will not punished by the law. It's disapointing but in the same time I think it's better for the futur child. To be the result of a rape, it's not an easy thing to bear, so when everybody knows it in such a country as Korea? It must be harder. I don't Seo In was weak for that, she just wanted to free and give a chance to her child.

Ki Seok was pathetic but at least now he knows it thanks to Shi Hoon and can move on.

I love the main couple! Jiho and Jung In are great together! They can talk to each other, they can be disagree. There is some balance in their couple. The scene where they fought on the bad was very lovely.

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In general, this drama was great! The writer, the PD, the actors did a great work to tell this story.

The second characters were interesting and I liked what they brought to the story.

Han Ji Min and Jung Hae In had a great chemistry. So many lovely scenes!

It will be a drama that I will rewatch many times!

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For the comparison with Pretty Noona, I think the writer did the same in the both drama. She was faithful to her characters until the end. Except this time, her characters were strong and mature. It made it for us easier to follow because less frustrating.

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I actually think Pretty Noona and One Spring Night could be parts of a duology - similar characters (and actors), similar situations but so different.

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I think it’s the moment Jung-in’s mother realizes she’s looking at the true Gi-seok for the first time. Her expression to me says a lot too, from wonder to surprise to bewilderment. Though it would have been satisying to see her put him in his place :)

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She is such a fine actress! she nailed it with her expressions. In makjang style lets imagine her throwing that coffee at his face.. LOL.

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Agree! From concern , to surprise, to disgust.. all within that same frame. Brilliant acting.

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I'm glad someone mentioned that scene. I, too, thought the mother finally saw Gi Seok's for who he is but would have loved it if she told him off.

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I think it's what it frustrated me. She didn't say anything and after there was the scene when Jung In said to Jiho that her mother wants to meet him. It made me confused.

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I think it made her want to meet him more to judge for herself whether what Gi Seok said had any truth. She probably didn't tell Gi Seok off because she didn't want to take sides and jump to conclusions without hearing both sides. But from her expression you could tell her disbelief was not of Gi Seok's claim of Ji Ho, but of Gi Seok's words. From slandering Ji Ho to claiming he could lead Jung In back to the correct path.

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Thank you abirdword and TeriYaki for the insightful comments and recaps. There are many points i’ve missed that you brought up very eloquently, they just added to the experience more.

I am so happy i get to watch this beautiful gem of a show. It’s been years since i last watched a show i really liked, but this has definitely turned tables for me and One Spring Night makes me ponder on many things introspectively.

I appreciate that the show does not take the ordinary, well-loved route of a time jump or epilogue. We don’t get to see them getting married or a glimpse of their future lives. There is not even a scene of an official proposal or a ring to make things official, because it is just not necessary. I learn a lot about subtle storytelling too - sometimes, grand scenes are better replaced with something subtler that pack a bigger impact.

Oh, i just want to whoop when Hyun-soo told Gi-seok that he thinks Ji-ho is getting married. The ending is low key, but perfect.

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I loved how he just said it before jumping in the elevator :D

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In my case, I actually whooped! What a grest revenge for Hyun-soo too ! It was not shown but I can imagine how smug he must have felt especially after all the pressure at work with his senior Ki-seok.

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This drama is one of those with the most satisfying ending. The writer has redeemed herself. This drama is not perfect but it has this heart and warmth. Very natural and realistic. Heart fluttering and shows that it is really love that is all that matters. There will be problems and it is given but as long as there is love and trust, they can get it through together. Jeong in will surely be a good mom, a mom at heart. It's hard to move on from this drama. Best drama i have watched this year.

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That little exchange between Jung In and Ji Ho, when she's scolding him and says "did you think you could fool me?" and he did that tiny, fidgety, mischievous, wavering "...yeah?" That was perfect. Perfect.

More than anything, that signaled a relationship that works. They know how to play with each other, and what's serious versus what's not, and they balance each other out. If they can keep that up, they'll be in a good place.

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And the reverse scene.. when it was JI's turn, and she said her stomach is upset.. that was just so perfect, too. Somehow it was not a lovey-dovey scene but to me it was the most swoon-worthy romantic scene of all. A love that was comfortable, fun, and familiar.

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Thank you for the wonderful recap as always. Chemistry is just so good plus all the supporting characters are good. Really great. Thank you to the whole team, PD, writer and whole cast. You have given us a great drama worthy of watching over and over again.

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It was the best k- drama I have watched. Kudos to the actors who gave such a heartfelt performance. Congratulations to the director and writer who gave life and words to every scene. Even the traffic light had meaning. It will be hard to move on, to say the least. Him without her will be difficult to imagine. And even if there is no spring in the Philippines, I will alway remember what the love of one spring night brings.

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Thank you TeriYaki for the wonderful recap and insights.

One Spring Night is undoubtedly one of my most favorite K dramas now.. didn’t know what to expect going into the finale but loved how it ended this way..such a heartwarming story on family, friendship and love. Will definitely be rewatching many times over all the scenes that made my heart smile.

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I can't say the drinking/pledge stuff was my favourite part of this drama, especially when I still think these two have some issues they need to work out. It strikes me that this writer thinks the relationship itself is less important than the social pressures they're examining, which is fine in terms of the drama but makes it somehow less satisfying than if we'd spent more time with our main couple.

It's a small gripe though. These final two episodes really showed that working within the framework of a culture like this is like being in a large board game. Everyone has their designated set of moves and each moves sparks other moves. Almost every episode, our couple made an unexpected move and sparked a cascade of resulting actions from other players in relation to each other. It was like watching an intricate dance in a confined space. It was really artful, if a bit frustrating. But then living within this system must be frustrating.

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There are things I could complain about with this episode but I won't because overall I loved it and was satisfied with the end. Sometime I walk away from a drama, looking at the OTP and think: I give it a month. Not this time. These people are good for each other and are so supportive and sensible in making decisions together.

I was also happy that Gi-Seok finally stepped away from the brink. I liked how the drama did it - that he realised for himself where the path that he was on was going to end up (becoming another Shi-hoon).

Thanks drama for being really good from beginning to end. Watching normal people make tough decisions made it such a satisfying watch.

And thanks @teriyaki for the recaps.

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The conversation between Gi-Seok and Shi-Woon was the best part of this episode. Two pathetic losers, insecure et al, trying to act all mighty. And they both could see how pathetic they looked. Atleast for Ki-Seok it was a mirror!

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Was it just because Gi-Seok saw himself in Shi-hoon that he admitted defeat? Or was it because his father called and basically said he/they had done enough?

Personally, I think it's the latter.

I think that Gi-seok saw Shi-hoon for who/what he truly is, and realised that Shi-hoon had never been in a position to help him, and could even drag him down. I am not sure that if Gi-Seok saw himself (somewhat) in Shi-hoon, that it was enough for him to abandon his own self-righteous efforts...

By his own admission, Gi-seok's actions were not necessarily driven purely by love for Jung-in, but more so to prove that he was a better match for Jung-in that Ji-ho, and essentially save Jung-in from herself.

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I think it’s a sequence of events. The meeting with Jung-In’s mom, his conversation with his dad and then this drinks. Finally he was able to see what it looks like to be in denial and look like a loser.

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I liked that scene because I took it that for Gi-Seok it was a wake-up call. Like wth am I doing with this crazy loser and - maybe - am I acting just like him? Is this the person I want to be?

But, I have to admit that I want to read the situation like that because that would mean that he realised what he'd been doing and that his txt apology to Jung-in was genuine and heart-felt.

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What a beautiful journey this drama was. I wish I can watch it again without the paranoia of it going south like pretty Noona :))

Even though I had some minor gripes with their relationship towards the end, I do believe that they both will resolve their issues and find a balance. Coming together has brought so much love into their life’s, not just them but also for people surrounding them.

Am really happy that EunWoo has gained so many loving people in his life. Another loving and mature grandmother, a responsible Aunt and a fun aunt. I really can see these two families bond and form a wonderful family filled with love and understanding.

Looks like the father is going through his own existential crisis and is better off left alone. It was very nice of the mother to make an effort to bring some couple moments between them. A simple meal/date could be a start of a good relationship as you enter retired old age.

Am disappointed that shiWoon is not in jail but I understand why she did what she did. The legal term would be just a few years. But by being aggressive and consistent she got him to sign the divorce without paternal rights. She is finally free.

Ki-Seok will probably be a disappointment throughout his life.

Young Jae and JaeIn (youngest sis) make a wonderful couple. I loved that last shot of them sitting by the river and drinking. Young Jae is the most emotionally mature of the 3 friends. He is perceptive and understanding. He has the tight temperament for her. He also needs someone like her to keep him focused and enjoy life while at it. They have a long way to go but am happy they found each other.

Overall, am a very satisfied viewer. Thank you show for being so beautiful.
And one request to the team, please use more than 2 songs in the OST. I really cannot listen to ‘seasons’ song anymore.

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And thank you @teriyaki and @abirdword for recapping this show and staying with us through this show. It was wonderful hearing your and fellow beanies thoughts!

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Yes thank you @teriyaki and @abirdword. My viewing experience of this drama had been enriched by your recaps.

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If we are looking into the future than Jung in needs to look at her relationship with Young Joo. That text will be a long line of passive aggressive BS she will pull because she does not approve of that relationship.

I never warmed to her and I also kept Jung in at arm's length because of their friendship.

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Young Joo is not against their relationship. She wanted Jung In to be sure she could be a mum with its consequences. I think she's a great friend. She always asked the good questions to force Jung In to face the reality and her feelings but she never told her what she should have done.

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I felt she was a good friend. She was a voice of reason, but once Jung In made decisions, she supported them 100%. That's what friends do...they don't always tell you what you want to hear...sometimes they tell you what they think you NEED to hear. But they are always, always there for you. And I think that's what she was.

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I agree with you up to a point. I felt the writer kept Young Joo as the voice of Korean society which can't seem to forgive single parents or give them any respect for not abandoning their children. And that was something Jung In had to contend with.

But as a friend, she became a Debbie Downer to me. She never took a wider view of the possibility that our couple could meet that challenge. She and JI could never discuss or research information about single parents. They are librarians for Pete's sake. Don't they know how to do research? All their conversations ended with the dire warning about how it's societal suicide.

However, Young Joo did have a convenient apartment location.

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I'm with @kurama and @mehgann on this one.

I think it's partially her personality - she seemed like the cool, cynic type who'll do anything for a friend despite being a bit more of a realist. Everyone needs that friend who's not afraid of being their devil's advocate - if only for you to be sure you understand what you may be getting yourself into.

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This is also the best k drama I have watched so far.. and in some ways.. it might have ruined kdramas for me because I might now start comparing the rest of the dramas with OSN. I know that it did with the other kdrama I am watching as that one had a lot of the tropes and the high dramas of noble idiocy- time lapse and impossible ending. But I will continue on hoping there would be gems like this as well. Any recommendations as to kdramas that would probably be in the same level as OSN? I am a kdrama newbie and had only started this 2019.

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I know what you mean. OSN has set the bar high for me as well. And I have noticed lately my preference turning into slice of life realism. If you’re also into that, I can think of two right now on my To Watch list — My Ajusshi and Misaeng. There’s no romance but both are highly acclaimed and well-loved. I’ve just started on My Ajusshi actually. Let’s wait and see what other Beanies can recommend.

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My Ahjussi is one of the most satisfying watches.

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I’ve started watching Love Affair in the Afternoon, and the vibe it’s giving off is gloomy and sentimental. I like it.

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Secret Love Affair. The acting is really good.

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If you want a romance that isn't the usual tropey stuff, try "Because this is my First Life." It isn't perfect, but it has some of the best moments and an awesome ensemble cast. You won't be disappointed.

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I think i saw this on Netflix too.. will check this out. Thanks!

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Viki carries it if I remember correctly.

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Have you watched Healer. Thos is my go to, lol. And Coffee Prince, you may end up with a Gong Yoo obsession though.
Or a Waffle Prince one.
Then second the @athena rec.

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Aah yes, Coffee Prince is a classic. First time I saw it was 2 years ago. It was surprisingly well done for a drama that aired 10 years ago then. Tidbit: Chairman Kwon has a minor support role here.

Waffle Prince indeed! And don’t forget Coffee Prince’s cousin ;)

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I couldn't think of any other k-drama that is of the same level as OSN, light, feel-good, heartwarming, and with satisfying ending.

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Oh yeah, Coffee Prince. Full House.

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Will look for Full House too. Thanks

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Thank you beanies for the tips. I have queued My Ahjussi already and will starr tonight. I saw Healer and Coffee Prince are on Netflix too so I have noted these and will watch next. I already love Gong Yoo as I watched Goblin already and he is the reason I got hooked into kdramas=).

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Here's my list of kdrama's with tender romance--similar to the love in One Spring Night: Another Oh Hae Young, Goblin, Healer, It's Okay That's Love, Jealousy Incarnate, Just Between Lovers, On the Way to the Airport, Something about 1%, The Greatest Love, and Weightlifting Fairy. I remember when I was new to drama watching and there were lists of great dramas for me to enjoy!

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Thank you so much for this list. From this, I only watched Goblin and Weighlifting Fairy so far, so happy I have more recommendations for my next viewing!

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There was always going to be a question whether One Spring Night was going to be a do-over or continuation of Pretty Noona. In the following long multi-posts I examine the two series.

PART ONE: THE CASTING & ORIGINAL STORY SET -UP

In initial filming before the Pretty Noona premiere, JA’s character was described as a hard working person with a lonely personal life where she stares at empty bottles of liquor. She is a typical South Korean woman in her 30s who feels emptiness in her heart because she doesn't feel accomplished in either career or love which every woman around her age can empathize with.
When it was first announced, the premise of One Spring Night was stated that it was a story about a husband and wife falling in and out of love. However, the series tracked the Pretty Noona premise of the perils of dating in your 30s.
At the beginning, JA’s situation can be summed up as follows:
1. She is 35 still living at home with her parents.
2. She is going out with a terrible BF who has cheated on her after she slept with him (meaning she was serious about the relationship but he was not).
3. Her mother is pushing her to marry the terrible BF because of his status and JA’s age.
4. She is stuck in a dead end job subject to work place harassment and takes blame for others’ mistakes.

In One Spring Night, JI’s situation can be summed up as follows:
1. She is in her 30s, living alone in a small apartment.
2. She is in the final stages of a 4 year dull relationship with her boyfriend.
3. Her father is pushing her to marry the dull BF because of his position/gain with BF’s father.
4. The social injustice in her life is her older sister’s domestic abuse husband.

JA Noona’s character is a meek, introverted, weak, hard working but repressed follower of society norms. She really does not talk about goals or a future. It appears she has resigned herself to an unhappy life because she is trapped in a culturally oppressive and socially conservative paternalistic world.

JI’s character is similar. She talks boldly but acts meekly around men. She gives off conflicting signals because she has self-doubts about her decision making. She does not talk about goals or a future. She seems to be adverse to sudden change.

Pretty Noona was always set up to be JA’s journey to self-awareness and independence. It was meant to be a realistic, sad story. One Spring Night was to be a journey of JI accepting the social stigma of having a serious relationship with a single father against her parents wishes and her clingy old BF.

What hooked viewers in the initial episodes of Pretty Noona was the chemistry between JA and JH. It was an unintended consequence because it masked the original story line and theme. PD Ahn stated in an interview that the theme of the show was the simple question:

“Are we really in love?”
In One Spring Night, the question could have been asked “What is commitment?” For JI, her relationship with JH may have...

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have started more to get out of her dead-end relationship with KS than falling deeply for JH. Evidence of that was that she continued to come back to KS after she announced her break up with him, accepted the ring, and continued to meet with him after rejecting his proposal. But she was not alone. The fact that JH was still not over Yumi, his past girlfriend, hammered home regret, self-doubt, commitment and abandonment issues. That is why JH constantly said he wanted JI to go slow, to take her time, so she could be fully ready for him.

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PART TWO: THE INITIAL CHEMISTRY

If you look objectively the beginning of Noona, JA and JH’s romantic relationship was a quick , explosive and burning passion. The reason for JA was simple: she was coming off a dead cat bounce relationship with her cheating ex-BF. Since her mid 20s, JA had been groomed by her mother to go out with a certain kind of man (one of status, means and upward mobility). JA’s only hope with these blind dates was that the man would “like” her. JA went out on those dates not out of a search for love but obligation to her mother.

In One Spring Night, JI and JH’s romance began as distant but friendly attraction to each other. JI was in a dying, trite and at times condescending relationship. JI did not think KS was marriage material but stayed on the hook for 4 years to appease her parents, especially her father.

In Noona, JH’s character lived a young and carefree in YOLO life style. He grew up without parents so it appears that he is still harboring abandonment issues. He had dated many women in the past, but apparently could not get beyond 3 months (which is interesting since the 100 day mark in Korea is a milestone of a “serious” relationship.) He is charming, attentive, but also selfish, temperamental and paternalistic.

In OSN, JH’s character lived a solidarity life after his abandonment by Yumi and the birth of his son. He was a semi-absentee father culturally stigmatized against dating because of his son. He only faults appear to be drinking and repressing his emotions so not to get hurt again.

In Noona, JA and JH get caught up in the mystery, excitement and secrecy of their romance. So did the audience. It was clear that JA and JH loved being together. It was an infatuation.

Attraction? Yes, they both complimented each other about their appearance.
Escapism? Yes, they both were coming back from negative experiences to find comfort in each others’ arms, away from their daily grind and problems.
Infatuation? Yes, the hot and secret aspect of their intense and short lived passion for each other.
True love? No. Even though viewers were caught up with the initial passion, the couple’s relationship was foreshadowed to be doomed. As reality encroached on their secret life, real serious issues arose between their family members and friends which the couple did not or could not discuss and work out together.

In OSN, JI and JH did not have an instant spark of passion but a slow burning ember of acceptance. The attraction was present but tempered to starting off as friends, leading to JH’s confession that he could not just be friends. But JI took it slow for most of the episodes pace had her wavering back and forth between what she knew (KS relationship) and what she did not know (JH relationship). Can you comparison shop true love? In JI case, that is what she did; she compared her two boyfriends to make a determination who was the best marriage partner.

How each character viewed their...

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elationship was telling:

In Noona, JA did like the fact that a younger man found her attractive and desirable. It may have been a long time since a man approached her (instead of through blind dates). She wanted to keep it a secret because she knew it was all merely fun: companionship with benefits, not a serious relationship. Also, JA wanted to keep it secret because she knew the negative ramifications to her family and friendship with KS. However, JH did not want to keep it secret. This showed his naivety. His character always lived in the moment, not thinking long term consequences of his actions.

In OSN, JI also liked the fact a man, after many years being unavailable, found her attractive and desirable. She kept in low key because she did not want to upset her family or KS. But over time, she realized that JH was a better man for her. JH was not spontaneous. He was willing to wait for her decision. He was always looking toward the long term.

While the JA-JH relationship could be called a cliche teenage crush, as the episodes went on, there was no intellectual, emotional or spiritual growth in their relationship. They never discussed a shared future together. In OSN, the main leads did try begin the process of integrating their lives together, including JI showing some backbone growth to go against KS and his family, as well as her own parents, to independently lead her own path to happiness. But their conversations were mostly about themselves, how they felt, and not detailed or deep communication about their future plans together which was also a significant issue in Noona as that series lacked deep discussions between the characters that is the foundation for serious relationships.

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PART THREE: THE MAJOR CONFLICT

In Noona, the greatest problem with the story was JA’s interaction with the people around her. It was an intentional portrayal by SYJ to the point that many viewers disliked her character at the end. She was an apologetic follower. She rarely stood up for herself. Her decision making was mired in self-conflict, self-doubt. She was immature. She continued to make the same mistakes over and over again. She thought the world viewed her as a commodity and not as a person or a woman.

In OSN, JI was more open and extroverted to the people around her, but her life was repetitively dull as her job stacking library books. She had a passive aggressive personality which mired her thoughts to make wishy-washy decisions. She could be curt and mean but then caring and understanding a moment later. Her view of herself is trapped in the middle between the unhappiness of her older sister’s forced marriage and the freedom of her wild child younger sister. She came to realize that she was viewed as a prize and not as a person or a woman.

How were those conflicts explored in each series? Both JA and JI were conditioned to be subservient and accept what others told them. Both JA and JI had a parent forcefully telling her what she should do, whom she should marry (the roles were reversed from mother to father). JA’s job was representative of her life because it became unbearable over time as she too the blame for others mistakes to her personal harassment. JI’s job represented her life as being stable but boring, much like her relationship with KS. It took a new relationship with JH to jolt them from their disappointing lives. Both JA and JI would have maniac, manipulative and obsessive ex-boyfriends who continued to intrude in their new relationships to the point of harming them.

How did teach couple “work” to resolve these issues? In Noona, they did not. JA and JH were merely apologetic to JA’s mother about their relationship, but did nothing to convince their families that they had a future together. JH did nothing to help JA resolve her work place issues, or support her if she wanted to change career path. JH brought JA to meet some of his friends (on the overnight trip) but JA did not do the same. (this shows JH was more into the relationship than JA). JH got jealous and violent about JA’s ex-BF which contributed to conflict between them because he did not discuss beforehand with JA his actions.

In OSN, the writer attempted to make JH more involved but it also failed to achieve merit. JH only formally met JI’s mother and sisters. They only spoke in pleasant generalities. JH never got an opportunity to overcome JI’s father’s objections. JH also did not do much to resolve JI issues with KS. JH made idle threats to KS, but never put any action behind them which allowed KS to continue to harass JI. JH should have manned up and taken out KS early on (actions over words) since KS abandoned love for a “competition.” But JH...

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did not aggressively fight for her when he said he was by her side.

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PART FOUR: MISSING ELEMENTS TO A RELATIONSHIP

One of the significant story line issues in Noona was that the main characters initial passion glossed over several important aspects missing from consideration on whether they were heading toward a serious relationship or “true love.” Likewise, in OSN, the main characters did not deeply dive into these key elements:

1. Communication. Their communication was superficial. They did not discuss important issues or ideas which represents mutual immaturity. They never opened up to each other on what their personal goals were (job, career, changes, etc.) or how they wanted to achieve them. They never really understood the other person's emotional state, and they never deeply discussed how the other person felt in a given situation, though in OSN each person said they “understood” how the other felt. A psychological study that concluded that many people told “white lies” early in their relationships as a means of making themselves more “attractive” to their partner. Usually, those minor lies were used to build up a person’s self-esteem or enhance their traits (prospects) to the other person. But in both stories, those lies were meant to hide the truth and real feelings (under the fabrication that they did not want to “hurt” the other person.) Instead of talking things through, they glossed matters over and then began to mistrust each other. The each called the other “childish” or made pinky promises.

2. Compatibility. Sympathy, friendship and like-mindedness are critical foundation blocks to any serious relationship. In Noona, JH knew about JA’s situation at home and at work, but his support for her situation was tempered and distant. He wanted to control the relationship but not solve problems. Likewise, JA did not seek out his advice on how to find a solution to any of her problems. In OSN, JH knew about her issues with her family and boyfriend, but he did not help her find a solution. In Noona, there was always a large hole in the compatibility chart because the leads had nothing in common as friends. Friends have mutual interests, concerns, ambitions, support, trust, varied experiences to share. In OSN, the leads were still had the getting-to-know you stage of their relationship to tell if they were truly compatible.

3. Commitment. In Noona, JA and JH never discussed the big things like their expectations, marriage and family life together. JH’s solution was unilaterally demanding JA move with him to the US. He never asked her hand in marriage. Some women would call this behavior selfish, inappropriate or “clingy.” JA’s solution to move out of her house so she could continue to date JH but not live with him showed that she was not ready to fully commit to him (she would later say she had things she wanted to be independent to become strong.) They never had the heart-to-heart discussion of “making plans” together as a couple. Even though both are adults, they both had serious...

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maturity issues. In OSN, a similar situation happened: JI made the demand to get married even though the relationship was still new. We never saw JI and JH have a heart-to-heart discussion on what they would do or how they would live as a married couple. Would JI quit her job, have more kids, adopt E-U, etc.? Instead, they made simplistic unenforceable promises not to lie and more importantly to JI, “if” they did not get married, she would remain single forever.

In Noona, when JA and JH had their sudden break-up, there really were no reasons why they should stay together. They never really moved on from the initial physical attractiveness stage of a relationship. Their relationship was doomed because they could not effectively communicate, be compatible or fully commit to each other. In OSN, people are rooting for JI and JH to find happiness together but it seems they are rushing to the finish line while still in the initial phase of their relationship. Though they had better communication than in Noona, they did not really work out their problems together in one unified plan. One pat on JH’s back by JI does not resolve JI’s deep abandonment and commitment issues. A few play dates with E-U by JI does not make her his mother. The simmering conflict is that JI wants to control her situation while JH does not commit himself too deeply as to cause severe pain to himself or his son if things do not work out. The external conflicts took center stage over the internal ones.

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PART FIVE: THE ENDINGS

Both hasty endings were ambiguous and seemed forced to meet viewer or network expectations.
The main focal point of each show was the female lead. The stories were how a Korean career woman in her 30s copes with the stresses of traditional cultural biases and family expectations.

In Noona, there is a 3 year flash forward. Both JA and JI have moved on, dating other people. If is when JH crashes the wedding, his feelings for her are rekindled. BR, JA’s friend, reminds JA that she gave up on JH and she got over him. BR tells JA that it would be a big mess if she rekindled any feelings for JH. As a result, JA decides that she has to completely cut ties with the past. She breaks up with the new BF. She quits her job. She tells her mother she does not want to get married. She decides to leave her mother’s sphere of influence to move to Jeju to work in her new best friend’s coffee shop. She wants to end the cycle of people controlling her. Her independence is now the most important aspect of her life. .JA tells BR that she has no regrets in breaking up with JH because their relationship could only go so far by “fate.” In other words, JA believes finding her true love is beyond her control.

In OSN, a different kind of lack of resolution manifested itself in the series ending. It was disappointing that none of the serious story lines were resolved. Even though SH had signed the divorce papers, he was still “making plans” to save his marriage with a spiteful KS. We do not know if he ever gave the papers to JA’s sister. SI. KS goes on a blind date with assemblyman Jang’s daughter (which his father arranged), but he immediately lies about his last relationship to Miss Jang. His facial expression showed deep regret and the fact he was not over JI. Even though JI’s father apparently cut ties with KS’s father, there was no resolution to his objections to JH.
The series ends with most the characters still swimming in a sea of regrets and unresolved issues. But most importantly, we do not see any significant progress in JI-JH’s relationship to infer that they would check off all the boxes to become a happy, married couple. (I do appreciate that the writer did not end with a rushed happy ending wedding scene).

To me, the ending Noona episodes were all about “closure” for JA. She went to KS not to renew a friendship but to finally close it. She quit her job to close the harassment issues behind her. She left Seoul to close the book on mom’s dominance over her life. And seeing JH in Jeju was the same opportunity to close the book on him since he was returning the US in three days, the issues of their break-up still unresolved, and they were never heading toward talking a real future together. The last scene was the nostalgic reunion but not a serious change in the JA character’s path. JH asked for forgiveness, but forgiveness without an acknowledgement of what you did wrong is not an apology. A couple of hugs is a...

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reminder of their mutual escapism from their work and family issues. While others thought the end of Noona was a new beginning for the leads, I felt that walking along the beach at sunset represented the end, closure of their time together because there was still no justifiable reason for them to be together.
Conversely, OSN ended with the couple rolling playfully in bed which harks back in the early part of the Noona series. Was this intentional? It seemed like the Noona episodes were cards that were merely reshuffled into the OSN series. Episodes 29 and 30 should have been in the middle of the series (and the long, drawn out, nonsensical break-up plot should have ended in an early episode). If the end was about “change,” what really happened to JI? Yes, she changed partners but her pattern seems to be the same. She changed KS by him giving up his music career, which sowed the seeds of his later bitterness. Now, she is attempting to change JH by making him sign pledges against drinking and lies, which is like laying down future land mines in their relationship. In an interview with HJM, she described her character as a “mean, hot-tempered woman.” At a certain point it would be natural JH would not want to be controlled or yelled at by her. We only received a muted taste of that potential conflict.

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PART SIX: OBSERVATIONS

SYJ and HI had more depth in their characters than HJM and HI did in OSN. The performances in OSN were much more reserved and the emotional range muted as the pace of the story line of the break-up was too long, too tedious, to give rise to character and relationship growth. Viewers loved the first 8 episodes of passionate Noona, but then hated the rest of the series as the relationship cooled and the side issues clouded the intentions of the parties. In OSN, it appeared that the slow pace had many viewers on edge to when the story would go off the rails. In the end, the lead OSN couple did not complete any of the hurdles to allow them to happily marry.

Both shows did have the same major story elements: a chance meeting, initial attraction, issues with dislikable boyfriends, oppressive parent, relationship objections, lies, betrayal, mistrust, miscommunication, poor decision making, unpacked personal baggage, and touching moments.

Both series showed there is a fine line between romance and love. Romance is a feeling of excitement and mystery associated with the search for love; an exciting, enjoyable love affair, esp. one that is not serious or long-lasting like a summer romance; or a wild exaggeration; picturesque falsehood. The Noona series captured that mood. However, this romance never developed into a deep, intense, serious relationship with long terms goals. OSN ended with the main characters just starting their romantic journey with many obstacles, like in the beginning of Noona. There will always be a huge question mark after each show.

But that is how realistic the show tried to be. Relationships require hard work to be successful, but sometimes even all the effort we put into our romances just isn't enough and they eventually fizzle out.  Of course, it's only natural to wonder why you keep striking out when it comes to finding a lasting love. Romantic relationships are a two-way street and it's up to both people to make it a prosperous one. However, we can only control our own part in a relationship. And it helps to know who we are as individuals and what we each need and want from a relationship. It can be hard for us to admit that sometimes we're the reason for the disintegration of a relationship. We saw the immaturity, miscommunication and frustration in Noona to see their relationship falter, but in OSN we never get a clear understanding on how JI or JH’s past relationship failures were caused by their partners or themselves to determine whether the same fate will fall upon them.

If the endings were trying to convey the notion there is always a second chance, that is an illusion. Second chances rarely turn out well. The reason in Noona simple: you broke up for a reason(s). The pain of a break up can erase the initial feelings of attraction and love. Hate is a powerful emotion. In this situation, both JA and JH have not come to terms on the reasons for their break up. They have not...

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not shared what each needs or wants in renewing their relationship. Both of them deeply hurt the other - - - and that pain is still unresolved in each of them. One hug cannot wash away those emotions. In OSN, the second chances were to find a soul mate. JH was still not over how his relationship with Yumi ended. He was given a second chance with JI, who may not know why her relationship with KS failed, but is willing to reach out farther over the edge to explore happiness with JH.

That is why the endings are frustrating: the story has only viewer assumptions of the story’s final conclusion.

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PART SEVEN: CONCLUSION

OSN was a softer, milder, less spicy version of Pretty Noona. Both female lead characters were women who were trying to find their rightful place in a relationship. Both had failed in the past. The open question is whether they would learn from their past mistakes. In Noona, the answer was an intentional NO as SYJ stated in numerous post-series interviews. In OSN, the answer was intentionally left unanswered by the writer and director.

As to the performances, Son Ye Jin and Jung Hae In were stronger and had wider range in Noona than Hae In and Han Ji Min had in OSN. The director cast OSN in more darkness, trying to convey the dark clouds over the main leads, to the point of making the characters appear more reserved and pensive.

As to the story lines, it was both sides of the same coin. In Noona, the leads were powerful together in good private times but weak in their public moments. In OSN, they were always doubting whether they were right for each other to cloud both the good and bad times in their relationship. While the Noona pair rushed into their romance to crash and burn, the OSN pair waited and waited to be picked from the vine before the fruit rotted in the sun.

The biggest weakness in both series was the story writing. Both series could have been better plotted out to reach the full potential of the characters.
The lack of dialogue beyond the superficial comments at critical moments was a glaring weakness in both shows. And the director’s overuse of the main theme songs became annoying.
But the greatest fault was the time spent in OSN on the “break up” story line.

I know that most viewers will prefer OSN over Noona because in the end, the OSN leads were still together actively trying to make their relationship work. It seems like a “happier” ending. But to me, that seems like a hollow victory after 30 episodes of being stuck in neutral. I wonder if the characters jobs, a librarian and pharmacist, symbolize the dull and repetitive personalities of each that lead to dull and repetitive relationships in their personal lives. It struck me that JA and JH had a difficult time getting out of their defensive shells to open up to each other in a lasting way.

In the end of each series, all that was left was the hope that the OTP couples would stay together. I am in the minority but I believe a well-written drama where the leads do not end up together is better than a story that leads to an unclear and ambiguous ending. I think that is what happened in both series.

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I just want to applaud you for this thesis. I remember your comments at the end of Pretty Noona, and they really helped me reconcile myself with the direction the show took. Thanks for your insights here as well. (I've only read half so far. Going back to finish)

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"well-written drama where the leads do not end up together is better than a storythan a story that leads to an unclear and ambiguous ending ". In One Spring Night the end it's not ambigous. Nobody can know what it will happen in the futur. Our couple knows that, they know that they will have obstacles, clashes, etc. The drama tells only the first part of their story, it doesn't mean it's badly written, it's just a choice. But they gave a lot of reasons to believe in this couple during all the episodes. I don't think to be a librarian and a pharmarcist is dull. They're normal people in normal world with normal struggles like us.

For Pretty Noona, the fact they had a difference of age made everybody thought their relationship was not serious and not possible. It wore their relationship out. They're not mature and strong enough to handle that. But their reunion after so long showed that they really had a bond but they needed to believe in it and fight for it. But everytime they made each other stronger together.

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I have not watched Pretty Noona, based on poor reviews it received from sources I trust, but I don't think I agree with your assessment of OSN.

Imho, OSN was a nuanced love story between two people of different backgrounds/circumstances, who were deeply attracted to each other from the start, but who would need to navigate several challenges – both internal to them as individuals and of family, friends and the wider society – if they wanted to have a chance to be together.

We really don't have any idea of timeline, or all of the conversations that were had between our OTP, but their honest and forthright conversations along with their willingness to be vulnerable in front of each other, and the fact that they actually love and care (deeply) for each other, I think, would augur well for them in the long term.

With regard to the show's ending, clearly not all of the challenges had been resolved, and there was a sense that they would not be rushing into marriage. But in that intervening period, they would be committed to each other, and would continue to strengthen the union they are building, which I think is the best, and most realistic, ending we could have hoped for in lives and situations that are not perfect and not without difficulty

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Did u guys notice the soundtrack?? It changed with their relationship status.
It started with No Direction (when she was confused)
Then moved to Oscar Dunbar's Spring rain (slowly realised her feelings)
Then to Is it you ... To finally Spring Waltz

All the songs were so beautiful and did complete justice to the series!!

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Yes, I noted that as well!
Some of the songs, especially No Direction (I think), were used quite effectively throughout series

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I'm happy to say that I enjoyed all the songs in One Spring Night but my complaint is their overuse. The verses fit particularly well with the story line but the repetition became annoying. My wish for this director is to invest in some instrumental pieces for background and not the constant repeat of the songs. Less is more!

This is a significant problem in Pretty Noona. I tried to watch again and had to mute "Stand By Your Man" every time it played which is depressingly frequent. I finally gave up.

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I agree. The songs were great, but they were waaay over used. A little more variety, and then I would have appreciated the 3 main songs more. (I had to mute "Stand by Your Man" in Pretty Noona too.)

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Oh! How clever. I didn't pick up on that near the end. *applauds*

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Ploughing through the comments thus far, I feel like most of what I'd contribute about the ending/show has already been said.

So I'd just like to share how great it's been to "live watch" a kdrama for the first time in such great company - reading through the recaps from @abirdword & @teriyaki, accented by the thoughtful insights of the Beanie community has been as much of a highlight as watching Jung Hae In's gorgeous face every week. So thanks all!

The show was great. I loved it to pieces. I'm sad that it's over. On to the next! :D

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How about a season 2 of One Spring Night?!

I think there is room for lots of stories to continue from this drama.

1. What happens to JI and JH and their attempt to make a family. All sorts of conflicts in setting up living and working arrangements. Can they build on their love?

2. What happens to Seo In as she becomes the next single parent.
Really, there's tons of stories they could take on from her standpoint especially as a psuedo-celebrity.

3. Jae In and Young Jae? <3 <3 <3

4. Ki Seok: can he find himself a new love or will he give in to his father and just go for the assemblyman's daughter assuming she doesn't mind an arranged marriage. What does he really want?
Would love to see him in a band, even if its just for fun.

5. JI's parents becoming grandparents. Her father learning to love Eun-u.

This could be an awesome weekend drama!

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I wanted a season 2 focused on Seo In becoming a single mother and a season 3 focused on Jae In finding what she wants to do.

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Is there anyway we can tell.the writers?? I wish they actually take out seasons...
But the problem is the main characters won't take secondary roles ...

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I would really love a Summer Day and Fall Afternoon or anything else :D

Yeah, Han Ji Min and Jung Hae In should accept to be second lead but the PD seems to be very convincing :p

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It's not the PD but their agency that matters ... Korean artist are very restricted with their contracts

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This show’s given me something to look forward to every Thu and Fri (so much for Netflix releasing on Wed and Thu - they lied to me!)

I became a fan of Joon Hae-in after Pretty Noona. Stoked to hear he’s starring in a movie with Kim Go-eun, I hope I’ll be able to catch it.

Anyhoos, my favourite moment from this episode is really Hyun-soo’s “I think Jiho’s getting married soon!” before the cheeky dart into the lift hahaha. He and Young-jae are such sweet friends to Ji Ho, and I hope they’ll keep their friendship alive until they’re old.

I’m quite glad the show kept the ending open, not attempting to tie it too neatly with a wedding scene (though I would love to see that!)

And random thought - the actor for Shi Hoon looked really handsome in the lunch scene. He has a great smile, and I think the casual shirt really suits him 🤷🏻‍♀️🙈

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Kim Go-Eun-Jung HaeIn's movie looks lovely. I want to see it!

If you want to see the actor playing Shi Hoon in a better role, watch Designated Survivor: 60 Days. His character is funny and smart.

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OMG that's where I've been seeing him. He's very savvy as the speech writer and now press secretary.

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I really enjoyed this drama to the very end. I wasn't planning on watching this at all but thank goodness I did. It was the endearing cuts that got me hooked. I really liked that it didn't have a lot of plot twists and too dramatic antics because I just loved the realness of this drama.
I thought I was gonna hate Giseok's father the most but Principal Lee was a whole different story. I tried to understand him but it was really hard. He remained stuck to his beliefs but he's an old man with a very public, very moral image and that's what I tried to support his stubbornness with.
In any case, this drama was so worth it. :) Thank you for completing the recaps!

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This drama was very well-done, very well-written. I loved the tone throughout, I appreciated that it wasn't over the top, but that it dealt with real, social issues at the same time. It was a cool, real, and nice drama, with great acting and I'm glad I watched it!

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I know I am in the minority here. Although I enjoyed watching this, it was a pretty 'eh' show. Moody was the adjective that always came to mind. It seemed we were told about the personal interactions but not really shown them. I didn't see any real spark or magnetism between the two main leads, we were just told they were in love. And I didn't think the ex was that bad a guy. We were just told he was. He did act like a jealous fool, but then he was dumped by his girlfriend for someone else. And our leading lady? She was pretty mean and insensitive. Because I wasn't convinced about what a jerk her ex was, I didn't fully buy into why she had to be so mean to him. So her meanness, just came across as, well, mean. I don't think she had to stay with him, I just think there are nicer and not so nice ways to dump a boyfriend of 4 years. And her reaction to drunken Ji-ho when he wore his heart on his sleeve? It was to get mad at his 'drunken' behavior. He was showing his heart, being honest, and all she did was get offended. And he has a kid that must come first. Expressing his worries seems to me a natural and very reasonable thing to do. It didn't seem like she got that at all, or got how having a kid would change one's approach to commitment.
So, I enjoyed watching this, but give me pretty noona anyday. I don't have to always like characters decisions to appreciate a show. But I bought into their dynamics much more than I did in this show.

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soooo.... was it better than pretty noona who shall not be named and is it worth watching?

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It was better than Pretty Noona in many ways, not the least of which in that you didn't want to kill yourself over how utterly depressing the conclusion was.

I thought it was good in the same ways and frustrating in some of the same ways but overall worth watching.

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Soundtrack !!! The best !

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After watching the endings of Something in the Rain and Nice Guy I concluded that Korean screenwriters just don't know how to end a story. Both were such a letdown. I love this series One Spring Night but I feared another disappointing ending so much that I read the recap of the last 4 episodes before watching them. I was so relieved with the ending so now I can watch them on Netflix with confidence. This series had become so important to me I just couldn't run the risk of another failed conclusion. Thank you Korea for such a wonderful experience!

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I'm really glad that I watched this show. I was quite apprehensive, especially after the disappointment that Pretty Noona was. Now, I can put it to rest.

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The performance of the main male lead Jung Hae-in is really awesome. I already saw his performance in Something in the Rain and he was already pretty good. We had access to the last episodes 15 & 16 (1 hr episodes) in France yesterday and that was the ending I longed for. The scene I love most is the one where Jung Hae-in is drunk and shows how vulnerable and reckless he is. But this is also what makes him so human and so true. The performance at this point was stunning. The mothers as often are the ones who fix things and make them right. They all are so courageous to go against culture, society and its rules. I love this drama because it gives insights of Korean society (domestic violence, sexual abuse and rape towards spouses, the place of divorced people and single mothers and fathers, ect.). The OST is as beautiful as for Something in the Rain. Again we find Rachel Yamagata, Carla Bruni among others. Looking forward the next film of Jung Hae-in!

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I enjoyed this love story thoroughly. I have watched it now five or six times and every time I find the acting delightful. Also I loved the down to earth sentiments and realistic plots. Other drama series I have watched tend to overkill on the drama part with abductions, murderplots and what not. This story sticks to the simple every day fact of life, very recognizable and beautifully interwoven by the director. Thank you very much for this great show.

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