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Red Moon, Blue Sun: Episodes 23-24

You always hurt the one you love — at least, if you’re an abuser, you do. We’ve been focused on abused children, but what happens when they grow up, having endured that abuse all their lives? Who do they become? What do they live for? Are they still able to be saved? Or is their fate grimly sealed?

 
EPISODES 23-24 RECAP

After being beaten by Red Cry on the rooftop, Ji-heon wakes up in the hospital. He recalls a vague memory of Red Cry’s face, shocked to realize that it was a mask of someone called “Good Person” from a children’s show. Well, Ha-na wasn’t wrong — if Red Cry was wearing this mask, then he really was a “Good Person.”

But now the detectives are back to square one, since Red Cry took down the horror site after realizing that the police had discovered it and created a trap.

At the nursing facility, Se-kyung is back in her regular room, having overcome her pneumonia attack. Woo-kyung’s decided to try a new, more experimental treatment, since she wants to do more for Se-kyung than merely hope for the best.

Woo-kyung particularly wishes Se-kyung to be able to wake up so that Se-kyung and Mom can resolve their conflict. Mom doesn’t seem too thrilled by this prospect, since she knows Se-kyung never liked her in the first place, plus Mom admits she wasn’t much of an affectionate parent, anyway. But Woo-kyung continues to live in optimistic hope, pointing out that Mom did her best to raise the two girls.

At the children’s center, Eun-ho works on his art projects in his room, startled to be interrupted by the director. Eun-ho cautiously greets his guest, and the director genially muses that Eun-ho is a lucky kid — except he uses his luck in all the wrong places.

Then he slaps Eun-ho upside the head, knocking him down as he angrily tells the young man that it’s only because of his money that Eun-ho is able to eat, sleep, and live a good life. Grabbing Eun-ho by the collar and hoisting him in the air, the director demands to know why Eun-ho stabbed him in the back.

Despite his injuries, Ji-heon checks himself out of the hospital. He calls Woo-kyung, keeping her up-to-date on the detective’s findings about the Good Person mask and Red Cry closing the website. As Woo-kyung studies the footage from the children’s show, she’s distracted by a lightbulb burning out above her desk.

She heads upstairs to the maintenance room, horrified to discover the director brutally beating up Eun-ho, who cowers and tells the director that he didn’t do anything. Eun-ho repeatedly insists that it was a “Mr. Yoon” who talked to the director’s father.

Still not satisfied, the director repeatedly kicks at Eun-ho, yelling at him to die. Woo-kyung rushes in, grabbing the director and ordering him to stop. As the enraged director staggers out of the room, Woo-kyung worriedly tends to Eun-ho’s wounds.

She gently cleans and bandages the cut on his check, telling Eun-ho that he should report this incident to the police. Eun-ho thinks that it’s pointless, and begs Woo-kyung to forget she saw anything — he can’t report someone that’s like family to him. Woo-kyung asks if he’s been regularly abused, and Eun-ho simply tells her not to worry about it.

Watch the video

They’re my family. They don’t mean harm.

 

Ji-heon’s team are surprised to see him to return to work so soon, but his injuries won’t prevent him from doing his job. But now that the website is gone, they’ll have to wait and hear about a new case in order to track down Red Cry.

Eun-ho fixes Woo-kyung’s broken lightbulb, explaining that the director is basically like an older brother to him since they grew up together. Woo-kyung is still concerned, but Eun-ho reassures her that although the director has a short temper, he’s not a bad man — he’s just worried about running the children’s center and making his father proud.

Even so, Woo-kyung’s determined to find out how long Eun-ho has been abused, but Eun-ho tells her that she only saw a small moment of anger between the two men — there’s much more to their relationship than that.

A new murder means a new case, and Ji-heon — still in his neck-brace — arrives at a takeaway shop where the owner was found dead. Captain Hong is there, and explains that he called in Ji-heon because the shop owner used to work at the children’s center — and a book of poetry was left near the body.

Further investigation reveals that the deceased, Yoon Hyung-pyo worked at the children’s center until last year. He also cancelled the adoption of a child a few years ago. Chan-wook realizes the case sounds familiar to one of the anonymous cases from Red Cry’s Judge’s Room, where an adoption was cancelled due to a seemingly nice couple actually turned out to be abusers.

Ji-heon follows up with Woo-kyung, showing her the print-out from the Judge’s Room regarding the cancelled adoption and explaining how it matches Hyung-pyo. Woo-kyung doesn’t believe it’s the same case, since she knows Hyung-pyo and his wife first adopted the child when they believed they couldn’t have kids of their own.

But when his wife got pregnant, the adopted child became jealous and actually started to hurt the wife, which resulted in a miscarriage. It was for both the child’s and Hyung-pyo’s wife safety that they decided to cancel the adoption. Woo-kyung was one of the witnesses during the cancellation, and there was no sign of abuse on the child.

Ji-heon asks why Ha-jung invited Woo-kyung to join Red Cry’s website, and Woo-kyung confesses that it’s probably because she feels the same fury as Red Cry when she sees children being abused. Ji-heon asks if she thinks that people should take the law into their own hands, like Red Cry does, and Woo-kyung hesitates to answer before admitting that, even though she might feel the same way, she wouldn’t be able to actually commit murder.

Back at the takeaway shop, Ji-heon and Soo-young carefully study the crime scene. Ji-heon muses over how the murder seems more like an impulsive act than carefully thought-out revenge.

The killer grabbed a nearby kitchen knife, stabbing the man in the back — only one stab wound, allowing Hyung-pyo to bleed out. Then the killer wiped the knife but left the bloodstains behind. The killer was smart enough to remove the CCTV memory card, but clumsily broke the camera while they were doing so.

It’s too awkward and messy, unlike Red Cry’s previous work, which was very deliberate and calculated. Soo-young points out that a book of poetry was left behind, but Ji-heom dismisses it — it’s just a book, not a specific poem. Any one of Hyung-pyo’s customers could have accidentally left the book.

But when the forensics team reports that Eun-ho’s fingerprints were found on the murder weapon and the book of poetry, Ji-heon seems somewhat surprised. He goes to the children’s center to find Eun-ho, who’s busy helping to repair some of the children’s toys.

When she hears that Eun-ho’s been arrested, Woo-kyung hurries outside, where she sees Ji-heon escorting a handcuffed Eun-ho into a police car. She sees Eun-ho staring at someone, and her gaze shifts over to where the director is standing. She eyes him suspiciously.

At the police station, Ji-heon and Eun-ho stare at each other from across the interrogation room table. Aw, they have matching injuries, which they both say came about because they tripped and fell. LIES!

Eun-ho admits he went to see Hyung-pyo, but that he didn’t kill the man. Eun-ho explains that he got along well with Hyung-pyo when he worked at the children’s center, and that he’d stopped by to give the man a New Year’s gift.

But when he arrived at the shop, he saw the body on the floor. He’d accidentally knocked off the knife from the table, and the book fell out of his bag. Ji-heon demands to know why Eun-ho fled a crime scene without calling the police, and Eun-ho says that he learned his lesson from the arson case.

Eun-ho knows that he’d be a prime suspect — an orphan without money or education. Clenching his jaw, Eun-ho says it’s better to run away and not get involved. After all, Ji-heon already suspects him just because he enjoys spending time with children, despite the fact that Eun-ho did nothing wrong.

But Ji-heon still finds it strange that Eun-ho’s only friends are children, pointing out that it’s not normal. Eun-ho takes umbrage at the concept of “normal” — what, indeed, can be considered “normal?”

Watch the video

The police taught me to never get involved

 

Unfortunately for Eun-ho, Soo-kyung’s search of his room revealed a pair of shoes with a sliver of plastic hidden in them — a sliver of plastic that perfectly fit the broken piece from the CCTV camera. Not only that, but the shoes are a perfect match for the tracks left at the dog farm — although the shoes don’t have any traces of mud or blood on them.

Ji-heon tosses the shoes aside, pointing out that it’s a common brand of shoe and doesn’t get them anywhere. But the broken CCTV piece is definitely interesting, and he goes back into the interrogation room, demanding to know how it ended up in Eun-ho’s shoe. Ji-heon’s determined to not be fooled by Eun-ho’s sweet and innocent act, but Eun-ho stubbornly insists that he didn’t kill Hyung-pyo.

Woo-kyung and Mom anxiously monitor Se-kyung’s new treatment, which uses magnetic force to try and stimulate the brain. The doctor asks what Se-kyung’s favorite song is to play while the treatment is going, and both women realize that they don’t know Se-kyung very well. She had been living in America for ten years before returning to Korea and ultimately getting into her accident.

What Woo-kyung does know is that Se-kyung hated the fact that Woo-kyung would always side with Mom instead of her own flesh-and-blood sister. Se-kyung refused to look Mom in the eyes, terrified by Mom’s cold look. Sighing, Woo-kyung asks Mom that, when Se-kyung is better, they be nicer and warmer to her. Mom grumps that she can’t exactly change her personality.

A nurse wheels Se-kyung back to her room after the treatment, and Woo-kyung believes that Se-kyung will be able to talk soon. As Mom preps Se-kyung’s bed, Woo-kyung notices that Mom’s wrist is all bruised.

Mom dismisses it as nothing — she bruises easily now due to old age. Besides, it’s nothing compared to the hardships Woo-kyung has gone through in the past year. Woo-kyung’s eyes grow wide when she suddenly sees the little girl in the green dress standing next to Mom.

Woo-kyung tries to hide her reaction to the little girl as Mom says that they should focus on Se-kyung’s recovery, since she believes that Se-kyung will wake up soon. Woo-kyung watches as the little girl goes to stand next to the still-vegetative Se-kyung, who’s wide-open eyes seem to stare at Woo-kyung as much as the little girl does.

Ji-heon and his team follow up every little lead from Hyung-pyo’s case, but so far it’s all been a dead end. Even though on the surface this seems to be one of Red Cry’s murders, it just doesn’t feel right.

Looking further into Hyung-pyo’s file, they discover that he still worked at the children’s center a year after being accused of embezzlement. Ji-heon visits the director to get more information, and the director explains that he trusted Hyung-pyo to take care of the center’s finances, even after the embezzlement claim since there was no proof of any wrongdoings.

The director assumes that Hyung-pyo must have gotten into an argument with Eun-ho about money, since Eun-ho used to let him money every so often. That surprises Ji-heon — after all, Eun-ho doesn’t exactly seem like the type to have a lot of extra money to lend to anyone.

But the director insists that even a small amount of money can ruin relationships and cause one man to stab another. Ji-heon’s surprised that the director knows Hyung-pyo was stabbed since Ji-heon never mentioned it, and the director stutters that the center is filled with gossip about the murder.

Ji-heon seems to accept this, but finds it difficult to believe that someone as seemingly gentle and sweet as Eun-ho would be the type to kill. The director insists that every human is capable of killing.

The director definitely seems suspicious, even more so when Soo-young pulls up his record and reveals that the director has multiple records of violent acts. Ji-heon also finds out that Hyung-pyo received a hefty severance pay after leaving the children’s center, which was enough to buy a new house as well as open up the takeaway shop.

At the children’s center, the director begs Woo-kyung to visit Eun-ho where he’s still being held at the police station. He wants her to give Eun-ho some money so get can get some food and warm clothes while he’s in jail. Woo-kyung rightly points out that, since the director is like Eun-ho’s family, he should be the one to visit Eun-ho.

Frustrated, the director angrily yells at her to stop asking questions and just go. Then he dials himself back down, reminding her that she saw that he and Eun-ho got into an altercation a few days ago, so Eun-ho probably doesn’t want to see him right now.

He tells Woo-kyung that he’ll hire a good lawyer, and for her to ask Eun-ho to confess to the crime, since that will be the best solution for all of them.

Eun-ho is genuinely pleased to see Woo-kyung, even though she explains she tried to get the director himself to visit. Eun-ho doesn’t mind, since he knows the director tries to avoid uncomfortable situations.

Woo-kyung still can’t believe that Eun-ho is the killer, and he pleadingly insists that he didn’t do it. But his eyes start to fill up with tears as Woo-kyung gently explains that the director asked her to convince Eun-ho to confess to killing Hyung-pyo.

Wipinga away his tears, Eun-ho repeats a phrase that Woo-kyung once said: “If you think that way, you’ll end up living that way forever.” His voice grows louder and angrier as he continues to quote Woo-kyung’s statements, that it doesn’t matter if they’re family, if they’ve brainwashed and tried to use you.

Struggling to contain his emotions, Eun-ho goes back to his placid poker face as Woo-kyung asks if the director was involved with Hyung-pyo’s death. Eun-ho says it doesn’t matter — if he tells the truth, then the senior director will be angry.

Furious on his behalf, Woo-kyung points out that Eun-ho will be considered a murderer, just to prevent the senior director from becoming angry. Hesitating, Eun-ho explains that he found the CCTV memory card in one of the director’s pockets after he picked up the director’s dry-cleaning.

It clearly showed the director killing Hyung-pyo, and when Eun-ho saw Ji-heon at the children’s center that day, Eun-ho hid the memory card in one of the children’s toys that he was fixing.

Eun-ho explains to Ji-heon that his first instinct was to hide the memory card, since he knew that the senior director would be furious if his son caused more trouble.

Ji-heon can’t believe that Eun-ho would risk his own life to protect a murderer, and demands to know what’s really going on. Eun-so sadly says that a relationship that has been cemented together never changes, even if you wish it could.

Eun-ho says that Ji-heon won’t understand, but he was more afraid of the senior director finding out than fearing for what would happen to him if he was accused of murder.

Ji-heon struggles to understand Eun-ho’s mindset, and Woo-kyung explains that, just like Ha-na couldn’t talk about her father out of fear, so, too, Eun-ho is afraid. Woo-kyung can’t say if Eun-ho was abused, but he was definitely put under a lot pressure by the senior director while he was growing up — and he still lives under that pressure today.

The director is shocked when Soo-young shows up at his office to arrest him, and Woo-kyung watches as her boss is escorted away in handcuffs. Ji-heon shows the director the CCTV footage, and the man breaks down in sobs. He explains that he didn’t mean to kill Hyung-pyo, but he was so afraid of Hyung-pyo telling his father about the money being embezzled, that he lost his mind.

The director pleads with Ji-heon not to tell his father about the money he stole from the company, since he’s terrified of what his father will do. Annoyed, Ji-heon says that the director is going to prison — it’s not like his father will follow him there.

Ji-heon also demands to know why the director didn’t seem sorry for forcing Eun-ho to take the blame for Hyung-pyo’s death, and the director seems genuinely confused, explaining that it’s not like he was going to completely abandon Eun-ho. He was going to pay for the boy’s lawyer!

Realizing the director isn’t the brightest bulb in the box, Ji-heon goes back to Eun-ho’s interrogation room, wondering how the heck a guy like the director can run his own life, much less an entire business. Eun-ho defends the director, saying the man has some mood swings, but he means well.

But Ji-heon is more curious about the senior director, since he wants to know what kind of man can cause such terror in both Eun-ho and the junior director. Eun-ho continues his placid defense, insisting the senior director always looked after them with lots of love.

Ji-heon warns Eun-ho that they’ll still continue their investigation, even though they’ve arrested the director. He suggests that Eun-ho should leave the children’s center and find a job elsewhere, even offering to introduce him to a few people who might help. The main thing is that Eun-ho should get away from the senior director.

Once Eun-ho’s released, however, he immediately goes to see the senior director, who is ominously polishing his hunting rifle. The senior director swings it at Eun-ho, berating the boy for failing at the one thing he’d always asked Eun-ho to do — which was to make sure his idiot son didn’t get into any trouble.

Later, Eun-ho calls Woo-kyung, thanking her for all her help. He reassures Woo-kyung that the senior director didn’t yell as much as Eun-ho thought he would — so everything’s fine. Eun-ho adds that it’s thanks to her that he survived.

At the police station, Chan-wook is going through the director’s laptop, and for a man who said he can barely use his computer except to access gambling sites, Chan-wook’s found some interesting things — namely, that not only was this laptop used to access Red Cry’s horror website, but that this laptop was the one that deleted the site, too.

That means the director is now suspected to be Red Cry, and the detectives search the man’s apartment. They find a pair of dirty shoes, just like the ones that they found in Eun-ho’s room and that match the treads found at the dog farm. But most importantly, they find a Good Person mask.

The senior director tells Eun-ho that he needs something comforting, and Eun-ho looks through the shelves of poetry books until he finds one that’s clearly a favorite — “The Leper.” Oohhhhhhhhh.

Meanwhile, Woo-kyung sits by Se-kyung’s beside, also reading poetry. But she stops in shock when she hears gurgling noises coming from her sister. Se-kyung’s eyes open and she stares at Woo-kyung, gasping out, “Unni.”

Watch the video

Back to consciousness

 
COMMENTS

Well, well, well. I’ll admit I was momentarily distracted by the sudden introduction of the senior director, who gave me Red Cry vibes just, well, because (and if the show thinks they can convince me that the selfish idiot junior director has the wherewithal to actually be Red Cry, then they must think I’m as dumb as he is). But remembering Woo-kyung’s assessment that Red Cry’s poetry is something he hates, now I’m swinging back to Eun-ho being Red Cry — or at least a very active member in Red Cry’s mission. It seems like he’s grown up reading poetry to the senior director, so he’s undoubtedly got hundreds of poems memorized whether he likes it or not. I, too, would hate poetry if I were forced to read it to a selfish old man who only sees me as a tool to use and not a human being worthy of love and affection.

I get the impression that the senior director only kept Eun-ho around because Eun-ho could help fix his son’s mistakes. Which means Eun-ho’s essentially been brought up in slavery — technically, I suppose he could leave any time he wanted, but there’s nothing out there for him. No job, no home, nothing if it weren’t for the directors. Maybe Eun-ho’s has indeed been brainwashed, maybe he’s got some sort of bizarre Stockholm syndrome — but he can’t leave the only people who ever gave him a home. His mission in life is to protect the junior director from the wrath of his father, and he must fulfill that mission no matter how much he may hate it.

This really was Eun-ho’s episode, though. He’s spent so much time in the background, popping up here and there as needed, but mostly just being a figure who seemed suspicious but not really suspicious (I mean, just look at that angelic face!). But now we’ve got a better idea of who he is, as well as his background. Which seems like a horrible background and if Eun-ho really is Red Cry, I fear for both directors’ lives. How could two such atrocious men be in charge of something that’s all about healing children? No wonder there’s a vigilante determined to take control and make things right.

I also have to give a lot of love to Cha Hak-yeon. I haven’t seen him in anything else until this show, and I hadn’t really noted his acting skills because Eun-ho’s character has been predominately one-note. There might be flickers of something here and there, but he’s generally just appeared with that sweet smile. Yet those scenes in the interrogation room were incredible. He did an excellent job of allowing dozens of emotions to be expressed in just a few seconds — it was viscerally raw yet also somehow understated. He’s definitely proven he can meet the level of more experienced actors, like Kim Sun-ah.

Finally, I’m still clinging to my belief that the little girl in the green dress is Se-kyung — or at least somehow connected to Se-kyung. So it’ll be interesting to find out what happens to the little girl in the green dress now that Se-kyung is coming out of her comatose, vegetative state. Will the little girl continue to exist? Or does she still have another purpose to fulfill? What secrets has Mom been hiding all these years that would make Se-kyung hate her so much?

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So my general feeling from the last few episodes was pretty well confirmed with this one - that final scene had awful sexual abuse vibes. I really squirmed uncomfortably when WK said that EH should "comfort" the Director and then the Director used those exact words on EH at the end.

For all her apparent perspicacity, WK can be really oblivious at times and it further re-enforces my sense that Red Cry might be angry at her for this. For not stopping abuse that's around her.

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I'm not sure I understand how she's been oblivious regarding Eun Ho. I would agree that she was oblivious, or maybe even obtuse, when she let Bit Na's mother walk off by herself after Ji Heon told her specifically not to let her out her sight. Here, she doesn't really know the full picture, does she?
Like @odilettante pointed out, Eun Ho isn't the most emotive person and he's determined to cover for both directors. Woo Kyung is trained enough to know that it would be best for him to get away from the senior director, and she does advise him to do so, but there isn't a lot she can do for an adult beyond that, is there?
I have seen the next episode, so that may be colouring my opinion here, but in this episode, I think she does what she can within the leeway Eun Ho affords her.

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Oblivious in terms of what is happening around her versus what is going on with her patients. She can be quite oblivious.

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As in, she's more aware of what her patients are going through than what is happening around her? If that is what you mean, then yes, totally agree with you there. She seems very disconnected from her family. I mean, we've barely seen her interact with her daughter at all, and she doesn't seem at all concerned about why her sister had such a problem with their step mom.

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There has been more than one scene where she said she "wasn't interested" in the Director, didn't care about him, didn't notice him, didn't think he was important. Or words to that effect.

There are a lot of things happening around her that she doesn't notice - in fact she seems determined not to notice. And if she's a crusader against abuse and abuse is all around her, then you could argue she is complicit in it by her obliviousness.

What children with abusive parents often hate the most is the hypocrisy of it - abusing them and then telling them they're doing it out of love.

We know WK is doing the best she can in the situation she's in. But someone looking in might not see it that way. Especially when they essentially handed Ha-na over to her abusive father. I can't help seeing the message on her father's back as being about WK and JH failure to protect her in that situation.

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I think a part of her obliviousness right now stems from the fact that she is so fixated on trying to figure out her past that it's simultaneously blinding her to her own real life and drawing her attention to the murders. This is not a defense for her behaviour, just an observation.
Also, in Ha Na's case, I think Ji Heon was the one who...instigated, for lack of a better word, Ha Na's dad into demanding she go back to him. Kind of like an f*** you to Ji Heon when he already felt like he was untouchable. And considering, he was her bio dad, there probably wasn't much they could do beyond what they did with the watch and the phone number. The system's just that sucky, sometimes.

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I mean I'm talking about how those actions might be perceived by a person who thinks murder is acceptable as a solution to a problem.

They had no choice within the system - but isn't that the basis of the warring philosophies here? If your job is to protect the child and the system doesn't protect them, then by working within the system you're in some way complicit.

Is how a certain personality might see it.

I've also seen the next episode but think its events don't necessarily preclude this interpretation, especially since we know that Red Sky has never worked alone.

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Okay, I see your point now. I was looking at it from a different angle, I think.
This is definitely a plausible interpretation of Red Cry's view about Woo Kyung.
Personally, however, I don't think Red Cry was as concerned about the second or third parties to blame as much as the direct offenders and deserved vengeance for the victims, so Woo Kyung wasn't complicit as much as she was a helpless bystander, maybe, or even someone to point to as a justification to say, "Here's someone who felt what I did, so what I did isn't wrong".

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Could it be that she is oblivious as a means of self-protection? It seems that we've had numerous hints that she was abused in her childhood.
So maybe she is trying to help and heal others, but not able to truly open up and feel what she needs to feel? With that in mind it seems that maybe it is why she just doesn't pick up on some things becuase she is just so emotionally stunted and frozen.
we have seen times when her emotions get so strong that she feels violent - but then tamps them down.
Her life is going through each day in neutral - just getting through them.
Now, however, her world that she has hidden in is being forced to expand...

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Yes I think that's true - that she's protecting herself emotionally. Bearing in mind as well that's she's recovering from a nervous breakdown following her sister's accident AND a recent miscarriage AND her asshole husband leaving her for another woman. Frankly, I find the fact she's walking around as a functioning human being quite astounding. I'd be curled up in a ball on the floor.

I found the fact she didn't even suspect the Senior Director of anything even after she saw the behaviour of his son to be telling.

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I felt that too, with the word choice. Not to mention, I don't think reading poetry on its own creates as much of a distinctively unpleasant association with poetry, something more would needed to have happened.
And not that it dissolves the Regular Director (not the Head Director) of guilt, but he undoubtedly was also abused by his father which is why he's so afraid of him.

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Yeah, sexual abuse was heavily implied. The use of β€œcomfort” added to EH’s dreams involving a desk pretty much confirmed it for me.

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For me too, when he used the words "comfort me" my skin crawled.

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After watching the next episode, it's undeniable. I don't feel angry as much as pure misery and sadness for that poor boy. I really just want to cry thinking about it.

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You know, I need to comment on how sad it makes me feel when all of us have the same response to the word 'comfort' now.
It used to be such a warm kind word, but in our world, we've learned too much and now that word has become so menacing when used in a certain context.
:-(

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I like how Ji Heon advices Eun Ho to leave. He understands him even if he suspects him.

The junior Director is clearly too dumb to be Red Cry. It's sad how abused children become themself abusing adults. It's really a sad cercle.

Everytime we get informations about the green dress's girl, I have the impression we don't really know more at the end.

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Cha Hak-yeon is the hidden gem of this show. His portrayal of Eun-ho's conflicted intentions and the damage his troubled childhood has wrought was excellent! I love that an idol actor has taken up such a different role.

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Yes if I'm ever tempted to use the words 'Idol Actor' as a pejorative again, feel free to smack me down.

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Aww no. How about we just shove pictures of Yoon Doo Joon/Cha Hak Yeon/*insert other good ones I'm too sleepy to think of here* in your face, instead?

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I'm a fan of Hakyeon as an idol and following his acting career I'm trying my best to stay critical but I'm so proud of him especially in his portrayal of Eun-ho! He has really worked to improve himself through small roles and I think that's admirable. I'm also really grateful to all directors and producers and acting sunbaes that I know have been helping him all this time, everyone has potential but we need to be supported to succeed.

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The most heart-wrenching of his performances by far is in the next episode. It tore my heart to shreds, but it was still absolutely mind-blowing.

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Yes, cheers to Cha Hak yeon or N. He has GROWN as an actor. He used to be so bad, but for whatever reason this drama brings out everyone's A game. That's all I have to say, but next recap should be good, I may have to start watching before the recap, because I'm always ahead.

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EVERYONE in this show is just so top notch - but Cha Hak Yeon is a marvel. I've never seen him before and thought his acting was so wooden.
wrong. how he changed and became slightly menacing looking at the end of this episode gave me chills.

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Which drama was it that he was "so bad"? I'm genuinely curious to see the difference...

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Cheer Up and Tunnel. Both fantastic dramas, but he is wooden in them and mostly one note.

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Cases like him are the best examples that we shouldn't oppose idol/models transitioning into acting, but rather inexperienced newbies getting lead roles from the start.

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I don't think I've felt as suffocated as I was during that phone call scene between Eun-ho and Woo-kyung. It was cutting to see her question to Ji-heon earlier about whether she could be so blind to a child abuse being answered in that one powerful scene. Of course the answer is yes. Because like what Eun-ho said earlier, not everything is as what it seems. With the head director, people only see the kind and frail-looking old man and formed their opinion solely based on it. But behind that facade, I sense the worse version of Bit-na's mom. A man who deliberately framed his prolonged abuse to his children as a form of love.

I still couldn't believe that Dir. Song is the much sought Red Cry. I think it's equally possible that Eun-ho used that computer without Song's knowledge, or that they are an unlikely team behind the Red Cry figure. Because while Song sometimes beat Eun-ho up, I think it's still possible that Eun-ho developed a strong bond with him from their years together under the Head Director's tyranny, and that they worked their own justice for people who suffered the same fate as them. I wonder if they actually 'killed' the Head Director in their mind whenever they enacted that twisted justice. And I also wonder what Woo-kyung's encouraging words would do to Eun-ho.

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About the girl in green dress, now I'm back to my theory: she looks like WK's younger sister that somehow died, while the sister in the nursing facility is Stepmother's biological daughter.
This could explain the fact that Mum seemed (to me) resentful towards WK, maybe because she wasn't loved by the only daughter she really wanted to be (I hope I was able to explain myself).
Then, I know I couldn't base my theories on the casting, but the actress that plays SK, now that is awake, seems a younger version of Mum.

I am a little disappointed about the almost miraculous recovery of SK...

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@carmen KarmenK
I was thinking that Se Kyung could have been made to recover a little earlier to give us more on the phantom girl. That new magnetic therapy session must have done wonders to shake her awake.

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Hi, @growingbeautifully, yes, luckily they used this new therapy to make it believable.

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I too feel that the original Se-kyung is not the girl in the hospital, and that the girl in the hospital--called Se-kyung--is the biological daughter of the stepmother. I've been having some other theories, but, since they are for later episodes, I've only been posting on my wall.

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@peridot @carmen
With the theory that the Se Kyung in hospital is the real daughter of stepmum, I wonder what could be the reason for so much animosity that the daughter has for the mother.

Maybe she had been abandoned for a while when mother got married?

Maybe mother paid WK more attention (to allay suspicions that Se Kyung was preferred as she was the blood relation)?

And what was with the great fear in upsetting stepmum that WK had, in spite of which she still treats stepmum well. Seems Se Kyung if she openly disliked the mother, was not afraid of her.

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@growingbeautifully you're right...
maybe SK grew up believing she was the other woman's daughter, and hated Stepmother simply out of prejudice.

And probably Stepmother treated badly WK because her father preferred his older child, and because she was frustrated by the situation with her own daughter...

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Maybe stepmom was single mother? And WK father offered her marriage and respectability in exchange for her daughter, South Korea has terrible track record with single mothers, and 30 yrs ago it must be even worse. If Se Kyung discovered this it must be traumatic for her, and earlier her mother could treat her with greater distance than WK to not to reveal that she is her bio child.
Jack Nicholson was raised by his granparents and thought his mom was his sister, so she was spared "the shame" of having child out of wedlock.

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@shach this could be! I never considered adult SK not blood related to WK...

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I don't know exactly. This is just conjecture since we are still waiting for the big reveal. I believe that Se-kyung knows the truth and might be feeling some guilt regarding that knowledge as well as anger towards her mother (i.e. the supposed stepmother) for the latters part in the duplicity. I would like to know more about the stepmother's life before marrying Woo-kyung's father. That information might also more background to Se-kyung's anger.

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"...the latter's part in the duplicity...."

And

"That information might also add more background to Se-kyung's anger."

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Yes, now that I think about it, the photo with the "real" SK was in adult SK's bag, so she must know something about her family's secrets.

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* runs to your wall *

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LOL

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It took me 26 episodes to realize that Eun Ho was the rascal Hwan in Familiar Wife! Annoying but delightful twerp.

I was impressed by his portrayal of Eun Ho and googled him, that's how I found out. I can't recognize 99.9999% of Kpop idols so the fact he was one didn't help.

I don't know what other bit parts he played(like I should remember him in Tunnel but I don't). This is an example of why I'm not against idol actors per se but that they be given small or supporting roles to hone their skills till they can play a substantial one.

Like @odilettante, I appreciate his acting style - visceral and understated. Actors who use their emotions to convey instead of canned expressions.

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My problem with SK drama industry is that people are deemed as lead without any credit or experience to their name just by the virtue of good looks or powerful backing and given oppurtinity after oppurtinity to ruin good dramas with their lack of skills, a lot of them improve of course, but it shouldn't be in that order imho.

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I spent this whole episode rooting for Eun Ho to not be Red Cry but having ALL of these evidence leading to the director just cemented the fact that Eun Ho is Red Cry.
I fear for Eun Ho's psyche and emotional stability if he tried to stay with that director, I got Goosebumps when the head director told EH to come comfort him for the first time in a long while it just didn't set well with me. alarm signs went off in my head.

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@psycho94 The word 'comfort' has taken on ominous meaning. I am reminded of the phrase 'Comfort Women' in a bad time during the war. What kind of comfort was an adult extorting from a young child ... and which continues to be expected when the child has grown?

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That head director was dreadful...

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Thanks @odilettante.
I too was quite affected by Eun Ho in the interrogation room. I could see how his face fell and his eyes well up with pain when he was told to take the blame for the murder. How wronged he felt, how enslaved. The words: β€œIf you think that way, you’ll end up living that way forever” - was hitting home.

It was amazing that he mastered himself within seconds and went back to being the placid, soft-spoken person we think is so sweet and mild. It's becoming obvious that he's been abused for all his life by both the directors and has been bottling it up so as to survive and avoid wrath and further abuse.

This show gives us the point of view of the 'children of nobody' when they've grown up. What happens to the victims who don't get any help and remain in their abusive environments for all their young lives?

Director was also abused by his father. There was obviously violence in his family so he too acts out instinctively in violence whenever thwarted. The end result of lack of care for children who grow up abused is that they perpetuate that abuse or violence on others.

Now I wonder about Woo Kyung's childhood. The thing that is more striking to me now is that both WK and Eun Ho have a similar soft-spoken, slow, mild way of speaking. They have a sad look in their eyes all the time. Generally WK is calm and mild but sometimes she can get roused to fury. I wonder how about Eun Ho ... we haven't seen Eun Ho really angry yet, but it seems to be seething and that outburst in the interrogation room might be a sign (as this writer does give clues) of much more that Eun Ho is capable of.

I want to know about Soo Young's childhood too. All the 4 leads must have some personal history which has to do with or to be Children of Nobody themselves.

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Acute observation about the similarities between WK and EH...

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LOL, Thanks 😊 😂

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That scene with the senior director asking Eun Ho to comfort just made me so so sad. The first thing that came to my mind was sexual abuse and it gave me chills that this adult man who is much physically stronger than an old man in a wheelchair had been so horrifically abused for such a long time that he doesn't even do anything to stop it, he just accepts the abuse and stays quiet

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I dont like how oblivious WK in this episode regarding EH. I cant understand how she can suggest EH comfort (ueghh), senior director, even after she sees that EH rather be a murderer than making SD angry. Her observation about EH/SD/Junior director's relationship to JH and her words to EH is contradictory... JH at least sees the situation better than her and advised him to get away from that family.

But when EH read that poem though... Redcry...? If WK theory is right, that EH has a higher possibility of being a RC than JD. But I do also wonder about JD scene on jail at the end though.

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That's beacuse she has very good relationship with SD, we saw him praising her to high heavens. So she maybe oblivious to how others perceived him, or refuse to believe that he can have many faces.

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Strongly suspecting Eun-Ho as Red Cry again. I'm convinced the director is a frame job, I can't even see him as being part of a group acting as Red Cry, he doesn't have the disposition somehow. Maybe because he'd be a huge hypocrite, accepting payouts to send kids back to their abusers and then acting like a vigilante for their benefit.

My heart hurts for Eun-Ho. I feel like, from his behaviour in this episode, he's grown up in a lot of pain. It's no excuse for him if he is Red Cry, but I genuinely have sympathy.

Little girl looks more and more like Se-Kyung. I think stepmother might be the maternal aunt. The only question left is what exactly happened that's making Woo-Kyung see the little girl, and what's haunting Se-Kyung. This is one of the few shows I'm watching right now that makes me wish entire weeks away so that I can watch more.

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