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Our Blues: Episodes 5-6

Life throws a curveball at our young lovers, and as they grapple with the reality of their situation, they need to make a decision about their future fast. Meanwhile, a familiar face returns to town, and her sudden appearance catches some people off guard. However, her mind is preoccupied with her own worries as she struggles with depression and the potential loss of someone dear.

 
EPISODES 5-6 WEECAP: YOUNG-JOO & HYUN; DONG-SUK & SUN-AH

Putting the adults’ stories on hold for a moment, the show shifts focus to the Romeo and Juliet-esque teenagers, Young-joo and Hyun. Young-joo is a smart kid who feels trapped by her surroundings. The ocean is a constant reminder of dead ends, and her small town feels stifling with the same gossip, jokes, and faces.

The people she cares about can be counted on one hand, and among the rare few is Hyun. She deems him as the only exciting thing around, but she realizes that her excitement went a little “too far” — she’s pregnant.

Young-joo’s goal in life is to leave Jeju, but her unexpected pregnancy derails all her dreams. With no one to turn to for guidance, the options for Young-joo are limited, and the medical professionals she meets are callous and dismissive. They only view her as another reckless teenager, and it feels like no matter what Young-joo chooses, she will be shamed for her decision.

Though Hyun tries to support Young-joo through this ordeal, she shuts him out. Seeing her parents’ marriage fall apart has taught her that love does not exist, and she believes her relationship with Hyun will be the same.

Despite her attempts to keep him at a distance, Hyun understands that Young-joo is scared and refuses to let her endure this alone. He chases after her to the hospital — unafraid of the rumors that might circulate about them — and his steadfast presence in her time of need finally convinces her to trust him.

Thus, when Hyun suggests raising the baby together, Young-joo takes a leap of faith and accepts his proposal. In spite of her fears, she decides to be a family with him, and a burden seems to lift from both their shoulders as they finally come to an agreement about their future.

However, their moment of happiness is tinged with a quiet discomfort as a sense of foreboding lingers in the air. As Young-joo lamented in the beginning of the episode, they live in a small town where everyone knows everything, and their secret has already been found out by a classmate and possibly Eun-hee. Once their dads get involved, things will get messier, and I’m worried for the young couple.

While I support Young-joo’s decision regardless of what she chooses, I wonder how much agency she really has in her current situation. Their story raises a lot of important questions, and I hope the show takes this narrative in an interesting and nuanced direction.

The other main pair this week is Sun-ah and Dong-suk. Recently divorced, Sun-ah continues to struggle with depression and finds herself amidst a custody battle for her son. In order to clear her head, she drives down to Jeju, and her path crosses with Dong-suk. The two of them share an odd history together, and while it is clear that Dong-suk used to like her, Sun-ah’s feelings are bit opaque.

In the past, when both of them lived in Seoul, they happened to meet each other and rekindled their friendship. However, when Dong-suk revealed his feelings by kissing her, Sun-ah recoiled. He took the rejection poorly, and his behavior immediately turned hostile and accusatory.

Dong-suk’s temper remains the same to this day, and his most well-known feud is with his mom, KANG OK-DONG (Kim Hye-ja), who he addresses as “aunt.” Though Ok-dong has cancer, she cannot bring herself to notify her son since he vowed to only answer her call after she dies.

Sun-ah wanders around the town in a daze as the sound of her son’s voice echoes in her head. She ends up near the edge of the wharf, and stares out into the ocean, unmoving, until sunrise.

Before taking this trip, Sun-ah had an interview with Child and Family Services, and told the investigator that she could not live without her son. While the investigator was aware of Sun-ah’s devotion and seemed understanding of her depression, the child’s best interest came first. She showed Sun-ah a video of her son’s interview, and his words broke her. When asked to describe his mom, her son answered, “Mom is sick.”

Even though it is early morning, Sun-ah’s world remains dark as she stands alone, cold, and wet. Her strange presence catches the eyes of the townsfolk, including Jung-joon and the haenyeos, but no one thinks much of it at first until she falls into the ocean and disappears.

Sun-ah’s story has consistently been about her depression and how it affects her life. Similar to Young-joo, Sun-ah feels constrained — damned if you do, damned if you don’t — and this feeling of futility was best captured in the interview scene. Her ex-husband accuses her of not trying to “get over” her depression, but when she does try, she is then blamed for putting their son in harm’s way. No matter what Sun-ah does, her actions are not good enough, and her illness is weaponized and used against her.

Society has strict scripts for people to follow, but very few can actually achieve these impossible and subjective standards. Even the slightest deviation is met with severe scrutiny as seen by the various characters in this show. In Eun-hee’s case, she chose not to marry or have kids, and as a result, she sees herself as a miserly spinster incapable of love rather than the big-hearted woman she actually is. The world around her has taught her that a fulfilling life for a woman is in a heteronormative family, and we see how she has internalized this message. For Young-joo, becoming a teen mom has stripped her of all her previous accomplishments, and society labels her as a failure because of this one mistake. Through Sun-ah, the drama explores a different side of motherhood, and the suffocating pressure to perform a certain role. Out of all the women so far, Sun-ah is the closest to the “ideal” life (financially stable, has a husband and son), yet she appears to be the least happy.

The beauty of an omnibus story like Our Blues is that different characters get a chance to shine, and all their experiences are valid. No one is the hero or the villain in this story because they’re all just people with their own struggles and shortcomings.

 
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The last time a k-drama broached the subject of teen-pregnancy, it was already pre-determined to go one way rather than the other. As much as I loved 18 Again, I really thought they glossed over the crisis real-quick. So I'm glad to see a meatier take on the subject. & equally surprised to see it in an omnibus-style drama!! At least, I know that options were explored, and I also know what circumstances brought Young-Joo to take the call she does finally. Given her advance stage, it's either that, or putting the child up for adoption, which she (or her boyfriend) wouldn't do, given their respective histories with their own moms. The actress visually reminds me so much of Ellen Page from Juno! Also, thanks show for reminding me that unplanned pregnancies are terrifying. :O

Kim Hye-Ja, as usual, continues to be the absolute hug-worthy Granny. I think she's being judged even harder than the other 3 ladies mentioned by the story so far. She's 80, feeds stray puppies, and is a cancer patient, but her son cannot stop giving her sh*t about her 2nd marriage, decades later. Can the poor lady please catch a break? :'(
Oh, and I think this is the 5th work of hers, where either she, or some other character within the plot is called Hye-Ja! I think it's a thing now! :P

Sun-Ah's depiction of depression is depicted SO beautifully. I cannot believe it's the same Shin Min-Ah who was flashing her dimples constantly in her previous gig! The scene where she is metaphorically drenched at the edge of the pier gave me more shivers than when she jumps. Also, who screamed when Shin Min-Ah and Kim Woo Bin locked eyes for a split-second at the docks? T__T

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“Who screamed when Shin Min-Ah and Kim Woo Bin locked eyes for a split-second at the docks?” 🙋🏻‍♀️

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Me too

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Same. Kind of sad, they didn't give them any dialogues or even closer proximity.

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I'm not sure to like how they changed the "format". At the beginning, the story focused on 2 characters, now everything is kinda mixed. It makes harder to keep tracks and to care for the characters.

Bang Yeong-Ju and Jung Hyeon : her appointment to the obgyn was awful... I just wanted to hit him. But I was surprised she still could have an abortion after 22 weeks. In my country, I think it's 12 weeks. So she wouldn't have the choice anymore. Why did she wait for so long? The situation was kinda weird. The sad part is they don't have adult acting as adult in their entourage. Their fathers are stupid, Eun-Hui is lackind softness or delicacy for this kind of subject.

Min Seon-A : Her story is really sad. It must be so frustrating to try again and again and still fail at the end. But I think it's better for her son to be with her everytime. She needs time to get better and her son is sensitive to her illness. But I don't think the father is better choice... but the grandparents looked nice.

Lee Dong-Seok : I though his mum commited a crime to make him behave like this. But she just married a man whose son he did not like? It's the reason? These people forgot to grow up and act as teenagers.

Lee Yeong-Ok and Park Jeong-Jun : so they like each other because they're both pretty?

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"so they like each other because they're both pretty?"

😂😂😂

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I think they were initially attracted to each other because they were "pretty". Now they have to get to know each other more thoroughly will this initial attraction last?

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I think for youngok definitely she chose jeongjun because he seems like nicest out of all men she ever met..she even warned him many times that he'll get hurt...for jeongjun he really fell at first sight but never know her story...for this couple I think they'll show more about trusting your partner

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I think Young-joo didn't realize she was that far along. The doctor told her that she must have mistaken implantation bleeding for a period and not realized she was already several weeks along in her pregnancy at that point.

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Young-joo's story would've been more powerful had she gotten the abortion and had to deal with the fallout. Although she would've had to have been less than six months pregnant. The first doctor was judgmental, but the second one lowkey trying to convince them to keep the baby was appalling.

I was really hoping last week that Young-joo wasn't pregnant because their baby doesn't deserve to grow up in a toxic household between their dads. If they were still in love after college, then they can get married and move out of Jeju. As sweet and patient as Hyun is, I felt sorry for Young-joo that her life and dreams were over.

Eun-hee is unfairly mean to Young-joo. I was hoping that our young couple would confide in Jung-joon and Young-ok who would go with Young-joo to get the abortion.

My first thought when Sun-ah attempted suicide was now she's definitely lost custody. I think it's a good thing that Yeol is aware his mom is sick.

Dong-suk is insufferable. His anger at his mom is understandable but holding a grudge against Sun-ah for rejecting his advances for years when he knew she wanted to get back together with her ex-boyfriend is petty.

Thanks for the weecap, @lovepark!

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Yeong-ju and Hyeon's story is a sad one and I already have a headache when I think of the way their fathers will handle this. Yes kids, you can get pregnant after doing it just once. I was so sad for Hyeon when Yeong-ju kept blaming him but I'm happy he stood firm and gave her the support she needs.

Dong-seok is such an entitled prick ! Ugh, I hope for him that he won't come to his senses when it's too late.

It's hard to watch Seon A basically trapped and in that custody battle 🥺. Shin Min Ah is doing amazing in portraying her

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i'm interested to see how they will resolve the pregnancy story..rather than trying to run from home etc they asked help from their dads..even tho they bringing so much trouble and headache to dads who already have bad term...i found this one is realistic since they want to show the acceptance of people from small town and the consequences to these teenagers

i wonder the reason why seon-ah got depression at the first place..not because of man at least..i guess she has a trauma from childhood

youngok and jeongjun scene got cut off last time and they suddenly on flirting term haha...good for them

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I liked the handling of Young-hoo and Hyeon's story: for a student who has lived her life preparing to escape from Jeju, the news of pregnancy would have devastated her. Actress Roh Yoon-seo captured perfectly the nightmare (she's good!), and the prickliness of someone working their way through it. The way she grabbed Hyeon's hand before listening to the heartbeat was a great touch - making clear that her harsh words were coming from a place of terror rather than anger. It felt a *little* rushed that she suddenly came round to going ahead with the pregnancy - I realise her options were limited, but she did her 180 in the space of about 30 seconds it felt. She's an intelligent woman: a quick 15 second montage of her thinking it through, weighing up choices, making her decision would have made more sense for me. But, hey, limited time and all.

I'm interested as to where they'll go with Dong-seok: he's been painted as an absolute bucket of foulness so far. Petulant, angry, vindictive - not a great deal to like about him! I'm intrigued to know how his re-meet with Sun-ah will play out - which part of his multiple issues will this touch and how? So far, I've really appreciated the way the drama has shown that (re)connection with people doesn't fix life, but does give new insight and the opportunity to grow. But I want them to tread carefully with Dong-seok - his set up means they could veer into ridiculousness if they try to "grow" him too much. Wait and see...

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Episode 6 (DONG-SUK & SUN-AH/Dong-seok and Seon-a 1) was my best (and even the saddest) Our Blues episode ever. I got a big hug from this show already because there are two things I learned: (1) because of great emotional performance from Shin Min-a (and I heard her crying... but I was crying too.) and (2) even the best OST from this episode (With You by BTS' Jimin and Ha Sungwoon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9b0Hj-BfaM).

With six episodes in, I am excited and I am looking forward to see more different characters to be featured as a pairing over the next weeks. By now, this show felt like a little bit of disappointment because this show did skipping the Yeong-ok and Jeong-jun storyline (their first part was on episode 4) but I hope next time we will do the next Kdramas with an omnibus style that having the no-skipping storyline (unlike Our Blues) until every storyline and the whole two or multiple episodic parts was finished in a consecutive way.

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Sun Ah's story is so interesting and layered. Her reaction to her son saying she was sick was emblematic of depression. Her son looks to be about 4 or 5, so his answer to the question could have been immediate( the last time he saw her, she was in the hospital) or his father could have told him she was sick, or he could have come to it on his own. It wasn't a condemnation, but she took it as such. She knew it could effect her negatively in court so she took her sadness to the extreme. Shin Min ah is doing a great job in this role and I hope her character gets the therapy and medicine she needs.

As for the pregnancy. It doesn't matter if you are the top student or the bottom student, you need to be taught about sex to understand it. An abortion at 22 weeks would have been a lot, the fetus is viable at that point, so I think it made sense not to have an abortion. Their fathers are insane, so I wish them both luck.

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I thought Episode 5 was so well done in how it handled teenagers dealing with the realities of sex. Children can result even when using protection, and lives are changed. Yeung Ju had to come to grips with the realities of being pregnant--obviously she ignored all signs until an abortion wasn't an option because of the baby's age. Her life will not play out as she had planned, but isn't that true for everyone? When we are teenagers, we can make all kinds of plans and dreams, and then reality offers all kinds of roadblocks and challenges not anticipated. Hyeon, as the father, has to let Yeung Ju make the decisions but can be beside her offering his support. Telling their families will be so difficult, but I have trust that the fathers and the community offer the love and help the teens will need to deal with this major change to their lives. Adoption is still an option for the young couple, and I hope the series explores this alternative too.

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I agree, Becky. Six episodes in, the theme of this show appears to be “life will not play out as planned.” Instead of The Land of Misfit Toys, they are The Island of Broken Dreams.
I hope the “adults” of the show will get over themselves and support the young couple. Even though a baby may delay their dreams of college and medical school, with the support of the dads and the community, they can still achieve their dreams. They have so many ready-made babysitters!!

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Yes, Ep 5 is finely crafted to depict the dilemmas and struggle of the young couple. Despite all the safe sex education, this could still happen throwing lives upside down. The worst thing is to be judgemental (and that doctor should be de-registered from his profession). The road will continue to be rocky for them but I am holding my breath that their dads and the small community will come along.

I’m glad that the omnibus format is working well in that the story of individual characters has not been diluted while the overall flow among all characters are shown in a continuum. Eun-hee is shaping up as a big sister and carer to everyone.

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If this show is realistic, it would show that her life is in fact nearly destroyed, UNLESS, as you say, they pursue adoption. The small town and fellow students would not be supportive, there would be continual whispering from both their peers and the older women. The key thing is her relative poverty. That plus the child will prevent any escape to Seoul so that she can improve her economic circumstances. Her boyfriend is not her equal, she will not be satisfied in any marriage with him, and as most young men in real life caught in this situation do, he will leave her. Meanwhile the fathers have shown no capacity for the continual emotional support needed in this situation--because they love their children, they eventually will do their best to provide financial assistance, but it will be with constant carping that will take its emotional toll over a lifetime.

I imagine one "out" the show might take from this desperate but totally realistic prospect, and it would actually also be pretty realistic in some respects, is to have Eun-Hee support Young Joo and her baby, both financially as a surrogate grandmother. But that would again put Eun-hee in the role of supporting family, even though she never experienced even the temporary joy of romantic love, which she clearly wanted. And also, Eun-hee's support does not remove the fact that any Young-joo's chance for a better life is over. She is totally trapped, with no way of escape.

Although I have a feeling that the show won't explore adoption, I really wish it would. K-Dramas always treat adoption as the ultimate source of trauma for the adopted child, but that just isn't true in my personal experience. I have 2 nieces and 2 nephews who were adopted as infants, and they are now wonderful young adults, successful in all respects, who deeply love their parents.

Anyway, not to raise any controversial politics, but I fully support the right to abortion early on, because too often the results of unmarried teen parenthood are tragic for both the mother and the child. However, if it gets too late in the pregnancy, I also believe the mother should have the baby, and that's where adoption is a completely appropriate course of action, in my opinion.

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Adoption would certainly be the best option but given the obsession with blood ties, it still seems pretty stigmatized in SK. If anyone writer could portray adoption in a positive life, it would probably be this one, but I have a feeling she might take the Eun-hee "out." I would love a positive portrayal of adoption though, as my niece and nephew were adopted as infants too, and they are wonderful, happy kids.

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What if Eun-Hee isn't an 'out'? What if the baby is adopted by her, giving her a shot at experiencing motherhood, and Young-Joo a second shot at life? :O
Giving the baby up for adoption, however, seems like a very unlikely option, given the history of the teen-parents with their moms... and not because writers are afraid to explore the adoption-route... :)

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I, for one, would be thoroughly behind that turn in the show's direction! What I'm afraid of, though, is that the show will take a falsely sentimental turn, with the "community" supporting them--this despite the fact that the community has already been shown to be pretty ruthless. But so far I've been really impressed with this show not taking the cliched direction, so I give the writer(s) kudos!

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I hope they explore the adoption alternative, because I know from 1st hand experience that this is a choice too. I have two terrific adult children adopted from Korea when they were babies. * have 2 nieces and a nephew who were also adopted.

My son is on his way to S.K. today for a friend's wedding. He will be there for a month, staying with his girlfriend's family (she lives and works in NYC, but her family lives in Inchon,) and he will also visit and stay with his intact birth family he was able to reconnect with 10 years ago when he studied for a semester in Seoul.
The lives of Yeung Ju, Hyeon, and their families will never be the same regardless of whether they raise the child together, so I hope they touch upon the adoption option.

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The long focus on the teen’s situation was more than I expected. The push-pull of decision making felt real and daunting. The real storm is still ahead for the couple . . . with no guarantee of a happy ending (which is the early theme of the series).

Dong Seok is his own worst enemy. He has such a huge chip on his shoulder that he pushes everyone away. Seon Ah’s illness has taken an emotional toll now, but we still do not know when or how it started. DS seems like he was betrayed, but SA seems to not have given him mixed signals. She returned to Jeju meaning that she had been to the town before . . . to find happy memories of her past now that her son is being taken away from her. She is drawn to the sea, which symbolizes formlessness, the unfathomable, and chaos, but also it be seen as a symbol of beginning of life and stability, as it can exist largely unchanged for centuries.

Captain Joon and Young-Ok’s relationship is on a nice slow pace but the old ladies whispers to Joon about her speculative past will soon throw a road block between them. I think Young-Ok’s past mirrors Yeoung-ju’s story.

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I found these episodes to be heartbreaking, centering as they did around two women who, for different reasons, can't really control their own futures.

I knew from the start that even as the show explored abortion as an option it was hugely unlikely a mainstream drama would show someone actually following through with having one. So it wasn't surprising when Young-joo decided to keep the baby. Hyun is also wonderful, but the stark reality of the result of that decision to keep and raise their baby is one that made me sad for both of them. Things are going to be very, very rough for them even if the show ultimately shows them putting the baby up for adoption, or more likely, the town rallying around to raise the child as they apparently did Young-joo. The fact remains that they live in a socially conservative place where everyone knows--and judges--everyone else, not to mention the fact that they're children of two feuding fathers who will be enraged and depressed over the obvious proof that their children had sex.

And Young-joo's college and life plans, which she worked so hard to achieve, are about to disappear in the face of an infant who will need and deserve constant love and attention.

I also feel sad for them as a couple. They deserve to just be young and in love without having to also take on this tremendous challenge. (Note: the only thing I had trouble buying in this whole narrative was that they only had sex twice in a six month period. I get that the writer wanted to make it clear that this was a birth control failure and that's less believable if they had sex often, but they're young adults, lol, and it's hard to believe they would begin but not continue to regularly have a sexual relationship.) Finally, although I was glad that the writing clearly showed that doctor who chided Young-joo for her supposed irresponsibility to be in the wrong, he's also representative of the exact kind of dismissive nastiness and mockery she's about to face en masse.

Sun-ah's pain is also hard to watch unfold. As I mentioned before, as someone who has suffered from clinical depression, I appreciate the careful and respectful way the writers show that it's an often misunderstood illness that can't always be successful treated. But I so feel for her losing her son! I'm not quite sure why they can't share custody, and I'm not sure I agree with the agency woman that a toddler pointing out that his mother is sick means that mother should not have at least partial custody.

All this said, I really like this show and appreciate the way it's taking on sad, difficult situations but in a way that is compulsively watchable and satisfying.

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Agreed - each story arc so far is about some complex human choices but ends in a sensible and satisfying manner. A high degree of achievement!

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You exactly expressed what I felt about this episode--it was actually very well written, and only a little cliched. I did feel like the dismissive nastiness of the original doctor was a bit overdone--no ob-gyn I know would behave in that way to a scared girl. I also wondered about the husband being so unsympathetic to Sun-Ah--wouldn't he have first demanded that she get therapy, rather than demanding that she clean the house? But perhaps he was always a jerk and the marriage was a mistake.
One thought that I had, just to alleviate the general sadness of this episode, is that its too bad the suicide prevention team of Tomorrow couldn't have entered the show. They could have cured Sun-Ah of her depression with a just few words of consolation, plus, in a bonus for male viewers, two of the more beautiful women in K-Drama, Shin Min-A and Kim Hee-Seon would be on the screen together!

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These episodes were all to realistic for me.

Our teenagers are set up for failure.

The reason for the divorce is also, in a way, tragic and realistic. The husband finally gave up. He just wore out. This does not make him a bad person- just a relatively weaker one. Even he knows that his comments about his wife not wanting to get better are not really true- they are emotional statements reflecting his frustration with the situation. Mental illness takes its toll not only on the patient but on their families as well. This is starkly and uncomfortably realistic.

The reality of the issues in a custody battle was also starkly realistic. The law now focuses on the welfare of the child. That is the bottom line. The courts do care about the parents but the child comes first.

The one truly unrealistic portrayal in the episodes was the actions of the investigator. These are highly trained professionals who are keenly aware of the impact of what they are doing not only on the child but also on the parent. I could not imagine any of them 'confronting' the parent of the child- particularly one with depression- with a video of the child answering that question. I am sure the drama writer thought that what the investigator would want to do in this situation is persuade the mother to give up on custody: That is the only reason for a confrontation like that. But that is not the investigator's job. The investigators job is to gather the facts, study them and make a recommendation to the court. What the writer had her do instead is playing with fire. In may have been dramatically effective but I was absolutely appalled at that one.

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Episode 5 was stellar. I'm so invested in Young-joo and Hyun's story. They are good, smart kids with a tough road ahead of them. I knew they wouldn't go through with the abortion, but I liked how the drama explored it. I've ran into cold and judgmental doctors like the first one. As someone living in a red state in the U.S. that requires women seeking an abortion to have an ultrasound, I couldn't help viewing the second doctor through a certain lens. Telling Hyun to go look at the monitor, playing the heartbeat even though anyone with eyes could see that Young-joo wouldn't even look at the screen, emphasizing that the baby was healthy all seemed very manipulative.

All hell will break loose when the kids tell their dads. Both are immature, but I warmed to Young-joo's a little this week. He seemed to be doing the best he could. The thing about teenage pregnancy is that it doesn't just shatter Young-joo and Hyun's dreams, but their dads' too.

I'm invested in Sun-ah too though Dong-seok is quite the problematic jerk. Her ex husband is a jerk too but it is a tough situation. I was glad to see the social worker portrayed professionally. Shin Min-ah is doing a great job portraying Sun-ah.

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I had exactly the same thought about the second doctor, given current red state politics in the U.S and I was wondering if that kind of brutal emotional manipulation was required by law in Korea, the way it was in some states in the U.S.
I say was, because there is no doubt in my mind that within a couple of months, abortion will be illegal in those states, and, who knows, you might have to head to my home state of California to watch a show like this one!

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A ‘real talk’ kdrama that can happen to everyone, its not like most make believe and too good to be true story. I like this kdrama😊 Yeong-Ju and hyeon will overcome the obstacle of course they will be a good parent, considering they want to do better than their parents. Hyeon melt my heart for owning up to the pregnancy and ready to take responsibilities even when he knows he's not even ready to be a father. I just hope their parent doesn't skin each other alive lol Kudos to all the actors they are doing well 😃

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Young Joo and Hyeon
I don't like this story. I don't like when dramas paint this insanely smart girl that has this awesome dream but gets pregnant for accident.

I can't believe a straight A's student that want to get the hell out of Jeju (like, right now) and has the dream of becoming a medicine student has sex with her boyfriend and their only protection is wtv condom the bf bought. When she asked him if he bought a cheap condom and when she said "we only did it twice" I was done.
I can't understand the logic in this kind of stories.
Do I feel bad for her? yeah. I even feel bad for her dad that was counting the days to be free too.
But do I like the plot? No, for me it doesn't make sense. And if they make her have the baby please adoption. Three kids and a gangster raising a kid? nightmare.
Hyeon was the character giving me more stress. I know he had good intentions, but he wasn't being that helpful tbh.

Soon Ah
Poor woman. Everything that's happening to her + Dong Seok? The writer most hate her.
If they end up together and/or there's a "he heals her" plot OMG.

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Yes - agree, hope they take the teen pregnancy more seriously. Initially it seemed to be taken so, but left turn with the idealized scene looking at the baby things in the store. Ahem - you have no income, don't bother looking. And the subsequent, we can do it. Can't imagine either father is going to be thrilled. Kinda puzzled that they used the "we used protection and it failed" - that is not common unless they didn't know what they were doing or as she suggested the condoms were no good. Not sure what sort of message that is trying to project. But, it certainly showed how young one really is as a teen.

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What are these doctors? I'm so mad at these people. So judgemental and unethical

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