54

Doom at Your Service: Episode 14

Now that Doom and his lady have recovered their memories, they will have to face the fact that they can no longer run from their fate. Whether you’re a god or human, some things are inevitable. When the end comes, all you can do is decide how you want to spend your time: together, or apart.

 
EPISODE 14 RECAP

After recovering their memories and finding one another again, Myeol-mang and Dong-kyung sit outside her apartment. She apologizes for making the deal to erase their memories. She had wanted to bear all the consequences herself, yet everything ended up the same. Myeol-mang jokes that he’s sorry too: For being so handsome that she fell for him again. Hur.

She asks what they should do now and Myeol-mang says they should finally accept their fate, acknowledging that nothing they do will change what is coming. Dong-kyung knows that this was he plan all along and he means to disappear and save her.

Dong-Kyung blames herself for starting all of this with her wish, but Myeol-mang insists she didn’t do anything wrong because it led to them meeting. If they hadn’t, he would have continued to be nothing. “I want to mean something to you.”

Returning to the hospital, they are met by Soo-ja who yells at Dong-kyung for leaving and admonishes Myeol-mang for being away for the last few days. Dong-kyung is surprised that everyone’s memories of Myeol-mang have returned. Then he shocks her further when by smoothly answering Soo-ja that he had some things to take care of, you know, before their wedding. (Say wut?!)

Hyun-kyu wallows over at the café after his failed first-of-three dates with Ji-na. Poor Sun-kyung is trying to piece together what happened with Ji-na through his boss’ mutterings about “her” kissing another man in the rain. Hyun-kyu finally sits up to clarify that he was dumped…and Sun-kyung gently lays him back down to continue moping.

Joo-ik picks that moment to stride in and tell the dejected Hyun-kyu to come back home. Sun-Kyung remembers Ji-na saying her #1 and #2 guys live together and figures out that Joo-ik is #2. Shocked, he runs off to pester her about kissing another guy, but she speed walks away.

The two burst right into Dong-kyung’s hospital room, but their mini-drama is quickly forgotten when Soo-ja announces the upcoming nuptials. Dong-kyung tries to deny it, but Myeol-mang’s firm confirmation seals the deal. Sun-Kyung grabs Myeol-mang while Ji-na snags Dong-Kyung, tugging the affianced couple out of the room.

The boys head up to the roof for some guy talk. Declaring that he really admires Myeol-mang for his choice, Sun-Kyung gives his future brother-in-law a bank book, revealing that he’s been saving money for years to give back to his sister. He asks Myeol-mang to use it for the wedding.

As though revealing a huge secret, Sun-kyung admits that he first thought Myeol-mang was a free-loader taking advantage of his sister. (Myeol-mang the mind reader just smirks.) He knows now that Dong-kyung is lucky to have met Myeol-mang and adds that Myeol-mang must have led a nice life as well to end up with her. Ooof.

Sun-kyung sincerely asks that his future brother-in-law to remain by his sister’s side and treat her well. Touched, Myeol-mang promises that he will.

The mood is a bit different over with the ladies. Ji-na can’t believe that Dong-kyung wants to get married and is mildly flipping out. Dong-kyung just answers that she wants to do whatever Myeol-mang wants.

Ji-na tries to argue that marriage shouldn’t be taken lightly, but Dong-kyung interrupts her with a hug. Cluthing her friend, she starts crying that no matter what she does, she’s running out of time and doesn’t know what to do. Ji-na returns the hug and assures her that it’s not her fault, promising to support her no matter what.

Myeol-mang leaves Sun-kyung, but once he’s alone he can’t hold back his grief anymore and falls to his knees, gasping out tears. Next to him, a butterfly flaps feebly against the ground then stills.

Hyun-kyu returns to Joo-ik’s apartment and the two share the most awkward dinner ever. Watching Joo-ik wash the dishes after, Hyun-kyu notes that Joo-ik always used to watch him this way, waiting for him. He tells Joo-ik not to wait anymore, planning to move out so he can learn to grow up.

Over at the hospital, Doctor Jung is all smiles as he grants Dong-kyung’s request to postpone treatment until after her wedding. He admits that the upcoming surgery is dangerous, but encourages her to live a little longer, be a little happier.

Now that Dong-kyung is returning home (until after the wedding), Sun-kyung is worried about her being outside the hospital. Ji-na agrees that she’s worried as well, but tells him that she’ll take responsibility. Since Dong-kyung cried in front of her, she’s going to do everything she can to make sure her friend can live the last of her life with no regrets.

Heh, ever the chameleon, Myeol-mang is now lounging as a patient in Dong-kyung’s room. She finds him posing on the bed the same way he once did in her apartment. Turning on the charm he pouts that she should be happier, since not ever girl gets to marry a guy she thought was handsome the first time they met.

Myeol-mang tries to cheer her up with the bank book that Sun-kyung saved for her, but Dong-kyung wordlessly hugs him instead. His smile dropping, Myeol-mang hugs her back, both comforting the other the best they can.

Hyun-kyu takes Ji-na out to their old high school athletics field for their second date. He reminisces back to when they first met and what drew him in was how her eyes were always honest, unlike his. He comes clean about getting sick and failing his SATs, then choosing to run rather than tell the truth. He had believed that he would have failed anyways and was relieved to find a way to avoid facing her.

When he left the country, all he wanted was to go back to her, but he couldn’t do it. Ji-na asked why he never found her when he returned from abroad and he admits that he was embarrassed. He thought it was better to be a bad guy than a pathetic guy, but in the end that made him even more pathetic.

Hyun-kyu finally apologizes for leaving her the way he did. Looking around the field, he says it still feels big to him, guessing that means he still hasn’t grown up. Reminding Ji-na that they still have one more date left, he tells her to ask him out again only if she really wants to see him.

The two split ways outside the school, but Ji-na turns to look back at Hyun-kyu, the same way she did in that hallway a decade ago. Hyun-kyu pauses as he once did, but this time, instead of turning around to see her, he continues walking forward. Ji-na watches him go with a quiet “Farewell.”

Hyun-kyu wanders back to the café where Joo-ik is waiting for him outside. Seeing him there, Hyun-kyu breaks down crying. Joo-ik pats his once-student’s back and Hyun-kyu sobs out that he’s not running away this time. He warns Joo-ik to never mess up or he’ll run back to Ji-na and take his spot. Joo-ik smiles and promises to never lower his guard.

The next morning Ji-na goes for an early hike. At the summit, she watches the sunrise and finally seems at peace. Dong-kyung tells us Ji-na later said that at that moment, rather than a lost teenager, she felt like was finally where she belonged. That no matter how long it took her the get there, she would have ended up in the same place eventually, nothing could change that. Dong-kyung supposes that means it was her fate.

Struggling with her own fate that cannot be changed, Dong-kyung meets with the goddess one last time. She desperately asks for help one last time, but the goddess says it’s out of her hands now and all they can do is accept what will happen.

Dong-kyung refuses, swearing that she will doom the world instead and save Myeol-mang, but the goddess just hugs her. Saying that she’s lived through countless cycles of life and death, no one knows better about perishing. Everyone cries and tries to fight it, but in the end all you can do is accept it. “Because it’s his choice. And that choice is his fate. So just accept it. Accept Doom.”

The goddess tells Dong-kyung that this is what Myeol-mang wants; this is his happy ending. Dong-kyung can’t believe that this could be a happy ending when they’re both miserable, but God argues that there is a reason behind everything she’s gone through. That reason will be her happy ending, but she can only find it if she stays alive. God wishes her to live a long and happy life, because that’s what Myeol-mang wants.

At “work,” Myeol-mang stops by an old woman selling roses. He tells her it’s time and that he’s the last person who will buy her flowers. He bids her goodbye, and she leaves all her wares behind, calling them a burden now that it’s time for her to go.

Dong-kyung returns home as an outpatient. Her doorbell rings and she scoffs to once again see the mountain and Italy scenes through her peephole. Myeol-mang pops out from behind the door the same he as when they first (officially) met and presents her with a whole bouquet of roses, cheerily asking her to marry him. Too cute.

Myeol-mang says he received the roses as a gift from someone whose life is ending today. He calls it a person who is about to disappear giving them to someone else who will soon disappear. Standing in each other’s arms, Dong-kyung asks to always stay together and never part, forever.

For the time that they have left, Dong-kyung and Myeol-mang spend every day with each other; Reading, walking, cooking, watching tv, even falling asleep together. The two go to see the tree that Myeol-mang had said was dying and he is surprised to see that there are green leaves on it. He wonders if it may yet flower one more time, so Dong-kyung says they should come see it together, next spring.

Dong-kyung narrates that spring will come again and the sun will continue to rise each morning, even after Myeol-mang is gone. His life will end but hers will begin. She thinks, “So every year when spring comes, and every time morning is here, I will think of you throughout my entire life. While I be able to endure that? Will that life be any different from doom?” Oh man, this is gonna hurt.

We are down to D-1 and Dong-kyung sends out the gifts she bought for everyone: Ji-na’s fountain pen, Soo-ja’s designer handbag, and Sun-kyung four boxes of shoes. She includes notes to all of them, telling them to be strong, saying goodbye, and thanking them for being her family.

Lastly, Dong-kyung visits her parent’s urns. She admits being scared since she doesn’t know what she’ll choose, but that either way it’s going to hurt.

Myeol-mang finds Dong-kyung outside the crematorium and brings her to a library for his work. He discloses that words die too when people stop using them and he’s here to bear witness as they fade away.

Noting her sad face, Myeol-mang adds that there is a short list of words that will never disappear and her name is one of them (Dong Kyung translates to “admiration.”). Dong-kyung asks if “Sa-ram” (her name for him meaning “human”) is also on that list. He smiles that it is.

That night, Dong-kyung tries so hard to stay awake but can’t. She grumpily warns him to stay with her and he sweetly promises not to disappear. Once she’s asleep, Myeol-mang heads out for one more farewell.

Back at the broken bridge, Myeol-mang meets God a final time to say goodbye. He asks if she knew all along that he would make this choice, since a god knows everything. She responds that everything is uncertain, suggesting that maybe he should bet on the possibility that Dong-kyung’s wish doesn’t have the ability to bring doom on the world after all.

Myeol-mang refuses, saying instead that he will bet on the one sure way he has to save her life. It is the only way to keep his promise, protect her, and save the world. The goddess notes that he seems to have more to protect than she does.

God reveals that she plans to stick around a little longer, extended her life a bit further. Myeol-mang is surprised since this is the first time she’s every done that. She replies that she has something she still wants to see in this life: A flower in full bloom.

Whoops. Myeol-mang’s sneak out wasn’t sneaky enough and he returns to find Dong-kyung completely distraught, thinking that he vanished already. He rushes to hold her and she cries that they’re almost out of time. Desperate she asks him to use her last wish to take away her love for him, for anyone. Make her unable to love.

Looking like his heart is breaking, Myeol-mang refuses, stating he has to save her. She yells that a life without him means nothing, but he says it has meaning for him. If she brings doom, he will have to live in a world without her and everyone she loved.

Myeol-mang insists that humans can find a way to love again, but he cannot. Echoing Dong-kyung’s words from long before, he tells her she can one day love again because she is human, while he doesn’t eat, sleep, or cry, because he is not.

Dong-kyung refuses and breaks down in his arms. She sobs that she can’t live in a world without him. Myeol-mang face crumples and he holds her close, crying as well.

When they both calm down, Dong-kyung asks to finally make her wish. She wants him to take her to the world of doom. Whether it is real or in her mind, she wants to spend her last day with him in his world. Myeol-mang covers her eyes and when she opens them again, they’re standing in the city, except it is completely void of all living creatures, as though everyone simply vanished.

Myeol-mang says that here, in the world of Doom, he has no purpose. There is nothing here, so there’s nothing for him to bring doom upon. He exists for the things that disappear, but when there is nothing that will disappear, he ceases to exist.

Dong-kyung tells him he still looks lonely when he sees things disappear. He points out that she has the same expression when she looks at him.

Dong-kyung asks to go to a church. She kneels at a pue but Myeol-mang wonders why since without humans, there is no god in this world. She points out that she is here as a human, so there must be a god. With that, they both bow their heads to pray.

The two watch the sunset later and Dong-kyung asks what Myeol-mang prayed for. He jokes that it’s between him and the deity. Dong-kyung admits that she prayed one final time not to love anyone, knowing it won’t work but still wanting to try.

Facing Myeol-mang, Dong-kyung confesses that she loves him. She apologizes for falling in love with him, but he is the one who matter to her most in the world. With hi heart in his eyes, Myeol-mang thanks her for loving him. He leans in and gently kisses Dong-kyun a final time while the world around them darkens and vanishes.

Back in the real world, Myeol-mang holds out his hand to Dong-kyung, saying it is almost midnight.

Myeol-mang promises that everything will be alright and Dong-kyung slowly takes his hand. Tears stream down her face and she whispers again that she loves him. He smiles sweetly, “I know.” Do-kyung is scared, but Myeol-mang tells her that their contract is over and promises to take all her sadness and pain with him when he goes.

Holding her face, Myeol-mang confides that at the church he prayed for her happiness. He says he was created for humans so she shouldn’t worry, asking her instead to live a happy life. Do-kyung tearfully begs him to please stay, saying she can’t be happy without him.

Myeol-mang reminds Dong-kyung of when they ran in the rain and he told her the even when she doesn’t have an umbrella, she just has to run for a bit and she’ll get home soon. “I want you to run once I’m gone. Don’t look back and just run. Then you’ll soon be…”

Before he can finish, Myeol-mang begins to fade away. He silently vanishes, leaving her standing alone with her hand reaching out into empty air. Dong-kyung collapses the ground, sobbing her heart out while it starts to rain.

 
COMMENTS

I think I’m broken. This couple may have legitimately broken me. It’s the only explanation for the huddled, sobbing mess that is all that’s left of my once dazzling self. (Or at a least a self that wasn’t wrecked from ugly crying for a half hour.) I almost can’t even find the words for how much this episode moved me. Oh my heart.

Alright, how about we rewind and start with our side trio – give me a chance to work my way back up. I will admit that I have greatly disliked the triangle of perpetual moodiness going on between Ji-na, Hyun-kyu, and Joo-ik. It all seemed like one big toxic mess of relationships, and I could not see any purpose for them besides providing a narrative break from our main leads. Even now I’m still not fully on board and if this drama was just those three, I would’ve dropped it long ago. That being said, something about them this week really resonated with me. This entire episode was centered around acceptance of what cannot be changed and meeting your fate with grace. And here we have three people who became lost because they could not accept what was.

Hyun-kyu was stuck, never truly growing up but instead always running away from his moment of failure. His embarrassment and pride not only shaped his life, but essentially stopped it. Ji-na has always been in a weird limbo, constantly looking back and not able to move on because she never got closure. She may have grown up, but she never let go. Lastly, Joo-ik’s guilt from causing Hyun-kyu’s failed exam left him always hovering around Hyun-kyu and Ji-na, waiting for the two of them to move on so he could take the next step as well. I still think their storyline could have been handled much better and I do not regret skipping past some of their previous scenes. However, it was undeniably a beautiful moment when Hyun-kyu paused while walking away from Ji-na – a rewind to the past and then him choosing not to look back this time, but go forward instead. He faced his shame to tell the truth, Ji-na got her long-awaited good-bye, and they were both able to start their lives again. It tied nicely with the episode’s main theme of how running from your fate doesn’t change it. We all have to face something in order to overcome it.

And face their fate our main couple did. They have both grown so much, with Dong-kyung honestly admitting her feelings and Myeol-mang seeing that the world is worth saving. They’ve come full circle from their shared apathy and they were able to do it because they had each other. Dong-kyung’s plan really did come true: she fell in love with Doom and thus saved herself and the world. But the irony is that in the end, it was Myeol-mang who truly saved everyone. I loved the conversation between Myeol-mang and the goddess when she suggests that there is a chance that Dong-kyung might not be able to bring Doom upon the world. He never even hesitated with his decision to sacrifice himself, since this way he could save not only the world, but Dong-kyung as well.

I was trying to figure out why the characters kept saying that this, disappearing, was Myeol-mang’s choice. It kept coming up over and over about him choosing this. Then I realized that for his entire life, he never had a choice in anything. He was created for humans and destined to simply exist as a doom button. This was his happy ending because he could choose it.

But dear gawd did he have to go like that?! My heart still hurts from seeing him smile while fading away, all the while telling Dong-kyung to live a happy life running in the rain. Ooof. I hope that crafty little goddess is hiding one heck of a deus ex machina in that flowerpot of hers because if he is gone forever, I might just wish doom upon the world myself.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

54

Required fields are marked *

Raise your hand if you'd rather face the end of the world than have to watch another show like this.

11
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

Raise hand in drive by as I said I'd never come by these recaps again.
Dropping this show gave me intense relief from actual physical pain.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I live for shows like this.

8
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

So do I.

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

There’s a Canadian movie called “Last Night” from 1998 that gives me some of the same vibes as this drama. Early Sandra Oh movie; it’s about the end of the world (due to some natural disaster everyone has known about for months, something like a meteor) and what a group of individuals do on that last night.

If you like the theme of people facing an inevitable end and how it impacts their actions, I remember really liking it (in a “made me think” way, not a “fun for the whole family!” way). Most popular movies focus on the meteor bit and long-shot heroics, like in “Armageddon”, but the ones that focus on different methods of acceptance can be really lovely.

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋🙋

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

SIGH, I don't know what we did to deserve this drama. Like why is it not good.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh my God 😹

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I’ve always loved the main theme of this show, but now I think I know why a bit more - Billy Collins’ poem “Bermuda” or Death Cab for Cutie’s “What Sarah Said”, both of which lodged in my brain early on. Dong Kyung and Myul Mang have had their ending written from the start. The tone of the show made it obvious to me early on that this wasn’t going to be one of those mystical hijinks shows, but would be much closer to charting the stages of grief. But in a way that still showed how brilliant life can be, even when you’re at the end of it, and how worth it.

My friend died before she was 30 of bowel cancer. It should have been caught; it wasn’t. She and her husband created the most brilliant final days. I didn’t want her to leave, none of us did, SHE didn’t want to go either but the love they had for each other and the stacked sacrifices and exchanges they had and the blazing love he still has for her today is what I hoped to see in this show, and I’m seeing some of it which makes me… not happy exactly, because it’s painful. But content because it rings true.

“Love is watching someone die” is a pretty true statement to me - you can hear it as gruesome and macabre, but you can also hear it as knowing you will bear absolutely anything to be with another person until the end, and that’s what this show does for me. There are lighter, sillier ways this story could’ve been told, but I appreciate how it’s being approached.

8
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Personally, I've felt that this writer has indeed been trying to give us much to think about in facing many great questions:
What does it mean to be alive?
what does it mean to be a good kid or an adult?
Can death be good?
Is there such a thing as a good death?
What gives meaning to living?

Despite the more cryptic elements that probably have frustrated many, I appreciate show's serious attempt to handle weighty subjects, in a relatively light but not flippant way.

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

This drama resonates for those who have shared an inescapable countdown to death with someone they have loved. It does an amazing job of capturing the stages of grieving, especially bargaining, and now acceptance.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

True very true both DK and MM's expressions are spot on. It makes you think that may be how you would be in similar situations

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

Alternate Endings Game: Dong-kyung wishes doom upon the world... and it turns out that our OTP is the next Adam & Eve.

5
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks @candidclown!

I've enjoyed every episode of this show. The truths it highlights which get us thinking, and the lovely growth in our characters.

I've even enjoyed the second lead threesome, as parallels to the the main pairing and goddess (Girl Deity). Their trajectory has been more or less on par, showing us what needed to be done and where our OTP would likely end up.

I look forward to the last 2 episodes, expecting of course, from the many hints already given, that the plant will indeed bloom in goddess' pot, and in the meta showcased in an earlier episode, that like Lee Yeon in TOTNT, after a separation and seeming 'death', there can be a reunion.

I enjoyed the Pinocchio allusion for the whole series. I agree with your assessment on the need to let go, leave and grow. Several characters needed to get away from tying themselves up emotionally, essentially making puppets of aspects of themselves, impeding their growth. They had to choose to make the grown up, responsible decisions, even when these would be painful. In the choosing of the appropriately good endings of separation, facing responsibility, accepting 'fate' and self-sacrifice, Pinocchio had become not just a real boy, but an adult.

9
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Nice to see you enjoying this one too @growingbeautifully!

I actually do enjoy a few aspects about the love triangle, like the theme of moving on. It just felt sort of slow and out-of-place, and sapped tension away from the main conflict at times. There were a few key moments in which it was really well-incorporated into the theme of the episodes though, this one, especially. I think I just wish it was about Ji-na moving on from the love triangle entirely, instead of complicating things by staying involved with one of them.

When the goddess said she’ll be staying on a while longer to watch the flowers bloom, it seemed like she meant she’ll be waiting for Myeol-mang’s return. Wonder what is in store for her next and whether she or her death will play a more active role in bringing him back from the ether.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Great to read you again @chandler. I seem to like 'challenging' shows LOL. The kind that are not quite clear and upfront about what's being said and what's happening.

That being said, though, I have noticed that the writing was planned well in advance so that many of the initial dialogues (Episodes 1 - 4 at least) and situations get their bookending by Ep 14.

It's highly likely that Cha Joo Ik is the parallel of the girl deity in how he intervened, interfered and manipulated events. Lee HK is the kid who was strung around like a puppet by his pride (his cafe is decorated with Pinocchios) and can be likened to Myeol Mang, while Na Ji Na is the one who has to learn to let go of attachments that are past their time, the way Dong Kyung was overly attached to being the one who did the giving, who didn't cry, who didn't want to let go of Myeol Mang.

I've liked the wisdom offered in the midst of trying and making mistakes, and the contradictory coming and going of sentiments that are so human.

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

While there are a lot of things this show could do better, it does reflect well on choices. Hyeon-kyu had amazing character development in this episode for ten minutes before walking into the sunset and out of the set. We might just see him for the final two episodes, but then solely as decoration. My poor Kang Tae-oh! May you have better luck in your next drama!

Concerning the OTP, I did appreciate them actually acting like a couple in the montage, but I have a problem with it just being a montage and the days counting down way too fast for me as a viewer. Their emotional connection, for me, is just too ungrounded.

The goddess seriously did a lousy job of erasing them from each others' lives, what was the whole point if a home screen and a phone book is all it takes to demolish the facade? This even insults my suspension of belief.

While I do look forward to the two final episodes and, I'm calling it: The rebirth trope. If this indeed is what's coming, it'll be the third time this couple has a fresh start.

I'm sad to say my memory of this show will consist of 90% Lee Soo-hyuk and 10% Seo In Guk's make-up. That hair, that lipstick - I still can't see WHY?

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The proposal was a bit sudden but overall I thinking WHY DID HE WANT TO DIE??? normally when you meet the person you love you want to stay with that person not VANISH IN FRONT OF HER!!!! please tell me he's coming back next week 😭😫 please 😭😭😭😭😭😭

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

There's still plenty of time for them to mess it up and for me to be massively dissapointed at how it turns out but for now, all other flaws aside, I think the drama did great in deciding to tackle the end of the contract and Myeol-mangs dissapearence in episode 14 instead of dragging it until the last hour and then having the hero return in the last few minutes for the happy ending like so many dramas do. This way they have time to deal with the fallout and give a proper resolution *fingers crossed *. It's pretty obvious Myeol-mang is not gone for good, there's no way they would get rid of Seo In Guk in episode 14, I just hope it's going to be the actual Myeol-mang and not a random human who happens to look like him or a reincarnation without his memories from his time as Doom.

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Heh. I wouldn’t mind him (and the show) trolling her (and us) by faking amnesia as payback for her earlier decision, just as long as that’s as far as it goes. I feel like he’s more than earned a human life fully cognizant of how he’d like to spend it. Seems a pretty fair severance package for having to doom each and every thing for the last zillion years, if you ask me.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Trolling us with fake amnesia I wouldn't mind, as long as it's the real Myeol-mang we get and not just a carbon copy of him. He's earned his freedom, but dramas pull the reincarnation thing quite often so I'm wary

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Nobody is commenting on the fact that, when Dong-kyung made that choice (of fate reset), the goddess told her that the contract is now invalid? So how come that when they get their memories back, the contract makes a comeback as well? The whole point of what the goddess did was to invalidate the contract so that the world wouldn't risk to be obliterated.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I’m kind of curious about this too. Is it possible that Myul Mang is wishing himself into oblivion needlessly? That this is the test - the contract is broken, but he’s so focused on keeping Dong Kyung safe that Myul Mang sort of deleted himself. That it wasn’t god or a contract clause; he wished himself out of existence.

If so, can he wish himself back, essentially? Because Myul Mang has two plausible objectives here - 1: his original goal of escaping his existence, which is why the deal happened in the first place, and 2: his evolved goal of doing anything he can to keep Dong Kyung safe, and not allowing any risk into that equation. If this is a test to see what’s more important to Myul Mang, his own non-existence or Dong Kyung’s safety and happiness, I could see a scenario where his ability to love her so completely brings him back to her.

If that’s what happened here, then he utterly believed her that he’s the person she loves most in the world, and that total lack of doubt enabled his confident fade-away. Her love for him is clear to both of them. But his love for her could be validated by this final test - when he ceases to exist on this plane, does he become completely fulfilled and content, or does he long for her and wish he existed in her world even if it meant continuing to be Doom?

5
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I got the idea that the contract would only remain void if they didn’t remember it. The amnesia and their subsequent regression seemed to be framed as both the cause and the consequence of the contract dissolving. The final convo between Myul-mang and the goddess also seemed to imply that it is once again binding now that they recall it.

That said, you do bring up an interesting point that — had the contract remained dissolved — would Myul-mang go to such drastic measures to insure he could still save her, that he would do all within his power? I think he definitely would. Even if that meant taking measures he hadn’t addressed with her.

Still, I think the evidence of the contract disappearing (while all their phone contact information conspicuously remained) and then reappearing, highlights that the contract was always tied to their memory of it.

I know many felt sort of underwhelmed by the goddess girl’s futile attempt to “eternal sunshine of the spotless mind” them, but I kind of like that there are limitations to what she can do for them (provided that wasn’t actually just an intentional test on her part of their love/growth — you never know with this one).

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

“does he long for her and wish he existed in her world even if it meant continuing to be Doom?”

I’ve always thought true growth for MM might be having the willingness to exist on as Doom, that it would be worth it to live through DK’s life and to remember her and live on fulfilling his duties. I didn’t particularly like when DK wished for everyone to forget her in a previous episode, but I found MM’s response telling — he seemed very averse to the idea, perhaps already sensing that it is far better to remember, even if its bittersweet.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Frankly, the way it was written, it was murky. If we have to squeeze our brains - and I don't think any of us is an idiot - to find convoluted explanations, it means that the writers wrote it in a fuzzy, unclear way, and it's their fault for not explaining it better. I'm not one who likes to be spoonfed the obvious, but this was too much.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

If this were an indi film I'd predict Dong-kyung will now spend her life visiting crash sites, emergency wards and natural disasters hoping to spot her lost Doom among the carnage. But that a bit dark for a K-drama.

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am so disappointed in this drama, but thank God there are only 2 episodes left. ha

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Best drama of the year so far.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You seem to be a bit of a troll, lol. I'm glad you enjoy it.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It started with a 4% rating and ended up with 2% rating. It is one the worst drama ever, produced by TvN.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Despite all the craziness happening, this episode made me cry like a baby. Kudos to SIG and PBY, who make this show so beautiful. Last two episodes would be pretty predictable, but if we're not getting a happy ending, I would be a sad bean for sure.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap @candidclown!

Well, well. If someone had told me that the first drama that would incite me to comment this year would be the one almost universally-panned on dramabeans as a KES-wannabe drama, I never would have believed it. If this drama is truly Goblin-inspired, I guess this is dramaland’s way of making up for the general dissatifaction that show caused me? Honestly, seems only fair.

I’ve been one of the few enjoying this drama pretty thoroughly, despite a few gripes here and there. It helps that I really feel the connection between the OTP, probably because both their personal struggles hit close to home for me, so them falling in love has felt more natural to me than it has for some.

I especially love that the consequences are of their own making. MM puts it well, that they’ve essentially been “hit by their own stone”. DK planned to use love as a weapon, without knowing what that really meant, ended up impaled on her own sword. And, while for MM, there’s a silver lining, in that he gets to save someone, he is also experiencing wanting to live for the first time, when he had originally set on this path to end his existence. And, though she gets to live, DK is forced to deal with the full brunt of the loss, to watch something she loves disappear. There was a lovely reversal between the two and, you could argue, that while MM is framed as the one making the sacrifice, by taking on his role from him, by giving him a reprieve from being the one to watch others disappear and allowing him to save her, what she did for him was just as powerful.

The leads accepting the full weight of their choices might bring them pain for now, but I’m sure their happiness will come and I appreciate that it feels earned. I’m surprisingly fully on board with whatever miracle the flower brings because the “possibility” it represents has been acknowledged from the start. Rather than finding a loophole that could easily save them both, I appreciate that there wasn’t an easy way out, that there was an actual cost for setting on to this course that could not be avoided. Because they did ultimately benefit from it and by accepting the consequences of the loophole the penalty offered them, it will make the eventual reprieve feel much more deserved.

10
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's beautifully said @chandler I also have really enjoyed this drama. I've wondered what sort of pleasure the antifans get from trashing the drama week after week and complaining so pitifully.

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks!

Eh, I have no problem with those disappointed with the show having their fun. It’s a way of coping. The intensity with which people express their hate towards this show does perplex me though since usually there is a certain degree of restraint here, even with the occasional snark.

I have had a problem with those no longer watching coming to the recaps just to make fans feel dumb. Someone I know is watching the show and I haven’t felt proud of the comment section here enough to suggest the DB recaps, which has honestly been pretty upsetting.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ha, I’ve been wondering if you could predict how much a kdrama fan will like Doom by gauging how much (or possibly why) they liked Goblin. They seem to occupy opposite poles.

I liked parts of Goblin, for instance the bromance and the humor, but actually DIDN’T like the worldbuilding, plot or pacing. I wouldn’t rewatch it. There’s far less humor in Doom and the side characters aren’t comedic (they’re infuriating), but I feel like the themes and plotting are tighter here and more coherent.

One way isn’t wrong and the other right - just interesting how preferences might be mapped to drama elements.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

“but actually DIDN’T like the worldbuilding, plot or pacing” — Same here.

Haha, my feelings for Goblin are so involved. I liked the cinematography, but really disliked the directing in the romantic moments (and I already had a hard enough time buying into the OTP). Some of the OSTs still grate on me because of all those slow-mos (though a recent parody from an adorable side pairing in True Beauty finally allowed me to “appreciate” one of my least favorite classic slo-mo scenes from the show, ha). This show punctuates certain moments in a similar way, but it doesn’t over-do it for the most part so it works for me.

Even the things I enjoyed, I had issues with. Like you, I liked some of the humor and bromance. However, sometimes even that felt forced to me. I don’t know how to explain it, but it was like Lee Dong Wook and Gong Yoo were putting on a skit rather than acting out their characters at times. That was ultimately endearing in its own way, though, just not my favorite approach.

Funny thing, this drama isn’t going for humor much of the time, but it does get a laugh from me when it does. I like that it doesn’t try to rely on it or force comedic scenes just for the sake of it. Here, they’ll occasionally undercut a serious situation by highlighting the humor already in it, like DK slowly crouching down when she had her run-in with MM in ep 12.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I ugly cried too, not just for DK and MM but for Ji-na and her boys too becos all finally came to terms with fate.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The number of call-back to past dialog and mirrored relationships among the characters means this series must've been meticulously laid-out. We'll do this throw-away line in episode two that will return in episode 14 as the perfect emotional line with greatly altered significance. Stuff like that doesn't happen when the writer's frantically writing-out scenes on-set while the penultimate episode's filming.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, precisely. It is the mark of a writer who has thought it through and planned the arc, to give us the complete coming full circle.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well, I’m late, as usual, but since I actually have the time to watch the episodes on time this week, figure I might as well take the time to comment my thoughts on the penultimate week of this drama, especially in light of the new recappers and their enthusiasm for the show.

First, before moving on to the ultimate angst , as one of the lone beanies that was actively excited for the mutual amnesia between the two leads, I have to give my critique of it. And, well, I totally set myself up for disappointment watching that preview last week. I totally thought MM confronted DK with the photo on his phone and was excited for both them trying to figure it out. It was still fun and lovely getting all the parallels to their past scenes. I’m sure the “repetition” probably just felt annoying to some, but I loved it.

Honestly, I could have loved a version of this where their memories didn’t come back so easily and they fell in love all over again, but I like that the contract isn’t so easy to undo. And I think the writer was pretty smart in depicting both the futility of trying to run away and how their draw for each other will always bring them back into each other’s orbit.

Kudos to both their acting in these two episodes. Really though, what was that espression on SIG’s face after he called her as “Kim Saram”. How am I supposed to deal with that?

(Btw, I’ve realized him calling on the phone was both a signifier of him remembering and being human — this writer has incorporated this PPL so thoughtfully that even though I sometimes laughed because of it, I can’t help but appreciate it too.)

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@candidclown

Honestly, the only reason the ending didn’t break me is because that scene of utter desperation after she thought he’d already disappeared already did. Finally, when she was at the end of her rope, she attempted to actually wish her ability to love away, just as I thought she would. And it led to such a beautiful moment of brutal honesty. Risking saving him, at the cost of her own life, would cause him far greater pain. Once she’s gone, no one will recognize “him”, not really. Saving her was incredibly meaningful to him and the people in her life. There was something so raw about this confrontation, in particular, it just gutted me.

Haha, I was sort of numb and already in a protective state, thinking “you’re in dramaland, he’ll be back next week” by the time he was actually disappearing, but that was my own fault. I refused to let myself feel the pain.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Can somebody please make me understand this point?
So basically she asked doom for the world to end. But then doom makes a deal with her. She has to doom the world before she dies. If she dies without dooming the world, then someone whom she loves will die. she ends up falling in love with Doom, and he chose to die to save her.
How did he choose to die to save her?
She’s dying anyway. 🥴

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

She gets a cancer diagnosis and dramatically yells about doom. He shows up and offers to give her 3 pain-free pre-death months if she dooms the world. She belatedly realizes that the contract terms would kill everyone she loves, and looks for a loophole; she turns an enforcement clause (break the contract, kill the one you love) into a loophole by deciding to love Doom, which he is into because he hates his own existence but can’t opt out.

But then they fall in love, and that means the inevitable death options are: 1. She follows through and dooms the world 2. She breaks the contract and he lives on - something he explicitly doesn’t want to do.

That’s the key: that he doesn’t want to exist. He can’t die and can’t kill himself, but if he can get Dong Kyung to wish it, that might work. The irony is that he now doesn’t want to die, because she’s in the world. So rather than “how did he choose to die to save her”, it’s “he finally got his centuries-old wish, just at the time when he wants to delay it”.

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Whoops, missing some text :

1. She follows through and dooms the world, and he lives on in an uninhabited Earth (his original goal) 2. She breaks the contract and he dies (she loves you!), then she dies 3. She breaks the contract, her brother or aunt die (uh oh, she didn’t love him the most), then she dies, and then he lives on - something he explicitly doesn’t want to do.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just to add for more clarification:

There was a line in ep 3 when Myeol-mang directly stated he’d take her “doom” (, in other words, her cancer) away from her and place it on the one she loves the most. This is what he means by “saving” her because if she loves him the most and takes advantage of the penalty as originally planned, she survives past her original D-day. So, while she will still die eventually, it won’t be from cancer now and she does, essentially, get an extension on life.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

THANK you. Ugh, it was driving me nuts that I couldn’t quite remember why she can still live, and that’s it: you either die and take the rest of the world with you, or you break the contract and live and are punished by having to continue in your loved one’s absence.

Couldn’t remember that for the life of me. Pandemic brain strikes again.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel as if I’m getting two dramas for the price of one. The first drama takes place primarily between Dong-kyeong and Myul-mang (our Doom) that is controlled by time and choices that alter outcomes and toys with, no, tries to outdo fate. But alas, the choices that seem to offer desired solutions are flawed. When diety crosses bounds it seems noble at first, but grand promises of protection mean different things from different perspectives. Dong-yeong and Doom can never be on the same page. Coming full circle the hard way still lands solidly at fate’s door. It was an emotional episode.
The second drama is in the here and now, two brothers pining over one woman for a decade that threatens their relationship in the name of protection (again) and, well, love - and heartache can’t be avoided. Sometimes I forget their story part of DaYS. Btw, Joo-ik has the best lines!

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Honestly, I am not a believer of "happy ending", at least not for happy ending for happy sake. This is why I hate quite a lot of K-dramas' happy ending (But not all, surprisingly I like W and My Mister's happy ending, but it's out of the topic today). I in fact enjoy Hotel del Luna's ending, because it looks sad, but in fact it is a happy ending, because Man-wol goes where she should go (and I don't fully understand why people hate that show: the mark is too low--Does some of the actresses/actors being hated so much people get irrational?)

Therefore, This episode of Doom at Your Service in fact is one of the few episodes I do enjoy this whole drama. I said I actually have no big feeling for this drama. I don't especially like (or hate) Seo In-guk, and I found Park Bo-young somehow cute, although I didn't watch too many of her work (I found her involvement in A Werewolf Boy, as well IU's MV Only I Didn't Know spectacular, and I guess her performance here almost match those--Her Strong Girl Bong-soon and Abyss are not those drama I do enjoy). If the drama just stop here at the end of Ep.14, I actually it is not too bad (and too bad there is one more week--especially when I am writing this, I watched Ep.15).

Afterall, Dong-kyung's intention is not too difficult to guess (I guess I wrote about it some weeks ago). It is the gods (both the goddess and Myul-mang)'s motives are opaque. But I guess the final week everything will be out in the open, so let's just wait for that ...

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Someone help me....all this time, I thought the deal was that Dong-Kyung (Dk) will die no matter what. The only choice she had was that she could wish doom on the rest of the world as she died, or she could sacrifice someone she loved to save the world. But I am pretty sure that there were several times in the inital episodes where it wa iterated again and again that Dk would die. So, I am SO confused when only MM fades away and Dk still lives? What happened....did I miss some part of an episode where the conditions were changed???? This is why I never trust a show that involves contracts with celestial beings....they always keep changing the goalpost and have loopholes that are not very logical!!!

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

The conditions haven’t changed, just DK’s resolve to live at the expense of MM’s existence or find a way out of both the contract and penalty so she could die as originally fated.

There was a line in ep 3 when Myeol-mang directly stated he’d take her “doom” (, in other words, her cancer) away from her and place it on the one she loves the most. So if she loves him the most and takes advantage of the penalty as she originally planned, she survives past her original D-day. Basically, while she will still die eventually, it won’t be from cancer now and she does, essentially, get an extension on life.

For me, though, this has been clarified a few times within the show. The end of episode 3, she mentions getting to “live” if she loves him. The recap at the beginning of ep 5 goes over it too.

The reason why DK acted as though she was going to die later on was because she truly planned to after she realized she couldn’t live happily after essentially loving MM to death. This is why DK went along with the amnesia to void the contract and tried to wish to not love anyone out of desperation towards the end. In the end, there was no way to get out of it because MM was determined to save her. The deity, too, when she said there was no way for her to “save” her, it was only when she was offering the amnesia to void the contract (,under those conditions, there truly wasn’t a way to save her).

Basically, only MM’s sacrifice could save her, her family, and the world, but DK didn’t want to accept that option and considered her death a forgone conclusion. This episode she realized that she had no way to get out of it (apart from something drastic, like suicide, which would be far too damaging to everyone). This is why, though she is extremely reluctant and afraid, she finally accepts MM’s sacrifice and lives on, recognizing that an eternity of pain for him would be far worse than living out the rest of her lifetime would be.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks, Chandler! I must have missed those details in episodes 3 and 5. But with that context, the show makes sense - yes, if she had to choose between the world and someone she loves to perish (for her cancer to go away), it made sense that MM would be the sacrifice in the end.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Someone explain to me how was dong kyung saved? Wasn't she supposed to be dead after 100 days???

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i lost tbh.. can somebody explain this...

we know that the deal dongkyung made with the goddess deleted the original "agreement" DK had with MM right?

so here, i thought the deal for destroying the world and losing her love ones will basically not be applied anymore in the future even tho their memory recovered.

is this wrong? does it mean that all the deals from the beginning still applies when their memories comeback? lol im so stupid

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *