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Radiant Office: Episode 2

After surviving the worst day ever, our three job seekers finally get some good news, which they hope will turn their luck around. But getting what you want isn’t necessarily the same as getting what you need, and they still have a long way to go before they see their dreams come true. Unfortunately, the Sad Sack Trio are as out of place in the corporate world as they are in their regular lives, proving that landing a good job isn’t the end of their problems, but only the beginning.

 
EPISODE 2 RECAP

Ha-won and her new friend Kang-ho wait for their turn to interview, this time at a furniture company named Hauline. The receptionist calls in three candidates, and when they stand, one of them whips out a gun and shoots one of the other candidates.

HA, it’s Ho-won’s runaway imagination again, and all hell breaks loose as she scuttles for safety. Job seekers go after each other with guns, knives, anything they can use to take out their competition and secure a job for themselves.

Ho-won watches as a girl parachutes in and makes a beeline for the interview room. Ho-won races past her, barrel-rolls into the room first, and pops up triumphantly to see… Woo-jin, the man who ruined her last interview.

Still fantasizing, Ho-won pulls out a bow and lets an arrow fly right at Woo-jin’s face. But he’s not even surprised and just bats it away with his pen like it’s nothing.

Back in reality, Ho-won finds herself in the same interview group as Kang-ho. She stays outwardly calm, though inside she’s screaming, “Why did you do that to me??” She smiles down at her tiny imaginary self cheering her on from the floor, telling herself to take advantage of this opportunity.

Woo-jin starts by commenting on her grades as her only asset, and asks, just like he did last time, why she only concentrated on her grades. Ho-won wonders if Woo-jin remembers her, though he’s given no indication that he does.

He turns to Kang-ho, who looks so nervous he could throw up, to ask why he applied to their company. Kang-ho’s voice is way too loud as he stumbles through an obviously rehearsed speech about furniture, concluding that he’ll bet his life on this job, which makes Woo-jin doubt his sincerity.

Woo-jin asks if Ho-won feels the same way, noting that she has no experience. She says that she’s been busy working part-time jobs to pay her rent and student loans. Angry and working herself into a righteous fury, she stalks towards Woo-jin, stating defiantly that she applied here because she needs to make a living. Suddenly her tiny cheerleader hollers up to her to pay attention — this is not a fantasy, and she really just said those things out loud. Whoops.

Horrified, Ho-won slumps back to her chair. Woo-jin laughs and reminds her of what she said before: that her talent was holding back her anger. Oh no, he does remember her!

Defeated, Ho-won tells him that she’s worked thirty-two part time jobs, never receiving insurance or benefits, while she dreamed of getting a job for a company like Hauline. Looking Woo-jin directly in the eyes, she says that even after one hundred rejections, she never gave up.

She says that her part-time jobs taught her that people in power are strong, while subordinates are always struggling. And the small companies where she’s worked are always subordinate to large companies like Hauline, so that’s why she’s applied here — to have a bit of power for once. Knowing she’s blown the interview, Ho-won stands and leaves.

The girl who broke Ki-taek’s heart, Ji-na, works here at Hauline, and she’s startled to run into Ki-taek on his way to the interviews. She’s furious, but Ki-taek says that she doesn’t like him anymore since he doesn’t have a job, so here he is. Ji-na snaps that he’s not good enough or smart enough to work here, and Ki-taek agrees that she’s probably right.

Ji-na tells him to leave again, and Ki-taek asks if she’ll reconsider dating him if he does. Ji-na turns it around on him and says that if he still likes her, he’ll leave.

Kang-ho and Ho-won run into Ki-taek outside the building, and the three have a Sad Sack reunion and finally learn each other’s names. Kang-ho tells Ki-taek that the interviewer today was the same one who drove Ho-won to jump in the river.

Although Ki-taek claims that his interview went well, he seems squirrelly when Kang-ho tells him which manager it was. Did he really go to his interview? They decide to get revenge on the jerk who hurt Ho-won, and when she sees a man delivering someone’s lunch, Ho-won hatches an evil plan.

They march out of the building like they’re on a mission, never even seeing their doctor from the emergency room, Hyun, heading inside. He just laughs to see them again.

The trio find a phone booth and start making calls, all to restaurants that Ho-won has worked for and who don’t pay their employees fairly. Soon a mountain of fast food is being delivered to Woo-jin’s office under his name, hee.

The employees scramble to hide the food from the head of sales, MANAGER PARK SANG-MAN (Kwon Hae-hyo), who has banned food from the office due to the smell. Of course, he’s the first to dig in while a confused Woo-jin swears he didn’t order anything.

Manager Park and Woo-jin meet with their CEO to discuss some reorganization within their departments. Woo-jin isn’t happy to learn that the ace of his marketing team is being transferred to Manager Park’s sales team, especially since marketing is about to be swamped with a new product launch. He’s told to just hire some new team members.

That evening, Ho-won goes to her roof to burn her remaining resumes, having decided to give up her dream of working for a large company. In the morning, she asks her roommate Hyo-ri if she can buy her old cell phone, and as soon as she has it activated, she gets a call from Hauline offering her a three-month contract.

Confused as to why they would hire her after her disastrous interview, she learns that Manager Park specifically requested her. Interesting, considering that he wasn’t even at the interviews.

Ho-won is still befuddled that night as she works at the convenience store, wondering why it’s only a three-month contract. But she remembers that she may only have six months to live, so she considers giving it a shot.

A man sneaks into the store and starts shoving things into a bag, which Ho-won sees on the security mirror. The man spots her and runs for the door, so Ho-won whips off her shoe and flings it at him.

But the thief escapes, and Woo-jin walks in with Ho-won’s manager right behind him. Her shoe hits her boss in the face, and her response is to hide from both of them behind a shelf. Ha.

The manager checks on Woo-jin while yelling at Ho-won, and she cringes in mortification when he says her name out loud. Woo-jin recognizes the name and smirks, saying she should be fired. Jerk.

After Woo-jin leaves, Ho-won’s manager yells at her for leaving the counter and allowing the theft to happen. She tunes him out to daydream about the Hauline job, but he gets her attention again when he says she should just quit.

When her boss informs her that he’s docking her pay for the stolen items, that’s the last straw. Ho-won yells that it’s part-timers like her who keep the store in business, and that without them, the whole country’s economy would crash.

Ho-won adds that part-timers are his employees, not his prey, and actually gives him The Hand when he tries to get a word in edgewise. She throws down her work vest and tells him that she got another job. Boo-yah.

Ho-won arrives at Hauline on her first day to discover that both Kang-ho and Ki-taek were also hired. None of them can figure out why when their resumes are lackluster at best, but they are supportive of each other.

As it turns out, the young ER doctor, Hyun, is the son of the chairman of Hauline. He has lunch with Manager Park to discuss teaching him the basics of company management, even though Hyun confesses that he has no interest in running Hauline.

Manager Park is nervous to be eating with the boss’s son, but Hyun butters him up so well that he guesses Hyun wants this kept a secret. Manager Park mentions that he took care of that favor Hyun asked of him before asking how he knows those people.

Hyun says that he feels sorry for them, and that he seeks symbiosis (a mutually beneficial relationship). Wait, so Hyun got the three misfits their jobs? How very interesting.

Woo-jin receives an envelope with no return address, and inside is a handwritten, unsigned letter. The writer says that they have proof that Manager Park is corrupt, but for now, we aren’t privy to the details. Woo-jin tucks the letter away safely and looks up Manager Park on the company website, then calls HR to request a list of the people who were hired at the same time as Manager Park.

Ji-na escorts the new employees to the marketing department (and boy, is she annoyed that Ki-taek is one of them) where Manager Park enthusiastically welcomes them to the team. He explains that he was too busy to sit in on the interviews, which is why such talented people as them didn’t get permanent positions and were only offered short-term contracts.

He makes a huge production about discovering their unique talents and qualifications, then tells the office that Ho-won will join the marketing team, and Ki-taek and Kang-ho will go to his sales team. But Woo-jin saunters up to say that nope, that’s not what’s going to happen.

All three of the newbies cringe, remembering the food-delivery prank they played on him. Woo-jin decides that Ho-won should work for the sales team, since marketing doesn’t require her famous patience, but Manager Park says that he prefers men on his team.

Woo-jin calls him out for gender discrimination, which has Manager Park backpedaling hard. Ho-won speaks up to say that actually, she’d prefer to work for the sales department (in other words, not with Woo-jin). Manager Park pulls Woo-jin into his office to speak privately about the issue.

He insists again on taking the guys for his team, but Woo-jin says he shouldn’t have hired a woman if he didn’t want to work with her. Woo-jin gets in Manager Park’s face to ask why he hired those three in particular, threatens to notify HR of his unusual hiring practices, and pointedly repeats that Ho-won should be on the sales team.

The three newbies sit in the break room moaning over their bad luck — Ho-won and Kang-ho because they’re terrified of Woo-jin, and Ki-taek because he has to work with his ex-girlfriend. When a secretary enters the room, they quickly change the subject to the confusing list of managers.

The secretary helps them out, giving them the lowdown on the three infamous sales managers. She says that Manager Park is a huge fake who’ll pretend to be your best friend, but if you get on his bad side, look out.

Manager JO SUK-KYUNG, the woman who was transferred to the sales team, is a perfectionist and workaholic known as the Ice Witch. The third is Assistant Manager LEE YONG-JAE (Oh Dae-hwan), the office suck-up.

Kang-ho asks about Ji-na, and they’re told that her nickname is Madame Face, because she spends most of her time applying her makeup. But nobody knows much about Woo-jin since he’s new, so Ho-won silently vows to throw her lot in with Manager Park.

Since the trio haven’t been assigned to a department yet, Suk-kyung sends them to visit one of the company stores with Yong-jae. Yong-jae wheedles for permission to go straight home after, but Suk-kyung coldly orders him to come back for a company meeting. Ice Witch, indeed.

Ho-won hangs back to beg Suk-kyung to help her get onto the sales team, promising to work hard. Suk-kyung says that what the company wants is a job well done.

Yong-jae spends the car ride to the store complaining about women in the workplace and how they’re always crying sexism and taking time off work to have children. (Well, isn’t he just delightful.) But Ho-won swears that she has no plans to get married or have children soon and asks him for a job in sales. Yong-jae says that to work on his team she has to forget she’s a woman, and he’s impressed when she says she can do that.

They arrive at the store, and Yong-jae goes inside. But before the others even get to the door, he runs back out screaming.

He tells them in the car that a woman bought an expensive bed there a few months ago that she was told was king-sized. But when she went to put her pricey, custom-made sheets on it, she discovered that it was actually a queen-sized bed and flew into a rage. She’s been throwing tantrums at the store for months because they refuse to give her a refund.

When they get back to the office, Suk-kyung informs Yong-jae that said angry customer is in the meeting room waiting to talk to him. Coward that he is, he whines that this situation isn’t his fault, and Ho-won seizes her opportunity. She offers to handle the customer herself, asking for a job in sales if she’s successful.

She’s allowed to try, so Yong-jae gives her a copy of store policy before they talk with the customer. He warns her not to apologize or take responsibility, since the woman could use it against them.

They enter the meeting room, and Ho-won launches right into a canned “we value our customers” speech. The disgruntled customer (cameo by comedienne Jang Do-yeon) slaps Yong-jae across the face and angrily offers to finish the speech she’s already heard so many times.

She blows up at Yong-jae’s insistence on following store policy and snatches him up by the hair. He accidentally calls her “ajumma,” and now he’s done it — she chases him around the room screaming and flailing, while Ho-won attempts to hold her back.

Woo-jin does a little detective work, figures out who sent him the letter about Manager Park, and goes to visit him where he still works in the company warehouse. The man, Gu-dong, is impressed that Woo-jin found him so quickly, so he invites him to have lunch and talk.

Once Yong-jae escapes the room and the customer calms a bit, Ho-won gets on her knees and introduces herself as a temporary employee. The customer isn’t pleased to have been pawned off on a rookie with no authority to make decisions.

Ho-won offers to let the customer hit her all she wants, because getting this job was harder than enduring abuse. She takes off her brand-new employee badge and says that if the customer storms out, she may lose her job. She tells the woman that it took over a hundred tries to get this job, which horrifies her.

Ho-won tells her everything, particularly the part about Woo-jin being so cruel at her interviews. The customer cries, identifying with Ho-won because after one hundred blind dates, she finally met a guy, but he fell in love with a younger woman. They end up in each other’s arms, wailing over their shared misfortune.

Soon after, the customer leaves the meeting room, announcing that Ho-won handled her claim to her satisfaction, and that she won’t be needing a refund. After advising Ho-won not to avoid obstacles, whether those are people or work, she leaves.

Ho-won puts her employee badge back around her neck, and I adore the tiny triumphant glance she shoots at Woo-jin before she confidently asks Suk-kyung about that spot on the sales team. Later, as she relates the story to her new friend the secretary, Ho-won learns a secret — that one of the temporary hires will be offered a permanent job at the end of their contract.

The sales team, which now includes Ho-won and Kang-ho, go out for drinks after work with the CEO of their supply company. Ho-won thinks about that possible permanent job offer, gives Kang-ho a quick apology, and makes her way to Manager Park’s side to begin her kissing-up strategy.

Ignoring the strange looks from the other team members, she pours Manager Park a drink then takes one from him in return. The way Suk-kyung watches her is interesting, as if Ho-won’s behavior worries her.

Ho-won is drunk by the time they leave the restaurant, and she and Kang-ho accidentally witness Manager Park taking a bribe from the supplier. Suk-kyung seems to have seen it too, but she doesn’t say anything.

They all head to a noraebang next, where the managers have a blast, Suk-kyung looks annoyed, and Ho-won falls asleep with Kang-ho watching over her. Manager Park wakes Ho-won, saying that company get-togethers are a part of work while pouring her another drink.

Ho-won refuses the drink as she’s not feeling well, but Manager Park gets a bit offended at her backtalk. Kang-ho and Suk-kyung both look uncomfortable when Ho-won gives Manager Park a cheeky grin and downs the drink. Manager Park tries to drag her to the dance floor, which is going too far in Suk-kyung’s opinion, so she tries to stop him.

The marketing team — basically Woo-jin, Ji-na, and now Ki-taek — stay late at the office, so Ki-taek gets to witness Woo-jin taking Ji-na to task for her sloppy filing system. Ki-taek offers to help her reorganize everything, but Ji-na snaps that he doesn’t know enough to help.

That looks like it stings, but Ki-taek gamely tells her that he feels like he started a brand-new life today. He says that he feels capable of accomplishing anything before asking if they can get back together. She looks at him like he’s something she found on the bottom of her shoe and says that if she wanted that, she wouldn’t have broken up with him in the first place.

Kang-ho calls Ki-taek, worried that Ho-won is about to get herself in big trouble. She’s drinking anything the managers give her, singing and dancing with them, and Kang-ho wants Ki-taek to come take her home.

Kang-ho says that he wants to tell Ho-won the truth — that they’ve both seen the results of their medical workups, and neither of them is terminally ill. Oh no, it’s Ho-won. Kang-ho heads outside to meet Ki-taek when he arrives, and Ho-won peers around the corner. She heard everything.

Ho-won goes back to the office alone and sits down to write her letter of resignation. Suddenly all the lights come on and Woo-jin sees her there. Ho-won clutches the resignation to her chest, trying to hide it from him.

 
COMMENTS

I’m glad that the office focus of our story seems, so far, to be as interesting as the characters’ personal introductions we were given in the first episode. I like that the misfits are still struggling to find their purpose even after landing a job, and I’d love to see them learning more about themselves and what they’re really capable of as they face the challenges of a cutthroat, and often corrupt, workplace. Each of them are already interesting and sympathetic as they are now, but they’re far from being confident and sure about their places in the world, which is something I really want for all three of them.

I think that Ho-won is an amazing lead female character. She may not be the smartest or the most capable person in the world, but she knows where her strengths lie. She’s also well aware of her weaknesses, which makes it that much more painful when Woo-jin pokes at her sore spots. She’s not afraid to stand up for herself when anyone tries to take her pride away from her. And she doesn’t just sulk, she gets up and takes action — it was very brave of Ho-won to take on a problem customer her very first day on the job, knowing that she had a good chance to screw it up and lose the job she’s worked for three years to land. But she refused to follow a bad company policy and chose honesty instead, which got her the reward she wanted.

We know the least about Kang-ho, only that he has a mother who is so hateful to him that her disapproval pushed him to attempt suicide. He’s such a cinnamon roll — sweet and meek, eager to please, and way too sensitive for the cutthroat corporate world. But it makes me wonder if he has some secret, especially considering that he has all the right education and experience, yet he’s also struggled to secure a good job. With his qualifications, even though he’s quiet and shy, shouldn’t he have been able to find something by now?

But Ki-taek is my favorite of the Sad Sacks, mostly because he’s just so pathetically heartbroken over a girl who doesn’t even remotely deserve him. Ji-na has him believing that he’s not good enough for her, which is why he got the job at Hauline in the first place, and his sadness over her rejection just kills me dead. But rather than behave like the desperate jilted lover we’ve seen in so many dramas, Ki-taek is actually pretty respectful of Ji-na’s wishes, and mostly keeps his distance while doing everything he thinks she wants. And while I do want all three of the misfits to get what they want out of this new job, it makes me sad that Ki-taek only did it get Ji-na back. I sincerely hope that working with her so closely allows him to see what a shallow, nasty piece of work she really is, and that he ultimately decides to just go be awesome all by himself.

I also find the doctor, Hyun, to be very interesting in a mysterious, vaguely unsettling sort of way. My interest in him increased exponentially when we learned that he was responsible for getting Ho-won, Kang-ho, and Ki-taek their jobs at Hauline. Obviously he finds them fascinating for some reason, and he appears to want to help them, but I wonder what he meant when he said he wanted to create a “symbiosis” with them. What does Hyun stand to gain by having them work at his father’s company? Since we know that his father, the Hauline CEO, pits him against his brother career-wise, I suspect that Hyun is planning to use the trio to manipulate his father somehow, and I only hope that his idea won’t harm them in any way. He seems like a nice enough guy so far, but looks can be deceiving. It will be enlightening to watch what he does once he starts interacting with the three new hires — remember, Hyun knows who they are, but none of them have ever seen his face, they’ve only heard his voice. They probably won’t guess that they’re dealing with the doctor who saved their lives the night they all first met.

But… damn. I was really hoping that the identity of the terminally ill patient would remain a mystery for a while. I liked not knowing who the sick person was, though I suppose it’s not very realistic to expect three people to know they might be dying and not look into it pretty quickly. But I do appreciate that Radiant Office is unafraid to take us down uncomfortable paths for the sake of a great story. As I mentioned before, there’s always the chance that we’re all being trolled and that the terminally ill patient Hyun was referring to wasn’t one of the three of them. But as unpredictable as the show is turning out to be, I don’t think we’ll really know the truth for quite some time.

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I do hope that she was not sick and that two guys too. I can relate myself to hyo won since im still job hunting without any good result yet and after i watch this i do wonder will i end up like her? Committing suicide? This is a good drama ?

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Don't you think that way.... Keep trying till you succeed.... ? I can relate to you even though i am employed and stuff.... I ve been trying for civil services for 3 years now and still no progress though... I almost gave up this year until my brother stopped me from doing so.....

Just find a right person to encourage you and keep you on track... All is well that ends well...

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You're not alone in this world and there are lots of us who sympathize with your struggle to find a job. Just to "cheer" you up...after working as a temp for years, I landed a federal job in November. It's March and my agency is up for being completely shutdown. When I think of having to find another job, of being able to do it...

But there is more than one road to take in life, right? Hold on and don't let go.

I'm thinking of you and wishing good things.

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I experienced it twice chingu - Be a job hunter for months. The problem with myself - when I fed up with the job, I will quit immediately. But not that I after one week. First job - I quit after around 1 year. Second job - I quit after more than 3 years. Not something good to be followed though. ? My family gave up to advise me. because they know how stubborn I am.

What I want to say, don't stress yourself. There is always a blessing in disguise - even you have no job now, you have more free time to spend with family etc. Use this time to read books and get much more knowledge from reading -although you may dislike reading. Sleep and watch drama as much as you can - because once you start working, you will probably start to miss these things. If money is some issue, find any temp job.

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Think about yourself, Job or working is not gonna be and can't be our dream.

Whenever I ask to people "what is your dream?" most of them reply "my dream is getting 'this kind of job'.

I feel very sorry for them but the aim or goal for our life is not only for working.

To work in such position or job is essential to make our goal happen. It allows us to get money, achievement and experiences. But that's all.

My dream is to live happy life with my family in a beautiful house.
My dream is to live and see my grand daughter's wedding.

To start working from small company doesn't limit your life to being subordinate.

I don't care what do you want to do or what are you gonna do.
But want to say, be sure don't be a bolt or nut, be the engine of something you involved. Be active for every things on you.

In a long term, you can definitely make your goal happen once you keep this in mind.

Nothing is useless or worthless.

That's what I believe.

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This drama somehow seems different from the other K-dramas. I could relate the characters though at times it seemed that the tone was tilting towards the dark side. I wish there was bit more humour sprinkled in. But over all the drama doesn't seem all bad.

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The first few minutes I thought it was real

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Thank you for the fast recap @Lollypip! I agree with so many of your points. This show is doing a wonderful job balancing an mix of realism, comedy and mystery.

There is scarcely a boring character. I, too, am intrigued by Doctor Seo. I thought it was nice of him to help the trio but his remark about symbiotic benefits really threw me off. I just can't imagine what his agenda might be.

Although I was kind of disappointed that Ho Won is very possibly the one with terminal illness, something doesn't add up. Surely, any hospital or the attending doctor who was Dr Seo should call back the patient with the terminal illness diagnosis? Do they just assume the patient is being treated somehow or somewhere else?

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Remember, all 3 of them slipped out of the hospital without paying. I am not sure the hospital has their information.

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Even then, the doctor saw them and recognized. If any of them were ill instead of helping them get the job he wud asked the person to get treated. This cud all be solved if she just go for a checkup but I don't see her doing that atleast until the middle of the series.

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I love this drama, but her not getting a medical checkup like the other two is niggling at me, unless check-ups are super expensive in Korea.

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I think ho-won doesn't have much money compared to the other two musketeers that's why she wasn't able to check-up.
She even used her laptop to temporary pay her place and even getting an older model of phone just for the sake of the use. Remember that she really wants to have a job so by getting the job at hauline, her mind was set to making sure she did her best in her job and maybe she didn't mind for a while if she's terminal or not.

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I agree. If Ho Won is seriously ill, the doctor should have advised her to get treated or at least talk to her about her condition instead of getting her the job. Getting a job isn't the top priority or even make it to anyone's bucket list. Quitting a job is a more likely response.

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I wonder if it's the doctor who's dying and he wants to keep the "three suicides" in his father's company so he can watch over them and how they find hope in life. Symbiotic relationship?

Or maybe it's for a less melodramatic reason. Maybe he just wants to groom them for success then point them out to his dad who seems to be looking down on him for some reason?

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One symbiotic benefit could be that they would stop back by the hospital and pay their bills!

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Yes. Hyun gets them jobs, so they get paid, so they can go pay off the hospital....
.... and see that the dying person is a 4th suicide attempt from that night who we haven't seen before.

That would mean a lot of failed suicides in one night, but hey, South Korea has a pretty high suicide rate.

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Maybe you guys could clarify something for me. I watched this on Dramafever and at the end when she's sitting at the desk, she looks at the physical results and it said "No complications." Was that hers or was that the one that Ki Taek left on his desk?

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It's Ki Taek's

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I laughed so hard when the parachute literally came down! I love how they depict Ho Won's imagination! ^_^

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I thought that whole battle scene was a tad too long, but it was a great depiction of how many jobseekers must feel who have to contend with such fierce competition as well as the reality of many positions being filled because of people's connections. Watching Protect the Boss taught me that Koreans use the term "parachute" (nakasan) to refer to someone who landed a job based purely on their connections. (In English we would say that somebody had "pulled strings" to get them the job.) My heart goes out to everyone who has to deal with such a brutal job search.

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From watching kdramas, the job search process seems incredibly stressful in South Korea and there seems to be very few opportunities for full time employment, especially for young people trying to get their foot in the door. My interviews have been just me facing a group of people. I'd hate to interview with my competitors sitting in the same room.

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The comments about women in the workplace resonated tremendously and brought back sad memories. As a woman in a male dominated profession, I have sat silently to see and listen to how my male colleagues just forget I'm there, rambling all sort of sexists chauvinist comments. I saw myself 5 year ago, it was uncomfortable at first, but then.. I'm not Eun Ho-won anymore.

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Interesting fact: the music for the opening action scene is the credit music from the Borne movies. I laughed so hard when I heard it. (it's called Extreme Ways by Moby)

also, I saw this on twitter, but some people have taken to calling the trio some sort of... suicide squad.

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Good play then.

Very good play. I tip my hat to you.

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Lmao for the opening scene. I hope they continue with her imaginations. :D

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I don't think she is sick. It is most probably a misunderstanding. They must have been referring to another person. But I think this will fuel her to enjoy her life to the fullest. Because if she was ill the hospital would have notified her and also that Dr saw her at the company and if he knew that she was ill he would have talked to her.

PS: DB, the site is really slow and is suddenly becoming unresponsive. I am not sure if this is my system's fault because other sites are running normally.

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I've been having issues with the site in recent months. It runs faster on a tablet (though it crashes at times), but once I'm on a desktop or laptop, there is a lot of lag. I thought it was my desktop and ancient laptop at first, but now that I've finally bought a new laptop, I notice that while the site is running better on the new laptop, it's still very slow. Even after the page is loaded, the browser tab would periodically have a spinning wheel, as if it's still loading.

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Aha! So I'm not the only one having issues. I've been wanting to write comments but the buffering is killing me. Even typing this takes a looong time.

Anyhoo, while I'm here, I just want to add how much I love the show for its depiction of Ho-won's imagination, as if writer-nim really had this similar thought process. The miniature version of the lead character, the job interview sequence, don't we imagine like this sometimes? Lol

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I thought it was just me also. That maybe it was all the ads causing the constant reloading/buffering. Glad I'm not the only one.

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I agree, I don't think she's sick either. So far there's been no real confirmation. And, while I've been out of the Kdrama game and just got back in, I don't think these shows have it in them to actually let the main character die. Granted, I've only seen two shows with this trope, but neither died and Kdramas don't seem to really lend themselves to that much sadness, especially when they have such a comedic tone. So, I guess we'll see.

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I can relate to real Eun Ho Won and miniature Eun Ho Won interactions. As weird as it sounds, my mind actually wanders off to weird (and mostly funny) topics whenever I am in crazy shit situation. I have laughed (without thinking) when am supposed to be serious and misunderstood a lot of times. I have learnt to control with time now but relieved to know am not the only weird one.

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One too many fantasy, daydream, imagination scenes.

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I'm really getting a kick out of this show! It's one of the few shows I've watched lately that doesn't have any parts that are dragging or annoying enough to make me fast forward through them. Thanks for the recap!

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<so pathetically heartbroken over a girl who doesn’t even remotely deserve him

<I sincerely hope that working with her so closely allows him to see what a shallow, nasty piece of work she really is, and that he ultimately decides to just go be awesome all by himself.

I really, really hope that they don't get back together, not even if she improves or starts appreciating him at some point. She's been so nasty to him, she doesn't deserve him back ever.

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nasty with one of those boring, rigid short haircuts.

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I don't know what it is but I don't care for the actress. It started with WGM then I couldn't stand her character in Marriage Not Dating, now this drama. Something about her bugs me.

Ji Na is a nasty woman. How do you tell someone not to interview at your company because it'll make you uncomfortable?! She is a piece of work.

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I'm not a fan of her and telling Ki-taek not to interview was clearly wrong. But. I disagree about Ki-taek being respectful towards her wishes. She DID break up with him, clean and clear and even if we might think her reasons are unfair, she has every right to select her man based on her personal wants and dislikes. However, Ki-taek does not accept this and keeps pestering her about taking him back. I'm not surprised by her bitchy behaviour towards him at all by this point because how many times does a woman have to say "no" until it is believed and respected?

This is basically the same situation when women get propositioned all the time and at first they decline nicely but finally, when it's the 100th time, they finally snap and become bitchy. And THEN people are like "OMG, how can she behave so badly, what a total BITCH".

So I'm sorry but I'm in team Ji-na when it comes to her break-up with Ki-taek. I understand his heartbreak and of course he has all the right to grieve but he needs to let her go.

(This doesn't mean I like Ji-na or even condone everything she does. As said, ordering Ki-taek not to apply to her workplace was wrong as well as letting him do the task that was assigned to her. Obviously Ki-taek is trying to get back into her good graces by doing things for her ((which is stupid and disrespectful from him and probably one reason Ji-na does not respect him)) and she is using that to her own advantage. That is, so very obviously, wrong and nasty thing to do.)

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I don't think I said anything about him being respectful towards her?

He's obviously being clingy right now, but it's been a couple of days. He's given her one drunken calls and talked to her maybe twice more, which isn't the 100th time by far. Of course, now he needs to back off – otherwise, he's crossing the line.

Of course she has every right to break up with him. She didn't have to do it by rubbing salt in his wounds though.

My worry is more about how the writers will deal with this, because I really hope there's no "reuniting them". Because what they should do, is put Ki Tae on path of getting over her, and either write Ji-na out of the story or make her become at least a little nicer (without any getting back together).

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I agree wholeheartedly! I knew people would be super anti-her because she's being a bitch but at this point she's basically being harassed over and over and that's just point blank ridiculous.

But I don't understand where she's using anything to her advantage? I even understand her telling him not to interview at her company. Imagine you breakup with a guy and then the next day he shows up at your office trying to get a job. I would tell him to buzz off in about 100 different ways too.

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I almost didn't try the show out because the synopsis sounded kind of blah, and that terminal illness bit will probably keep some away. That is too bad because so far I really like it quite a bit.

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this show is funny. the imagination scenes are the best, but I am not sure if thy can continue, usually dramas drop such scenes half way that demand a lot of work put in

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oh but one thing though: drinking or not drinking is a personal choice not a job obligation, and if anyone forced me like that I would imagine at least shooting his eyeballs out.

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If this is Korean office culture being practiced widely, then I feel sorry for them. I don't know how any one can keep gulping down those drinks one after one when they look like they might die any minute from excessive drinks. That's a very sad corporate culture.

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SO disgusting. I personally wouldnt be able to control my behavior - no, I would not even try to. I would just tell the guy that I am not his toilet bowl cause that´s the only thing that would be ok after this much alcohol.

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I normally won't even start a terminal illness show. If I thought this was one of those instead of a misunderstanding comedy I wouldn't be here.

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Me too. Debating on whether I should continue. Uncontrollably Fond was it for me.

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Definitely don't want this to be another terminal illness drama, damn the last few episodes turn into tear fests which is not a pleasant experience. I did get japanese drama vibes from the dialogue based, 2nd episode, which is not a bad start after the meh starting. I kind of love go ah sung and if they can pull off both the romance and the office anecdotes, may be it's gonna be a good watch. The guy from shopping king louie is a nice addition to the office team though lol.

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Oh Dae Hwan is on the oll, he is in Defendant and now this! After 38 Police Unit he suddenly became like a permanent screen feature, and it is all thanks to his bu...em, well, maybe his acting too, though.

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He's in defendant? I might have to check it out then heheh, just because defendant looks so serous to me. He kind of brings out more laugh out loud moments in any dramas, love his quirks.

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But they made him a 30 yr old, like seriously? :D the guy is a 38 yr old in real life.

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people are rarely older than 30, superiors just have gray hair, but they are all actually 30. Chaebol grandpas are 30. everyone is 30. they get hit by truck of doom by 30 and still keep living and being 30 after 3 years of treatment or 6 years of coma.

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@redfox Yes, 30 is a good number. Wish I look now like I did when I was 30, wish I weighed the same as when I was 30, wish I had my 30 year old body... (But honestly, I do kinda like the wisdom that eventually comes with the older years... hehe...)

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Thanks for recapping this drama! I got the feeling I would like this drama, but wasn't expecting to love it. It's got me in the feels and I'm cheering for our sad sack trio. I love how Ho Won appeased that client and got herself a spot on the Sales Team, while everyone was just waiting outside the door. I really hope they don't make romance too prominent a part of this drama.

I get the feeling the the "Ice Witch" (so she's an ice witch because she actually does her job? what the heck is with that?) will be one of their allies.

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Agreed! Particularly about 'Ice Witch', she works hard and ensures her team mates do the same. And how the heck could the company not refund that woman her money! That's ridiculous. Does Korea not have a consumer watchboard or something? That made me so mad.

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The Ice Witch nickname raised my hackles too. :( But I like this show so far. It's probably just accurately reflecting workplace dynamics, horrible it may seem.

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I don't think any of them are terminally ill. They assumed the doctor was talking about them and then found out there were 3 of them. So assumed they had a 1 in 3 chance.

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Whoops hit submit too soon. Basically what I'm trying to say is that Doctor could have been talking about literally anyone in the hospital who tried to commit suicide. No guarantee its any of them.

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So far, I like this show. It's interesting and in some degree the characters are relatable. You can't help buy feel for the three main characters.

Thanks for the recap! :)

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I don't think she was writing a resignation at the end of the episode. If my hangul skills are correct, she was at Ki-taek's desk looking at his medical report that indicated no medical abnormalities.

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perhaps, since she had decided to be sly, she was writing HIS resignation? nah, she aint that evil... or ambitious

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She IS writing a resignation letter. I think she looks at Ki-taek's medical report to confirm she heard them right, and out of despair wants to just quit her job.

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I didn't think I would love it but I'm in love with it. Funny, interesting, and oh so relatable. Love the trio aka 'Suicide Squad' (kudos to the user who came up with that name!). Looking forward to the next. :)

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What is the name of the song Eun Ho Won was singing at the karaoke place? It's the second time I have heard the song in a kdrama but since I don't understand Korean I cannot look it up.

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