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Clean With Passion for Now: Episode 7

Opportunity pays a visit to our two leading men, but while one just might step up to take his chance, the other struggles with uncertainty. Our germaphobe CEO is in entirely new territory as he tries to understand what he really wants, while Oh-sol’s rooftop tenant tries to gauge the right timing to confess the feelings he’s harbored for years. And while those two struggle with their own emotions, our heroine tries to manage everyone else’s expectations of her, from her boss to her family.

  
EPISODE 7: “While we touch each other”

Oh-sol’s talk with Seon-gyeol about their kiss does not go as expected, and he lets her know in no uncertain terms that he has zero interest in dating. And while he maintains a stern expression as he walks away from her, by the time he gets home he’s holding his head in his hands in frustration with himself.

Oh-sol retreats to her favorite spot atop the neighborhood stairs with alcohol in hand. It isn’t long before Mr. Choi turns up with a bandage for her battered feet after her long day in heels. Mr. Choi spots the can in her hand and asks her if something happened that has her drinking alone, and Oh-sol asks if it’s normal for a guy to hold hands and kiss a girl, and yet have zero interest in her.

Oh-sol starts to reason the situation out on her own, and comes to the conclusion that she kissed the guy in a similar way before, so they should be even. Having come to her own resolution, she changes topics and asks Mr. Choi about the status of his secret crush confession.

Mr. Choi protests that the timing is tricky, and Oh-sol gives him a pep talk from her hurdling days. She recalls that whenever she tried too hard to get the timing right, that’s when she’d fall. But when she listened to what felt right without over-thinking, that’s when she’d succeed. Mr. Choi can’t help but smile as he gets advice from the very target of his affections.

Meanwhile, Seon-gyeol can’t even concentrate on cleaning Geum-ja without the scenes from the restaurant with Oh-sol flooding back.

The next day at work, Seon-gyeol and Oh-sol struggle to avoid making eye contact as she arrives at work. While the rest of the crew strolls in, Oh-sol ducks away first by herself.

But instead of heading in to the office, she’s staged an ambush for Seon-gyeol and corners him in the stairwell. She lets him know that she also has no interest in dating anyone, especially someone like Seon-gyeol. She declares them officially even, and stalks away before Seon-gyeol has the opportunity to respond.

The interaction weighs on him though, and it doesn’t help that Oh-sol stands outside the windows of the office during his meeting, threatening and taunting him. When he stands to yell at her, she’s gone, so he hunkers down in his chair for the remainder of the presentation. When he looks up again, Oh-sol still mocks him from a corner (is this real, or his brain making things up again?)

As Oh-sol heads through the hallway, she gives Joo-yeon the updates by phone, and Joo-yeon congratulates her for taking charge of the situation. Oh-sol starts to wonder if she was too harsh, but then flip flops again, of course just as Oh-sol complains about how obnoxious her boss is, Seon-gyeol materializes through the doorway in front of her. “It’s too bad you think I’m such a jerk,” he says as he steers past her down the hall.

Joo-yeon’s left with silence as Oh-sol hangs up on her, but she’s quickly distracted by the sign for the event at her school, featuring the “youngest psychiatrist” from the Rochester Clinic. I see, now we know what Mr. Choi was all dressed up for…

Back at the cleaning company, Seon-gyeol rants to Secretary Kwon about Oh-sol, so much so that he doesn’t even notice that his sanitation chamber entrance to his office is malfunctioning.

Meanwhile, Oh-sol’s father’s car washing business doesn’t seem to be doing too badly. He cheerfully washes a car as he answers new requests via his bluetooth speaker. But then two unsavory gentlemen approach him and ask him what he’s doing on their turf. Dad tries to smile them away, but they kick over his cleaning buckets as a final warning.

The parking lot attendant runs after them, and then turns to reassure Dad. He explains that these guys show up to drive away cleaners in the area, and then clients complain as soon as they take over. The guard smiles that Dad has nothing to worry about, since people are always asking for his contact info.

Oh-dol invites Yeong-shik out for lunch, but Yeong-shik is still a sullen sack mourning the end of his crush. He does perk up though when Oh-dol reminds him that this is a celebratory lunch–he got into Hanguk University! Yeong-shik offers to let Oh-sol know the news when he heads back to work, and as soon as he’s said it, he realizes his mistake. Oh-dol’s face falls as he realizes where his sister has been working.

Oh-sol is cleaning and mulling over her latest interaction with Seon-gyeol when her brother and Yeong-shik arrive. Yeong-shik drops to his knees to ask forgiveness, while her brother gives her a cool glare.

Oh-dol drags his sister out of the building, all the while accusing her of lying to everyone about her awesome job. He asks her if this is what she quit hurdling for, and the hurt is plain on Oh-sol’s face. When Oh-sol asks what’s so wrong with a cleaning job, he points to other girls her age who wear nice clothes and work in big buildings. Oh, Oh-dol…

Meanwhile, Secretary Kwon pays a visit to Seon-gyeol’s grandfather in the hospital. She reports on his changed behavior, and Grandfather is hopeful that the new doctor is helping. But Secretary Kwon confesses that she thinks it’s their new hire, Oh-sol, who is making a change in Seon-gyeol’s actions.

Oh-sol retreats to a restaurant to treat her brother to some grilled meat, but Oh-dol’s mood isn’t improving. Oh-sol tells him that this job is temporary until she can save up money. Oh-dol doesn’t understand why she can’t rely on their father to help her out, so then Oh-sol shares with him that their father lost his job.

She tries to reassure him that she’s doing the work because she enjoys it, and he grumbles out that she’s a liar. She reaffirms that she refuses to do anything but fun things, and he asks again why she quit hurdles then. She bluffs that she got bored with it, and then tells him that she never quit, but just went down another path.

When they get home, Oh-sol asks Oh-dol not to let their dad know he’s aware of the job loss. Oh-sol is the one who shares Oh-dol’s big college news, but while Dad is ready for a celebration, Oh-dol glumly excuses himself for bed.

Seon-gyeol spends his evening on the phone with his new psychiatrist Mr. Choi. Mr. Choi listens to him go on about how the girl who has been affecting him, and now that Mr. Choi knows that it’s Oh-sol, he can’t help but ask some probing questions that are probably not strictly professional. He asks Seon-gyeol if he likes that person and if he’s willing to protect them. Seon-gyeol answers honestly that he hasn’t thought about it enough yet to know for sure.

Seon-gyeol asks if these questions are part of his therapy, but Mr. Choi answers that no, he just wants to know what kind of man Seon-gyeol is. Before Seon-gyeol has a chance to ask about what that means, Mr. Choi switches to the topic of Seon-gyeol’s medical records. Mr. Choi tells him that according to the documents, Seon-gyeol’s phobia may be inherited. Hmmm…

All the talk of Oh-sol’s athletic past has her looking at her old medals stashed away in a box. She holds one in her hand, and it triggers a flashback to the day of the accident that took her mother’s life. That day, Oh-sol receives a call after track practice, and races to the scene of the accident. She joins her father alongside her mother’s stretcher, and the gold medal falls from her mother’s hands.

The next morning, Oh-sol is stunned to see Mr. Choi wearing a nice suit jacket on his way out. She guesses that he’s off to confess his love, and wishes him luck.

As soon as she arrives at work, Oh-sol runs into Seon-gyeol on the stairs. Seon-gyeol stops her to ask about what she said the day before. She assumes he means their agreement that they both aren’t interested in dating, but Seon-gyeol is stuck on the fact that she called him obnoxious.

He asks her if she really feels that way, and Oh-sol says that yes, she thinks that men who play with other people’s feelings are obnoxious, and then she leaves him stammering on the stairs.

Seon-gyeol retreats to his office, not even excited to hear that his air sanitation system is working again. He sits down with Secretary Kwon for some advice, for his “friend.” This friend has no dating experience, but there’s a girl whom he can’t stop thinking about. And indeed, his mind rushes with all of the interactions he’s had with Oh-sol, from revealing her under the horse head to the moment that he reached out and held her hand and then leaned in for that kiss.

Seon-gyeol says that his friend does have feelings for her, but didn’t have the courage to take the next step. Secretary Kwon promptly tells him that his “friend” sounds completely clueless and needs to watch more tv dramas, ha. She says that the worst thing he could do was apologize after a kiss, and that the friend needs to go confess his feelings.

Back at Joo-yeon’s school, a crowd is gathering for the talk from Daniel Choi. And as the doctor arrives, Joo-yeon recognizes him immediately as Oh-sol’s handsome rooftop tenant.

Oh-sol and crew are cleaning at a hospital, where a familiar face strolls through the halls–it’s “Doctor” Baek, Mr. Choi’s patient. Oh-sol spots him in the hall, and watches as the man ducks into a room just before a harried swarm of hospital attendants rush by, looking for their lost patient.

Oh-sol’s still unaware of the man’s delusion, so when Dr. Baek returns to the hall, she’s quick to say hello, as well as ask for some psychotherapy, since she’s got a lot on her mind recently. Oh-sol’s questions delay him just long enough for the attendants to return, and they corner Dr. Baek, who starts growling like a dog at them. His shouts of, “I’m a doctor!” echo down the hall as the attendants carry him overhead back to his room. Oh-sol wonders to herself that if Dr. Baek is a patient, what does that make Mr. Choi?

At the university, Mr. Choi stands before his audience and begins his lecture, which just happens to be about opportunity, and specifically, why people often hesitate when an opportunity arises. Joo-yeon steps out of the room to call Oh-sol and demand that her friend come to her school to see for herself.

Mr. Choi lectures on, about how it’s the fear of failure that holds people back from taking opportunities. Mr. Choi says that while we worry about the what ifs, in the end, the lost opportunities haunt us.

Back in his office, Secretary Kwon tells Seon-gyeol that the girl in question must have expected a confession after the kiss. And Seon-gyeol has his own what if questions holding him back. He asks what if his friend gets turned down, or what happens after a confession, but Secretary Kwon responds that as long as his feelings are true in the moment, there’s no point in worrying about what will happen in the future.

Seon-gyeol heads for the employee lounge, but everyone except for Dong-hyun has already left. Seon-gyeol asks specifically about Oh-sol, so Dong-hyun tips him off that she’s headed for Myungwon University to see her friend.

When Oh-sol finally arrives, Joo-yeon drags her into the auditorium and dead center into Mr. Choi’s line of sight. They both catch each other’s eyes, as Mr. Choi continues to lecture about how once an opportunity has passed, it can’t be obtained. And then he likens opportunity to the concept of “timing,” something that should sound very familiar to Oh-sol.

Mr. Choi says that a friend told him, “Timing is something that gets harder even if you try to control it,” quoting Oh-sol from the night before, and he encourages the audience to not think too hard and just act when it feels like the right time.

Joo-yeon and Oh-sol stand on the steps of the building after the presentation lets out. Seon-gyeol is in his car on the way there, Oh-sol’s phone buzzes with a call from him. Just as she picks up, Seon-gyeol arrives at the building and spots her on the stairs. He tells her not to move, and hangs up to meet her.

But before he can reach her, Mr. Choi joins her on the steps, even as his fans beg him to stay for one more photograph. She asks if this is what he had to do today, rather than confess his love, and he says that he’s considering adding a confession to the day as well, since he doesn’t want to miss his opportunity.

“It’s you, Oh-sol,” Mr. Choi says, “The person I want to protect. From the bottom of the stairs, Seon-gyeol arrives just in time to hear Mr. Choi’s confession.

EPILOGUE

We return to those two little kids from the first episode on the playground, and the young boy has fainted after the booger encounter. The little girl sits astride him while she attempts mouth-to-mouth to revive him. He screams when he wakes up with her on top of him, but the girl takes no notice and jumps up to dance.

“I saved you!” she shouts, and as she dances and shouts around him, the boy can’t help but look up at her with a smile.

  
COMMENTS

Timing and opportunity all lined up for Mr. Choi in this episode, and he managed to take Oh-sol’s advice and act when it felt right. He couldn’t have asked for a more perfect moment, and I’m glad that he went for it, no matter what the outcome.

I love an episode that does a good job of tackling a single resonant theme and the way its various characters work through it in different ways. Not a lot happens in this episode, and I really appreciate the slow-down, because the slower pace gave them the opportunity to really thread that theme through Seon-gyeol and Mr. Choi’s experiences and demonstrated the very different ways that these men approach uncertainty.

While Mr. Choi listens to those around him and takes the leap when he gets the chance, Seon-gyeol isn’t accustomed to taking chances, and he’s just only now realizing that he has romantic feelings for another person at all. In every prior moment when Seon-gyeol has made a mistake, he’s been quick to apologize and make amends. But this time he was caught off-guard by his new emotions, and they ultimately delayed him just enough for him to miss the chance that was offered up, and also forced him to watch a rival step up to the plate.

But Mr. Choi’s presentation on opportunity skips over the idea of second chances, and I can’t help but think that Seon-gyeol isn’t going to give up just because he missed one moment.

Meanwhile, Oh-sol serves as the old soul to these older men, the one who learned early on in life about opportunity and missed chances and what it can mean to overthink things. And I think that she is the example they need to understand how one missed chance can quickly become a new opportunity. She may not have been able to live out her dreams as an athlete, but she might be on a new path to happiness that she never would have found without that initial loss. It seems like they’ve all got a lot to learn from one another, and I appreciated this more serious episode to set up these stakes.

Not to be overshadowed, Oh-sol and Oh-dol’s moments after he discovered her real line of work were really grounded and rich. They were full of conflicting emotions, things said hastily, half-truths, then revealed truths, and then some more bluffs to cover old wounds. It was all there, mushed together in what came out to be a very real scene between two siblings who are very similar, even if they don’t recognize it.

Oh-dol looks up to his sister, and is also likely feeling the burden of getting a chance at his own dream, while both his sister and father struggle to make a living doing something he assumes is a burden to them.

And am I reading too much into it, or are we going to learn that Seon-gyeol’s grandfather also suffers from a phobia? And what if that phobia somehow contributed to the accident that connects everyone, in turn making Seon-gyeol’s grandfather’s insistence on fixing the phobia not so much because he’s disgusted by it, but because he fears it will destroy his grandson, as it has him?

It sounds so dramatic, but it’s not so unbelievable either. It’s the first thing that came to my mind when Mr. Choi suggested that Seon-gyeol’s phobia came from his family, and I can’t help but think of the way that his grandfather’s eyes widened when he heard that Seon-gyeol’s symptoms may be lessening. Of course, that could easily be explained by Grandfather’s eagerness to crown Seon-gyeol as the successor to his company, and not anything to do with actual feelings this horrible man might have.

Still, I trust Secretary Kwon, and I don’t believe that she would report to Seon-gyeol’s family unless she thought she was helping him. I’m not sure that I need a redemption arc for Grandfather, but then, maybe it’s not for me. Perhaps Seon-gyeol really needs to see another side to his family before he can truly heal.

But before he can get to that, Seon-gyeol’s going to have to figure out what to do with the new emotions that come with a romantic rivalry. This is not a man made to endure a love triangle, so I can’t imagine this is going to go well. But even with my love for all second leads ever, I’m still rooting for our main man. Seon-gyeol, fighting!

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Is it bad that I genuinely have no idea why I tune into this every week? I don't overly hate it (although I think it's kinda a mess all round), nor do I love it (although it has its moments)... But we're half way through and I'm still here...

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I think of it as akin to eating a familiar yet not-great-for you and kind of unsatisfying junk food. You know what you're getting, you know it's not great for you, and you know there is much better fare out there, and yet there is something comforting (maybe not the right word) that keeps you digging in.

I'm interested in the large and eminently comfortable track suit collection of Choi-gun. I wonder if he had that wardrobe put into his contract?

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This is a great description.
It's not like a crack drama, which for me is still really enjoyable even if it's not necessarily good. It's a junk food drama, which I do not actually like, but sometimes eat anyway.
(Or maybe it's like saltnvinegar chips that you keep eating even though they might make your mouth bleed...)

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I have to say I'm a little conflicted about Choi Gun. He knew his patient liked Ohsol, and then confessed to her. While I'm drama-glad that he confessed, I'm real-life thinking that wasn't a professional thing to do. Hm.

I sympathize with Ohsol. She likes her cleaning job. I like cleaning too (other people's houses, not mine) and would have done it as a job if my relatives wouldn't be horrified at it like Ohsol's family is. Sigh.

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I don't that part wasn't so unprofessional from him, I mean he can't stop living his life and going after what he wants because of his career choice, right? However, I think it was anti-ethical of him to keep the consultation the moment he found out who his patient was and how he liked the same girl as him, instead of stopping, he went on and asked Seon-gyeol how much he liked Oh Sol.... That was definitely not right and made me reaaally uncomfortable watching, but then again, it's just a drama.

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Thank you for the recap!

ME: I know you're not going to confess! I know it! This is why you're the second le--
CHOI: *confesses*
ME: oh… I see…
ME: well HOORAY.

I'm so happy that he did! And happy that he listened to her, and her words meant enough for him to be able to repeat them. It's nice to see a love triangle getting tipped in a way that feels legitimate, even if we know ultimately it's heroine's choice and we can see what that choice will be (if we see a heroine's feelings develop over the course of the story, we hardly ever see her swerve from them, though she can from an initial attraction. And I'm not against it, I like SK, though I'm not sure when she started to--I could use a set of flashbacks from her POV as we got from his!).

That said, this poor girl, they are both acting bananas, one installed in her home under false pretences, one acting out on her at work, as her boss, because he has feelings for her. Not that she's always a dream or a pro, but they both have power over her (one has knowledge he's keeping from her, one is her boss) and are exercising it too much.

On that note, I dislike the little boy and girl… I'm sure they're meant to be them, and pretending these two are the same age is absurd. I'd feel much better about the skewed power dynamics if they did just say--yes both these guys are older than her, yes there are other concerns, but they're also both legitimately appealing. (Which they are--all three mains are turning in some super likeable performances.) Not like the concept of attractive older dudes is a foreign one!

Clean with Passion is fun when it breaks from tropes, as with giving Choi that great un-SL-y confession, but sadly it sticks to the tropes most of the time. I don't entirely get why SK isn't in love with Secretary Kwon in a noona romance Secretary Kim way, but I guess she's married! And how I like jailbird cupid Dong Hyun, actively trying to set up both SK and OS, and previously Yeong-shik and his lady (he went to a cafe on his day off to talk him up!). What a sweetie. I hope he finds love.

Last week I went odd episode--feeling SLS, even episode--back to the first lead. This pattern may hold strong!

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Now I can't stop picturing the Secretary Kwon+Seon-gyeol noona romance, and I'm super into it.

I also like the idea of "heroine's choice." We can love that SL as much as we want, but in the end it's up to the heroine and what she's been feeling since the start.

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No no noo~ Secretary Kwon feels more like Sun Kyul's mother rather than anything else.. And I don't want to change it 😣 I looove their current relationship !

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?? So Grandpa beat his young grandson because he wasn't clean enough to be beyond reproach in front of other people, because he (Grandpa) was obsessed with cleanliness? If that's what happened, I would say SG's phobia was learned, not inherited. Maybe that explains why young SG was told that his mother would come home if he kept himself clean. Otherwise, such a strange and unlikely thing to be told.

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I'm with you on that one. I didn't understand it as 'inherited' either but that his family contributed to it. I mean I know psychological problems can be inherited but patients most of the time have history of childhood abuse, trauma or something significant enough to affect the mind. Anyways, the trajectory of this drama reminds me of Protect the Boss, if anyone can recall that drama of Jisung

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phobias aren't inherited, like ever, they are always learned and that was definitely Seon-gyeol's case as well

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I was sure of the same so I looked it up. It turns out that OCD does in fact run in families, although it's not completely clear the nature vs nurture proportion of the effect. Given twin studies and co we know that there is a genetic component, and having a parent of sibling with OCD increases quite a bit the likelihood of developing symptoms.

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of course in the context of the drama it is almost surely nurture, or to be specific lack thereof.

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@lindag latebloomer,

The issue of heritability of phobias, OCD, etc., reminds me of a quote from comedian Sam Levenson:

"Insanity is hereditary. You can get it from your children."

https://quoteinvestigator.com/2015/09/11/insanity/

Seriously, though, it strikes me that Grandpa projected his own fear(s) onto Seon-gyeol when he was a small, vulnerable child. After all, what's a little scapegoating between family?

He comes across as such a domineering old coot that it wouldn't surprise me if Mom got pregnant out of wedlock as an act of rebellion. Perhaps no mortal man was good enough for his daughter. Or maybe her adaptation to her father's control freakery was to become serially promiscuous. It's also possible that he himself is a fearful nervous wreck on the inside -- but it doesn't excuse his emotional abuse of his grandson.

When I stop to think about Seon-gyeol's decontamination chamber -- resembling an airlock -- outside his office, it calls to mind children who have no immune system, and have to live inside "bubbles." I'm not sure which episode shows his bedroom -- but it looks like a free-standing isolation chamber with a wall of glass. Or maybe a giant hamster habitat. Is Seon-gyeol some kind of lab rat? (I may be confusing him with medical examiner Dr. Han Jin-woo in GOD'S QUIZ.)

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Lol a giant hamster habitat.. They showed his bedroom on episode 8 too and now it really looks like that 😂

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@keiru,

Or a goldfish bowl! Just looking at it made me feel exposed. I've seen many weird house layouts in Kdramas, but this one takes the cake. LOL.

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Well the weirdest house for me is still Jo In Sung's house (or specifically his bedroom) in It's Okay It's Love 😉

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I didn't know Daniel meant that his phobia is hereditary, I just thought he meant that the cause is his family. Honestly, if you look back at the scenes with the grandpa, both the childhood scenes and the scene when they had lunch together, grandpa didn't seem that type to have a phobia. Could they be going after the father? I wouldn't like it if they went for making it hereditary. It takes the depth out of it, grandpa should acknowledge that he is partly to blame and reconcile with his grandson.

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@caro77 KDFL,

You're right. Grandpa looked like the kind of person to cause a phobia!

On the other hand, it is also possible that Grandpa is putting up a false front. On the inside, he might really be a cornered mouse fighting for his life. I suspect he's compensating for something. Maybe he grew up poor, and is an aggressively self-made man with trust issues.

Thanks for mentioning Seon-gyeol's father. The poor guy doesn't even know his Dad's name. Was there something medically or mentally wrong with Dad? Maybe he was a commoner, not a chaebol heir. Or did he perhaps challenge Grandpa, or refuse to play along with the Emperor's new clothes, and get himself banished -- or worse?

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I really don't like Dr.Choi now, he keeps crossing the line. Why he counselling SG when there is clear conflict of interests and he crossed the line when started probing him about Oh Sol during the session. And talking to Oh Dol about "the girl" he likes and what he should do, it was quite manipulative to me.

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I don't know how I feel about him. It seems to me that he used his knowledge about his feelings to act upon his own. I know the episode's theme is timing/opportunity but I feel like he wouldn't have acted upon his feelings sooner if he didn't find out about SG's. Idk

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Plus he clearly manipulated Oh-sol with this confession, asking her for advice and doing exactly what she said to him, it put pressure on her, and put her in uncomfortable position to reject him, because he only did what she told him to do. And it's hard to believe him being older and in this specific profession couldn't perceived in what pickle he would put her in. Icky.

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Ikr. His move just made me sympathize with SG more in this episode. At least the man was careful with what to do next even though I know that it's partly because he's clueless when it comes to relationships. I'd choose naïve over manipulative any day. I like song jae rim but this character is meh.

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I love all their interactions! You really can see all their feelings on their face. Both KYJ and YKS have great face expressions. They're really funny. It's really nice to see Seon-gyeol struggling with his feelings but staying honest with himself. He always knows when he did a mistake and tries to fix it.

For Dr Choi, I understand why he confessed because all his timing sucks anyway. But as the doctor of Seon-gyeol, he should stop and advice him an other doctor because he's personaly involved. I'm happy that O Sol knows a part of the truth now.

I didn't like O Dol's reaction. Like all women should be pretty and wearing dress and high heels...

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Trueee.. I really enjoyed the scene between Sun Kyul and Secretary Kwon because without a capable acting, that scene would probably feel boring.. 😁

Maybe it hurts Oh Dol's pride a little.. Seeing that the oldest child in the family dresses like that at her age.. After all, he's just a high school boy 😉 but I believe he didn't mean any harm with his words..

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Her age ? She's only 20 years old. And I'm older and I don't wear dresses and high heels. Yes, he's young but he grew up in the 20th century, he could be more open :)

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Oh yes.. Maybe it will be a part of his character growth in the future episod too.. 😊👍

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"It sounds so dramatic, but it’s not so unbelievable either. It’s the first thing that came to my mind when Mr. Choi suggested that Seon-gyeol’s phobia came from his family..."

I totally get where this comment is coming from, but that ain't right. As a psychology student, I'm quite sure what Mr. Choi meant by that was that Seon-gyeol developed his mysophobia because of his family's actions, and that is quite visible through the drama so far, the way his trauma came to be, I mean. First, we had the scenes where his younger self comes to the house covered in dirt and his grandpa beats him up telling him he couldn't be dirt, because of the image he was passing ida ida. And later, there was the scene of the housekeeper finding him in the bathroom, with him scrubbing his hands' raw saying "I can't be dirty or mom won't come back", some way or another he started to think that his mom wasn't coming back because he was dirty, and I'm quite sure that was what Mr. Choi meant by "your disease came from your family", even because those are mostly 'caused by some sort of trauma.
Sorry for the freaking long comment, I just couldn't avoid but get excited talking about it, 'cause I've been analyzing this drama over it since the beginning lol

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I also think that Sun Kyul got his phobia from traumatic moments from his family..

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I love this show and I loved this episode - the best episode so far, by far.

And I don't mean to quibble (much) but could we stop calling "rooftop" Mr. Choi? he is properly Dr. Daniel Choi- and he has earned that distinction through hard work and tough circumstances. The "Rochester Clinic" refers to the world famous Mayo Clinic in southern Minnesota. I spent a fair part of my childhood in Minnesota- and it gets really cold there in the winter (and really hot in the summer). Daniel Choi had to really tough it out to associate with some of the best doctors in the world.

That being said- there is a weakness in Dr. Choi's admiration for O-sol. He really does not know her- is he in love with O-sol the person- or O-sol the image that he carried through the 8 years he was not around her?

I love the actress who plays O-sol's best friend- Min Do-hee. You may recall that she played the same role in My ID is Gangnam Beauty. I first saw her playing the minor role of Mini Min-hee in Naeil's Cantabile - where she portrayed the tiny musician who just happened to play the largest instrument in the orchestra (the Contra Bass).

I love Abirdword's speculation regarding our lead character's grandfather. Given that this show is based upon a web comic it would not surprise me to find that there was a backstory there.

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I spent a fair part of my childhood in Minnesota- and it gets really cold there in the winter (and really hot in the summer). Daniel Choi had to really tough it out to associate with some of the best doctors in the world.

LOL, you make it sound like he suffered in the wilds of Minnesota, and while it does get bitterly cold and swelteringly hot, I don't think Dr. Choi suffered too much in the sprawling, climate controlled facilities. Also, I was just there while a relative had surgery, and spent a fair amount of time wandering around and admiring the amazing and extensive art collection at the Mayo. Outside of major museums, I don't think I've ever seen so much outstanding art in one place. However, I chuckle every time they say The Rochester Clinic, like they are avoiding giving free product placement if they say Mayo Clinic.

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I have an uncle who lives about 10 miles from the clinic. Part of the reason they can have such an extensive art collection is that the Mayo clinic has been a major and prominent medical institution for a long time. How long? I do not know - but I do know that my Great Grandfather had his prostate removed by the surgeons there- and I am not a young man.

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@oldawyer,

Thanks for calling a spade a spade. Dr. Choi studied at the Mayo Clinic. I just checked for you: Dr. William Worrall Mayo opened his frontier surgery practice when he moved to Rochester, Minn. in 1863.

IIRC, Min Do-hee was also in MIRROR OF THE WITCH, and cutely ended up with long-lived Taoist warrior Yo-Gwang, played by Lee Yi-kyung.

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This is the kind of that quiet episode which pull your heartstring.. Where there are many words and less action, but I still love it nonetheless..❤

This is the episode where the second lead shines with their caring attitude, so I got less Sol Kyul moment.. My heart also breaks by Oh Sol's cold attitude to Sun Kyul 😩

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Oh Sol's attitude shows she's hurting and that she's not indifferent, so it's a good news for us :D

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That is exactly right- she may not love him yet but he has become important to her- which is why he could hurt her with his words- and why it was so important for her to speak up.

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I still think that the writer is on crack when she writes our hero.
There are times that I go like "Wow, so that is a mature and smart and confident hero", but then he turns into a 5 year old for some strange reason or acts like someone else.
Why is this writer suffering from whiplash?

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This story is based upon a webtoon- and one where the main male character suffers from a debilitating mental condition- a form of OCD. The swings that you are speaking of are consistent with not only the condition itself but the natural effects of having been isolated from many normal human interactions as a result of his disorder. He lacks much of the common history of social interaction that would be natural to you or I.

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Thanks for your recap, @abirdword. I like the idea that Grandpa may also be affected by a phobia. It's something I hadn't considered before. I'm still wondering what the deal is with Mom. Does she have a phobia, too?!

I'm feeling conflicted over Dr. Choi's professional conflict of interest in relation to Seon-gyeol and Oh-sol. His own one-sided interest in her for six years has been a matter of timing. I suspect he met her on the picket line when he was working a temporary construction job to pay tuition. But it's also in the back of my mind that he could have been doing fieldwork for a research project or a thesis. Timing would have become an issue when he had to go overseas for his education.

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