46

Call It Love: Episodes 1-2

Call It Love is finally here after weeks of pretty-in-pink teasers, and I, for one, am calling it lovely. The premiere week is high on vengeance and low on romance but it’s already clear the seesaw will shift, lifting our leads up and out of their current gloom. It’s got an artsy feel, siblings at its center, and a tough-as-nails heroine that’s really not as tough as she looks. Yep, I’m already under its spell.

 
EPISODES 1-2

As with any revenge story, we first have to understand what went wrong in the past to be able to get behind the punishing intentions of our main character. In this first set of episodes, we get lots of exposition as the backstory is slowly revealed in pieces. (I’m going to lay it out all at once, though.)

To begin, we meet our heroine, SHIM WOO-JOO (Lee Sung-kyung), who’s hurt, angry, and doesn’t take nothin’ from nobody. She’s the middle of three adult siblings who live together in the house they grew up in, but are now parentless. Their mother died of an illness when Woo-joo was a senior in high school (causing her to bypass college and go straight into the workforce) and their father had abandoned the family for his mistress before that (taking with him all the family’s money).

In our opening sequence, set in the present, Woo-joo learns of her father’s death and decides to go make a scene at the funeral service (which she wasn’t invited to). She shows up in a skin-tight dress and bright red pumps and loudly divulges the family’s dirty laundry, as she drinks soju and complains about the food.

The mourning widow (a.k.a. the woman Woo-joo’s dad left her mom for) doesn’t recognize Woo-joo at first, after fifteen years of not seeing each other. But Woo-joo makes her identity and her intentions known, saying revenge should be taken — even decades later — by humiliating the other person in any way possible.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

While Woo-joo is at the service, she overhears her estranged aunts talking about the fact that the widow, MA HEE-JA (Nam Ki-ae), has inherited the house that Woo-joo and her siblings live in (which legally still belonged to their father). Worse, Hee-ja has already sold it, and when Woo-joo confronts her, she says the kids have one week to move out. If Woo-joo was toying with revenge before, she’s serious about it now.

We see the three siblings, along with Woo-joo’s lifelong friend YOON JOON (hello Sung Joon), packing and boxing all their belongings. Joon is uncomfortable during the process, but the rest are methodic and unemotional as they go along. I get the impression these three are used to loss and have disconnected from their feelings. They move into Joon’s house with him, seemingly because they have nowhere to go, but we later learn Woo-joo has an ulterior motive.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

The name of that motive is HAN DONG-JIN (Kim Young-kwang) — who lives in the same neighborhood as Joon. We meet him as the CEO of a company that organizes trade fairs. Due to some scandalous behavior from a former business partner, his company, Best Fairs, is on the rocks. In order to stay afloat, he accepts a large sum of money from his mother — who is none other than Hee-ja.

There are a couple of things to note here. First, Dong-jin purposefully does not ask where the money came from. We’re given the sense that he and Hee-ja have a complicated relationship and that she wasn’t around much as he was growing up (she says she got married a lot, and even though she was with Woo-joo’s dad, Dong-jin never knew him too well). Since Dong-jin needs to accept the money his mother offers, he doesn’t want to know anything about it that might make him feel too guilty to take it.

Second, we are led to believe — along with Woo-joo — that the money for Dong-jin came from the sale of Woo-joo’s house. (There’s a little shadiness around this right now, though, so we’ll have to wait to find out what’s going on.) The thing is, Woo-joo believes her house was sold to invest in Dong-jin — who she sees as a spoiled guy, living in comfort, who never had to struggle for anything. And so, she turns her vengeful plan toward him, believing he’s just like his mother.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

To enact this plan, Woo-joo quits her job and gets hired as a part-time office assistant at Best Fair. She tries to start sneaking around and collecting possibly valuable data to use against our male lead, but she’s just not good at it. On one occasion, she follows Dong-jin to his apartment building and starts going through mailboxes to find out which apartment is his. He catches her in the act — because he saw her following him (and so did the convenience store worker where he stopped to eat. The girl might have heart but she needs some training in vigilantism).

Dong-jin is pretty calm about the whole thing, though. He tells her his apartment number and asks why she followed him. She’s super vague, just saying she has a lot of interest in him (clarifying that it’s not in a romantic way). It’s a strange scene that lacks emotional intensity on either side, but gives us clues that (like Woo-joo) Dong-jin is a loner type and is also holding onto some secrets.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2 Call It Love Episodes 1-2

The next major encounter between the two happens when Woo-joo is accused of having infiltrated the company to spy. It just so happens that on the night a dubious email is sent from an office laptop, Woo-joo is at the office way after hours (copying files that she might need to use against the CEO). But she didn’t send the email and she’s not a spy. As she says, she’s not the most upright person in the world but she can’t be bought off that easily.

Dong-jin isn’t sure what to believe at first. When he questions her about why she was at the office, and asks her to explain why she followed him home that night, she’s too angry to answer. Instead, she starts insulting him about his comfortable life, and says he’s taking the easy way by blaming her, rather than considering one of his long-time employees may have turned on him. It’s clear she’s hurt, but her hurt always pours out as antagonism.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

And what we see in this scene is that he’s hurt too. The things she’s saying are getting under his skin because they’re true — which, in turn, makes him just as angry as she is. He fires her on the spot, but later learns that one of his long-time employees was in fact the culprit.

Dong-jin feels bad about firing Woo-joo and asks her to meet up with him. They sit outside a convenience store and he says he wants to hire her back. As they’re talking, a guy in a suit shows up and begins to charge at Dong-jin as if he’s about to hit him. Woo-joo sees that Dong-jin is not going to defend himself — he closes his eyes and tenses for impact. So, she steps in and pushes the man to the ground before he gets in a swing. Dong-jin stares at Woo-joo in awe as we end our episodes for the week.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

There are a few things I’m really liking about this show. One of them is the aesthetic and directorial choices. As mentioned in our Premiere Watch post for Call It Love, PD Lee Kwang-young intended to capture the tone of the story by coating the images with dusky light (“a reddish sunset glow”). This works for me on a couple of levels.

For one, this is shot beautifully. It’s got an architectural feel that embraces clean lines and a modernist aesthetic. But that also means it’s got some sharp edges, which are softened by the color choice. These two things together — the framing and the cherry blossom hue — make for a pretty combination.

The other reason it works for me is more symbolic. If the aim of the palette is to express emotion (as the PD suggests), it’s interesting to note that the flashback scenes are hued in blue and green — cool colors — rather than the warm tint that covers the present. It’s like being taken back to a time before fiery tempers and hot emotions were the basis for our characters’ actions. (This also makes me wonder if it will be toned down when they start to heal.)

And that leads to the second thing I’m really liking in this drama, which are the emotions. So far, we’ve seen Woo-joo has complex feelings beneath her anger. She cries at her father’s funeral but berates herself for it. Her eyes are wet when Dong-jin is blaming her for something she didn’t do. She uses anger to deal with the world rather than feel her pain. It’s a nice, nuanced touch.

It’s also in contrast to her older sister, SHIM HYE-SUNG (Kim Ye-won). We get to know Hye-sung when a woman comes to visit her at work and accuses her of dating the woman’s boyfriend. Hye-sung denies it — because she doesn’t know the guy she’s seeing has a girlfriend. When she realizes it’s true (the guy lives with this other woman, whom he’s been with for ten years), she’s humiliated. She cries (in front of everyone she works with) and promises to never see him again. Then she empathizes with the woman, saying she doesn’t know how he could do that to her.

The scene conveys Hye-sung’s recurring problems picking boyfriends, which we’ve already heard about from her friend. And it tells us something about how she handled her parents’ breakup — she dates around (always choosing badly), and now, the fact that she’s on the cheating side (her father’s side), shames her. Woo-joo, we’re told, is the opposite: she doesn’t date at all because she thinks all men will be like their dad.

While I feel like the drama falls a little flat on the revenge plot side, I’m hoping it’s because we won’t stay here too long. Woo-joo is highly moralistic — calculating in her moves, not fly-off-the-handle crazy — and I feel like the drama might use that to have her change her mind about the revenge sooner than later.

At the heart, we’ve got two lonely leads, bottled with emotions, just waiting for someone to come along and help them open up. Even if it sometimes feels a little thin on story and overstuffed with melo, I’m ready to tag along on this journey and enjoy the purple-sky ride.

Call It Love Episodes 1-2

 
RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

46

Required fields are marked *

I liked this premiere, I am not a fan of that pink filter but I am able to get past it for now. I really like Woo-joo, she looks tough but has a lot of heart and I just like how the drama handles that. The drama did a great job conveying how lonely our leads are and I like the idea of them finding comfort in each other and Woo-joo realising she cares for him more than she cares for her revenge. At least this rough outline is what I am here for, if it goes makjang or whatever interest of love seemed to be in recaps I am out.

Also the performances are solid so far so that's nice to see.

12
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I loved the setup and can't wait to see more. Stepmother is cruel and brazen. I think she is living in the house but fooled the three siblings to kick them out.

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The pink filter didn't really work for me, the whole viewing experience was tough on my eyes. Also am not sure what emotions / mood the pink filter was supposed to evoke in the viewers. For me, it didn't serve to create a melancholic feel or any other feel, it just felt unnecessary for me.

I like Lee Sung-kyung's depiction of Woo-joo so far, but am still not so sure about Kim Yong-kwang's depiction of Dong-jin. Going around your day looking like a dead zombie with no energy is a very in-your-face way of showing his lacklustre and deadbeat attitude (due to his company's situation and perhaps other factors too), but I would have preferred more nuances to portray that (was it perhaps the writing / plot then?).

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think this will fill The Interest of Love sized hole in my schedule. Overall, I wasn't enamored but it did pique my interest. The pacing was slow, yet a lot happened in terms of plot and character development. I like both the lead actors, and was also glad our FL added some emotional layers to the flat portrayal of her character. I hope they'll do it for the ML as well. She's so gorgeous tho despite the attempts to make her more plain. Sometimes I wish drama-land would just hire less attractive but skilled actors for these roles.

One thing I don't like is the demonizing the female partners in affairs. But there's no father left to blame, and the woman did make them homeless so the FL's hate feels justified. I didn't get one thing: ML finds his new employee/FL stalking him to his home and going through his mail! And he lets it go because she may be interested in him (tho not romantically she says)?

I am not loving the palette. It's not just the pink, but the many other filters ranging from almost monochrome to bright color that are displayed like a slideshow. But I'm not hating it either. It became less noticeable as the show went along, or I adapted. The main reason I question the choice is that it's a distraction, even in all our discussions.

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

> ML finds his new employee/FL stalking him to his home and going through his mail! And he lets it go because she may be interested in him (tho not romantically she says)?

I don't think Dong Jin cares about what happens to him. He seems to be in that state of depression in which he is apathetic to his surroundings and goes through life without actually interacting with the outside world. The only thing he cares about is his company and even that I suspect is because of his responsibility & obligations toward his employees.

7
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought about giving a break after the massacre of interest of love, but here I am again. The plotline was enough to pique my interest
In addition, I was curious about the dynamic between our leads. I found the first two episodes pretty slow paced & the pink filter started giving me a headache ( eventually it subsided though). However, I'm still invested to see where the plot heads ( I think it's not gonna head into the makjang territory as the Fl's revenge plot seems quite unplanned & vague)

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I still feel a bit scarred by "Interest of Love," too. I'm hopeful that because this one is advertised as a healing drama that it will end less openly, and won't be as frustrating to watch. More "Do You Like Brahms" in nature.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

The pinkness really hurt my eyes and FL voice is too montonous. It is also not as heart wrenching as I expected it to be, maybe yet. On other side, Kim Young Keang does pretty good and I think that’s enough for me to look at several more episodes.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really love Lee sung kyung here, so much fire and nuance in her potrayal. . Her circumstance is definitely the center of the show so far. So glad she finally showcase her acting through this character. I have become more looking forward to dr romantic 3. She definitely carried it. So far I'm intrigued.

5
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just reading this recap filled me with hot anger so I definitely won't be watching this.
I don't understand why characters who have to antagonists always have to be the absolute worst too. Like it's not bad enough that you left your family but then you took all their money too? Then you leave the house to the new wife? Did he not have even the slightest care or love or affection for his kids?
(Sure, it's not the most unbelievably thing to happen but sigh, it's anger inducing to say the least)

Also I think I'm particular sensitive to the "blame/crucify/criticize the kids for the actions of their parents" thing. I know, just by the recap, that the viewer is supposed to feel a certain way about the guy using the money that was supposedly gotten by shady means. Mostly likely people are suppose to feel for the female lead and support her revenge plot against him until she gets to know him better and yadda yadda.
I really can't with that because the father (and the mistress) are the trash people and yet the kids are the ones who have to deal with the fallout.

I need to take some deep breaths haha

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I do not really think the show wants us to judge the ML for taking the money. In fact, even the FL does not assume he is a bad guy because of that and firstly simply wants to ask for the money back (she does not, because she assumes he spent the money on luxurious car).

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

What you're saying doesn't really match with what I think the show is depicting. First, in the case of the stepmom, yes, she is clear an antagonistic character. At the same time, her actions of marrying for money and then giving some of that money to her son to keep his business flush are framed as more nuanced. Clearly, she's not overtly likeable, but she's also not evil. It's very easy to imagine that she is a gold digger because she's *both* selfish and desperate to provide for her son. And she was with Woo-joo's father for 13 years, so it may also be that the show reveals Hae-ee genuinely cared for him.

As for the ML, there's no sense at all that the show means to suggest that he deserves to suffer because his mom is bad. Quite the opposite, actually. The show is sympathetic to him, and even the FL is clearly struggling to see him as a villain.

I can completely understand emotional reactions to recaps--I've certainly decided to not watch a show based on one alone--but in this case, I'm not sure your anger is justified by the actual story the show is telling so far.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sorry, did I get wrong? Was the female lead not trying to revenge on the mother by hurting her son? Were they not lumped together as antagonists because of the mother's actions?

If I got it wrong, I'm sorry. I guess I'm projecting or something.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree with what both @nerdy and @laurensophie have said. I don't think you are completely wrong but it is an oversimplification to lump the ML with his mother as an antagonist. He is just a grey character, just like the FL. FL's principle is "If you hurt me, then I'll hurt you back" so she does want revenge for her family home being taken away from her. However, the FL isn't by any means trying to get revenge on the mother by hurting the son. She is after the ML for accepting the money gotten from selling the house and his connection to the step-mom is a sort of a coincidence. I think had someone else received the money then she would have been after them instead. Of course, she is angry with her step-mom however her main focus at the moment is getting what was rightful hers - the house. We have no idea whether she will eventually also take revenge on her step-mom.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really enjoyed it. It is just as ridiculously angsty as I thought with a little touch of heart in it.

5
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Difficult to kick a beaten puppy, right Woo Joo?

I actually liked the first two episodes. Certain elements reminded me of My Mister (such as unfortunate woman attempting to hurt a decent dude, who got cheated on, but finding out that the guy is actually decent). I also liked that Woo Joo is terrible at stalking and the only reason why she can keep going with the plan is because the target himself can't care less. That gives a nice touch to their dynamic and does not put ML in strictly the victim category.
In addition, Woo Joo has a great fighting spirit and I love that underneath that she is a kind person who can't stand by when someone is getting hit.

As for the pink filter...It better become less apparent as the show goes on. I didn't mind it too much, it does mirror the lethargic state of the characters. Still, I miss other colors.

8
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was getting My Mister vibes, too, at least until it was clear that our FL was pretty inept at subterfuge. IU would never!

4
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, that’s what it is. I couldn’t figure out why this show felt somewhat familiar.

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

When she was pasting the invoices / receipts to the sheet, all my thoughts flew to JiAh. Also WooJoo is also dressing in sneakers and hoodies and barely talks to any work mate.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was waiting for her to walk into the office with sunglasses--which she honestly should have in a meager attempt to disguise herself.

1

Yes, I loved how sloppy and terrible she was at stalking. The first 5 or so minutes of episode 2 were quite comical because of it. It really just shows that even though she appears to be intimidating she isn't all - she's of no real threat (unless provoked). I have no doubt that she would fight back anyone when and if a situation called for it.

Interesting. I was under the impression that she still going through with the plan primarily because she wants her house back, and now with the knowledge that Dong Jin (ML) is living what appears to be a "comfortable" life she has directed her revenge at him. In the act of her planning her revenge, she has taken an interest in him (as she has said herself). So far, she has seen conflicting behaviour from him, for example
1. He was willing to help her out with carrying the groceries into the office
2. He was willing to accept money from his mother without even knowing where the money came from, indicating he is just like his mother.
I suspect he only helped her out because in that situation she was an employee at his company, and as you nicely pointed out in a different comment - he is willing to do anything for his company, in particular his employees.

That all being said, even though FL has openly said she wants revenge. Imo, her conviction doesn't seem too strong. Her actions towards getting revenge don't entirely match up with her words. It doesn't seem like she would do absolutely anything to get her revenge. For example, when she was accused and then eventually fired for harming the company, she seemed ready to give up her revenge scheme, and wasn't instead looking for another way to get her revenge. She has also had opportunity to enact her revenge but hasn't taken it yet, e.g., she could have easily done what she was accused of doing at the company but she didn't. Although, this could been because she is still collecting information and waiting for a perfect moment to strike. In her information-collection mode, it seems more like she is trying to find reasons to absolve herself from the guilt she might feel from going through with her revenge. If the ML is just like his mother, then she has no reason to feel bad and justice would have been served. Lastly, the very fact that the ML is clueless about where the money came from and shows no interest in finding out was definitely a hard pill for her to swallow. I think it has made her revenge much harder to execute because now it's like she is just punching air. What is the point of revenge, if the recipient has know idea what he has even done wrong. He has in a way robbed her from the satisfaction that people often get from revenge. She has had to reassess and recalculate her revenge. I'm curious about how much of the story will be about revenge vs healing. The ending of episode 2 seems so suggest that she is back in the game and will continue her pursuit for revenge. Although, I do think it's way too early to tell, I'm...

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I've only seen the first episode so far, but this is exactly what I was looking for right now. I am actually relieved that the revenge plot is so weak, as frankly, I'm tired of revenge dramas. Woo-joo's "plan"--barely a plan at all, just a series of hastily conceived actions that humiliate herself more than the intended target--is exactly what an emotionally damaged, angry young woman would invent. It's obvious to all that it won't work, but she still feels compelled to continue. At heart, she's just crying out "Look at me! I exist and my feelings matter!" even though she's also desperately trying to appear and be stoic, tough, and untouchable.

It may be my TV monitor, but the pink filter was barely noticeable on my screen. I could see that the flashback scenes were crisper and clearer but honestly, I'm not sure I would have chalked that up to a production team's choice if I didn't already know about it. The cinematography and directorial choices that distracted me more were the arty ones--like the rain falling upwards, or the slo-mo shots to indicate the desperate loneliness of the characters--but I'm not put off by them. I'm simply not sure yet if they add anything to the drama or not.

The only part I didn't quite catch is how Woo-joo so easily scored an assistant job at a struggling company when her last job was at a pharmacy. I thought for a moment that the woman who hired her was the wife of her sister's jerk boyfriend, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Additionally, I kept hoping during the bank confrontation scene that Woo-joo would point out to the woman that even if her sister *had* known her boyfriend was in a committed relationship that boyfriend is the one who deserves the brunt of her rage, not the sister. It's typical in a lot of media to place outsize blame on the woman when a man cheats, but it was still frustrating that no one said anything to suggest they hold this particular man responsible for the choice he made to lie and deceive the women with whom he's in a relationship. It was similar with the stepmom/mistress. Yes, she seems like an awful person, and it's not like Woo-joo doesn't hate her father, too, but this whole notion that Hae-ee "took" (i.e. seduced) this man away from his family--as if he had no agency of his own--was a constant, grating theme.

As for Dong-jin, based on the first episode alone, I'm not as clear on the reasons for his misery as I am about Woo-joo's. I liked the flinch he made when his mother tried to ruffle his hair; it spoke volumes about his contempt for her, and also, the self-loathing that must at least in part drive his desire to resist being comforted. I can see that he's a decent enough person that he'd likely be horrified to know how his mother came by that money, but it's hard to say for sure if he would have rejected it under those circumstances, either.

As for the performances, I did marvel at how far LSK has come. She was very green...

8
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

@laurensophie You raise an interesting point about the cinematography, which beyond the pink (isn't that the name of a girlband?) is very gimmicky. But I actually found, in these two episodes, at least, that it made the show more appealing to me. The pink, I can take or leave. It is very pink on my monitor, especially on outdoor shots. But knowing that if I decide to stick with this one, I'll be seeing the world in pink, I'll just go with it. I find the pink filter less annoying than the blue filter in Decoy/Bait, because the blue tends to darken indoor shots so much that I can't see anything. If I watch these two shows back to back, I'll feel like I'm at a gender reveal party, where the parents have discovered they are having have boy-girl twins!

But, the other parts of the cinematography I actually find somewhat attractive. Of course, it shows me as an easily manipulated viewer. Overhead shots like the one of the table in episode 1, where the dishes are arranged to highlight the geometry of circle and squares, seem designed to make me say "wow, look at that overhead shot of the table and how it highlights the geometry of circles and squares."
But, I agree with @dramaddictally that overall, its sharp edged, high definition aesthetic is very architectural. In fact I wish the ML was an architect, because it would fit the images. The cinematography does work, at least in the first two episodes, to make this noticeably different from other shows--whereas the plot and characters seem drawn from other dramas of revenge and modernist alienation. So I actually might watch this one primarily for the gimmicky cinematography, to see how it fits with the narrative. Also, I might get used to the pink and buy some rose colored glasses, which would improve how I see the world!

7
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have not seen Decoy/Bait, but love this line:

If I watch these two shows back to back, I'll feel like I'm at a gender reveal party, where the parents have discovered they are having have boy-girl twins!

Speaking of the ML's occupation, are you clear on exactly what it is? I mean, I know he's a CEO of a company that sets up various, themed products in huge warehouses, but what job title is that exactly?

In noting those architectural shots, you speak to the seeming deliberateness ("Admire my architectural aesthetic, fellow film school graduates!") of some of the artsier shots. In other words, they felt a bit too staged and deliberate for my liking, but I agree that making these kinds of cinematography choices helps distinguish the drama overall from every other romantic melo out there. I don't *not* like it; jury is just out for me so far as to whether or not it will enhance the overall story. But as you said, that's a good enough reason to keep watching.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that the key in evaluating the impact of the cinematography will be how it fits, or not, with the story. For example, that visually spectacular shot in episode one where the ML is highlighted in a triangle of light as he contemplates the empty exhibit space--does that mean that there's going to be some sort of theme of interior space? Filling the emotional void? Although that would be pretty depressing, if the show's solution to emotional trauma rests on exhibit booths of portable propane stoves and pop-up tents! (the subtheme: you should browse and view displays of comfort, warmth and shelter before you buy? ) Anyway, I'll give it a couple of more episodes, at least.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I loved that shot. The arc of light into a giant empty room and the male lead's shadow preceding him; elongating as he walks in.

There was also another shot where the two of them are standing there with a window frame between them and then it shifts and pans back and now they're framed within it together.

2

Architectural is an inspired way to put it so I'm glad for the terminology. I personally love how boxed in everybody is, surrounded by pillars and walls and windows with that almost oppressive filter weighing them down.

Although I admit there were a number of shots where I was so busy admiring the framing of the shot that it was a distraction. To the point where the direction and cinematography may start to be intrusive ,that's a real concern.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I need to go to the dark side and watch this pink drama asap.
I heard there is a brooding shower scene!! Why no screenshot dramaddictally???

5
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

LOL. 😂 (It's only shoulders up. Trust me, I thought about it.)

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Also feet!! beautiful feet!!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's one of the "brooding shower" scenes which are used for narrative purposes rather than visual (still the scene was funny to me because Kim Young-kwang was looking directly into the camera i.e. the audience).

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Are we quite sure it's the disgruntled employee attacking the ML at the end of Episode 2? I even went back to rewatch the last scene after reading the recap; I still think it's a different face, build and voice. Looks like something else is going on to me =\

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I quite liked it. It wasn't crazy with revenge or makjang, which I liked. I kinda liked all the characters.

So, we don't know if Dong-jin is a biological son of the father or if he was from her earlier marriage? I coudn't tell.

I am more angry with the father than the mistress. I get it that he was smitten and left his wife. But abandoning his children was awful. The fact that he didn't even leave the house for the kids was cruel. Unless, the mistress faked the document and took it illegally, because no one ever asked for proof of will and worse, they didn't contact/consult a lawyer.

The pink filter bothers me in the outdoor shots. esp KYK's crisp white shirts are pink.

Sung Joon's hair - It looked great in the pics, not so great in the drama. Needs conditioning.

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm pretty sure DongJin is not WooJoo's brother. The way his mum talked addressed to his dead husband and then her saying that she had been marrying a lot (quite a hobbie).

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't think we're supposed to let the fahter off the hook, just that her anger at him has to go somewhere now that he's dead. She went to the funeral angry with him, not the stepmother. But now the latest injustice has left her without the real purveyor of that injustice - her father - to appeal to. That anger and impotence has to go somewhere and it's settled here.

Her father wouldn't be the first man to decide that a fresh start with all the money and no responsibilities sounds like a great thing and certainly not the first not to care about his kids at all. He's absolutely the worst villain in this piece and I don't think the show is saying otherwise.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just who thought that excessive pink filter was a good idea?

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have just finished both episodes and liked it a lot, and the palette is not bothering me at all.
I wonder how long it will take until our leads find out who the other is.
And I'm also interested on knowing the reasons Hajee kept the house when the drama made us believe he had sold it and was using that money to help her son.

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really enjoyed the first 2 episodes- so much so I went back and watched both episodes - which never happens in my world! So now I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will continue, at least as good as it has started but preferably getting better with each new episode. And by the end I hope our heroine and our hero are married and have moved back into the family home. The best friend has seen how wonderful the older sister is and they are hooked up and happily ever aftering. The brother has passed his exams, the business partner can buy an even cuter baby to drive. And the evil mother and the mean-spirited aunties have all contracted Covid19 and died. And all without the slightest whiff of a murdery subplot!!! (PS has covid even made it into kdrama land yet?) And has Nam Ki-ae ever played a nice mum? Every time I see her in a new drama I cringe 😬 she is certainly very good at playing thoroughly unlikeable mothers……

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i dont get the pink filter at all, im gonna stick to weecaps for now

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm intrigued. This one could be really interesting. I usually tend to avoid melodramas and I'm also not a fan of revenge plots but I decided to give this show a chance for the ever-watchable LSK and KYK (who was utterly adorable in Hello, Me!). For now, I definitely appreciate that the more melo aspects of the narrative feel mostly grounded in reality. Obviously, things might change once the Evil Stepmother and/or the Mysterious Ex-Girlfriend arrive to make things hard for our two leads but even then, I'm willing to be patient as long as they are more than your typical cardboard cutout clichés.

Sidenote: If the best friend character is not mainly there to pine for WJ (and then, in the end, to settle for her sister), I will die from happiness. The short scene in which he used WJ as a fake girlfriend didn't seem to carry any romantic undertones but, who knows, how things might change once he's no longer the most important (not blood-related) man in WJ's life...

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

So this isn't the type of drama I typically go for, but the premise and artsy/moody teasers piqued my interest. I'm surprised at how much I'm enjoying it so far. It reminds me of the beginning of My Mister, but less... unrelentingly bleak. There were some nice lighter moments here with Dong-jin's partner, plus Woo-joo's siblings and longtime friend. Side note: please, show - can we just have a nice, supportive male-female friendship that doesn't get shoehorned into a love triangle? Just this once? Pretty please?

I liked the cinematography overall, but I'm mixed about the color palette. At times it works well and it's really pretty, but other times I found it distracting. It's interesting that the director was going for a warm sunset feel since to me it created this cool, distant vibe instead.

Anyway, whether I stick with this drama or not depends on just how much melodrama it's going to throw my way, but so far I'm liking these characters a lot, and am looking forward to watching their relationship develop.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Only for LSK will I add another drama to my too long media list. Be back tomorrow.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Slowburn character driven dramas are the ones I find myself enjoying the most. And I've been waiting for something like that to come out since the last episode of My Liberation Notes aired back in May, but nothing has really met my expectations until now. I love that, at least so far, characters seem human enough, which makes it easier to relate and sympathise with them

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

That house has been used in so many KDramas right? It looks very familiar but just can't remember which shows it was in.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It remind me of My Ajusshi, with the angry, broken female lead watching the male lead from a step behind, in his shadow so to speak.

I loved the opening monologue about watching somebody from behind and the way in which the intersection of the deep melancholy blue and the pink filter caused shadows the characters were always walking into. I particularly liked how the male lead is seen mostly through glass, in reflections and turning away like a glass half darkly.

Yes the pink filter got a bit much when it wasn't intersecting with the blues; almost like a washed out flashback, like what was happening wasn't entirely real.

But mostly I have to say I loved it.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm here extremely late having just started this today. I am aware of how much Beanies liked this drama, having seen it mentioned many times in the past few weeks. However... I have to say were it not for such high recommendation I would not have made it even to the end of ep 2. It was such a dreary watch I was itching to turn it off. Finally I made it to the point where the real spy was discovered, but no scene of him being confronted and dismissed, so it seems that while our leads can now begin again (even if it is a somewhat uneasy relationship) any potential drama will be relentlessly downplayed in favour of tedious downbeat scenes. I'll see what episode 3 brings, but what is it that made so many people like this? It has absolutely no life in it at all!

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *