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Sisyphus: Episode 16 (Final)

Our leads make their last stand against the enemy and try to rewrite the future. However, winning has its own consequences since it means that none of the time travelers will exist, so our genius engineer will have to say farewell to the love of his life. As the final fight between good and evil comes to a close, only time will tell who will emerge victorious at the end.

 
EPISODE 16 RECAP

A crowd gathers around the building as Mr. Park walks up the stairs to his old apartment. He pulls out a gun, but Bingbing appears behind him and grabs his arm. He scolds her for following him and points his gun at her head when she refuses to leave.

Mr. Park resumes his march, listening to his present self fight with his wife, but Bingbing runs after him and calls him dad. She hands him a bankbook, and Mr. Park remembers the time Tae-sool whispered in his ear.

Bingbing tells him that she and Mom rode the uploader to run away from him, but Mom never arrived. As the truth dawns on him, Mr. Park orders her to return to the mart, but Bingbing begs him not to go inside since Mom always told her that he was not completely evil.

Mr. Park opens the door a crack and watches his present self threaten to kill his wife. Trusting Bingbing’s words, he does not interfere as his present self inches closer to his wife. Before present Mr. Park stabs her, their young daughter comes out of her room, and her presence brings both parents to their senses.

Outside, Mr. Park flickers and apologizes to Bingbing, berating himself for not recognizing his own daughter. He explains how the future has changed since he did not kill a person, which means they can see her mom again. She hugs him, and Mr. Park hugs her back.

Sigma’s lackeys storm the church, and Seo-hae drops her weapon. She tells Tae-sool that Sun died, and he assures her that everything was necessary. Hearing Tae-sool’s confidence, Sigma mocks him for his “plan” since all that is left for them is his final decision: the world or the girl?

Tae-sool grabs Seo-hae’s hand and tells her that everything will go well no matter what. His assertion makes Sigma smile, and he orders Tae-sool to finish the code or else Seo-hae will die. As Sigma counts down, Tae-sool stops him to ask about present Sigma’s whereabouts.

His random interruption sounds like stalling to Sigma, but Tae-sool smiles confidently since he knows he will win. On cue, he flickers, and Tae-sool announces, “The future can change. It’s boring if it’s always the same.”

This time, Tae-sool counts down, and a phone rings in the church. Sigma receives a call from an unknown number, and the uploader downstairs shuts off. Smirking, Tae-sool says that this is the sound of nails hammering inside Sigma’s coffin.

Sigma calls it a bluff and aims his gun at Seo-hae, but to his disbelief, his hand flickers. Seo-hae uses his moment of confusion to attack, and Sigma orders his guards to shoot her. However, they vanish into thin air, leaving Sigma all alone.

Sigma gains the advantage when he hits Seo-hae first, and Tae-sool is no match for him in a physical fight. With nothing else in his way, Sigma chokes Seo-hae and tells her that no one is left to save her. As she gasps for air, he flickers again and loses his grip.

A look of shock passes over Sigma’s face, and as he turns around, someone shoots him from the second floor. Still alive, Sigma asks Tae-sool what happened but the others simply stare at him. He tells them to stop looking at him like that and says that he hates everyone.

He recalls the empty city and clear night sky with fondness and asks Seo-hae if she misses that future, too. She tells him that she does not, and the next shot hits Sigma in the chest—killing him instantly.

Unlike Seo-hae, Tae-sool looks rather calm about what just transpired and tells her that their work is not done. When she asks where they are going next, he says that when is the important question. Looking up at the second floor, Seo-hae understands what they need to do, and they head downstairs for the uploader.

They wait until Seung-bok leaves, and Tae-sool tweaks the code so the uploader only works once. Seo-hae wonders if the machine will send them back automatically, but Tae-sool tells her that someone else will come help them.

Seo-hae asks how long Tae-sool knew about this plan, and he tells her that it was put in motion since the time he locked her up in the bunker. She scolds him for keeping her in the dark, and their fight dissolves into petty bickering about Tae-sool lying to her.

Mr. Park interrupts their lovers’ quarrel and brings his crew with him to help Tae-sool with the uploader. While the brokers prepare them for the trip, Tae-sool complains about the shot and orders the younger brother to hand over his bulletproof vest. He asks one for Seo-hae as well, but she declines the offer.

As Tae-sool gets ready to leave, Mr. Park reminds him to visit him and repeat the same thing he said last time. Saying their goodbyes, Tae-sool and Seo-hae walk into the uploader and hold hands as they go back to the past.

They reappear by the Han River, and Tae-sool tells Seo-hae that he is probably locking her inside the bunker right now. He says that the Control Bureau will be too busy looking for her, and Seo-hae realizes that he kept her hidden to buy them some time. She smacks him in annoyance, but Tae-sool just leans into her arms and asks for a quick break.

Tae-sool orders Seo-hae to wait here while he goes to the bathroom, and after disappearing for a few minutes, he returns and takes them to their next destination. They stop by the police station to visit her dad, and Tae-sool asks him to capture present Sigma and call this number when he does.

Dad agrees to do it if it means stopping the war, and they thank him for his cooperation. As they walk away, Dad calls out to Seo-hae and asks to hug her once. She runs into his arms, and Dad pats her on the back like he does in the future.

The next stop is Asia Mart, and the Tae-sool we saw before buying the guns is actually this Tae-sool. He whispers in Mr. Park’s ear the message from the broker’s future self: his daughter was next to him all this time. He tells the brokers to come to the church tomorrow if they can and leaves.

Tae-sool meets Seo-hae in a dark alley and waits for their ride to pick them up. A familiar car drives up to them, and Sun gets out—alive and well. He reveals the bulletproof vest he was wearing the entire time and explains what happened.

Back when Tae-sool left Seo-hae at the park, he went to find Sun and gave him his vest. He told the younger man to keep their meeting a secret and asked him to trust him like he did during their first rescue mission.

Though the vest saved his life, Sun tells Seo-hae that he legitimately fainted back then because of the pain. He flinches when she gets closer, expecting a beating, but Seo-hae hugs him instead. As he lets down his guard, she punches him in the gut. She asks Tae-sool if he has more secrets, and he promises that this was the last one.

While Seo-hae’s present self attracts all the guards’ attention, she and Tae-sool use the back door to get upstairs. They quietly set up her weapon, and Tae-sool looks down at Sigma, muttering under his breath that things are just getting started.

At the park, Dad and his fellow officers search for present Sigma and find him hunched over in a corner. Dad approaches him slowly, and present Sigma stares at him with fearful eyes. After verifying his identity, Dad walks up to present Sigma and drapes his jacket over the shivering man.

As present Sigma looks up at Dad with tears in his eyes, Sigma flickers right at that moment, which allows Seo-hae to attack him. The scene unfolds like before, and upstairs, Tae-sool urges Seo-hae to shoot faster before Sigma gets a chance to hit her. Heh.

Seo-hae stands up to shoot Sigma, but it causes her present self to look in her direction and makes them both flicker. Though Sigma seems to realize what is happening, it is already too late as Seo-hae pulls the trigger and shoots him.

Since Seo-hae is weakened, Tae-sool helps her carry the gun to finish the job, and she tells her present self that she will save her. She shoots, and Sigma falls to the ground once again.

After their present selves leave, Tae-sool and Seo-hae go downstairs to watch Sigma disappear, and as soon as he is gone, she flickers as well. Tae-sool hugs her, knowing that their end is near, and they both hold back their tears.

He tells her that this is all he saw, and she caresses his face before kissing him on the cheek. She thanks Tae-sool for everything, and he leans in for a proper kiss. She slowly vanishes in his arms, and he begs her to stay.

As they embrace one last time, Seo-hae suddenly solidifies, and they pull apart in shock. They wonder what is happening, and the doors swing open. The intruder fires a gun, and Tae-sool catches Seo-hae as she falls. A look of betrayal contorts Tae-sool’s face as he sees his old friend walk towards them.

Seung-bok throws the laptop at Tae-sool and orders him to finish the code. He tells him to build it so they get another chance, but Seo-hae tells him to stop things here. Watching her writhe in pain, Tae-sool screams at Seung-bok, asking why he did it.

His old friend offers to let them go if Tae-sool knows his birthday, but Tae-sool cannot answer. Seung-bok gives him another chance, asking if he knows how many times he kneeled on his behalf, and tells Tae-sool that he sacrificed so much for him.

He claims to have loved Seo-jin first and gave up everything for Tae-sool because he was nothing more than a sidekick. He complains about Tae-sool never thanking him even once and says that he will start over and win back Seo-jin this time. Tae-sool calls him crazy, but Seung-bok repeats Sigma’s mantra: “Don’t look at me like that!”

Seung-bok vows to take everything from Tae-sool and makes him choose between the world or the girl. Though Seo-hae begs him to not build it, Tae-sool relents and asks Seo-hae to try again with him. As he writes the code, missiles streak the sky.

Seo-hae tells Tae-sool that she is fine and points out that this will never end if they continue. Images of the world’s destruction play on screen, and Tae-sool stares at Seo-hae, looking conflicted. He notices the gun on the floor and grabs it.

Tae-sool points his gun at Seung-bok who points his own at Seo-hae. Looking over at her, Tae-sool admits to knowing the solution from the very beginning, but he avoided it in order to be with her. He asks Seo-hae to come find him even if there is no future and smiles at her. Raising the gun to his head, Tae-sool shoots himself, and Seo-hae screams his name.

The missiles in the sky disappear, and all around the country, the time travelers vanish as well. In Sigma’s old headquarters, Tae-san wakes up with a look of understanding on his face. While the rest of the world continues living in ignorance, Dad stares up at the sky and knows that his daughter won.

Seo-hae gently strokes Tae-sool and brings up the questions he asked at the school. Back then she did not answer his last one, so she tells him now that the person she likes is him. She says that she will find him again and tells him that she loves him. Holding onto Tae-sool until the end, Seo-hae vanishes.

A bright light flashes on screen, and Tae-sool wakes up on the flight with the mean passenger from episode one. However, unlike before, Seo-hae sits next to him and asks him to choose their food. He struggles to answer her, and she stares at him curiously.

A flight attendant comes by with his water, and Tae-sool reaches for his pills. He hesitates and looks over at Seo-hae before dropping the drugs. He rests his head on her shoulder, and they hold hands while smiling peacefully. As the camera moves away, a bright light fills the cabin and engulfs the lovers.

In this new timeline, Sigma sketches portraits in the park and even smiles. After work, he returns to his studio and takes a seat across from his painting of Tae-sool. Taking out Dad’s notebook, he reads the different clues Seo-hae’s dad wrote alluding to the other future.

Sigma walks up to his mirror and takes off his jacket—the one he received from Seo-hae’s dad. Underneath it, he wears the same sweater Tae-sool wore in his magazine interview and dons a pair of similar glasses. Staring at his reflection, he tells it not to stare at him like that and smiles.

 
COMMENTS

Mirroring Sigma’s reveal from the previous episode, we watched Tae-sool flip the script and show the audience that he was in control this entire time. It was fun to see him outsmart Sigma for once, and I appreciated the quick pace. Though Tae-sool and Seo-hae’s time traveling adventure brought back some of the show’s whimsy, on the whole, I found this to be a very disappointing finale. Personally, there were too many plot holes and a lack of explanation for me to enjoy this episode, and I still do not understand what exactly the creators wanted to convey to the audience at the end. The show has Tae-sool and Seo-hae fly into the “light,” which could be a metaphor for the afterlife and suggest that they both died and reunited in death. While fans hoping for a happy ending might be satisfied with this scene (though I would call it bittersweet at best), it felt like a poor attempt at a “happily ever after” that puts the leads together with no real explanation. On the whole, I do prefer happy endings, but sometimes sad endings are needed and preferred if they make sense to the story. In the case of Sisyphus, the only way for the leads to “win” was their separation because the show never explored any alternatives.

In fact, the idea of time travel was barely fleshed out in the show, and the characters no longer cared about the time paradox except for using it to outmaneuver each other. It does not make much sense for only Tae-sool to see this future since his and Seo-hae’s body were buried together, but this isn’t the first time the creators have opted for convenient plot devices to suit their needs. I also found it odd for Sigma’s lackeys to disappear first while all the other time travelers went away at the time of Sigma’s death, and when Seung-bok appeared, the missiles were about to hit when Dad and Seo-hae were still outside, which technically means that even if Tae-sool built the uploader, her younger self should have died during the first attack. Again, these choices show the creators’ decisions to make things dramatic at the expense of logic, and while a certain degree of plot holes can be forgiven, they become a problem when they hinder the audience’s ability to immerse themselves into this world and understand what is happening.

The worst part of this ending, however, was Seung-bok. He becomes Sigma 2.0, but a downgraded version, which I didn’t think was possible. Both Seung-bok and Sigma envy Tae-sool because they think he has everything they want. However, the show makes it very clear that Tae-sool is hurting and hiding a painful past. Thus, the villains reveal the ugly jealous nature of humans and depict a lesson about the grass looking greener on the other side. One of the rare moments that I like about the finale was Seo-hae’s dad’s act of kindness. Even though he knows this man probably causes the war, he is the first person to offer a helping hand, and as a result of this, Sigma nearly disappears because he no longer hates everyone. Then at the very end, the creators backtrack on this message since Dad’s warmth seems to hint at the possibility of Sigma recreating this loop all over again. Sigma learns about the uploader and the war because of Dad’s notebook, and though it’s left open-ended, it seems the show is leaning towards the notion that Sigma would still burn down the world even if someone stopped him from dying that day.

What I also dislike about Seung-bok’s last-minute appearance was that it took away Tae-sool and Seo-hae’s heartfelt goodbye. Though the show had lots of problems, this ending captured the bittersweet choice the leads made and was the culmination of Tae-sool’s character growth. His struggle was never about whether he valued his life over others but that he loved people so fiercely that he was afraid of letting them go. This is why he struggled with Tae-san’s death and let his life spiral out of control. This is also why he couldn’t shoot present Sigma when he had the chance because it meant losing Seo-hae. Thus, having Tae-sool finally make that decision out of his own free will felt like the moment the show was building up to, but then, he commits suicide to save the world. It becomes another “hero sacrifices himself for the world” tale, and it nearly unravels the 16+ hours of storytelling the show worked towards. If Tae-sool claims that his death is the only solution, why does Seo-hae think saving his life will stop the war? Was the decision never about Tae-sool having to decide between the world or the girl but actually Seo-hae having to choose the world or the boy? It seems like a cruel ending for Seo-hae who lived through a post-apocalyptic world and went through multiple loops believing that her sacrifice was the only way to save her loved ones and the world, but in reality, she could never succeed in her mission. There are so many things I wished the show did differently since it feels like the creators wasted a lot of potential, but at the very least, I hope the remaining fans enjoyed the ending. As for the rest of us, at least it’s over.

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Enter Sh☠️tpost here. ;)

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I didn’t make it to the end. Argh...

I was going to note that Korea had been experimenting with fresh water clams in its rivers to assist in their clean up - and as anyone who’s watched bad 50’s sci-fi movies knows that when you mix radiation from nuclear weapons and random critters, you get giant random critters. Which means, inevitably, there were giant fresh water clams in the Han River tunneling and undermining the city on the river banks. But I just couldn't find the energy...fireballs and clams reminded me too much of Forest.

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aldfjajlfdhal zombie clams? what next? Giant Godzilla Clams?! Le gasp 😂😂😂😂😂

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If this drama had more of a tongue in cheek view of itself, it could have done wonderful homages to the bad sci-fi era. Think about it - Seoul is rich enough for there to be populations of “exotic and semi-exotic” pets. Which would mean we could have been delighted with glimpses of iguanas dressed up as giant lizards, tarantulas the size of buildings, reuse the giant female stooping to pick up a tiny man scene from IOTNBO... the possibilities for fun were limitless!

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Despite the flaws in this show I actually enjoyed most of its badass and emotional moments. I really liked the parting scene between Seo Hae and Tae Sul, and teared up when he told her not to go in that heartbroken voice (oh JSW you were so great in this) but was left confused by his decision to shoot himself? Couldn’t he have just not finished the code and let history not repeat itself seeing as there was no happy ending for them anyway.

More me on an enjoyment level, the pacing seemed to fail because it had me invested in some parts and then the politicking would bore me and then I’d be excited again. I still liked this finale more than I thought I would but only because I left my brain out of it.

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He was going to die and she was going to disappear. As you said, they didn't really explore any options beyond that. Then why did they do the stupid plane scene? What's the point?
I think CSW and PSH were sorely miscast. Maybe CSW with an older battle hardened So Hye. Or PSH with a younger nerdy Tae Sul. Together they just didnt work for me. Their romance scenes were secondhand embarrassing for me. And this from a person who has never had any trouble with large age gaps between the leads. Sigh. i really dont like, correction, trust time travel dramas. I will sit out the next one.

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Quote: "i really dont like, correction, trust time travel dramas." True that! Why do I hope again and again that someone will make a time-travelling drama that would be logical???!!! I don't even know where to begin about where it all began to go wrong in these last 2 episodes. Well, how about the fact that when that cop-turned-Control Bureau sniper decided not to go back in time, then Tae-Sul would never have believed about time travel (because he wouldn't have appeared in the warehouse). Or, even before that.....when Mr. Park did not kill the other Mr. Park, he would be not in prison, but out in the world when the bomb goes off, which means he (and his daughter) would never have ended up working as the downloader/broker. So, all those people from the future should have disappeared immediately, including Seo Hae. And don't get me even started on Seo Hae not realizing that Sun is wearing a vest...the one woman who has probably worn a vest 95% of her life cannot feel that under a jacket, especially when she is holding him as he is dying?????? This is the scene that requires the BIGGEST SUSPENSION OF BELIEF in this show! Again...why do I keep torturing myself and hope someone will get these time-travel dramas to make sense! :(

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From what I can remember Tunnel wasn't *that* bad, so I hold to some thread of hope that once in a blue moon an OK time travel drama can appear. This was not the case of Sisyphus, but for some reason I feel very proud of my hear work earned bean. This is the first time when it happens to me :)

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I agree - Tunnel and Signal did a good job handling the time travel aspect, I think because the emphasis wasn't about changing a specific event in the past or future. They were forced to interact with the past/future in each case as part of something they were trying to solve that happened in their own timeline. But when you make the science of time travel the crux of your story, I think that's when the logic breaks down, merely because no one has solved the core logic problem of time travel (the whole time paradox thing!). So, yes- you can have a good story that has a time travel element, but I don't think you can have a logical time travel story no matter how hard the writers try! But they just keep on trying......

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Actually, there are two solutions to the time paradox that I’ve seen and liked.

1. Everything that will happen has already happened. Think Harry Potter in Prisoner of Azkaban. He saw someone save him from the dementors, but it turns out it was his future self. Perfect loop. Nothing actually changes, only the future selves gain a different perspective of the events.

Also shout out to the Taiwanese drama Someday or One Day for creating the perfect circle time loop where there was no end nor beginning. They didn’t quite stick the landing but it was a wonderful time travel romance nonetheless. Highly recommend!

2. Parallel universes. Think the anime Steins Gate or the Manga Orange or even Back to the Future Changing the past creates a parallel universe/new timeline that either gradually replace the original timeline or becomes an alternate universe that exists alongside the original. Therefore, the paradox doesn’t come into play because there is no loop.

In my experience, time travel stories that adopts one of these two logics tend to succeed. Unfortunately, Sisyphus chose the time loop but fail to make it a perfect one. It was more like a time scribble; random and ruleless.

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Lol, I had so many of the same questions. This show kept refusing to adhere to its own established rules. Regarding Mr. Park, if he shot the past version of himself doesnt the future version also die? So how can he be jailed? According to the writers, he was in jail for murdering someone that's how he survived, but if the person he killed was the past version of himself, then he's just dead. Ugh.. How has Sigma been living in the past for so long, when at the beginning of the show we were told that the illegal immigrants cant live in the past for too long. You know, whatever, it's finally over. You're right, Seo Hae not realizing Sun is alive is one of the most ridiculous plot lines I've ever watched. I went back to that scene after he insisted he was unharmed and I was right, there is blood splatter and a blood stain on his lower back on his right. Still, she didnt notice the lack of bloodstains on his chest or upper back? When he closed his eyes she just assumed he was dead? She didnt check for a pulse? Okay... sure.

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I think he killed his future self (only way it would make sense) but the writers never bothered to explain it.

Also, side note, did I miss something? Who put Taesan in that time “ghosts of futures’pasts-esque” limbo? Did he put himself in it? Has he been there all the time? Is that why he would just “appear” places? How could he take pictures? Actually, how could you bring things into that place (i.e the syringes)?

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@am1993 - oh, I was so mad I didn't even think about poor Tae-San! I know he wakes up from his "past surfing" in one scene with no one around, but what does that even mean? Is he "trapped" in the future then? Because, according to Zigma, he had Tae San's body, while his mind/psyche was wandering in past memories (like Seo Hae had done). So, when Tae Sul killed himself, where did Tae San end up? Alive? Dead? Trapped in the upside down world???? Who knows....and even Tae Sul didn't care at the end because he decided he was going to commit suicide to get it all over with!

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@am1993 -I will check out "Some Day or One Day"...but maybe not any time soon - need a time-travel drama cleanse first! :)

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According to Mr. Park, Agnes shot him with the drug because she was nervous that Sigma would find him. Which confuses me, since it implies that Agnes doesnt want Sigma to get the blue print, but she participates in and supports all the rest of his plan. (Also, we see that Sigma eventually gets the blue print from the future and builds the uploader, without Tae San, so why did he need him to begin with?) As for how they are able to travel with the syringes, I have no idea, I guess it's like how they can bring the clothes they are wearing? He did put it in his pocket. I'm just confused as to how they are traveling around in the past without the uploader. That whole plotline implies that you can time travel using just a drug. I also thought that the drug only worked on the illegal immigrants, because they had gone through the uploader before and were currently not living in their own timeline, but HTS was able to get the shot and time travel as well. I'm confused about any of these rules. Why bother giving us these pieces of information if you are going to completely ignore them in the future?

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Yes, the whole limbo place doesn't make sense. I thought it was a thing that was lost in translation, and they meant that people are wandering around in their "memories" of the past (not actually in the past). But if it's memories, then bring able to take a syringe makes even less sense. Why do I feel like we the audience are like the moles in "whack-a-mole" game, popping up to point out the illogic aspects of the drama, and the writers just tried to whack us down. But the last laugh is on them...clearly, us "logic moles" won this game!!!!

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Side note: Maybe try Kairos. Came out last year. It's not exactly time travel, but the protagonists live a month apart in time. The writer stuck to his/her established rules, so I think she/he did a good job with the world building.

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I support Kairos recommendation. The writer established time-crossing rules clearly in her drama and followed through till the end 👏🏻.

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The plane scene meant this to me: as the time loop was broken, we get back to the starting point, which is TaeSul in the plane but as TaeSan will not cause the plane crash, we assume we're back in square one. SeoHae is the hallucination TaeSul is having, just as he hallucinated before with his brother.
(and somehow I managed to get two 2PM title songs in this comment... ha!).

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Finally, we can all now be put out of our misery. You know, I can't even say that in total, the whole was less than the sum of its parts, because the sum of its parts also sucked individually, truth be told. Once again, JTBC and the writers oughta be ashamed.

Thank you for the recaps and the analysis, @lovepark, you have been magnificent.

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I hoped at a point I will understand the story... I didn't... I have so many questions! I never thought that a drama could make me liking God's Gift - 14 Days's end.

Congratulation to everybody! We got a well-deserved bean \o/

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I thought the explanation of why Tae-sul locked Seo-hae up was kinda cool and they were doing sort of ok thru the part when Tae-sul shot himself.

Then instead of having our couple on the plane, I would have shown little girl Seo-hae growing up happily, not remembering Tae-sul, and perhaps not believing a word of it when Dad told her bedtime stories about how she had saved the world.

Or maybe Tae-sul could have just shot Seung-bok. He could have decided it was ok if Seung-bok shot Seo-hae, because little girl Seo-hae would still grow up just fine, again not believing her father's stories even if Tae-sul came to her birthday parties and backed up her father's stories.

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Maybe part of the point of the show was to complain that Koreans care too much about family and not enough about people who aren't close to them (??)

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By far a better ending that what we got.

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I love your ending!!!

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I didnt understand this throughout the whole show. Each time he was held by the concept of someone shooting the future Seo-Hae, but she would be fine. The present version of her was alive and well. So ultimately his choice was never between her life and the world's it was between two extra seconds with her or her life and a million others. If anything I would have understood if the antagonists threatened young Seo-Hae's life.

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@lovepark, you deserve a medal. Your persistence in analysing well till the end is stunning. Thank you - you made a great deal more sense than the drama did.

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At lasttttttt, in my Etta James voice. What an incredibly tedious and stupid drama. In the end, none of this made sense. The writers made stuff up in between points and and thought they were writing an exciting story. To all my beanies who made it to the end, we were warriors in the battle of tedium and stupidity, I salute us for our perseverance. 😝❤🤔😁

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We deserve a double bean.
(This reminds me of Men are Men stupidity last year).

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Deep bow of appreciation and respect to Lovepark. After reading your recap I almost understand what happened in the finale but remain mystified as to the why.
Happy to see the brief roll of photos of the crew hard at work in all weathers creating stunning visuals. Kudos to all for their hard work and sincere dedication.
Trying to understand this drama, I began consulting Alluvial-hubby who loved reading sci-fi in his teens. Am I supposed to expect internal logic, a sympathetic character and a little actual science?
"Nope, it's all about world-building," was the reply. "Just expect convoluted plots, shallow characters and crappy writing."
Hard bean earned and lesson learned.

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I became a little wiser reading your comment. 🌟

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I had waited to watch the last two episodes due to personal reasons and that i was losing interest. It was a waste of my time to be honest. I believe they should have ended it with our hero's flying into the light. bitter sweet, but a closed ending. The final scenes with sigma made no sense (similar to an other show that ruined it in the last minute * cough* nine tale *cough* ) and were pointless. why go through 16 eps of saving the world only for it to be undone..unless the writers wanted to stress that the future can never be changed. hence with sigma 2.0

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This ending was very disappointing to me - as was much of the series - plot holes, major gaps in believability, Eddy as Sigma 2.0, etc. Also, I found the suicide in the church offensive. Some of these actors are favorites of mine from other shows - what a letdown.

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Haven't joined the recaps for this show. I was silently suffering through this by myself lol. Glad it's finished and am proud of myself for sticking it out.

As a chronic drama-dropper, I have no idea what kept me watching this one. I didn't realize until about episode 9 that this drama had plot issues and the lack of new shows in dramaland somehow resigned me to watching. Typically I would have dropped this at episode 9.

The storyline had a lot of potential. I was hopeful things would come back together and tie up nicely, but everything just diverged further and further apart.

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Thanks so much for the recap and comments, Lovepark. I can only imagine how painful it must have been not being able to FF through this show, specially the second part.

The best thing I can say is that it is over. This could have been something if anyone had tried harder and actually wrote a script. Anyway, whenever I'm asked: name a drama that's a whole plot device nonsense I will know what my answer will be.

And as I don't want to leave only a bad comment, I will praise the acting of CSW and PSH and of course SDI. They were fantastic, even more than expected, making an outstanding role of the very little they were given. I hope this drama doesn't become a burden in their careers.

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Well said, your say something nice. The actors really worked hard and elevated what was essentially a trash script. They made it just super mediocre.

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The cast was definitely the drama's strong point (aka redeeming point). I don't fully agree with the idea that they were miscast (as stated by some others). I think they all played their part well and made the material they were given much better. They were fun to watch. I cared and liked the characters, and I know it wasn't because of the script/directing!

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I love love love Park Shin-hye and Cho Seung-woo each individually. When I heard of the pairing, to say that I was excited for the drama was an understatement. I tried really hard to watch this drama but I couldn't watch it past ep. 4. I honestly didn't care what happened to the characters after they had jumped off the bridge. I value my time way too much to put another minute in that atrocious mess. Sigh, I'm sad that my PSH/CSW got bamboozled by the writers, JTBC, and directors. Do better, JTBC!

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I’m just putting this into my fantasy bucket and not try to make sense of it. My daughter has been following along with me (not actually watching) and asked how this ended. “He couldn’t control the urge to make the time machine, so he killed himself to stop the nuclear war.” Her, “So he sacrificed himself to save the world.” That’s about right. The End.

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that ending was very confusing. i initially thought that Tae-sool dropped the medication because Seo-hye was an illusion that he didnt want to erase. if seo-hye and tae-sool did get together in this new future how can 2 seo-hye exist in the same timeline? doesnt that go against every time traveling rule?

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I'm not even going to pretend to understand what just happened, but I am going to say everyone was miscast. Would the drama have been saved with a different cast? No, this show is beyond saving, but if they had aged down Tae-sul, they would have had to age down Eddie and Seo-jin as his friends, and age down Sigma as his classmate, and age down Tae-san as his hyung.

I agreed with Sun that if Tae-sul died, then there would be no uploader thus no war, which ended up being Tae-sul's solution anyway when he shot himself, but I wished he had acknowledged it when his needle broke and he couldn't come back. Before their (awkward) kiss, I wished he said to Seo-hae, "Well, at least there won't be war."

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i've been confused thruout this drama, but sorta enjoyed the weird ride anyway, gave up trying to figure it out... i even forgot about the ending until reading this recap...
: D

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I agree. This was a rather disappointing episode, for what I thought was a good (not great - good) drama. The fact that Tae-sool commits suicide didn't sit right with me, since I expected the ending to be him going back to his childhood and saving Gil-bok from a sad and violent future... Maybe by reporting his dad? Maybe by being more supportive? Though I know that he wouldn't go back as his childhood self, but as a grown man, but I think he could've still made changes. Idk, Gil-bok was a scary kid anyways, but Sigma always made a point of saying that if someone had offered him a hand, maybe he wouldn't have turned out this way. The scene where Dad gives Gil-bok the jacket was touching, and I genuinely thought that would make a difference. But, the truth of the matter is that Gil-bok was already too scarred by that point, for a single moment to make all the difference.

That's why I thought Tae-sool would go back to the past and sort it out... I wish he would've gone to the past and made better decisions in general - stop being so self-centred and having a better relationship with those he hurt, like Gil-bok, his girlfriend, Tae-san and Seung-bok. At the end of the day, the whole point of the time-travel premise was that people went back to the time they regret most, and he seemed to regret the way he treated the people who loved him, so I though that was what the ending would be about.

Also, it's from the last episode but, did Mr Park and his wife get an ending? I was a bit confused about that as well. Okay so, his present self didn't kill her, and his future self disappeared, so... what was their ending? Is the implication that he just keeps beating her, or maybe he realises what he's doing once he sees the knife in his hand? Not sure. I'm not someone who likes open-endings so, I'm not asking for a happy ending... I just want to get closure.

I don't know. This whole ending felt lacking in many ways, but I enjoyed the drama as a whole. This feeling is very similar to when I watched Black (2017) and was so disappointed by the ending, because it felt like all the work the main characters had done was UNdone by the end...

Anyways, it's way past midnight! See you next time :D

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Tae-sul couldn't have gone back to save Gil-bok, because then they never would have been able to give us the final shot of him with Seo-hae on the airplane. Which seems to have been, as far as I could work out, the drama's End Game goal, no matter what. *shrugs*

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I saw the whole thing and while the journey was interesting, it got super confusing near the end. I could follow some of the meaning but after awhile I couldn't keep up -- I still am not sure about a lot of things except that maybe there will be a season 2. One other thing, Sisyphus' was punished to continuously do the same thing over and over. I am wondering that there may be infinite time loops and that certain choices and actions change things. I am guessing that the show is hinting that there's always a chance you can break the cycle.

I did like Bingbing coming to save her Dad from ruining his life -- twice.

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Well lol. It's over folks! On a serious note, the actors weren't the issue. I just feel like in the end, it started to lose its way, and its core essence. It didn't anger me like Alice's ending did, so that's a positive! But generally, I just felt like rme at the extra epilogue of the villain.

The writers must be nihilistic to the core b/c I know drama title and all, it just felt a bit cheap to me? 16 episodes and we get that ending? It just felt like the battle between Tae-sul and his friend should've been in Ep 8/9. And then Ep 10-14 was building up the battle, and Ep 15-16, would be ending/finding a solution to it. Just nihilistic and not hopeful what so ever, not saying happy endings obviously but I feel like something was missing.

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I admit that I regret seating through 16 episodes , which were 15 and half episodes too many. I should have bailed out when Tae-sul fixed plane with duct tape.
With this comment I declare that I am free of this drab of a drama.

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I actually enjoyed the show despite its numerous gaps and inconsistent logic. I think most of the plot holes throughout the series can be reasonably explained and chalked up to the time travel logic.

After reading a lot of comments and explanations about the ending, I am settling with this - the show ended with Seo-hae disappearing. What happens after that is material for Season 2.

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I fast forwarded through most of this drama. ML is one of my favorites but the FL never gets better. Story confusing. So many better time travel kdramas out there.

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Too over convoluted plot. Park Shin Hye is no longer pretty as she was in Memories of the Alhambra. There are terrible wrinkles on her chin from a bad plastic surgery to give her a dimple on her chin. Beurk!

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Well clearly this show had it's problems. But I like how slick everything looked, the camera work and the settings were quite well made. Lots of money spend there ^^ it basically made the crazy story very watchable, also the fact that I mostly binged it and didn't use my head most of the time helped. So I didn't find it too offensive even though it had massive flaws. There are lots of dramas recently that are just unwatchable for me, so I am happy I made it through this one.

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