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Red Moon, Blue Sun: Episodes 1-2

From the writer of Village: Secret of Achiara, Red Moon, Blue Sun (also known as Children of Nobody) looks like it will be another such suspenseful thriller, one that promises to be mysterious and full of surprising twists-and-turns. The premiere gives us more questions than answers, but that’s to be expected for a show that’s laying the groundwork for a complex puzzle.

 
EPISODES 1-2 RECAP

During a sports day at an elementary school, a young boy runs in a relay race. He crosses the finish line, winning the race — but as he stops to catch his breath, he sees a young girl jumping rope and singing a nursery song. The boy is both entranced and fearful as she turns to smile at him — as he should be, since the girl isn’t really there.

Dazed, the young boy goes to the top of a flight of stairs and, with the young girl’s sing-songy voice ringing in his ears, he turns around and purposefully falls backwards down the stairs.

Later, he meets with child counselor CHA WOO-KYUNG (Kim Sun-ah). The boy, Shi-wan, survived the fall but broke his arm, and Woo-kyung gently tries to ask him why he chose to fall down the stairs. Shi-wan says there was no reason — he just wanted to do it. Then he asks Woo-kyung, who is visibly pregnant, when her baby will be born. Woo-kyung cheerfully says that she’s not completely sure, but her daughter is excited to have a baby brother.

Shi-wan says that having siblings isn’t always a good thing, and when Woo-kyung pries a little more, the boy tells her that his younger sister died. He says it in such a chilling, matter-of-fact way that Woo-kyung instinctively clutches her stomach and unborn child.

Watch the video

There’s no special reason
 

At a woman’s prison, inmate Park Ji-hye is released. She was sent to prison for killing her child, and as she steps out into freedom, she’s greeted by the furious cries of the protestors who insist she should still be in jail. As they call her a murderer and yell that she should die, they throw eggs and flour at her.

As Woo-kyung makes breakfast for her husband, KIM MIN-SEOK (Kim Young-jae), and daughter, Eun-seo, she sees the news about Ji-hye’s release. Later, when she’s taking care of her bed-ridden sister who’s in a coma, Woo-kyung and her mother discuss the case and the fact that Ji-hye returned to her home, which is now covered in protesters’ graffiti calling her a murderer.

But Mom defends Ji-hye — even if the woman did a terrible act, she paid for her crime in prison, so she should be at least allowed to live in peace. Besides, Mom believes that Ji-hye was just taking the blame for her husband so that her husband wouldn’t end up in prison for killing their child. Shocked, Woo-kyung reminds her mother that Ji-hye still burned her child to death, but Mom insists it was a cover-up anyway.

When Woo-kyung tucks her comatose sister into bed, she’s shocked when her sister’s eyes suddenly open. She excitedly calls her husband at his office, who warns her not to expect too much since her sister is still comatose. Oooh, there’s some interesting tension between Min-seok and his young assistant as she helps him with his jacket.

Ji-hye ruthlessly cleans out her child’s room, erasing any trace of her son’s existence. The last thing to be removed is a photo of him with Ji-hye and her husband. She rips off the bottom half that shows her son, leaving only the upper half of the photo, that part that shows her and her husband.

Later that night, a car burns in an abandoned amusement park.

In a messy apartment that’s littered with empty food containers and alcohol bottles, an alarm rings, waking up detective KANG JI-HEON (Lee Yi-kyung), who’s asleep fully clothed in the water-filled bathtub. As he changes into dry clothes and fights off his hangover, he studies his reflection in the mirror, noting his split lip and the fresh scrapes on his cheek.

Ji-heon arrives at the amusement park where the CSI team is already dismantling the burnt car. Captain Hong Ki-tae greets him, pointing out that Ji-heon’s late.

A body was found burnt to a crisp in the driver’s seat of the car, and while it will take some time to identify the body, they’ve discovered the car was registered to Ji-hye’s husband. Captain Hong orders Ji-heon to find Ji-hye.

Woo-kyung heads to her scheduled appointment with Shi-wan, but his mother calls to tell her that Shi-wan is sick so Woo-kyung will have to skip her counseling session with him. When Woo-kyung offers to reschedule, Shi-wan’s mother says that her son — despite purposefully throwing himself down the stairs — is perfectly fine and doesn’t need any help, so Woo-kyung doesn’t need to visit again.

As Woo-kyung drives along the highway, the truck in front of her suddenly swerves. Woo-kyung sees why, but it’s too late — a child is standing in the middle of the road, and even though Woo-kyung slams on the brakes, she ends up fatally hitting the child.

Ji-heon goes to Ji-hye’s house, but there’s no one there. The door’s unlocked though, so he enters and looks around. He picks up the photo from the dresser, noting the hand-written inscription on the back: “When the moon rises above the barley field.”

At the police station, Min-seok tends to his dazed wife, who’s still in shock that she hit and killed a child. The police officer tells Min-seok that they’re still looking for the boy’s guardians, but Woo-kyung interjects, since the child she saw on the bridge was a little girl in a green dress — not a boy.

Watch the video

Worried about the wrong kid
 

The police officer shows them the CCTV footage, and then gently explains that the shock and adrenaline of the moment can play tricks on one’s perception, but the child Woo-kyung hit was definitely a boy, not a girl. Distressed, Woo-kyung insists it was a girl in a green dress — she remembers it clearly.

Unlike what he told his boss, Ji-heon’s wounds are from a scuffle he got into with his girlfriend’s boyfriend last night — or, rather, his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend, since the ex reminds Ji-heon (when he calls to confirm what happened last night since he was so drunk) that Ji-heon broke up with her months ago.

His ex-girlfriend, Yeon-joo, is also Min-seok’s assistant, and there’s definitely something going on between her and her boss based on the way she touches his arm in comfort after he returns to the office. Min-seok worries that his wife will have another breakdown.

Now at home, Woo-kyung channel surfs, stopping on a news report about the body burnt in the car, which has now been confirmed to be Ji-hye. When the news report rehashes Ji-hye killing her child, Woo-kyung can’t stop thinking about the fact she just killed a child, too. She looks to be on the edge of a panic attack — perhaps Min-seok’s fear of a breakdown isn’t so far off.

Ji-heon goes to the prison to meet with Ji-hye’s husband. Ji-heon asks if he or his wife have any enemies, and the man scoffs, pointing out that all of the country is their enemy — everyone hates them for the death of their child. Ji-hye’s husband is convinced his wife’s death wasn’t suicide, though, arguing that she wasn’t the type to kill herself.

It turns out that there’s good evidence that Ji-hye was murdered, since there was a powerful anesthetic in her blood stream that’s only accessible to those in the medical community.

Ji-heon then goes to the women’s prison to collect Ji-hye’s leftover belongings. Her only belongings are all the hate mail she received over the years, which she meticulously collected and kept. The prison guard muses that this must be one of Ji-heon’s easiest cases, since there isn’t much incentive to find Ji-hye’s killer. After all, everyone wanted Ji-hye to die for her crimes. In the guard’s opinion, Ji-hye’s killer did what the law couldn’t.

But Ji-heon — who believes every life has value — coldly tells the prison guard that he is a detective, and that no matter who was murdered, his job is to find and capture the culprit.

He goes through all of the hate mail, looking for clues, as well as tracking down all the photos of the people who were at the protest during Ji-hye’s release. He tries calling Yeon-joo, but she ignores his call, having just gotten out of the shower — and she stands next to a mysterious man (who, from behind, looks an awful lot like Min-seok).

In the morning, Min-seok and Woo-kyung meet with a lawyer. The lawyer is optimistic about their case, because even if it goes to trial, all the facts are in Woo-kyung’s favor — the child was killed on a highway where no pedestrians are allowed and the boy’s guardians haven’t been found, which means there won’t be anyone fighting against them.

Woo-kyung is still distressed about the boy, but as Min-seok drives the two of them home, he’s pleased that the matter should blow over easily and they can focus on their regular lives. Woo-kyung screams at him to pull over, distressed that a boy just died and that no one is looking for him, demanding to know how Min-seok would feel if Eun-seo was the one who died.

Woo-kyung sobs that she’s terrified, and Min-seok yells that she needs to be more focused on her living daughter and the child in her womb than some random boy that’s already dead. Realizing that his wife is on the verge of a breakdown, he quickly tells her that the boy’s death wasn’t her fault.

But Woo-kyung can’t get over the fact she killed a child — how can she look at her daughter’s face, knowing she’s killed another mother’s son? Min-seok gently reminds Woo-kyung that it was an accident. She weeps into his shoulder as he holds her in a comforting embrace.

Woo-kyung still follows up with the police, asking what will happen to the boy if no one claims him. The police officer says that they’ll send his cremated body to a columbarium for awhile as an unclaimed body, then if no one claims him, he’ll be buried with other unknown bodies. Woo-kyung asks to see him off properly, and she watches as the casket is sent to be cremated.

Ji-heon’s investigation leads him to the group of protesters the day Ji-hye was released, since many of them believed that Ji-hye should die for the crime she committed. But as he identified and investigated the protestors, none of them had the medical connections to obtain fentanyl, the drug used to sedate Ji-hye.

However, there are a half-dozen protestors that he hasn’t been able to identify, who are not connected to any specific organization against Ji-hye. But with the help of his enthusiastic hoobae, Ji-heon discovers that some of the protestors are affiliated with an unofficial group. When Ji-hye was first imprisoned, members would take turns protesting with a specific sign. One of those protesters was none other than Woo-kyung.

Ji-heon visits Min-seok at his office, which startles Yeon-joo, since she wants to know why her ex-boyfriend is at her workplace. But Ji-heon cooly says he’s there on official business, and asks Min-seok for help tracking down Woo-kyung since she hasn’t been to work and isn’t answering her phone.

As he leaves Min-seok’s office, Yeon-joo follows after him, demanding to know what’s going on. Ji-heon admits he could have just called Min-seok, but when he noticed that Min-seok worked at the same place as Yeon-joo, he wanted to come in person just so he could see her. He pulls her into the elevator, and once they’re alone, his aloof detective demeanor disappears and he pleads with her, promising to do whatever she wants if she’ll just take him back.

Yeon-joo points out that Ji-heon aways begs for her love — but has he ever truly ever loved anyone? She refuses to listen to his desperate pleas, and tells him to leave her alone.

At the columbarium, Woo-kyung helps lay to rest the unknown boy’s ashes, but she catches a glimpse of the girl in the green dress. Woo-kyung tries to follow her, never quite reaching the little girl who runs through the columbarium’s maze of walls.

Ji-heon finds Woo-kyung at the columbarium, asking about her involvement in the protests. Woo-kyung explains that a bunch of mothers — including herself — had protested Ji-hye’s actions by taking turns holding an identical sign. He then asks what Woo-kyung was doing the night Ji-hye died, and Woo-kyung says she was with her family — besides, she’s not exactly in a physical state to kill someone, considering how pregnant she is.

When Ji-heon asks if she knows anyone in the photos of the protestors during Ji-hye’s release, Woo-kyung recognizes a doctor who used to help out at the counseling center.

As Ji-heon races to find Doctor Park, his hoobae reports that after Doctor Park’s wife and daughter died a few years ago, he started volunteering at the counseling center. Most notably, a couple of months ago his clinic was investigated and shut down — because he was stealing fentanyl. That’s enough evidence for Ji-heon, who asks his hoobae to track Doctor Park’s current location.

Woo-kyung returns to the police station, asking to see the dead child’s belongings. She’s desperate to understand what he was like when he was alive, and even though the police officer is concerned for Woo-kyung’s obsessive state of mind, she allows her to look at the boy’s clothing. Woo-kyung finds a piece of paper hidden in the boy’s shoe and unfolds it, revealing a child’s drawing of a family — a mother, father, and little boy.

Ji-heon arrives at the place they’ve tracked Doctor Park to, noticing that the door’s window has been smashed open. Grabbing his gun, Ji-heon hurries inside. He hears screaming from one of the rooms and enters, gun drawn, to see a young woman stabbing the doctor in the stomach.

He points the gun at the young woman, ordering her to drop the knife.

Written on the back of the child’s drawing is the same phrase that was written on the back of Ji-hye’s photo: When the moon rises above the barley field. Recalling the rest of the poem, Woo-kyung drops the drawing in shock as she finishes the phrase: “When the moon rises above the barley field, a child is eaten.”

Watch the video

When the moon rises above the barley field
 

COMMENTS

For a show where I have no idea where it’s headed, this is a pretty strong start! I know it’s a mystery/thriller, but the little girl in the green dress makes me wonder if it’ll be more than that — is she a ghost? Or some other supernatural figure? Is Woo-kyung crazy (what kind of breakdown did she have previously that made her husband so concerned about her reaction to accidentally killing the boy)? Was the little girl killed and she wants someone to solve what happened to her by looking into where this unknown boy came from?

I’m assuming the little girl in the red dress that Shi-wan saw in the beginning of the episode was his sister who died, which would explain his shock and morbid comments later. Which then makes me wonder if the little girl in the green dress is some sort of force for justice for abused and forgotten children who died due to neglect and poor parenting. Perhaps she’s somehow choosing Woo-kyung as the person to look into the cases since she knows Woo-kyung is the type of person to be tenacious and caring enough to get down the bottom of things (although if that’s true, then the fact the little girl in the green dress would make Woo-kyung go through the trauma of actually killing a child seems unnecessarily cruel). There are so many questions and theories buzzing around my brain, which I’m taking as a good sign — if everything made sense right at the beginning, there’d be nothing to look forward to.

I’m happy to see Kim Sun-ah again, since she’s one of my favorite actresses, and Woo-kyung seems like she’ll be a complex character to play. I don’t think I’ve fully connected with any of the characters yet, but I anticipate that I will soon, especially once the investigations overlap and our leads begin to work together. Even though I know Lee Yi-kyung is the hot new thing right now, I haven’t really seen him in anything so I have nothing to compare him against — but I’m hoping he can match well with Kim Sun-ah and not make me feel like she’s acting circles around him. Also, we’ve yet to meet the second lead characters, so that’s another reason why the premiere has me patient yet anxious — clearly we’re still in the introductory phase. As such, I feel like I can’t make a solid judgement on the show yet because the plot and character groundwork is still being put in place, but knowing this writer, patience is a virtue.

At any rate, I’m happy to be watching a thriller that genuinely feels mysterious, and I’m looking forward to finding out — along with our characters — what’s truly at the heart of this little girl in the green dress and the “moon above the barley.”

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This was a very interesting start. Started watching for the Kim Sunah and didn’t expect it to be so heavy. Now it’s too late to stop cause I’m hooked.

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Thinking of watching this after TSHLYE. I'm having a nasty case of MooKang withdrawal.

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I have one complaint. The lighting is terrible. I know this drama is supposed to be dark, but there’s dark and there’s “I’m going blind”.

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I even thought that there's something wrong with my monitor, especially toward the end of ep 2.

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I turned up gamma to watch and it almost blinded me when the episode ended😂

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LOL! I did too. 😆 But I did not turn it up too much! 😂

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darker than the guest and priest?
dang... adjusting my tv setting feels like a chore tho (CON airs thru my country cable channel)

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Guest and Priest has greater contrast and luminance. So light areas stand out and objects are sharp. Here the darkness is so flat that everything is just a huge shadow.

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I was facing the same problem. It was so dark and smudgy at times I had to put the brightness at 75% It does create an eerie atmosphere tho

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Wooohooooo... My brain is thinking so hard about what happened. Who's the girl in the green dress? and what is her relationship with the boy who killed in the car accident if that little girl does exist!

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@lemoncello
That's the beauty of this show... one watch and it does not let us go!!! 😵 😅 😊

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So true.. it's one of the drama which we can't predict what's going to happen next. It's so boring if a serial is predictable, LoL.

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I've only read this recap and didn't watch the episodes yet, and boy, this is..... DARK O.O

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Me too but now I am going for it right now

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😰😰😰😰😱😱😱😱😱

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Re girl (ghost?) in green dress -- we seem to have a surplus of ghosts, exorcists and misc supernatural this year. Did all the writers get together last year and decide on that theme for the year?
I'm not much of a ghost/horror fan. Next year can they maybe go back to time travel or space aliens?

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Well, heard that Guest PD will be coming back with a bunch of zombies and then it will be a zombie fest in every broadcasting stations

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OMG... so true. Zombie is a trending topic in Dramaland. Even in "God's Quiz" also raised zombie issue ... Just watched "Rampant", and it's zombie all around Joseon, LoL.

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and neflix's kingdom is about zombie too right?
welp.. guess we know the next year 'it' plot
lol

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@lordcobol
This is the same question I ask every year when a surfeit of shows with similar themes and premises crop up one after another or even simultaneously. I'm thinking that there is a secret guild for drama writers and they decide for specified seasons that they'll do ghosts or time travel or dementia or re-united ex-spouses or aliens and compete with each other to see which version audiences like! 😆

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Well put

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That's the nice theory, the one most of us would prefer to believe in. I fear it's more likely that someone heard what someone else was planning to do and decide to cash in on the craze, and maybe rush things to come it first and make it look like the other guys were the copycats. (A big rush might some script/plot issues too).

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"When the moon rises above the barley field, a child is eaten.”
I guess kim sun ah and lee yi kyung will join force to fight a serial killer who killing children.

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I'm glad the girl is in green. I've had my share of mysterious entity in red for this year.

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@thequiet1 LOL are we thinking about The Ghost Detective's baddie and the less scary Beauty Inside Han Se Kye who wore red to help Do Jae recognise her?

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Ghost Detective's baddie scares me more than that eye stabbing demon at that time. Fortunately I didn't watch Beauty Inside, or I'll be traumatized every February as I live in a place where they Chinese New Year are celebrated in red clothing. Huhuhu.

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Thanks @odilettante. From a healing horror to a ghostly thriller, we've come.

I didn't at first intend to start this series, but clicked to try it out because I was bored. And now I'm hooked! Typical of the Writer of Achiara, (which I found too twisty and only skip watched), we have once again, the heightened mysteriousness, the ghostly comings and goings and a great sense of unease. With the information that our main protagonist has had a breakdown before (what kind... nervous?), we realize as viewers that we may or may not have an assured and true view of what's going on when we only see through Woo Young's eyes. It's a relief to have Det Kang as another source for the story.

I guess the theme here will be the judgement and culpability, real or imagined, for the neglect of, abandonment of and killing of children or younger siblings (dongsaeng). Woo Young has a dongsaeng in coma, her daughter wants a dongsaeng, and Shi Wan claims to have lost his. Woo Young stands in judgement upon Ji Hye but ends up killing a child herself.

About Shi Wan, I'm assuming the girl he saw in the red dress is his dead sister. The reason I'm thinking of neglect and abandonment is that Shi Wan won the race but unlike all the other children, no adult came to claim him from the race-track. And then for his mother to cancel counselling when he is obviously still troubled, speaks of something wrong going on. The other obvious case is that no one claimed the dead boy. I'm eager to know how this plays out.

I'm also eager to watch how Lee Yi Kyung manages his main actor role, since I've only ever seen him in supporting roles and have not paid him much attention. He looks an awful lot like Jung Jin Woon (Let Me Introduce Her) and I thought it was the same actor for a while. 😅

I like his take on the Detective role, that he appears competent and energetic, and that he is out there really 'detecting'. I like that he has an able helper doing the research for him and giving him the right info so that he can run around to get things done.

The creepiness factor is high in this show: At the time when Ji Hye is released from prison, Woo Young's sister, Se Kyung opens her eyes, but does not get out of her coma. Ji Hye ends up dead in 3 days, and Se Kyung remains unmoving. So is she hearing and knowing what's going on or not, is she more dead or alive?

I think I was most creeped out by the scene at the columbarium where Woo Young was endlessly surrounded by high walls in a maze, running after the ghostly child.

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If nothing, this show certainly knows how to create atmosphere and suspense. It's got great camera work and music that brings us into the chilling uncertainty of Woo Young's world. I like the many weird angles from which the camera shot, with scenes taken from far and near, and the inter-cutting of scenes between Woo Young and Ji Heon as they each made their discoveries…maybe suggesting that what each discovered is linked (this however could be a red herring). Everything is deliciously obscure and like what you, @odilettante says, raises more questions than it answers. After the fiasco that was The Smile, I wish all of us viewers, All the Best with this show!!

Oh... I found the Korean Poem ... again, chilling indeed!

The Leper by Seo Jung-ju (1915-2000)
The sunlight from the sky
filled the leper with sorrows.
He gobbled up a baby
when the moon rose over the barley field.

https://www.scribd.com/document/388982636/Korean-Poems

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I was thinking though that I like the translation of the Poem in the show itself (Ep 2).
"Saddened by the sun and the blue of the sky
The leper ate a child
At moonrise by the barley fields."

So the title comes from this Poem? Blue sky in the day = Blue Sun? Moonrise = Red Moon?
I'd love to know what the significance of those colours and of "barley fields" might be. 😔

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I found another translation and a little context behind poem: http://trilingualrookie.blogspot.com/2014/02/word-wednesday-seo-jeong-jus-poem-leper.html

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Thanks @shach!! That was great to read. So poignant and disturbing.

I'm thinking for this show, we are not talking about just the killing of children, but of children eaten up by neglect, abuse, etc. And the recurrent ghostly dongsaengs appearing (even in the kid's drawing), seems like a cry for help.

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Yes, I thought that the theme maybe as children are sacrifice to hide adults sins, or something to that effect.

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Thanks for this! The poem is giving me the chills! I really wanna know the mysteries presented to me in eps 1&2 but I am scared to watch the show. Honestly the death of a child in the first 2 eps was too much fr me to handle.

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The poem (the chilling line) bluntly applied the lore which said people with Leprosy (called Heaven's punishment) ate the raw liver of young children to treat their illness. It was expression to emphasize the tragedy of those's cursed fates. http://sso3208.tistory.com/18:

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Basically everything You said in this comment I agree:)
I think that the girl Woo Young is seeing can be projection of her guilty conscience, maybe even something related to her sister state.
And I believe it was Shi Wan father who didn't want him to continue theraphy becuase "people will talk" which unfortunately is common stigma on mental health consueling not only in SK, but the boy have serious issue judging by ep.2.(MY flashback ;))
My only issue with storytelling was the unknown boy's death, I can't believe authorities would do so little to try to found his identity, and to treat this tragedy like, sorry for sounding so harsh, no more than hitting a stray animal, by everyone but Woo Young was unconscionable to me.

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@shach I want lots of backstory on Woo Young. Her sister must have met with an accident to have ended up in a coma. There may have been an element of guilt in WY about this. No one else seems to be blaming her but she went overboard in reacting to it.

I'm wondering if we're going to keep meeting more and more children each episode. Ep 2 introduces yet another child. We are maybe meant to look out for the plight of each child and/or their dongsaeng.

The boy on the road was a really weird occurrence. He was about 10 years old... old enough to know not to run into all that traffic. It was almost like a child committing suicide. It's strange that he had nothing else on him. He must have had belongings somewhere, ... a school or home at/in which he was able to draw his picture. But when he was killed, he didn't even have a bag and had to keep the drawing in his shoe. So strange. Maybe the police just were not thorough because they did not know about the drawing. They should be able to trace his home or school from it. But the really strange thing is that no one is looking for him.

One of the Children of Nobody, like the alternative title of this show.

Shi Wan has a home, but his parents have other set other priorities above his needs. He is one of the neglected or emotionally abandoned children. 😠

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happy to see fellow tshlye fans here. so i guess imma give this one a try. i've always been intrigued by the premise and i adore the leads, so yeah, i'll give this a go!

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It's really great follow up to TSHLYE! It had similar kind of atmophere and a lot to theorize about in the comments section ;)

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okay ill see if i can post a comment after watching the first ep. i think it's the kind of show i should watch when the sun is out haha

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This is my first thriller which involving a child's death and trust me, i couldnt watch the parts where the boy let himself falls from stairs.. i can watch adult's suicide but it is overly mental to watch a pure, innocent child to do so.

But over all, what interest me was the conversation between Mom and Woo-young. I think Mom is truly a kind person because she was trying to put herself in Ji-hye's shoes. I can relate to Mom's perspective from my experience doing a little volunteering work with a support group.

I learnt that some wives are left without choice in marriage especially if they're full time housewives and depended on their husbands for household expenses. Even if beaten to death by husbands, they wont make a report because it can be a huge humiliation/taboo in our traditional society. Sometimes husbands beat both the mothers and the children but threatened them to avoid from being reported. These cases most of time end up with either the death of the mother or the children.

But still the whole dark cinematography (which made it difficult to watch on my smartphone) and the dark theme scarred me. I'm still contemplating whether to keep on watching or drop it.

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If the girl in the green dress was someone in a coma condition; oh no, this, reminds me of Sunwoo Hye (The Ghost Detective) and i dont want to go there again! Never!

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"When the moon rises above the barley, a child is eaten." What poem is this? Any idea nyone? This series is sure dark horrifying gripping and intense. **scared**

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I haven't gotten to this yet but the almost unreliable narrator and ambiguity of the first ep is pulling me in. Definitely off to watch this.

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Just reading the recap was enough to disturb me. I can't imagine what would it be like if a story like this comes true in RL. *shudders*
Never have watched anything with KSA before, but I get a vibe similar to Lee Young-ae just from looking at these screencaps. Compelling!
Dunno how the watching experience feels like, but judging from the screencaps i think the lighting and cinematography gives of a perfect dreary/hopeless/misery vibe just like when you're under a sodium lamp and everybody look sort of mummified/walking dead.

Also,
WHAT a poem the writer has chosen to serve as a drama backdrop! Suddenly I'm having goosebumps thinking what if the scriptwriters from around the whole world turn all the creepy and dark poetry as inspirations for dramas!

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Her husband is just awful. He thinks his wife is on the verge of a breakdown and instead of helping her he comforts himself by cheating. What a pig.

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I know... Even when he mentioned his wife was breaking down once when her sister became vegetative. I'm curious what happened to her sister actually....

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If you think that relationship is screwed up, don't watch A Promise to the Gods - it is even worse.

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Agree! My blood was boiling. He kept saying get a grip like how would she? She's traumatised and clearly needs an outlet or counselling.

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One of the very few new dramas on my Must Watch list, though A Promise with the Gods/A Pledge To God might make the list. Episodes 3/4 just add to the mysteries - there seems to be several different things going on here, and not sure yet how they are all connected.

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Uhm okay... that was intense. Chilling as well.

I'm still trying to collect my thoughts after such a thriller of a first episode. I was thinking of choosing a lighter drama after HMSFTS/TSHLYE ended only to find myself roped into another atmospheric drama. Plus, it also has a kid's drawing. Omo.

I find the plot intriguing, and Kim Sun-ah's acting so riveting. I liked Lee Yi-kyung as an adorable sidekick in Go Back Couple and Mirror of the Witch. I hope he does well in this huge break given to him. So far I think he's doing a pretty good job.

Btw, that is one creepy poem. I'll try to read up on the links you guys posted!

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Kid's drawing.
Kids singing.
Kids dying.
Yup. Can't get any creepier than this.

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Well, this was dark and creepy. I tuned in for Kim Sun-ah not really knowing what to expect; I still don't know what to expect, but I'm intrigued.

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Not just dark and creepy, but the most graphic K-drama I've seen in terms of disturbing scenes. I also tuned in for Kim Sun-ah, but she's not enough to keep me watching. Mystery thriller is the wrong label for this; horror is a better fit.

And isn't it pretty clear from the conversation between Kim Sun-ah's character and her mother, where she is condemning the just-released prisoner and her mother is showing compassion, that Kim Sun-ah is going to be in the same position pretty soon, and she's going to need that compassion.

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Yup @lindag latebloomer, that thought about judgement and culpability, as a theme of this show, came up for me too. It's strange that Woo Young is so emotionally affected ... could be guilt eating at her or eating her up, like that poem.

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I have no idea where this is going but I'm excited for it. The tags on MDL didn't make me think there would be anything supernatural involved, and maybe there won't be, but that girl in the dress sure seems ghostly.

I like the collection of characters so far, and the mood that is being set. Everything has this eerie surreal feeling, similar to Donnie Darko, as if we fell into a different world where everything is a few clicks anti-clockwise of normal.

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Thanks for the recap @odilettante
Seems like I'm following you here from The Guest~
This is a dark drama especially since it involves children and we cant blame it on bad spirits (yet?).

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Quite a solid premiere! Will definitely be continuing. I'm definitely most interested in Woo-young right now but hopefully that will involve the other characters soon.

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I'm hooked. That last line gave me the chills.

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Also, I'm really admiring the Detective so far. The moral values he stands by (e.g., "no one ever DESERVES to die"). How he kept professional when seeing his ex-gf (that he's clearly still mad for) at her workplace.

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Chills is right @bdxpelik My word of choice to describe this show is 'chilling'. 😓

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